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Zucker, S.

Normalized to: Zucker, S.

80 article(s) in total. 928 co-authors, from 1 to 41 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 3,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.05942  [pdf] - 2032967
A public HARPS radial velocity database corrected for systematic errors
Comments: 16 pages, 17 figures, 4 tables, Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2020-01-16
Context. The HARPS spectrograph provides state-of-the-art stellar radial velocity (RV) measurements with a precision down to 1 m/s. The spectra are extracted with a dedicated data-reduction software (DRS) and the RVs are computed by CCF with a numerical mask. Aims. The aim of this study is three-fold: (i) Create easy access to the public HARPS RV data set. (ii) Apply the new public SERVAL pipeline to the spectra, and produce a more precise RV data set. (iii) Check whether the precision of the RVs can be further improved by correcting for small nightly systematic effects. Methods. For each star observed with HARPS, we downloaded the publicly available spectra from the ESO archive and recomputed the RVs with SERVAL. We then computed nightly zero points (NZPs) by averaging the RVs of quiet stars. Results. Analysing the RVs of the most RV-quiet stars, whose RV scatter is < 5 m/s, we find that SERVAL RVs are on average more precise than DRS RVs by a few percent. We find three significant systematic effects, whose magnitude is independent of the software used for the RV derivation: (i) stochastic variations with a magnitude of 1 m/s; (ii) long-term variations, with a magnitude of 1 m/s and a typical timescale of a few weeks; and (iii) 20-30 NZPs significantly deviating by a few m/s. In addition, we find small (< 1 m/s) but significant intra-night drifts in DRS RVs before the 2015 intervention, and in SERVAL RVs after it. We confirm that the fibre exchange in 2015 caused a discontinuous RV jump, which strongly depends on the spectral type of the observed star: from 14 m/s for late F-type stars, to -3 m/s for M dwarfs. Conclusions. Our NZP-corrected SERVAL RVs can be retrieved from a user-friendly, public database. It provides more than 212 000 RVs for about 3000 stars along with many auxiliary information, NZP corrections, various activity indices, and DRS-CCF products.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.01982  [pdf] - 1918397
Small Planets in the Galactic Context: Host Star Kinematics, Iron, and $\alpha$ Element Enhancement
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2019-06-05, last modified: 2019-06-24
We explored the occurrence rate of small close-in planets among $\textit{Kepler}$ target stars as a function of the iron abundance and the stellar total velocity $V_\mathrm{tot}$. We estimated the occurrence rate of those planets by combining information from LAMOST and the California-$\textit{Kepler}$ Survey (CKS) and found that iron-poor stars exhibit an increase in the occurrence with $V_\mathrm{tot}$ from $f < 0.2$ planets per star at $ V_\mathrm{tot} < 30\ \mathrm{km~s}^{-1}$ to $f \sim 1.2$ at $V_\mathrm{tot} > 90\ \mathrm{km~s}^{-1}$. We suggest this planetary profusion may be a result of a higher abundance of $\alpha$ elements associated with iron-poor, high-velocity stars. Furthermore, we have identified an increase in small planet occurrence with iron abundance, particularly for the slower stars ($V_\mathrm{tot} < 30\ \mathrm{km~s}^{-1}$), where the occurrence increased to $f \sim 1.1$ planets per star in the iron-rich domain. Our results suggest there are two regions in the $([\mathrm{Fe}/\mathrm{H}],[\alpha/\mathrm{Fe}])$ plane in which stars tend to form and maintain small planets. We argue that analysis of the effect of overall metal content on planet occurrence is incomplete without including information on both iron and $\alpha$ element enhancement.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.05920  [pdf] - 1843864
Prospects for detecting the astrometric signature of Barnard's Star b
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2018-11-14, last modified: 2019-03-06
A low-amplitude periodic signal in the radial velocity (RV) time series of Barnard's Star was recently attributed to a planetary companion with a minimum mass of ${\sim}$3.2 $M_\oplus$ at an orbital period of $\sim$233 days. The relatively long orbital period and the proximity of Barnard's Star to the Sun raises the question whether the true mass of the planet can be constrained by accurate astrometric measurements. By combining the assumption of an isotropic probability distribution of the orbital orientation with the RV-analysis results, we calculated the probability density function of the astrometric signature of the planet. In addition, we reviewed the astrometric capabilities and limitations of current and upcoming astrometric instruments. We conclude that Gaia and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are currently the best-suited instruments to perform the astrometric follow-up observations. Taking the optimistic estimate of their single-epoch accuracy to be $\sim$30 $\mu$as, we find a probability of $\sim$10% to detect the astrometric signature of Barnard's Star b with $\sim$50 individual-epoch observations. In case of no detection, the implied mass upper limit would be $\sim$8 $M_\oplus$, which would place the planet in the super-Earth mass range. In the next decade, observations with the Wide-Field Infrared Space Telescope (WFIRST) may increase the prospects of measuring the true mass of the planet to $\sim$99%.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02986  [pdf] - 1843850
Correcting HIRES radial velocities for small systematic errors
Comments: 5 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-06, last modified: 2019-03-06
The HIRES spectrograph, mounted on the $10$-m Keck-I telescope, belongs to a small group of radial-velocity (RV) instruments that produce stellar RVs with long-term precision down to $\sim1$ ms$^{-1}$. In $2017$, the HIRES team published $64,480$ RVs of $1,699$ stars, collected between $1996$ and $2014$. In this bank of RVs, we identify a sample of RV-quiet stars, whose RV scatter is $<10$ ms$^{-1}$, and use them to reveal two small but significant nightly zero-point effects: a discontinuous jump, caused by major modifications of the instrument in August $2004$, and a long-term drift. The size of the $2004$ jump is $1.5\pm0.1$ ms$^{-1}$, and the slow zero-point variations have a typical magnitude of $\lesssim1$ ms$^{-1}$. In addition, we find a small but significant correlation between stellar RVs and the time relative to local midnight, indicative of an average intra-night drift of $0.051\pm0.004$ ms$^{-1}$hr$^{-1}$. We correct the $64,480$ HIRES RVs for the systematic effects we find, and make the corrected RVs publicly available. Our findings demonstrate the importance of observing RV-quiet stars, even in the era of simultaneously-calibrated RV spectrographs. We hope that the corrected HIRES RVs will facilitate the search for new planet candidates around the observed stars.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.07928  [pdf] - 1807367
Detection of Periodicity Based on Independence Tests - IV. Phase Distance Correlation Periodogram for Two-Dimensional Astrometry
Comments: 5 pages, 8 figures (accepted for publication in MNRAS Letters)
Submitted: 2018-12-19
I present an extension of the phase distance correlation periodogram to two-dimensional astrometric data. I show that this technique is more suitable than previously proposed approaches to detect eccentric Keplerian orbits, and that it overcomes the inherent bias of the joint periodogram to circular orbits. This new technique might prove to be essential in the context of future astrometric space missions such as Theia.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.10236  [pdf] - 1742144
A Quantitative Comparison of Exoplanet Catalogs
Comments: Published in Geosciences, special issue on "Detection and Characterization of Extrasolar Planets"
Submitted: 2018-08-30
In this study, we investigated the differences between four commonly-used exoplanet catalogs (exoplanet.eu; exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu; openexoplanetcatalogue.com; exoplanets.org) using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test. We found a relatively good agreement in terms of the planetary parameters (mass, radius, period) and stellar properties (mass, temperature, metallicity), although a more careful analysis of the overlap and unique parts of each catalog revealed some differences. We quantified the statistical impact of these differences and their potential cause. We concluded that although statistical studies are unlikely to be significantly affected by the choice of catalog, it would be desirable to have one consistent catalog accepted by the general exoplanet community as a base for exoplanet statistics and comparison with theoretical predictions.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09378  [pdf] - 1732652
Gaia Data Release 2: Observational Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams
Gaia Collaboration; Babusiaux, C.; van Leeuwen, F.; Barstow, M. A.; Jordi, C.; Vallenari, A.; Bossini, D.; Bressan, A.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; van Leeuwen, M.; Brown, A. G. A.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Walton, N. A.; Arenou, F.; Bastian, U.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Bakker, J.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; DeAngeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Holl, B.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Teyssier, D.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Audard, M.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Burgess, P.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Clotet, M.; Creevey, O.; Davidson, M.; DeRidder, J.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fouesneau, M.; Frémat, Y.; Galluccio, L.; García-Torres, M.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Gosset, E.; Guy, L. P.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández, J.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Jordan, S.; Korn, A. J.; Krone-Martins, A.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Lebzelter, T.; Löffler, W.; Manteiga, M.; Marrese, P. M.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Moitinho, A.; Mora, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Richards, P. J.; Rimoldini, L.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Sozzetti, A.; Süveges, M.; Torra, J.; vanReeven, W.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aerts, C.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alvarez, R.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Arcay, B.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Balm, P.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbato, D.; Barblan, F.; Barklem, P. S.; Barrado, D.; Barros, M.; Muñoz, S. Bartholomé; Bassilana, J. -L.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; Berihuete, A.; Bertone, S.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Boeche, C.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Bramante, L.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Brugaletta, E.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Butkevich, A. G.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cancelliere, R.; Cannizzaro, G.; Carballo, R.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Casamiquela, L.; Castellani, M.; Castro-Ginard, A.; Charlot, P.; Chemin, L.; Chiavassa, A.; Cocozza, G.; Costigan, G.; Cowell, S.; Crifo, F.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Cuypers, J.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; deLaverny, P.; DeLuise, F.; DeMarch, R.; deMartino, D.; deSouza, R.; deTorres, A.; Debosscher, J.; delPozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Diakite, S.; Diener, C.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Eriksson, K.; Esquej, P.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernique, P.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Frézouls, B.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavel, A.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Giacobbe, P.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Glass, F.; Gomes, M.; Granvik, M.; Gueguen, A.; Guerrier, A.; Guiraud, J.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Hauser, M.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Heu, J.; Hilger, T.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holland, G.; Huckle, H. E.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Janßen, K.; JevardatdeFombelle, G.; Jonker, P. G.; Juhász, Á. L.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kewley, A.; Klar, J.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, M.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Koubsky, P.; Lambert, S.; Lanza, A. F.; Lasne, Y.; Lavigne, J. -B.; LeFustec, Y.; LePoncin-Lafitte, C.; Lebreton, Y.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; López, M.; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martino, M.; Marton, G.; Mary, N.; Massari, D.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molnár, L.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; O'Mullane, W.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Panahi, A.; Pawlak, M.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poggio, E.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Racero, E.; Ragaini, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Riclet, F.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rivard, A.; Rixon, G.; Roegiers, T.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sanna, N.; Santana-Ros, T.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Ségransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Siltala, L.; Silva, A. F.; Smart, R. L.; Smith, K. W.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; SoriaNieto, S.; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Teyssandier, P.; Thuillot, W.; Titarenko, A.; TorraClotet, F.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Uzzi, S.; Vaillant, M.; Valentini, G.; Valette, V.; vanElteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; Vaschetto, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Viala, Y.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; vonEssen, C.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Wertz, O.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zorec, J.; Zschocke, S.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.
Comments: Published in the A&A Gaia Data Release 2 special issue. Tables 2 and A.4 corrected. Tables available at http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/616/A10
Submitted: 2018-04-25, last modified: 2018-08-13
We highlight the power of the Gaia DR2 in studying many fine structures of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD). Gaia allows us to present many different HRDs, depending in particular on stellar population selections. We do not aim here for completeness in terms of types of stars or stellar evolutionary aspects. Instead, we have chosen several illustrative examples. We describe some of the selections that can be made in Gaia DR2 to highlight the main structures of the Gaia HRDs. We select both field and cluster (open and globular) stars, compare the observations with previous classifications and with stellar evolutionary tracks, and we present variations of the Gaia HRD with age, metallicity, and kinematics. Late stages of stellar evolution such as hot subdwarfs, post-AGB stars, planetary nebulae, and white dwarfs are also analysed, as well as low-mass brown dwarf objects. The Gaia HRDs are unprecedented in both precision and coverage of the various Milky Way stellar populations and stellar evolutionary phases. Many fine structures of the HRDs are presented. The clear split of the white dwarf sequence into hydrogen and helium white dwarfs is presented for the first time in an HRD. The relation between kinematics and the HRD is nicely illustrated. Two different populations in a classical kinematic selection of the halo are unambiguously identified in the HRD. Membership and mean parameters for a selected list of open clusters are provided. They allow drawing very detailed cluster sequences, highlighting fine structures, and providing extremely precise empirical isochrones that will lead to more insight in stellar physics. Gaia DR2 demonstrates the potential of combining precise astrometry and photometry for large samples for studies in stellar evolution and stellar population and opens an entire new area for HRD-based studies.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09373  [pdf] - 1767409
Gaia Data Release 2: Summary of the variability processing & analysis results
Comments: 21 pages, 10 figures, 5 tables, accepted by Astronomy & Astrophysics, added several language corrections, and expanded Gaia archive query examples
Submitted: 2018-04-25, last modified: 2018-07-06
The Gaia Data Release 2 (DR2): we summarise the processing and results of the identification of variable source candidates of RR Lyrae stars, Cepheids, long period variables (LPVs), rotation modulation (BY Dra-type) stars, delta Scuti & SX Phoenicis stars, and short-timescale variables. In this release we aim to provide useful but not necessarily complete samples of candidates. The processed Gaia data consist of the G, BP, and RP photometry during the first 22 months of operations as well as positions and parallaxes. Various methods from classical statistics, data mining and time series analysis were applied and tailored to the specific properties of Gaia data, as well as various visualisation tools. The DR2 variability release contains: 228'904 RR Lyrae stars, 11'438 Cepheids, 151'761 LPVs, 147'535 stars with rotation modulation, 8'882 delta Scuti & SX Phoenicis stars, and 3'018 short-timescale variables. These results are distributed over a classification and various Specific Object Studies (SOS) tables in the Gaia archive, along with the three-band time series and associated statistics for the underlying 550'737 unique sources. We estimate that about half of them are newly identified variables. The variability type completeness varies strongly as function of sky position due to the non-uniform sky coverage and intermediate calibration level of this data. The probabilistic and automated nature of this work implies certain completeness and contamination rates which are quantified so that users can anticipate their effects. This means that even well-known variable sources can be missed or misidentified in the published data. The DR2 variability release only represents a small subset of the processed data. Future releases will include more variable sources and data products; however, DR2 shows the (already) very high quality of the data and great promise for variability studies.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.03163  [pdf] - 1656177
Shallow Transits - Deep Learning I: Feasibility Study of Deep Learning to Detect Periodic Transits of Exoplanets
Comments: 15 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2017-11-08, last modified: 2018-02-07
Transits of habitable planets around solar-like stars are expected to be shallow, and to have long periods, which means low information content. The current bottleneck in the detection of such transits is caused in large part by the presence of red (correlated) noise in the light curves obtained from the dedicated space telescopes. Based on the groundbreaking results deep learning achieves in many signal and image processing applications, we propose to use deep neural networks to solve this problem. We present a feasibility study, in which we applied a convolutional neural network on a simulated training set. The training set comprised light curves received from a hypothetical high-cadence space-based telescope. We simulated the red noise by using Gaussian Processes with a wide variety of hyperparameters. We then tested the network on a completely different test set simulated in the same way. Our study proves that very difficult cases can indeed be detected. Furthermore, we show how detection trends can be studied, and detection biases be quantified. We have also checked the robustness of the neural-network performance against practical artifacts such as outliers and discontinuities, which are known to affect space-based high-cadence light curves. Future work will allow us to use the neural networks to characterize the transit model and identify individual transits. This new approach will certainly be an indispensable tool for the detection of habitable planets in the future planet-detection space missions such as PLATO.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.06075  [pdf] - 1807277
Detection of Periodicity Based on Independence Tests - III. Phase Distance Correlation Periodogram
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures (accepted for publication in MNRAS Letters)
Submitted: 2017-11-16, last modified: 2017-11-29
I present the Phase Distance Correlation (PDC) periodogram -- a new periodicity metric, based on the Distance Correlation concept of G\'abor Sz\'ekely. For each trial period PDC calculates the distance correlation between the data samples and their phases. PDC requires adaptation of the Sz\'ekely's distance correlation to circular variables (phases). The resulting periodicity metric is best suited to sparse datasets, and it performs better than other methods for sawtooth-like periodicities. These include Cepheid and RR-Lyrae light curves, as well as radial velocity curves of eccentric spectroscopic binaries. The performance of the PDC periodogram in other contexts is almost as good as that of the Generalized Lomb-Scargle periodogram. The concept of phase distance correlation can be adapted also to astrometric data, and it has the potential to be suitable also for large evenly-spaced datasets, after some algorithmic perfection.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.04477  [pdf] - 1587112
Methods of Reverberation Mapping. I. Time-lag Determination by Measures of Randomness
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2017-08-15
A class of methods for measuring time delays between astronomical time series is introduced in the context of quasar reverberation mapping, which is based on measures of randomness or complexity of the data. Several distinct statistical estimators are considered that do not rely on polynomial interpolations of the light curves nor on their stochastic modeling, and do not require binning in correlation space. Methods based on von Neumann's mean-square successive-difference estimator are found to be superior to those using other estimators. An optimized von Neumann scheme is formulated, which better handles sparsely sampled data and outperforms current implementations of discrete correlation function methods. This scheme is applied to existing reverberation data of varying quality, and consistency with previously reported time delays is found. In particular, the size-luminosity relation of the broad-line region in quasars is recovered with a scatter comparable to that obtained by other works, yet with fewer assumptions made concerning the process underlying the variability. The proposed method for time-lag determination is particularly relevant for irregularly sampled time series, and in cases where the process underlying the variability cannot be adequately modeled.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.08007  [pdf] - 1586362
Disproval of the validated planets K2-78b, K2-82b, and K2-92b
Comments: accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-07-25
Transiting super-Earths orbiting bright stars in short orbital periods are interesting targets for the study of planetary atmospheres. While selecting super-Earths suitable for further characterization from the ground among a list of confirmed and validated exoplanets detected by K2, we found some suspicious cases that led to us re-assessing the nature of the detected transiting signal. We did a photometric analysis of the K2 light curves and centroid motions of the photometric barycenters. Our study shows that the validated planets K2-78b, K2-82b, and K2-92b are actually not planets but background eclipsing binaries. The eclipsing binaries are inside the Kepler photometric aperture, but outside the ground-based high resolution images used for validation. We advise extreme care on the validation of candidate planets discovered by space missions. It is important that all the assumptions in the validation process are carefully checked. An independent confirmation is mandatory in order to avoid wasting valuable resources on further characterization of non-existent targets.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00688  [pdf] - 1583007
Gaia Data Release 1. Testing the parallaxes with local Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars
Gaia Collaboration; Clementini, G.; Eyer, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Muraveva, T.; Garofalo, A.; Sarro, L. M.; Palmer, M.; Luri, X.; Molinaro, R.; Rimoldini, L.; Szabados, L.; Musella, I.; Anderson, R. I.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Azntoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernánde, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: 29 pages, 25 figures. Accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2017-05-01
Parallaxes for 331 classical Cepheids, 31 Type II Cepheids and 364 RR Lyrae stars in common between Gaia and the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1) as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). In order to test these first parallax measurements of the primary standard candles of the cosmological distance ladder, that involve astrometry collected by Gaia during the initial 14 months of science operation, we compared them with literature estimates and derived new period-luminosity ($PL$), period-Wesenheit ($PW$) relations for classical and Type II Cepheids and infrared $PL$, $PL$-metallicity ($PLZ$) and optical luminosity-metallicity ($M_V$-[Fe/H]) relations for the RR Lyrae stars, with zero points based on TGAS. The new relations were computed using multi-band ($V,I,J,K_{\mathrm{s}},W_{1}$) photometry and spectroscopic metal abundances available in the literature, and applying three alternative approaches: (i) by linear least squares fitting the absolute magnitudes inferred from direct transformation of the TGAS parallaxes, (ii) by adopting astrometric-based luminosities, and (iii) using a Bayesian fitting approach. TGAS parallaxes bring a significant added value to the previous Hipparcos estimates. The relations presented in this paper represent first Gaia-calibrated relations and form a "work-in-progress" milestone report in the wait for Gaia-only parallaxes of which a first solution will become available with Gaia's Data Release 2 (DR2) in 2018.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.01131  [pdf] - 1567701
Gaia Data Release 1. Open cluster astrometry: performance, limitations, and future prospects
Gaia Collaboration; van Leeuwen, F.; Vallenari, A.; Jordi, C.; Lindegren, L.; Bastian, U.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Martino, D.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffer, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegrio, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Rimoldini, L.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingril, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernsteiny, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclarky, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardio, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Palmer, M.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poelsy, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: Accepted for publication by A&A. 21 pages main text plus 46 pages appendices. 34 figures main text, 38 figures appendices. 8 table in main text, 19 tables in appendices
Submitted: 2017-03-03
Context. The first Gaia Data Release contains the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). This is a subset of about 2 million stars for which, besides the position and photometry, the proper motion and parallax are calculated using Hipparcos and Tycho-2 positions in 1991.25 as prior information. Aims. We investigate the scientific potential and limitations of the TGAS component by means of the astrometric data for open clusters. Methods. Mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are derived taking into account the error correlations within the astrometric solutions for individual stars, an estimate of the internal velocity dispersion in the cluster, and, where relevant, the effects of the depth of the cluster along the line of sight. Internal consistency of the TGAS data is assessed. Results. Values given for standard uncertainties are still inaccurate and may lead to unrealistic unit-weight standard deviations of least squares solutions for cluster parameters. Reconstructed mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are generally in very good agreement with earlier Hipparcos-based determination, although the Gaia mean parallax for the Pleiades is a significant exception. We have no current explanation for that discrepancy. Most clusters are observed to extend to nearly 15 pc from the cluster centre, and it will be up to future Gaia releases to establish whether those potential cluster-member stars are still dynamically bound to the clusters. Conclusions. The Gaia DR1 provides the means to examine open clusters far beyond their more easily visible cores, and can provide membership assessments based on proper motions and parallaxes. A combined HR diagram shows the same features as observed before using the Hipparcos data, with clearly increased luminosities for older A and F dwarfs.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.03295  [pdf] - 1535694
Gaia Data Release 1: The variability processing & analysis and its application to the south ecliptic pole region
Comments: 40 pages, 46 figures. Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2017-02-10
The ESA Gaia mission provides a unique time-domain survey for more than one billion sources brighter than G=20.7 mag. Gaia offers the unprecedented opportunity to study variability phenomena in the Universe thanks to multi-epoch G-magnitude photometry in addition to astrometry, blue and red spectro-photometry, and spectroscopy. Within the Gaia Consortium, Coordination Unit 7 has the responsibility to detect variable objects, classify them, derive characteristic parameters for specific variability classes, and provide global descriptions of variable phenomena. We describe the variability processing and analysis that we plan to apply to the successive data releases, and we present its application to the G-band photometry results of the first 14 months of Gaia operations that comprises 28 days of Ecliptic Pole Scanning Law and 13 months of Nominal Scanning Law. Out of the 694 million, all-sky, sources that have calibrated G-band photometry in this first stage of the mission, about 2.3 million sources that have at least 20 observations are located within 38 degrees from the South Ecliptic Pole. We detect about 14% of them as variable candidates, among which the automated classification identified 9347 Cepheid and RR Lyrae candidates. Additional visual inspections and selection criteria led to the publication of 3194 Cepheid and RR Lyrae stars, described in Clementini et al. (2016). Under the restrictive conditions for DR1, the completenesses of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars are estimated at 67% and 58%, respectively, numbers that will significantly increase with subsequent Gaia data releases. Data processing within the Gaia Consortium is iterative, the quality of the data and the results being improved at each iteration. The results presented in this article show a glimpse of the exceptional harvest that is to be expected from the Gaia mission for variability phenomena. [abridged]
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.07654  [pdf] - 1581281
Two Empirical Regimes of the Planetary Mass-Radius Relation
Comments: accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-01-26
Today, with the large number of detected exoplanets and improved measurements, we can reach the next step of planetary characterization. Classifying different populations of planets is not only important for our understanding of the demographics of various planetary types in the galaxy, but also for our understanding of planet formation. We explore the nature of two regimes in the planetary mass-radius (M-R) relation. We suggest that the transition between the two regimes of "small" and "large" planets, occurs at a mass of 124 \pm 7, M_Earth and a radius of 12.1 \pm 0.5, R_Earth. Furthermore, the M-R relation is R \propto M^{0.55\pm 0.02} and R \propto M^{0.01\pm0.02} for small and large planets, respectively. We suggest that the location of the breakpoint is linked to the onset of electron degeneracy in hydrogen, and therefore, to the planetary bulk composition. Specifically, it is the characteristic minimal mass of a planet which consists of mostly hydrogen and helium, and therefore its M-R relation is determined by the equation of state of these materials. We compare the M-R relation from observational data with the one derived by population synthesis calculations and show that there is a good qualitative agreement between the two samples.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.04606  [pdf] - 1484699
Evidence for periodicity in 43 year-long monitoring of NGC 5548
Comments: Accepted in ApJS, 64 pages, 10 figures and 4 tables
Submitted: 2016-06-14, last modified: 2016-09-20
We present an analysis of 43 years (1972 to 2015) of spectroscopic observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. This includes 12 years of new unpublished observations (2003 to 2015). We compiled about 1600 H$\beta$ spectra and analyzed the long-term spectral variations of the 5100 \AA\ continuum and the H$\beta$ line. Our analysis is based on standard procedures including the Lomb-Scargle method, which is known to be rather limited to such heterogeneous data sets, and new method developed specifically for this project that is more robust and reveals a $\sim$5700 day periodicity in the continuum light curve, the H$\beta$ light curve and the radial velocity curve of the red wing of the H$\beta$ line. The data are consistent with orbital motion inside the broad emission line region of the source. We discuss several possible mechanisms that can explain this periodicity, including orbiting dusty and dust-free clouds, a binary black hole system, tidal disruption events, and the effect of an orbiting star periodically passing through an accretion disc.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.03597  [pdf] - 1498400
Very Low-Mass Stellar and Substellar Companions to Solar-like Stars From MARVELS VI: A Giant Planet and a Brown Dwarf Candidate in a Close Binary System HD 87646
Comments: Accepted for publication at AJ. RV data are provided as ascii file in the source files
Submitted: 2016-08-11
We report the detections of a giant planet (MARVELS-7b) and a brown dwarf candidate (MARVELS-7c) around the primary star in the close binary system, HD 87646. It is the first close binary system with more than one substellar circum-primary companion discovered to the best of our knowledge. The detection of this giant planet was accomplished using the first multi-object Doppler instrument (KeckET) at the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) telescope. Subsequent radial velocity observations using ET at Kitt Peak National Observatory, HRS at HET, the "Classic" spectrograph at the Automatic Spectroscopic Telescope at Fairborn Observatory, and MARVELS from SDSS-III confirmed this giant planet discovery and revealed the existence of a long-period brown dwarf in this binary. HD 87646 is a close binary with a separation of $\sim22$ AU between the two stars, estimated using the Hipparcos catalogue and our newly acquired AO image from PALAO on the 200-inch Hale Telescope at Palomar. The primary star in the binary, HD 87646A, has Teff = 5770$\pm$80K, log(g)=4.1$\pm$0.1 and [Fe/H] = $-0.17\pm0.08$. The derived minimum masses of the two substellar companions of HD 87646A are 12.4$\pm$0.7M$_{\rm Jup}$ and 57.0$\pm3.7$M$_{\rm Jup}$. The periods are 13.481$\pm$0.001 days and 674$\pm$4 days and the measured eccentricities are 0.05$\pm$0.02 and 0.50$\pm$0.02 respectively. Our dynamical simulations show the system is stable if the binary orbit has a large semi-major axis and a low eccentricity, which can be verified with future astrometry observations.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.01225  [pdf] - 1351683
Detection of Periodicity Based on Independence Tests - II. Improved Serial Independence Measure
Comments: 5 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2016-01-06
We introduce an improvement to a periodicity metric we have introduced in a previous paper.We improve on the Hoeffding-test periodicity metric, using the Blum-Kiefer-Rosenblatt (BKR) test. Besides a consistent improvement over the Hoeffding-test approach, the BKR approach turns out to perform superbly when applied to very short time series of sawtoothlike shapes. The expected astronomical implications are much more detections of RR-Lyrae stars and Cepheids in sparse photometric databases, and of eccentric Keplerian radial-velocity (RV) curves, such as those of exoplanets in RV surveys.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.04564  [pdf] - 1308371
A possible correlation between planetary radius and orbital period for small planets
Comments: accepted for publication in MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2015-10-15
We suggest the existence of a correlation between the planetary radius and orbital period for planets with radii smaller than 4 R_Earth. Using the Kepler data, we find a correlation coefficient of 0.5120, and suggest that the correlation is not caused solely by survey incompleteness. While the correlation coefficient could change depending on the statistical analysis, the statistical significance of the correlation is robust. Further analysis shows that the correlation originates from two contributing factors. One seems to be a power-law dependence between the two quantities for intermediate periods (3-100 days), and the other is a dearth of planets with radii larger than 2 R_Earth in short periods. This correlation may provide important constraints for small-planet formation theories and for understanding the dynamical evolution of planetary systems.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.01734  [pdf] - 1336408
Detection of Periodicity Based on Serial Dependence of Phase-Folded Data
Comments: 11 pages, 21 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-03-05
We introduce and test several novel approaches for periodicity detection in unevenly-spaced sparse datasets. Specifically, we examine five different kinds of periodicity metrics, which are based on non-parametric measures of serial dependence of the phase-folded data. We test the metrics through simulations in which we assess their performance in various situations, including various periodic signal shapes, different numbers of data points and different signal to noise ratios. One of the periodicity metrics we introduce seems to perform significantly better than the classical ones in some settings of interest to astronomers. We suggest that this periodicity metric - the Hoeffding-test periodicity metric - should be used in addition to the traditional methods, to increase periodicity detection probability.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.03829  [pdf] - 935392
The Gaia Mission, Binary Stars and Exoplanets
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures. LIVING TOGETHER PLANETS, HOST STARS and BINARIES, Proceedings of a Proceedings of a Conference held in held at Litomy\v{s}l, Czech Republic. Edited by Slavek M. Rucinski, Guillermo Torres and Miloslav Zejda. Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Conference Series, 2015
Submitted: 2015-02-12
On the 19th of December 2013, the Gaia spacecraft was successfully launched by a Soyuz rocket from French Guiana and started its amazing journey to map and characterise one billion celestial objects with its one billion pixel camera. In this presentation, we briefly review the general aims of the mission and describe what has happened since launch, including the Ecliptic Pole scanning mode. We also focus especially on binary stars, starting with some basic observational aspects, and then turning to the remarkable harvest that Gaia is expected to yield for these objects.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.0822  [pdf] - 892108
Finding Hot-Jupiters by Gaia photometry using the Directed Follow-Up strategy
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures, Proceedings of the GREAT-ESF workshop "Gaia and the unseen - the brown dwarf question", Torino, 24-26 March 2014, to be published in Memorie della Societa' Astronomica Italiana (SAIt), eds Ricky Smart, David Barrado, Jackie Faherty
Submitted: 2014-11-04
All-sky surveys of low-cadence nature, such as the promising Gaia Space mission, have the potential to "hide" planetary transit signals. We developed a novel detection technique, the Directed Follow-Up strategy (DFU), to search for transiting planets using sparse, low-cadence data. According to our analysis, the expected yield of transiting Hot-Jupiters that can be revealed by Gaia will reach a few thousands, if the DFU strategy will be applied to facilitate detection of transiting planets with ground-based observations. This will guaranty that Gaia will exploit its photometric capabilities and will have a strong impact on the field of transiting planets, and in particular on detection of Hot-Jupiters. Besides transiting exoplanets Gaia's yield is expected to include a few tens of transiting brown dwarfs, that will be candidates for detailed characterization, thus will help to bridge the gap between giant planets and stars.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.5499  [pdf] - 1159227
Transit Timing Observations from Kepler. VIII Catalog of Transit Timing Measurements of the First Twelve Quarters
Comments: Accepted for publication to ApJ. 57 pages, 23 Figures. Machine readable catalogs are available at ftp://wise-ftp.tau.ac.il/pub/tauttv/TTV
Submitted: 2013-01-23, last modified: 2013-07-01
Following Ford et al. (2011, 2012) and Steffen et al. (2012) we derived the transit timing of 1960 Kepler KOIs using the pre-search data conditioning (PDC) light curves of the first twelve quarters of the Kepler data. For 721 KOIs with large enough SNRs, we obtained also the duration and depth of each transit. The results are presented as a catalog for the community to use. We derived a few statistics of our results that could be used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have found 130 KOIs that showed highly significant TTVs, and 13 that had short-period TTV modulations with small amplitudes. We consider two effects that could cause apparent periodic TTV - the finite sampling of the observations and the interference with the stellar activity, stellar spots in particular. We briefly discuss some statistical aspects of our detected TTVs. We show that the TTV period is correlated with the orbital period of the planet and with the TTV amplitude.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.6499  [pdf] - 670059
Quasar Cartography: from Black Hole to Broad Line Region Scales
Comments: 12 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2013-05-28
A generalized approach to reverberation mapping (RM) is presented, which is applicable to broad- and narrow-band photometric data, as well as to spectroscopic observations. It is based on multivariate correlation analysis techniques and, in its present implementation, is able to identify reverberating signals across the accretion disk and the broad line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Statistical tests are defined to assess the significance of time-delay measurements using this approach, and the limitations of the adopted formalism are discussed. It is shown how additional constraints on some of the parameters of the problem may be incorporated into the analysis thereby leading to improved results. When applied to a sample of 14 Seyfert 1 galaxies having good-quality high-cadence photometric data, accretion disk scales and BLR sizes are simultaneously determined, on a case-by-case basis, in most objects. The BLR scales deduced here are in good agreement with the findings of independent spectroscopic RM campaigns. Implications for the photometric RM of AGN interiors in the era of large surveys are discussed.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.4876  [pdf] - 596778
Directed follow-up strategy of low-cadence photometric surveys in Search of Transiting Exoplanets - II. application to Gaia
Comments: 7 pages, 9 figures, 2 tables, Accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Submitted: 2012-11-20
In a previous paper we presented the Directed Follow-Up (DFU) approach, which we suggested can be used to efficiently augment low-cadence photometric surveys in a way that will optimize the chances to detect transiting exoplanets. In this paper we present preliminary tests of applying the DFU approach to the future ESA space mission Gaia. We demonstrate the strategy application to Gaia photometry through a few simulated cases of known transiting planets, using Gaia expected performance and current design. We show that despite the low cadence observations DFU, when tailored for Gaia's scanning law, can facilitate detection of transiting planets with ground-based observations, even during the lifetime of the mission. We conclude that Gaia photometry, although not optimized for transit detection, should not be ignored in the search of transiting planets. With a suitable ground-based follow-up network it can make an important contribution to this search.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.4725  [pdf] - 1123550
Detection of transiting Jovian exoplanets by Gaia photometry - expected yield
Comments: 13 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2012-05-21
Several attempts have been made in the past to assess the expected number of exoplanetary transits that the Gaia space mission will detect. In this Letter we use the updated design of Gaia and its expected performance, and apply recent empirical statistical procedures to provide a new assessment. Depending on the extent of the follow-up effort that will be devoted, we expect Gaia to detect a few hundreds to a few thousands transiting exoplanets.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.3512  [pdf] - 1084891
Kepler KOI-13.01 - Detection of beaming and ellipsoidal modulations pointing to a massive hot Jupiter
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2011-10-16, last modified: 2012-03-11
KOI-13 was presented by the Kepler team as a candidate for having a giant planet - KOI-13.01, with orbital period of 1.7 d and transit depth of ~0.8%. We have analyzed the Kepler Q2 data of KOI-13, which was publicly available at the time of the submission of this paper, and derived the amplitudes of the beaming, ellipsoidal and reflection modulations: 8.6 +/- 1.1, 66.8 +/- 1.6 and 72.0 +/- 1.5 ppm (parts per million), respectively. After the paper was submitted, Q3 data were released, so we repeated the analysis with the newly available light curve. The results of the two quarters were quite similar. From the amplitude of the beaming modulation we derived a mass of 10 +/- 2 M_Jup for the secondary, suggesting that KOI-13.01 was a massive planet, with one of the largest known radii. We also found in the data a periodicity of unknown origin with a period of 1.0595 d and a peak-to-peak modulation of ~60 ppm. The light curve of Q3 revealed a few more small-amplitude periodicities with similar frequencies. It seemed as if the secondary occultation of KOI-13 was slightly deeper than the reflection peak-to-peak modulation by 16.8 +/- 4.5 ppm. If real, this small difference was a measure of the thermal emission from the night side of KOI-13.01. We estimated the effective temperature to be 2600 +/- 150 K, using a simplistic black-body emissivity approximation. We then derived the planetary geometrical and Bond albedos as a function of the day-side temperature. Our analysis suggested that the Bond albedo of KOI-13.01 might be substantially larger than the geometrical albedo.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.5140  [pdf] - 1093230
The impact of Gaia and LSST on binary stars and exo-planets
Comments: 8 pages, 2 figures, Proceedings of the IAU Symposium No. 282: From Interacting Binaries to Exoplanets: Essential Modeling Tools. Tatranska Lomnica, Slovakia
Submitted: 2012-01-24
Two upcoming large scale surveys, the ESA Gaia and LSST projects, will bring a new era in astronomy. The number of binary systems that will be observed and detected by these projects is enormous, estimations range from millions for Gaia to several tens of millions for LSST. We review some tools that should be developed and also what can be gained from these missions on the subject of binaries and exoplanets from the astrometry, photometry, radial velocity and their alert systems.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.1034  [pdf] - 1084658
A simple method to estimate radial velocity variations due to stellar activity using photometry
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-10-05
We present a new, simple method to predict activity-induced radial velocity variations using high-precision time-series photometry. It is based on insights from a simple spot model, has only two free parameters (one of which can be estimated from the light curve) and does not require knowledge of the stellar rotation period. We test the method on simulated data and illustrate its performance by applying it to MOST/SOPHIE observations of the planet host-star HD189733, where it gives almost identical results to much more sophisticated, but highly degenerate models, and synthetic data for the Sun, where we demonstrate that it can reproduce variations well below the m/s level. We also apply it to Quarter 1 data for Kepler transit candidate host stars, where it can be used to estimate RV variations down to the 2-3m/s level, and show that RV amplitudes above that level may be expected for approximately two thirds of the candidates we examined.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.6671  [pdf] - 1336399
On the Ages of Planetary Systems with Mean Motion Resonances
Comments: 15 pages, 2 tables. Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2011-09-29
We present preliminary though statistically significant evidence that shows that multiplanetary systems that exhibit a 2/1 period commensurability are in general younger than multiplanetary systems without commensurabilities, or even systems with other commensurabilities. An immediate possible conclusion is that the 2/1 mean-motion resonance in planetary systems, tends to be disrupted after typically a few Gyrs.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1107.4458  [pdf] - 1078148
On using the beaming effect to measure spin-orbit alignment in stellar binaries with Sun-like components
Comments: v2: replaced with accepted version
Submitted: 2011-07-22, last modified: 2011-08-24
The beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting) induces a variation in the observed flux of a luminous object, following its observed radial velocity variation. We describe a photometric signal induced by the beaming effect during eclipse of binary systems, where the stellar components are late type Sun-like stars. The shape of this signal is sensitive to the angle between the eclipsed star's spin axis and the orbital angular momentum axis, thereby allowing its measurement. We show that during eclipse there are in fact two effects, superimposed on the known eclipse light curve. One effect is produced by the rotation of the eclipsed star, and is the photometric analog of the spectroscopic Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, thereby it contains information about the sky-projected spin-orbit angle. The other effect is produced by the varying weighted difference, during eclipse, between the beaming signals of the two stars. We give approximated analytic expressions for the amplitudes of the two effects, and present a numerical simulation where we show the light curves for the two effects for various orbital orientations, for a low mass ratio stellar eclipsing binary system. We show that although the overall signal is small, it can be detected in the primary eclipse when using Kepler Long Cadence data of bright systems accumulated over the mission lifetime.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.5393  [pdf] - 1076905
Directed follow-up strategy of low-cadence photometric surveys in Search of transiting exoplanets - I. Bayesian approach for adaptive scheduling
Comments: 11 pages, 11 figures,accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-05-26
We propose a novel approach to utilize low-cadence photometric surveys for exoplanetary transit search. Even if transits are undetectable in the survey database alone, it can still be useful for finding preferred times for directed follow-up observations that will maximize the chances to detect transits. We demonstrate the approach through a few simulated cases. These simulations are based on the Hipparcos Epoch Photometry data base, and the transiting planets whose transits were already detected there. In principle, the approach we propose will be suitable for the directed follow-up of the photometry from the planned Gaia mission, and it can hopefully significantly increase the yield of exoplanetary transits detected, thanks to Gaia.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1008.3859  [pdf] - 1336397
Re-assessing the radial-velocity evidence for planets around CoRoT-7
Comments: 11 pages, accepted for publication in MNRAS, revised version with minor modifications and one additional figure
Submitted: 2010-08-23, last modified: 2010-10-08
CoRoT-7 is an 11th magnitude K-star whose light curve shows transits with depth of 0.3 mmag and a period of 0.854 d, superimposed on variability at the 1% level, due to the modulation of evolving active regions with the star's 23 d rotation period. In this paper, we revisit the published HARPS radial velocity measurements of the object, which were previously used to estimate the companion mass, but have been the subject of ongoing debate. We build a realistic model of the star's activity during the HARPS observations, by fitting simultaneously the line width and the line bisector, and use it to evaluate the contribution of activity to the RV variations. The data show clear evidence of errors above the level of the formal uncertainties, which are accounted for either by activity, nor by any plausible planet model, and which increase rapidly with decreasing signal-to-noise of the spectra. We cite evidence of similar systematics in mid-SNR spectra of other targets obtained with HARPS and other high-precision RV spectrographs, and discuss possible sources. Allowing for these, we re-evaluate the semi-amplitude of the CoRoT-7b signal, finding Kb=1.6 +-1.3 m/s, a tentative detection with a much reduced significance (1.2-sigma) compared to previous estimates. We also argue that the combined presence of activity and additional errors preclude a meaningful search for additional low-mass companions, despite previous claims to the contrary. Our analysis points to a lower density for CoRoT-7b, the 1-sigma mass range spanning 1-4 MEarth, allowing for a wide range of bulk compositions. In particular, an ice-rich composition is compatible with the RV constraints. This study highlights the importance of a realistic treatment of both activity and uncertainties, particularly in the medium signal-to-noise ratio regime, which applies to most small planet candidates from CoRoT and Kepler.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.5991  [pdf] - 1336398
Search for brown-dwarf companions of stars
Comments: 24 pages, 21 figures, 10 tables. Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics. Abridged abstract
Submitted: 2010-09-29
The discovery of 9 new brown-dwarf candidates orbiting stars in the CORALIE and HARPS radial-velocity surveys is reported. New CORALIE radial velocities yielding accurate orbits of 6 previously-known hosts of potential brown-dwarf companions are presented. Including targets selected from the literature, 33 hosts of potential brown-dwarf companions are examined. Employing innovative methods, we use the new reduction of the Hipparcos data to fully characterise the astrometric orbits of 6 objects, revealing M-dwarf companions with masses between 90 M_Jup and 0.52 M_Sun. Additionally, the masses of two companions can be restricted to the stellar domain. The companion to HD 137510 is found to be a brown dwarf. At 95 % confidence, the companion of HD 190228 is also a brown dwarf. The remaining 23 companions persist as brown-dwarf candidates. Based on the CORALIE planet-search sample, we obtain an upper limit of 0.6 % for the frequency of brown-dwarf companions around Sun-like stars. We find that the companion-mass distribution function is rising at the lower end of the brown-dwarf mass range, suggesting that in fact we are detecting the high-mass tail of the planetary distribution.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.2996  [pdf] - 1018791
A single sub-km Kuiper Belt object from a stellar Occultation in archival data
Comments: To appear in Nature on December 17, 2009. Under press embargo until 1800 hours London time on 16 December. 19 pages; 7 figures
Submitted: 2009-12-15
The Kuiper belt is a remnant of the primordial Solar System. Measurements of its size distribution constrain its accretion and collisional history, and the importance of material strength of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs). Small, sub-km sized, KBOs elude direct detection, but the signature of their occultations of background stars should be detectable. Observations at both optical and X-ray wavelengths claim to have detected such occultations, but their implied KBO abundances are inconsistent with each other and far exceed theoretical expectations. Here, we report an analysis of archival data that reveals an occultation by a body with a 500 m radius at a distance of 45 AU. The probability of this event to occur due to random statistical fluctuations within our data set is about 2%. Our survey yields a surface density of KBOs with radii larger than 250 m of 2.1^{+4.8}_{-1.7} x 10^7 deg^{-2}, ruling out inferred surface densities from previous claimed detections by more than 5 sigma. The fact that we detected only one event, firmly shows a deficit of sub-km sized KBOs compared to a population extrapolated from objects with r>50 km. This implies that sub-km sized KBOs are undergoing collisional erosion, just like debris disks observed around other stars.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.3480  [pdf] - 26492
TRIMOR - three-dimensional correlation technique to analyze multi-order spectra of triple stellar systems; Application to HD188753
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-07-20
This paper presents a new algorithm, TRIMOR, to analyse multi-order spectra of triple systems. The algorithm is an extension of TRICOR, the three-dimensional correlation technique that derives the radial velocities of triple stellar systems from single-order spectra. The combined correlation derived from many orders enables the detection and the measurement of radial velocities of faint tertiary companions. The paper applied TRIMOR to the already available spectra of HD188753, a well known triple system, yielding the radial velocities of the faintest star in the system. This rendered the close pair of the triple system a double-lined spectroscopic binary, which led to a precise mass-ratio and an estimate of its inclination. The close-pair inclination is very close to the inclination of the wide orbit, consistent with the assertion that this triple system has a close to coplanar configuration.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.2237  [pdf] - 1002871
Removing systematics from the CoRoT light curves: I. Magnitude-Dependent Zero Point
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2009-07-13
This paper presents an analysis that searched for systematic effects within the CoRoT exoplanet field light curves. The analysis identified a systematic effect that modified the zero point of most CoRoT exposures as a function of stellar magnitude. We could find this effect only after preparing a set of learning light curves that were relatively free of stellar and instrumental noise. Correcting for this effect, rejecting outliers that appear in almost every exposure, and applying SysRem, reduced the stellar RMS by about 20 %, without attenuating transit signals.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.1829  [pdf] - 315693
Noise properties of the CoRoT data: a planet-finding perspective
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2009-03-10
In this short paper, we study the photometric precision of stellar light curves obtained by the CoRoT satellite in its planet finding channel, with a particular emphasis on the timescales characteristic of planetary transits. Together with other articles in the same issue of this journal, it forms an attempt to provide the building blocks for a statistical interpretation of the CoRoT planet and eclipsing binary catch to date. After pre-processing the light curves so as to minimise long-term variations and outliers, we measure the scatter of the light curves in the first three CoRoT runs lasting more than 1 month, using an iterative non-linear filter to isolate signal on the timescales of interest. The bevhaiour of the noise on 2h timescales is well-described a power-law with index 0.25 in R-magnitude, ranging from 0.1mmag at R=11.5 to 1mmag at R=16, which is close to the pre-launch specification, though still a factor 2-3 above the photon noise due to residual jitter noise and hot pixel events. There is evidence for a slight degradation of the performance over time. We find clear evidence for enhanced variability on hours timescales (at the level of 0.5 mmag) in stars identified as likely giants from their R-magnitude and B-V colour, which represent approximately 60 and 20% of the observed population in the direction of Aquila and Monoceros respectively. On the other hand, median correlated noise levels over 2h for dwarf stars are extremely low, reaching 0.05mmag at the bright end.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.3767  [pdf] - 14800
Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission IV: CoRoT-Exo-4b: A transiting planet in a 9.2 day synchronous orbit
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics letters. See also companion paper by Moutou et al. (arXiv:0807.3739)
Submitted: 2008-07-24
CoRoT, the first space-based transit search, provides ultra-high precision light curves with continuous time-sampling over periods, of up to 5 months. This allows the detection of transiting planets with relatively long periods, and the simultaneous study of the host star's photometric variability. In this letter, we report on the discovery of the transiting giant planet CoRoT-Exo-4b and use the CoRoT light curve to perform a detailed analysis of the transit and to determine the stellar rotation period. The CoRoT light curve was pre-processed to remove outliers and correct for orbital residuals and artefacts due to hot pixels on the detector. After removing stellar variability around each transit, the transit light curve was analysed to determine the transit parameters. A discrete auto-correlation function method was used to derive the rotation period of the star from the out-of-transit light curve. We derive periods for the planet's orbit and star's rotation of 9.20205 +/- 0.00037 and 8.87 +/- 1.12 days respectively, consistent with a synchronised system. We also derive the inclination, i = 90.00 -0.085 +0.000 in degrees, the ratio of the orbital distance to the stellar radius, a/R_s = 17.36 -0.25 +0.05, and the planet to star radius ratio R_p/R_s = 0.1047 -0.0022 +0.0041. We discuss briefly the coincidence between the orbital period of the planet and the stellar rotation period and its possible implications for the system's migration and star-planet interaction history.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.1019  [pdf] - 12395
ELODIE metallicity-biased search for transiting Hot Jupiters V. An intermediate-period Jovian planet orbiting HD45652
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures, Astronomy & Astrophysics, in press; Replaced after minor language corrections and typo correction in Table 3
Submitted: 2008-05-07, last modified: 2008-05-29
We present the detection of a 0.47 Jupiter mass planet in a 44-day period eccentric trajectory (e=0.39) orbiting the metal-rich star HD45652. This planet, the seventh giant planet discovered in the context of the ELODIE metallicity-biased planet search program, is also confirmed using higher precision radial-velocities obtained with the CORALIE and SOPHIE spectrographs. The orbital period of HD45652b places it in the middle of the "gap" in the period distribution of extra-solar planets.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.1926  [pdf] - 10059
From Espresso to Codex
Comments: To appear in the Proceedings of the Workshop "Science with the VLT in the ELT era", 8-12 October 2007, Garching, A. Moorwood, ed
Submitted: 2008-02-13
CODEX and ESPRESSO are concepts for ultra-stable, high-resolution spectrographs at the E-ELT and VLT, respectively. Both instruments are well motivated by distinct sets of science drivers. However, ESPRESSO will also be a stepping stone towards CODEX both in a scientific as well as in a technical sense. Here we discuss this role of ESPRESSO with respect to one of the most exciting CODEX science cases, i.e. the dynamical determination of the cosmic expansion history.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.1532  [pdf] - 9960
Cosmic dynamics in the era of Extremely Large Telescopes
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS, 27 pages, 19 figures
Submitted: 2008-02-11
The redshifts of all cosmologically distant sources are expected to experience a small, systematic drift as a function of time due to the evolution of the Universe's expansion rate. A measurement of this effect would represent a direct and entirely model-independent determination of the expansion history of the Universe over a redshift range that is inaccessible to other methods. Here we investigate the impact of the next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes on the feasibility of detecting and characterising the cosmological redshift drift. We consider the Lyman alpha forest in the redshift range 2 < z < 5 and other absorption lines in the spectra of high redshift QSOs as the most suitable targets for a redshift drift experiment. Assuming photon-noise limited observations and using extensive Monte Carlo simulations we determine the accuracy to which the redshift drift can be measured from the Ly alpha forest as a function of signal-to-noise and redshift. Based on this relation and using the brightness and redshift distributions of known QSOs we find that a 42-m telescope is capable of unambiguously detecting the redshift drift over a period of ~20 yr using 4000 h of observing time. Such an experiment would provide independent evidence for the existence of dark energy without assuming spatial flatness, using any other cosmological constraints or making any other astrophysical assumption.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:0712.4152  [pdf] - 260139
The CODEX-ESPRESSO experiment: cosmic dynamics, fundamental physics, planets and much more..
Comments: 6 pages Latex, to appear in the proceedings of `A Century of Cosmology', S. Servolo, August 2007, to be published in Il Nuovo Cimento
Submitted: 2007-12-26
CODEX, a high resolution, super-stable spectrograph to be fed by the E-ELT, the most powerful telescope ever conceived, will for the first time provide the possibility of directly measuring the change of the expansion rate of the Universe with time and much more, from the variability of fundamental constants to the search for other earths. A study for the implementation at the VLT of a precursor of CODEX, dubbed ESPRESSO, is presently carried out by a collaboration including ESO, IAC, INAF, IoA Cambridge and Observatoire de Geneve. The present talk is focused on the cosmological aspects of the experiment.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:0708.2100  [pdf] - 1336396
Beaming Binaries - a New Observational Category of Photometric Binary Stars
Comments: 15 pages, 4 figures, accpeted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2007-08-15
The new photometric space-borne survey missions CoRoT and Kepler will be able to detect minute flux variations in binary stars due to relativistic beaming caused by the line-of-sight motion of their components. In all but very short period binaries (P>10d), these variations will dominate over the ellipsoidal and reflection periodic variability. Thus, CoRoT and Kepler will discover a new observational class: photometric beaming binary stars. We examine this new category and the information that the photometric variations can provide. The variations that result from the observatory heliocentric velocity can be used to extract some spectral information even for single stars.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:0707.0958  [pdf] - 2878
Elodie metallicity-biased search for transiting Hot Jupiters IV. Intermediate period planets orbiting the stars HD43691 and HD132406
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, to be published in A&A
Submitted: 2007-07-06
We report here the discovery of two planet candidates as a result of our planet-search programme biased in favour of high-metallicity stars, using the ELODIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute Provence. One of them has a minimum mass m_2\sin{i} = 2.5 M_Jup and is orbiting the metal-rich star HD43691 with period P = 40 days and eccentricity e = 0.14. The other planet has a minimum mass m_2\sin{i} = 5.6 M_Jup and orbits the slightly metal-rich star HD132406 with period P = 974 days and eccentricity e = 0.34. Both stars were followed up with additional observations using the new SOPHIE spectrograph that replaces the ELODIE instrument, allowing an improved orbital solution for the systems.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610556  [pdf] - 85980
Photometric follow-up of the transiting planet WASP-1b
Comments: Revised version accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-10-18, last modified: 2007-01-22
We report on photometric follow-up of the recently discovered transiting planet WASP-1b. We observed two transits with the Wise Observatory 1m telescope, and used a variant of the EBOP code together with the Sys-Rem detrending approach to fit the light curve. Assuming a stellar mass of 1.15 M_sun, we derived a planetary radius of R_p = 1.40 +- 0.06 R_J and mass of M_p = 0.87 +- 0.07 M_J. An uncertainty of 15% in the stellar mass results in an additional systematic uncertainty of 5% in the planetary radius and of 10% in planetary mass. Our observations yielded a slightly better ephemeris for the center of the transit: T_c [HJD] = (2454013.3127 +- 0.0004) + N_tr * (2.51996 +- 0.00002). The new planet is an inflated, low-density planet, similar to HAT-P-1b and HD209458b.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0612418  [pdf] - 87756
The Sys-Rem Detrending Algorithm: Implementation and Testing
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures. To appear in the PASP proceedings of "Transiting Extrasolar Planets Workshop" MPIA Heidelberg Germany, 25th-28th September 2006. Eds: Cristina Afonso, David Weldrake & Thomas Henning
Submitted: 2006-12-15
Sys-Rem (Tamuz, Mazeh & Zucker 2005) is a detrending algorithm designed to remove systematic effects in a large set of lightcurves obtained by a photometric survey. The algorithm works without any prior knowledge of the effects, as long as they appear in many stars of the sample. This paper presents the basic principles of Sys-Rem and discusses a parameterization used to determine the number of effects removed. We assess the performance of Sys-Rem on simulated transits injected into WHAT survey data. This test is proposed as a general scheme to assess the effectiveness of detrending algorithms. Application of Sys-Rem to the OGLE dataset demonstrates the power of the algorithm. We offer a coded implementation of Sys-Rem to the community.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0609753  [pdf] - 85345
Spectroscopic Binary Mass Determination using Relativity
Comments: 10 pages, 1 figure, accepted for publication by the Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2006-09-27, last modified: 2006-11-14
High-precision radial-velocity techniques, which enabled the detection of extrasolar planets are now sensitive to relativistic effects in the data of spectroscopic binary stars (SBs). We show how these effects can be used to derive the absolute masses of the components of eclipsing single-lined SBs and double-lined SBs from Doppler measurements alone. High-precision stellar spectroscopy can thus substantially increase the number of measured stellar masses, thereby improving the mass-radius and mass-luminosity calibrations.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0608597  [pdf] - 84474
The effect of red noise on planetary transit detection
Comments: 14 pages, 15 figures, to appear in MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-08-28
Since the discovery of short-period exoplanets a decade ago, photometric surveys have been recognized as a feasible method to detect transiting hot Jupiters. Many transit surveys are now under way, with instruments ranging from 10-cm cameras to the Hubble Space Telescope. However, the results of these surveys have been much below the expected capacity, estimated in the dozens of detections per year. One of the reasons is the presence of systematics (``red noise'') in photometric time series. In general, yield predictions assume uncorrelated noise (``white noise''). In this paper, we show that the effect of red noise on the detection threshold and the expected yields cannot be neglected in typical ground-based surveys. We develop a simple method to determine the effect of red noise on photometric planetary transit detections. This method can be applied to determine detection thresholds for transit surveys. We show that the detection threshold in the presence of systematics can be much higher than with the assumption of white noise, and obeys a different dependence on magnitude, orbital period and the parameters of the survey. Our method can also be used to estimate the significance level of a planetary transit candidate (to select promising candidates for spectroscopic follow-up). We apply our method to the OGLE planetary transit search, and show that it provides a reliable description of the actual detectionthreshold with real correlated noise. We point out in what way the presence of red noise could be at least partly responsible for the dearth of transiting planet detections from existing surveys, and examine some possible adaptations in survey planning and strategy. Finally, we estimate the photometric stability necessary to the detection of transiting ``hot Neptunes''.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0607293  [pdf] - 83496
TIRAVEL - Template Independent RAdial VELocity measurement
Comments: 6 pages, 11 figures, to be published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Submitted: 2006-07-13
We propose a new approach to measure differential radial velocities, mainly for single-lined spectroscopic binaries. The proposed procedure - TIRAVEL (Template Independent RAdial VELocities) - does not rely on a prior theoretical or observed template, but instead looks for a set of relative Doppler shifts that simultaneously optimizes the alignment of all the observed spectra. We suggest a simple measure to quantify this overall alignment and use its maximum to measure the relative radial velocities. As a demonstration, we apply TIRAVEL to the observed spectra of three known spectroscopic binaries, and show that in two cases TIRAVEL performs as good as the commonly used approach, while in one case TIRAVEL yielded a better orbital solution.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0511679  [pdf] - 78037
A Massive Planet to the Young Disc Star HD 81040
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures, 4 tables. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2005-11-23
We report the discovery of a massive planetary companion orbiting the young disc star HD 81040. Based on five years of precise radial-velocity measurements with the HIRES and ELODIE spectrographs, we derive a spectroscopic orbit with a period $P =1001.0$ days and eccentricity $e = 0.53$. The inferred minimum mass for the companion of $m_2\sin i = 6.86$ M$_\mathrm{Jup}$ places it in the high-mass tail of the extrasolar planet mass distribution. The radial-velocity residuals exhibit a scatter significantly larger than the typical internal measurement precision of the instruments. Based on an analysis of the Ca II H and K line cores, this is interpreted as an activity-induced phenomenon. However, we find no evidence for the period and magnitude of the radial-velocity variations to be caused by stellar surface activity. The observed orbital motion of HD 81040 is thus best explained with the presence of a massive giant planet companion.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510119  [pdf] - 1468971
ELODIE metallicity-biased search for transiting Hot Jupiters II. A very hot Jupiter transiting the bright K star HD189733
Comments: 5 pages, submitted to Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2005-10-05
Among the 160 known exoplanets, mainly detected in large radial-velocity surveys, only 8 have a characterization of their actual mass and radius thanks to the two complementary methods of detection: radial velocities and photometric transit. We started in March 2004 an exoplanet-search programme biased toward high-metallicity stars which are more frequently host extra-solar planets. This survey aims to detect close-in giant planets, which are most likely to transit their host star. For this programme, high-precision radial velocities are measured with the ELODIE fiber-fed spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope, and high-precision photometry is obtained with the CCD Camera on the 1.20-m telescope, both at the Haute-Provence Observatory. We report here the discovery of a new transiting hot Jupiter orbiting the star HD189733. The planetary nature of this object is confirmed by the observation of both the spectroscopic and photometric transits. The exoplanet HD189733b, with an orbital period of 2.219 days, has one of the shortest orbital periods detected by radial velocities, and presents the largest photometric depth in the light curve (~ 3%) observed to date. We estimate for the planet a mass of 1.15 +- 0.04 Mjup and a radius of 1.26 +- 0.03 RJup. Considering that HD189733 has the same visual magnitude as the well known exoplanet host star HD209458, further ground-based and space-based follow-up observations are very promising and will permit a characterization of the atmosphere and exosphere of this giant exoplanet.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510048  [pdf] - 1468944
Elodie metallicity-biased search for transiting Hot Jupiters I. Two Hot Jupiters orbiting the slightly evolved stars HD118203 and HD149143
Comments: Accepted in A&A (6 pages, 6 figures)
Submitted: 2005-10-03
We report the discovery of a new planet candidate orbiting the subgiant star HD118203 with a period of P=6.1335 days. The best Keplerian solution yields an eccentricity e=0.31 and a minimum mass m2sin(i)=2.1MJup for the planet. This star has been observed with the ELODIE fiber-fed spectrograph as one of the targets in our planet-search programme biased toward high-metallicity stars, on-going since March 2004 at the Haute-Provence Observatory. An analysis of the spectroscopic line profiles using line bisectors revealed no correlation between the radial velocities and the line-bisector orientations, indicating that the periodic radial-velocity signal is best explained by the presence of a planet-mass companion. A linear trend is observed in the residuals around the orbital solution that could be explained by the presence of a second companion in a longer-period orbit. We also present here our orbital solution for another slightly evolved star in our metal-rich sample, HD149143, recently proposed to host a 4-d period Hot Jupiter by the N2K consortium. Our solution yields a period P=4.09 days, a marginally significant eccentricity e=0.08 and a planetary minimum mass of 1.36MJup. We checked that the shape of the spectral lines does not vary for this star as well.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0509105  [pdf] - 75687
Probing Post-Newtonian Gravity near the Galactic Black Hole with Stellar Doppler Measurements
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, submitted to The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2005-09-05
Stars closely approaching the massive black hole in the center of the Galaxy provide a unique opportunity to probe post-Newtonian physics in a yet unexplored regime of celestial mechanics. Recent advances in infrared stellar spectroscopy allow the precise measurement of stellar Doppler shift curves and thereby the detection of beta-squared post-Newtonian effects (gravitational redshift in the black hole's potential and the transverse Doppler shift). We formulate a detection procedure in terms of a simplified post-Newtonian parametrization. We then use simulations to show that these effects can be decisively detected with existing instruments after about a decade of observations. We find that neglecting these effects can lead to statistically significant systematic errors in the derived black hole mass and distance.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0502129  [pdf] - 70920
SINFONI in the Galactic Center: young stars and IR flares in the central light month
Comments: 50 pages, 10 figures, 2 tables, submitted to ApJ, February 6th, 2005, abstract abridged
Submitted: 2005-02-06
We report 75 milli-arcsec resolution, near-IR imaging spectroscopy within the central 30 light days of the Galactic Center [...]. To a limiting magnitude of K~16, 9 of 10 stars in the central 0.4 arcsec, and 13 of 17 stars out to 0.7 arcsec from the central black hole have spectral properties of B0-B9, main sequence stars. [...] all brighter early type stars have normal rotation velocities, similar to solar neighborhood stars. We [...] derive improved 3d stellar orbits for six of these S-stars in the central 0.5 arcsec. Their orientations in space appear random. Their orbital planes are not co-aligned with those of the two disks of massive young stars 1-10 arcsec from SgrA*. We can thus exclude [...] that the S-stars as a group inhabit the inner regions of these disks. They also cannot have been located/formed in these disks [...]. [...] we conclude that the S-stars were most likely brought into the central light month by strong individual scattering events. The updated estimate of distance to the Galactic center from the S2 orbit fit is Ro = 7.62 +/- 0.32 kpc, resulting in a central mass value of 3.61 +/- 0.32 x 10^6 Msun. We happened to catch two smaller flaring events from SgrA* [...]. The 1.7-2.45 mum spectral energy distributions of these flares are fit by a featureless, red power law [...]. The observed spectral slope is in good agreement with synchrotron models in which the infrared emission comes from [...] radiative inefficient accretion flow in the central R~10 Rs region.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0502056  [pdf] - 70847
Correcting systematic effects in a large set of photometric lightcurves
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2005-02-03
We suggest a new algorithm to remove systematic effects in a large set of lightcurves obtained by a photometric survey. The algorithm can remove systematic effects, like the ones associated with atmospheric extinction, detector efficiency, or PSF changes over the detector. The algorithm works without any prior knowledge of the effects, as long as they linearly appear in many stars of the sample. The approach, which was originally developed to remove atmospheric extinction effects, is based on a lower rank approximation of matrices, an approach which was already suggested and used in chemometrics, for example. The proposed algorithm is specially useful in cases where the uncertainties of the measurements are unequal. For equal uncertainties the algorithm reduces to the Principal Components Analysis (PCA) algorithm. We present a simulation to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and point out its potential, in search for transit candidates in particular.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0411701  [pdf] - 69300
An intriguing correlation between the masses and periods of the transiting planets
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, accepted for publication in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Submitted: 2004-11-25
We point out an intriguing relation between the masses of the transiting planets and their orbital periods. For the six currently known transiting planets, the data are consistent with a decreasing linear relation. The other known short-period planets, discovered through radial-velocity techniques, seem to agree with this relation. We briefly speculate about a tentative physical model to explain such a dependence.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0409433  [pdf] - 67514
An Upper Bound on the Flux Ratio of rho CrB's Companion at 1.6um
Comments: 22 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2004-09-17
We use high resolution infrared spectroscopy to investigate the 2001 report by Gatewood and colleagues that rho CrB's candidate extrasolar planet companion is really a low-mass star with mass 0.14+-0.05 Msun. We do not detect evidence of such a companion; the upper bounds on the (companion/primary) flux ratio at 1.6 microns are less than 0.0024 and 0.005 at the 90 and 99% confidence levels, respectively. Using the H-band mass-luminosity relationship calculated by Baraffe and colleagues, the corresponding upper limits on the companion mass are 0.11 and 0.15 Msun. Our results indicate that the infrared spectroscopic technique can detect companions in binaries with flux ratios as low as 0.01 to 0.02.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0409281  [pdf] - 67362
Eclipsing binaries in open clusters. III. V621 Per in chi Persei
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS (10 pages, 5 figures)
Submitted: 2004-09-13
V621 Persei is a detached eclipsing binary in the open cluster chi Persei which is composed of an early B-type giant star and a main sequence secondary component. From high-resolution spectroscopic observations and radial velocities from the literature, we determine the orbital period to be 25.5 days and the primary velocity semiamplitude to be K = 64.5 +/- 0.4 km/s. No trace of the secondary star has been found in the spectrum. We solve the discovery light curves of this totally-eclipsing binary and find that the surface gravity of the secondary star is log(g_B) = 4.244 +/- 0.054 (cm/s). We compare the absolute masses and radii of the two stars in the mass--radius diagram, for different possible values of the primary surface gravity, to the predictions of stellar models. We find that log(g_A) is approximately 3.55, in agreement with values found from fitting Balmer lines with synthetic profiles. The expected masses of the two stars are 12 Msun and 6 Msun, and the expected radii are 10 Rsun and 3 Rsun. The primary component is near the blue loop stage in its evolution.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0309103  [pdf] - 58930
The Mass Ratio Distribution in Main-Sequence Spectroscopic Binaries Measured by IR Spectroscopy
Comments:
Submitted: 2003-09-03
We report infrared spectroscopic observations of a large, well-defined sample of main-sequence, single-lined spectroscopic binaries in order to detect the secondaries and derive the mass ratio distribution of short-period binaries. The sample consists of 51 Galactic disk spectroscopic binaries found in the Carney and Latham high-proper-motion survey, with primary masses in the range of 0.6--0.85 msun. Our infrared observations detect the secondaries in 32 systems, two of which have mass ratios, q=M_2/M_1, as low as ~0.20. Together with 11 systems previously identified as double-lined binaries by visible light spectroscopy, we have a complete sample of 62 binaries, out of which 43 are double-lined. The mass ratio distribution is approximately constant over the range q=1.0 to 0.3. The distribution appears to rise at lower q values, but the uncertainties are sufficiently large that we cannot rule out a distribution that remains constant. The mass distribution derived for the secondaries in our sample, and that of the extra-solar planets, apparently represent two distinct populations.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0306612  [pdf] - 57693
A Possible Correlation between Mass Ratio and Period Ratio in Multiple Planetary Systems
Comments: 8 pages, 2 figures, published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2003-06-29
We report on a possible correlation between the mass ratio and period ratio of pairs of adjacent planets in extra-solar planetary systems. Monte-Carlo simulations show that the effect is significant to level of 0.7%, as long as we exclude two pairs of planets whose periods are at the 1:2 resonance. Only the next few multiple systems can tell if the correlation is real.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0303426  [pdf] - 55665
Cross-Correlation and Maximum Likelihood Analysis: A New Approach to Combine Cross-Correlation Functions
Comments: 6 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2003-03-18
This paper presents a new approach to combine cross-correlation functions. The combination is based on a maximum-likelihood approach and uses a non-linear combination scheme. It can be effective for radial-velocity analysis of multi-order spectra, or for analysis of multiple exposures of the same object. Simulations are presented to show the potential of the suggested combination scheme. The technique has already been used to detect a very faint companion of HD41004.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0303055  [pdf] - 55294
Multi-order TODCOR: application to observations taken with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2003-03-03
This paper presents an application of the TwO-Dimensional CORrelation (TODCOR) algorithm to multi-order spectra. The combination of many orders enables the detection and measurement of the radial velocities of very faint companions. The technique is first applied here to the case of HD41004, where the secondary is 3.68 magnitudes fainter than the primary in the V band. When applied to CORALIE spectra of this system, the technique measures the secondary velocities with a precision of 0.6 km/s and facilitates an orbital solution of the HD41004B subsystem. The orbit of HD41004B is nearly circular, with a companion of a 19 Jupiter masses (minimum mass). The precision achieved for the primary is 10 m/s, allowing the measurement of a long-term trend in the velocities of HD41004A.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0210106  [pdf] - 52144
Component Masses of the Young Spectroscopic Binary UZ Tau E
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2002-10-03
We report estimates of the masses of the component stars in the pre-main-sequence spectroscopic binary UZ Tau E. These results come from the combination of our measurements of the mass ratio, M2/M1=0.28 +/-0.01, obtained using high resolution H-band spectroscopy, with the total mass of the system, (1.31 +/-0.08)(D/140pc) M_sun, derived from millimeter observations of the circumbinary disk (Simon et al. 2000). The masses of the primary and secondary are (1.016 +/-0.065)(D/140pc) M_sun and (0.294 +/-0.027)(D/140pc) M_sun, respectively. Using the orbital parameters determined from our six epochs of observation, we find that the inclination of the binary orbit, 59.8 +/-4.4 degrees, is consistent with that determined for the circumbinary disk from the millimeter observations, indicating that the disk and binary orbits are probably coplanar.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0206099  [pdf] - 1468413
A box-fitting algorithm in the search for periodic transits
Comments: 9 pages, 12 figures and 1 table, to appear in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2002-06-06
We study the statistical characteristics of a box-fitting algorithm to analyze stellar photometric time series in the search for periodic transits by extrasolar planets. The algorithm searches for signals characterized by a periodic alternation between two discrete levels, with much less time spent at the lower level. We present numerical as well as analytical results to predict the possible detection significance at various signal parameters. It is shown that the crucial parameter is the effective signal-to-noise ratio -- the expected depth of the transit divided by the standard deviation of the measured photometric average within the transit. When this parameter exceeds the value of 6 we can expect a significant detection of the transit. We show that the box-fitting algorithm performs better than other methods available in the astronomical literature, especially for low signal-to-noise ratios.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0202415  [pdf] - 47909
On the Mass-Period Correlation of the Extrasolar Planets
Comments: 13 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2002-02-22
We report on a possible correlation between the masses and periods of the extrasolar planets, manifested as a paucity of massive planets with short orbital periods. Monte-Carlo simulations show the effect is significant, and is not solely due to an observational selection effect. We also show the effect is stronger than the one already implied by published models that assumed independent power-law distributions for the masses and periods of the extrasolar planets. Planets found in binary stellar systems may have an opposite correlation. The difference is highly significant despite the small number of planets in binary systems. We discuss the paucity of short-period massive planets in terms of some theories for the close-in giant planets. Almost all models can account for the deficit of massive planets with short periods, in particular the model that assumes migration driven by a planet-disk interaction, if the planet masses do not scale with their disk masses.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0201337  [pdf] - 47281
A Statistical Analysis of The Extrasolar Planets and The Low-Mass Secondaries
Comments: 17 pages, 7 figures, to appear in Reviews in Modern Astronomy, 15
Submitted: 2002-01-21
We show that the astrometric Hipparcos data of the stars hosting planet candidates are not accurate enough to yield statistically significant orbits. Therefore, the recent suggestion, based on the analysis of the Hipparcos data, that the orbits of the sample of planet candidates are not randomly oriented in space, is not supported by the data. Assuming random orientation, we derive the mass distribution of the planet candidates and show that it is flat in log M, up to about 10 Jupiter masses. Furthermore, the mass distribution of the planet candidates is well separated from the mass distribution of the low-mass companions by the 'brown-dwarf desert'. This indicates that we have here two distinct populations, one which we identify as the giant planets and the other as stellar secondaries. We compare the period and eccentricity distributions of the two populations and find them surprisingly similar. The period distributions between 10 and 1650 days are flat in log period, indicating a scale-free formation mechanism in both populations. We further show that the eccentricity distributions are similar - both have a density distribution peak at about 0.2-0.4, with some small differences on both ends of the eccentricity range. We present a toy model to mimic both distributions. We found a significant paucity of massive giant planets with short orbital periods. The low frequency of planets is noticeable for masses larger than about 1 Jupiter Mass and periods shorter than 30 days. We point out how, in principle, one can account for this paucity.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0201324  [pdf] - 47268
The Smallest Mass Ratio Young Star Spectroscopic Binaries
Comments: Accepted for publication in the April, 2002, ApJ; 6 figures
Submitted: 2002-01-18
Using high resolution near-infrared spectroscopy with the Keck telescope, we have detected the radial velocity signatures of the cool secondary components in four optically identified pre-main-sequence, single-lined spectroscopic binaries. All are weak-lined T Tauri stars with well-defined center of mass velocities. The mass ratio for one young binary, NTTS 160905-1859, is M2/M1 = 0.18+/-0.01, the smallest yet measured dynamically for a pre-main-sequence spectroscopic binary. These new results demonstrate the power of infrared spectroscopy for the dynamical identification of cool secondaries. Visible light spectroscopy, to date, has not revealed any pre-main-sequence secondary stars with masses <0.5 M_sun, while two of the young systems reported here are in that range. We compare our targets with a compilation of the published young double-lined spectroscopic binaries and discuss our unique contribution to this sample.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0111550  [pdf] - 46316
A Planet Candidate in the Stellar Triple System HD178911
Comments: 24 pages, 4 figures, 3 tables, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2001-11-29
We report the detection of a low-mass companion orbiting the solar-type star HD178911B, the distant component of the stellar triple system HD178911. The variability of HD178911B was first detected using radial-velocity measurements obtained with the HIRES spectrograph mounted on the 10-m Keck1 telescope at the W.M. Keck Observatory (Hawaii, USA). We then started an intense radial-velocity follow up of the star with the ELODIE echelle spectrograph mounted on the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (France) in order to derive its orbital solution. The detected planet candidate has an orbital period of 71.5 days and a minimum mass of 6.3 Jupiter masses. We performed a spectral analysis of the star, which shows that the lithium abundances in the system are similar to those in another known planet-hosting wide binary stellar system, 16 Cyg. In both systems the lithium is undetected in the atmosphere of the visual secondary harboring the planetary companion, but is easily detected in the spectrum of the visual primary. We discuss this similarity and its ramifications.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0110536  [pdf] - 45593
IR Detection of Low-Mass Secondaries in Spectroscopic Binaries
Comments:
Submitted: 2001-10-24
This paper outlines an infrared spectroscopic technique to measure the radial velocities of faint secondaries in known single-lined binaries. The paper presents our H-band observations with the CSHELL and Phoenix spectrographs and describes detections of three low-mass secondaries in main-sequence binaries: G147-36, G164-67, and HD144284 with mass ratios of 0.562+-0.011, 0.423+-0.042, and 0.380+-0.013, respectively. The latter is one of the smallest mass ratios derived to date.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0107124  [pdf] - 43495
Analysis of the Hipparcos Observations of the Extrasolar Planets and the Brown-Dwarf Candidates
Comments: 23 pages, 4 figures, to be published in ApJ, added references
Submitted: 2001-07-06, last modified: 2001-07-20
We analyzed the Hipparcos astrometric observations of 47 stars that were discovered to harbor giant planets and 14 stars with brown-dwarf secondary candidates. The Hipparcos measurements were used together with the corresponding stellar radial-velocity data to derive an astrometric orbit for each system. To find out the significance of the derived astrometric orbits we applied a "permutation" technique by which we analyzed the permuted Hipparcos data to get false orbits. The size distribution of these false orbits indicated the range of possibly random, false orbits that could be derived from the true data. These tests could not find any astrometric orbit of the planet candidates with significance higher than 99%, suggesting that most if not all orbits are not real. Instead, we used the Hipparcos data to set upper limits on the masses of the planet candidates. The lowest derived upper limit is that of 47UMa - 0.014 solar mass, which confirms the planetary nature of its unseen companion. For 13 other planet candidates the upper limits exclude the stellar nature of their companions, although brown-dwarf secondaries are still an option. These negate the idea that all or most of the extrasolar planets are disguised stellar secondaries. Of the 14 brown-dwarf candidates, our analysis reproduced the results of Halbwachs et al., who derived significant astrometric orbits for 6 systems which imply secondaries with stellar masses. We show that another star, HD164427, which was discovered only very recently, also has a secondary with stellar mass. Our findings support Halbwachs et al. conclusion about the possible existence of the "brown-dwarf desert" which separates the planets and the stellar secondaries.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0106256  [pdf] - 43052
HD 80606 b, a planet on an extremely elongated orbit
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure included, submitted to A&A, final version
Submitted: 2001-06-14, last modified: 2001-06-28
We report the detection of a planetary companion orbiting the solar-type star HD 80606, the brighter component of a wide binary with a projected separation of about 2000 AU. Using high-signal spectroscopic observations of the two components of the visual binary, we show that they are nearly identical. The planet has an orbital period of 111.8 days and a minimum mass of 3.9 M_Jup. With e=0.927, this planet has the highest orbital eccentricity among the extrasolar planets detected so far. We finally list several processes this extreme eccentricity could result from.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0106042  [pdf] - 42838
Derivation of the Mass Distribution of Extrasolar Planets with MAXLIMA - a Maximum Likelihood Algorithm
Comments: 19 pages, 3 figures, submitted to The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2001-06-04
We construct a maximum-likelihood algorithm - MAXLIMA, to derive the mass distribution of the extrasolar planets when only the minimum masses are observed. The algorithm derives the distribution by solving a numerically stable set of equations, and does not need any iteration or smoothing. Based on 50 minimum masses, MAXLIMA yields a distribution which is approximately flat in log M, and might rise slightly towards lower masses. The frequency drops off very sharply when going to masses higher than 10 Jupiter masses, although we suspect there is still a higher mass tail that extends up to probably 20 Jupiter masses. We estimate that 5% of the G stars in the solar neighborhood have planets in the range of 1-10 Jupiter masses with periods shorter than 1500 days. For comparison we present the mass distribution of stellar companions in the range of 100--1000 Jupiter masses, which is also approximately flat in log M. The two populations are separated by the "brown-dwarf desert", a fact that strongly supports the idea that these are two distinct populations. Accepting this definite separation, we point out the conundrum concerning the similarities between the period, eccentricity and even mass distribution of the two populations.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0104098  [pdf] - 41837
On the Statistical Significance of the Hipparcos Astrometric Orbit of rho Coronae Borealis
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2001-04-04
Recently Gatewood, Han & Black presented an analysis of the Hipparcos stellar positions and their own ground-based measurements of rho CrB, suggesting an astrometric orbit of 1.5 mas with an extremely small orbital inclination of 0.5 degrees. This indicates that the planet-candidate secondary might be a late M star. We used the Hipparcos data of rho CrB together with the individual radial velocities of Noyes et al. to independently study the stellar orbit and to assess its statistical significance. Our analysis yielded the same astrometric orbit. However, a permutation test we performed on the Hipparcos measurements indicated that the statistical significance of the astrometric orbit is only 2-sigma. Therefore, we can expect about one out of 40 systems with a similar data set to show a false astrometric orbit.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0102451  [pdf] - 41162
Studies of multiple stellar systems - IV. The triple-lined spectroscopic system Gliese 644
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures, Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2001-02-26
We present a radial-velocity study of the triple-lined system Gliese 644 and derive spectroscopic elements for the inner and outer orbits with periods of 2.9655 and 627 days. We also utilize old visual data, as well as modern speckle and adaptive optics observations, to derive a new astrometric solution for the outer orbit. These two orbits together allow us to derive masses for each of the three components in the system: M_A = 0.410 +/- 0.028 (6.9%), M_Ba = 0.336 +/- 0.016 (4.7%), and $M_Bb = 0.304 +/- 0.014 (4.7%) M_solar. We suggest that the relative inclination of the two orbits is very small. Our individual masses and spectroscopic light ratios for the three M stars in the Gliese 644 system provide three points for the mass-luminosity relation near the bottom of the Main Sequence, where the relation is poorly determined. These three points agree well with theoretical models for solar metallicity and an age of 5 Gyr. Our radial velocities for Gliese 643 and vB 8, two common-proper-motion companions of Gliese 644, support the interpretation that all five M stars are moving together in a physically bound group. We discuss possible scenarios for the formation and evolution of this configuration, such as the formation of all five stars in a sequence of fragmentation events leading directly to the hierarchical configuration now observed, versus formation in a small N cluster with subsequent dynamical evolution into the present hierarchical configuration.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0008087  [pdf] - 37403
Comparison Between Extrasolar Planets and Low-Mass Secondaries
Comments: 11 pages with 4 figures, To be published in the proceedings of IAU Symp. 200 "Birth and Evolution of Binary Stars"
Submitted: 2000-08-04
This paper compares the statistical features of the sample of discovered extrasolar planets with those of the secondaries in nearby spectroscopic binaries, in order to enable us to distinguish between the two populations. Based on 32 planet candidates discovered until March 2000, we find that their eccentricity and period distribution are surprisingly similar to those of the binary population, while their mass distribution is remarkably different. The mass distributions definitely support the idea of two distinct populations, suggesting the planet candidates are indeed extrasolar planets. The transition between the two populations probably occurs at 10--30 Jupiter masses. We point out a possible negative correlation between the orbital period of the planets and the metallicity of their parent stars, which holds only for periods less than about 100 days. These short-period systems are characterized by circular or almost circular orbits.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0001282  [pdf] - 34079
Analysis of The Hipparcos Measurements of HD10697 - A Mass Determination of a Brown-Dwarf Secondary
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures, LaTex, aastex, accepted for publication by ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2000-01-16
HD10697 is a nearby main-sequence star around which a planet candidate has recently been discovered by means of radial-velocity measurements (Vogt et al. 1999, submitted to ApJ). The stellar orbit has a period of about three years, the secondary minimum mass is 6.35 Jupiter masses and the minimum semi-major axis is 0.36 milli-arc-sec (mas). Using the Hipparcos data of HD10697 together with the spectroscopic elements of Vogt et al. (1999) we found a semi-major axis of 2.1 +/- 0.7 mas, implying a mass of 38 +/- 13 Jupiter masses for the unseen companion. We therefore suggest that the secondary of HD10697 is probably a brown dwarf, orbiting around its parent star at a distance of 2 AU.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0001284  [pdf] - 34081
The Spectroscopic Orbit of the Planetary Companion Transiting HD209458
Comments: 11 pages, 1 figure, 2 tables, LaTex, aastex, accepted for publication by ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2000-01-16
We report a spectroscopic orbit with period P = 3.52433 +/- 0.00027 days for the planetary companion that transits the solar-type star HD209458. For the metallicity, mass, and radius of the star we derive [Fe/H] = 0.00 +/- 0.02, M = 1.1 +/- 0.1 solar masses, and R = 1.3 +/- 0.1 solar radii. This is based on a new analysis of the iron lines in our HIRES template spectrum, and also on the absolute magnitude and color of the star, and uses isochrones from four different sets of stellar evolution models. Using these values for the stellar parameters we reanalyze the transit data and derive an orbital inclination of i = 85.2 +/- 1.4 degrees. For the planet we derive a mass of Mp = 0.69 +/- 0.05 Jupiter masses, a radius of Rp = 1.54 +/- 0.18 Jupiter radii, and a density of 0.23 +/- 0.08 grams per cubic cm.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9907175  [pdf] - 107400
Analysis of The Hipparcos Measurements of Upsilon Andromedae - A Mass Estimate of Its Outermost Known Planetary Companion
Comments: 9 pages, 2 figures, LaTex, aastex, accepted for publication by ApJ Letters
Submitted: 1999-07-13
We present an analysis of Hipparcos astrometric measurements of Upsilon Andromedae, a nearby main-sequence star around which three planet candidates have recently been discovered by means of radial-velocity measurements. The stellar orbit associated with the outermost candidate has a period of 1269 +/- 9 days and a minimum semi-major axis of 0.6 milli-arc-sec (mas). Using the Hipparcos data together with the spectroscopic elements we found a semi-major axis of 1.4 +/- 0.6 mas. This implies a mass of 10.1 (+4.7, -4.6) Jupiter masses for that planet of Upsilon Andromedae.