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Zhang, Dong

Normalized to: Zhang, D.

42 article(s) in total. 282 co-authors, from 1 to 16 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 1,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.01775  [pdf] - 1929954
Dusty Cloud Acceleration with Multiband Radiation
Comments: 17 Pages, 14 Figures, Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2019-08-05
We perform two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations of cold, dense clouds, which are accelerated by radiation pressure on dust relative to a hot, diffuse background gas. We examine the relative effectiveness of acceleration by ultraviolet and infrared radiation fields, both independently and acting simultaneously on the same cloud. We study clouds that are optically thin to infrared emission but with varying ultraviolet optical depths. Consistent with previous work, we find relatively efficient acceleration and long cloud survival times when the infrared band flux dominates over the ultraviolet flux. However, when ultraviolet is dominant or even a modest percentage ($\sim 5-10$\%) of the infrared irradiating flux, it can act to compress the cloud, first crushing it and then disrupting the outer layers as the core of the cloud rebounds due to gas pressure. This drives mixing of outer regions of the dusty gas with the hot diffuse background to the point where most dust is not likely to survive or stay coupled to the gas. Hence, the cold cloud is unable to survive for a long enough timescale to experience significant acceleration before disruption even though efficient infrared cooling keeps the majority of the gas close to radiative equilibrium temperature ($T \lesssim 100$K). We discuss implications for observed systems, concluding that radiation pressure driving is most effective when the light from star-forming regions is efficiently reprocessed into the infrared.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.02173  [pdf] - 1910775
The on-orbit calibration of DArk Matter Particle Explorer
Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bernardini, P.; Cai, M. S.; Caragiulo, M.; Chang, J.; Chen, D. Y.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, W.; Cui, M. Y.; Cui, T. S.; Dai, H. T.; D'Amone, A.; De Benedittis, A.; De Mitri, I.; Ding, M.; Di Santo, M.; Dong, J. N.; Dong, T. K.; Dong, Y. F.; Dong, Z. X.; Droz, D.; Duan, K. K.; Duan, J. L.; D'Urso, D.; Fan, R. R.; Fan, Y. Z.; Fang, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Feng, L.; Fusco, P.; Gallo, V.; Gan, F. J.; Gao, M.; Gao, S. S.; Gargano, F.; Garrappa, S.; Gong, K.; Gong, Y. Z.; Guo, J. H.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, Y. Y.; Ionica, M.; Jiang, D.; Jiang, W.; Jin, X.; Kong, J.; Lei, S. J.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, W. L.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. M.; Liao, N. H.; Liu, C. M.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, Y.; Loparco, F.; Ma, M.; Ma, P. X.; Ma, S. Y.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Q.; Ma, X. Y.; Marsella, G.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mo, D.; Niu, X. Y.; Pan, X.; Peng, X. Y.; Peng, W. X.; Qiao, R.; Rao, J. N.; Salinas, M. M.; Shang, G. Z.; Shen, W. H.; Shen, Z. Q.; Shen, Z. T.; Song, J. X.; Su, H.; Su, M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Surdo, A.; Teng, X. J.; Tian, X. B.; Tykhonov, A.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, L. G.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S.; Wang, X. H.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. P.; Wang, Y. Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wen, S. C.; Wei, D. M.; Wei, J. J.; Wei, Y. F.; Wu, D.; Wu, J.; Wu, L. B.; Wu, S. S.; Wu, X.; Xi, K.; Xia, Z. Q.; Xin, Y. L.; Xu, H. T.; Xu, Z. H.; Xu, Z. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, G. F.; Yang, H. B.; Yang, P.; Yang, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. L.; Yao, H. J.; Yu, Y. H.; Yuan, Q.; Yue, C.; Zang, J. J.; Zhang, D. L.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P. F.; Zhang, S. X.; Zhang, W. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Y. L.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Zhao, X. F.; Zhou, C. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Zimmer, S.
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-07-03
The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), a satellite-based cosmic ray and gamma-ray detector, was launched on December 17, 2015, and began its on-orbit operation on December 24, 2015. In this work we document the on-orbit calibration procedures used by DAMPE and report the calibration results of the Plastic Scintillator strip Detector (PSD), the Silicon-Tungsten tracKer-converter (STK), the BGO imaging calorimeter (BGO), and the Neutron Detector (NUD). The results are obtained using Galactic cosmic rays, bright known GeV gamma-ray sources, and charge injection into the front-end electronics of each sub-detector. The determination of the boundary of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), the measurement of the live time, and the alignments of the detectors are also introduced. The calibration results demonstrate the stability of the detectors in almost two years of the on-orbit operation.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.04296  [pdf] - 1885615
The effect of Large Magellanic Cloud on the satellite galaxy population in Milky Way analogous Galaxies
Comments: 9 pages, 10 figures, published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-04-08, last modified: 2019-05-19
Observational work have shown that the two brightest satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (MW), the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), are rare amongst MW analogues. It is then interesting to know whether the presence of massive satellite has any effect on the whole satellite population in MW analogues. In this article, we investigate this problem using a semi-analytical model combined with the Millennium-II Simulation. MW-analogous galaxies are defined to have similar stellar mass or dark matter halo mass to the MW. We find that, in the first case, the halo mass is larger and there are, on average, twice as many satellites in Milky Way analogs if there is a massive satellite galaxy in the system. This is mainly from the halo formation bias. The difference is smaller if MW analogues are selected using halo mass. We also find that the satellites distribution is slightly asymmetric, being more concentrated on the line connecting the central galaxy and the massive satellite and that, on average, LMC have brought in 14.7 satellite galaxies with $M_{r}<0$ at its accretion, among which 4.5 satellites are still within a distance of 50kpc from the LMC. Considering other satellites, we predict that thereare 7.8 satellites with 50kpc of the LMC. By comparing our model with the early data of Satellites Around Galactic Analogs (SAGA), a survey to observe satellite galaxies around 100 Milky Way analogues, we find that SAGA has more bright satellites and less faint satellites than our model predictions. A future comparison with the final SAGA data is needed.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.00558  [pdf] - 1777956
A Review of the Theory of Galactic Winds Driven by Stellar Feedback
Comments: 47 pages, 7 figures. Accepted for publication in the special issue of Galaxies
Submitted: 2018-11-01
Galactic winds from star-forming galaxies are crucial to the process of galaxy formation and evolution, regulating star formation, shaping the stellar mass function and the mass-metallicity relation, and enriching the intergalactic medium with metals. Galactic winds associated with stellar feedback may be driven by overlapping supernova explosions, radiation pressure of starlight on dust grains, and cosmic rays. Galactic winds are multiphase, the growing observations of emission and absorption of cold molecular, cool atomic, ionized warm and hot outflowing gas in a large number of galaxies have not been completely understood. In this review article, I summarize the possible mechanisms associated with stars to launch galactic winds, and review the multidimensional hydrodynamic, radiation hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of winds based on various algorithms. I also briefly discuss the theoretical challenges and possible future research directions.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06603  [pdf] - 1767521
Numerical simulations of supernova remnants in turbulent molecular clouds
Comments: 18 pages, 11 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publication in MNRAS, minor revision made
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2018-10-10
Core-collapse supernova (SN) explosions may occur in the highly inhomogeneous molecular clouds (MCs) in which their progenitors were born. We perform a series of 3-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to model the interaction between an individual supernova remnant (SNR) and a turbulent MC medium, in order to investigate possible observational evidence for the turbulent structure of MCs. We find that the properties of SNRs are mainly controlled by the mean density of the surrounding medium, while a SNR in a more turbulent medium with higher supersonic turbulent Mach number shows lower interior temperature, lower radial momentum, and dimmer X-ray emission compared to one in a less turbulent medium with the same mean density. We compare our simulations to observed SNRs, in particular, to W44, W28 and IC 443. We estimate that the mean density of the ambient medium is $\sim 10\,$cm$^{-3}$ for W44 and W28. The MC in front of IC 443 has a density of $\sim 100\,$cm$^{-3}$. We also predict that the ambient MC of W44 is more turbulent than that of W28 and IC 443. The ambient medium of W44 and W28 has significantly lower average density than that of the host giant MC. This result may be related to the stellar feedback from the SNRs' progenitors. Alternatively, SNe may occur close to the interface between molecular gas and lower density atomic gas. The region of shocked MC is then relatively small and the breakout into the low density atomic gas comprises most of the SNR volume.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.02946  [pdf] - 1641263
Dusty Cloud Acceleration by Radiation Pressure in Rapidly Star-Forming Galaxies
Comments: 22 pages, 21 figures, 2 table, Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2017-08-09, last modified: 2018-01-16
We perform two-dimensional and three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations to study cold clouds accelerated by radiation pressure on dust in the environment of rapidly star-forming galaxies dominated by infrared flux. We utilize the reduced speed of light approximation to solve the frequency-averaged, time-dependent radiative transfer equation. We find that radiation pressure is capable of accelerating the clouds to hundreds of kilometers per second while remaining dense and cold, consistent with observations. We compare these results to simulations where acceleration is provided by entrainment in a hot wind, where the momentum injection of the hot flow is comparable to the momentum in the radiation field. We find that the survival time of the cloud accelerated by the radiation field is significantly longer than that of a cloud entrained in a hot outflow. We show that the dynamics of the irradiated cloud depends on the initial optical depth, temperature of the cloud, and the intensity of the flux. Additionally, gas pressure from the background may limit cloud acceleration if the density ratio between the cloud and background is $\lesssim 10^{2}$. In general, a 10 pc-scale optically thin cloud forms a pancake structure elongated perpendicular to the direction of motion, while optically thick clouds form a filamentary structure elongated parallel to the direction of motion. The details of accelerated cloud morphology and geometry can also be affected by other factors, such as the cloud lengthscale, the reduced speed of light approximation, spatial resolution, initial cloud structure, and the dimensionality of the run, but these have relatively little affect on the cloud velocity or survival time.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.10981  [pdf] - 1600918
Direct detection of a break in the teraelectronvolt cosmic-ray spectrum of electrons and positrons
Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bernardini, P.; Bertucci, B.; Cai, M. S.; Chang, J.; Chen, D. Y.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, W.; Cui, M. Y.; Cui, T. S.; D'Amone, A.; De Benedittis, A.; De Mitri, I.; Di Santo, M.; Dong, J. N.; Dong, T. K.; Dong, Y. F.; Dong, Z. X.; Donvito, G.; Droz, D.; Duan, K. K.; Duan, J. L.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Fan, R. R.; Fan, Y. Z.; Fang, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Feng, L.; Fusco, P.; Gallo, V.; Gan, F. J.; Gao, M.; Gao, S. S.; Gargano, F.; Garrappa, S.; Gong, K.; Gong, Y. Z.; Guo, D. Y.; Guo, J. H.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, Y. Y.; Ionica, M.; Jiang, D.; Jiang, W.; Jin, X.; Kong, J.; Lei, S. J.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, W. L.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. M.; Liao, N. H.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, Y.; Loparco, F.; Ma, M.; Ma, P. X.; Ma, S. Y.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Q.; Ma, X. Y.; Marsella, G.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mo, D.; Niu, X. Y.; Peng, X. Y.; Peng, W. X.; Qiao, R.; Rao, J. N.; Salinas, M. M.; Shang, G. Z.; Shen, W. H.; Shen, Z. Q.; Shen, Z. T.; Song, J. X.; Su, H.; Su, M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Surdo, A.; Teng, X. J.; Tian, X. B.; Tykhonov, A.; Vagelli, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, L. G.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S.; Wang, X. H.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. P.; Wang, Y. Z.; Wen, S. C.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, D. M.; Wei, J. J.; Wei, Y. F.; Wu, D.; Wu, J.; Wu, L. B.; Wu, S. S.; Wu, X.; Xi, K.; Xia, Z. Q.; Xin, Y. L.; Xu, H. T.; Xu, Z. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, G. F.; Yang, H. B.; Yang, P.; Yang, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. L.; Yao, H. J.; Yu, Y. H.; Yuan, Q.; Yue, C.; Zang, J. J.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, D. L.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P. F.; Zhang, S. X.; Zhang, W. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Y. L.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Zhao, X. F.; Zhou, C. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Zimmer, S.
Comments: 18 pages, 6 figures, Nature in press, doi:10.1038/nature24475
Submitted: 2017-11-29
High energy cosmic ray electrons plus positrons (CREs), which lose energy quickly during their propagation, provide an ideal probe of Galactic high-energy processes and may enable the observation of phenomena such as dark-matter particle annihilation or decay. The CRE spectrum has been directly measured up to $\sim 2$ TeV in previous balloon- or space-borne experiments, and indirectly up to $\sim 5$ TeV by ground-based Cherenkov $\gamma$-ray telescope arrays. Evidence for a spectral break in the TeV energy range has been provided by indirect measurements of H.E.S.S., although the results were qualified by sizeable systematic uncertainties. Here we report a direct measurement of CREs in the energy range $25~{\rm GeV}-4.6~{\rm TeV}$ by the DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) with unprecedentedly high energy resolution and low background. The majority of the spectrum can be properly fitted by a smoothly broken power-law model rather than a single power-law model. The direct detection of a spectral break at $E \sim0.9$ TeV confirms the evidence found by H.E.S.S., clarifies the behavior of the CRE spectrum at energies above 1 TeV and sheds light on the physical origin of the sub-TeV CREs.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.05825  [pdf] - 1598121
Exploring the dark matter inelastic frontier with 79.6 days of PandaX-II data
Comments: 5 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2017-08-19, last modified: 2017-10-03
We report here the results of searching for inelastic scattering of dark matter (initial and final state dark matter particles differ by a small mass splitting) with nucleon with the first 79.6-day of PandaX-II data (Run 9). We set the upper limits for the spin independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section up to a mass splitting of 300 keV/c$^2$ at two benchmark dark matter masses of 1 and 10 TeV/c$^2$.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.00945  [pdf] - 1589178
Study on 2015 June 22 Forbush decrease with the muon telescope in Antarctic
Comments: 10 pages,6 figures
Submitted: 2017-10-02
By the end of 2014, a cosmic ray muon telescope was installed at Zhongshan Station in Antarctic and has been continuously collecting data since then. It is the first surface muon telescope to be built in Antarctic. In June 2015, five CMEs were ejected towards the Earth initiating a big large Forbush decrease (FD) event. We conduct a comprehensive study of the galactic cosmic ray intensity fluctuations during the FD using the data from cosmic ray detectors of multiple stations (Zhongshan, McMurdo, South Polar and Nagoya) and he solar wind measurements from ACE and WIND. A pre-increase before the shock arrival was observed. Distinct differences exist in the timelines of the galactic cosmic ray recorded by the neutron monitors and the muon telescopes. FD onset for Zhongshan muon telescope is delayed (2.5h) with respect to SSC onset. This FD had a profile of four-step decrease. The traditional one- or two-step classification of FDs was inadequate to explain this FD.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.06917  [pdf] - 1587379
Dark Matter Results From 54-Ton-Day Exposure of PandaX-II Experiment
Comments: Supplementary materials at https://pandax.sjtu.edu.cn/articles/2nd/supplemental.pdf version 2 as accepted by PRL
Submitted: 2017-08-23, last modified: 2017-09-21
We report a new search of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) using the combined low background data sets in 2016 and 2017 from the PandaX-II experiment in China. The latest data set contains a new exposure of 77.1 live day, with the background reduced to a level of 0.8$\times10^{-3}$ evt/kg/day, improved by a factor of 2.5 in comparison to the previous run in 2016. No excess events were found above the expected background. With a total exposure of 5.4$\times10^4$ kg day, the most stringent upper limit on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section was set for a WIMP with mass larger than 100 GeV/c$^2$, with the lowest exclusion at 8.6$\times10^{-47}$ cm$^2$ at 40 GeV/c$^2$.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.08453  [pdf] - 1585147
The DArk Matter Particle Explorer mission
Chang, J.; Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bernardini, P.; Bertucci, B.; Cai, M. S.; Caragiulo, M.; Chen, D. Y.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, W.; Cui, M. Y.; Cui, T. S.; D'Amone, A.; De Benedittis, A.; De Mitri, I.; Di Santo, M.; Dong, J. N.; Dong, T. K.; Dong, Y. F.; Dong, Z. X.; Donvito, G.; Droz, D.; Duan, K. K.; Duan, J. L.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Fan, R. R.; Fan, Y. Z.; Fang, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Feng, L.; Fusco, P.; Gallo, V.; Gan, F. J.; Gan, W. Q.; Gao, M.; Gao, S. S.; Gargano, F.; Gong, K.; Gong, Y. Z.; Guo, J. H.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, Y. Y.; Ionica, M.; Jiang, D.; Jiang, W.; Jin, X.; Kong, J.; Lei, S. J.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, W. L.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. M.; Liao, N. H.; Liu, Q. Z.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, Q. Z.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, Y.; Loparco, F.; Lü, J.; Ma, M.; Ma, P. X.; Ma, S. Y.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Q.; Ma, X. Y.; Marsella, G.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mo, D.; Miao, T. T.; Niu, X. Y.; Pohl, M.; Peng, X. Y.; Peng, W. X.; Qiao, R.; Rao, J. N.; Salinas, M. M.; Shang, G. Z.; Shen, W. H.; Shen, Z. Q.; Shen, Z. T.; Song, J. X.; Su, H.; Su, M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Surdo, A.; Teng, X. J.; Tian, X. B.; Tykhonov, A.; Vagelli, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, Chi; Wang, H.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, L. G.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S.; Wang, X. H.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. P.; Wang, Y. Z.; Wen, S. C.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, D. M.; Wei, J. J.; Wei, Y. F.; Wu, D.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. S.; Wu, X.; Xi, K.; Xia, Z. Q.; Xin, Y. L.; Xu, H. T.; Xu, Z. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, G. F.; Yang, H. B.; Yang, J.; Yang, P.; Yang, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. L.; Yao, H. J.; Yu, Y. H.; Yuan, Q.; Yue, C.; Zang, J. J.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, D. L.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P. F.; Zhang, S. X.; Zhang, W. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Y. L.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Zhao, X. F.; Zhou, C. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Zimmer, S.
Comments: 45 pages, including 29 figures and 6 tables. Published in Astropart. Phys
Submitted: 2017-06-26, last modified: 2017-09-14
The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), one of the four scientific space science missions within the framework of the Strategic Pioneer Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is a general purpose high energy cosmic-ray and gamma-ray observatory, which was successfully launched on December 17th, 2015 from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. The DAMPE scientific objectives include the study of galactic cosmic rays up to $\sim 10$ TeV and hundreds of TeV for electrons/gammas and nuclei respectively, and the search for dark matter signatures in their spectra. In this paper we illustrate the layout of the DAMPE instrument, and discuss the results of beam tests and calibrations performed on ground. Finally we present the expected performance in space and give an overview of the mission key scientific goals.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.01951  [pdf] - 1579662
Entrainment in Trouble: Cool Cloud Acceleration and Destruction in Hot Supernova-Driven Galactic Winds
Comments: 15 pages, 6 figures, 2 table, Accepted for publication in MNRAS, minor revision made
Submitted: 2015-07-07, last modified: 2017-03-30
Efficient thermalization of overlapping supernovae within star-forming galaxies may produce a supernova-heated fluid that drives galactic winds. For fiducial assumptions about the timescale for cloud shredding from high-resolution simulations (which neglect magnetic fields) we show that cool clouds with temperature from $T_{c}\sim 10^{2}-10^{4}$ K seen in emission and absorption in galactic winds cannot be accelerated to observed velocities by the ram pressure of a hot wind. Taking into account both the radial structure of the hot flow and gravity, we show that this conclusion holds over a wide range of galaxy, cloud, and hot wind properties. This finding calls into question the prevailing picture whereby the cool atomic gas seen in galactic winds is entrained and accelerated by the hot flow. Given these difficulties with ram pressure acceleration, we discuss alternative models for the origin of high velocity cool gas outflows. Another possibility is that magnetic fields in cool clouds are sufficiently important that they prolong the cloud's life. For $T_{c}=10^{3}$\,K and $10^{4}$\,K clouds, we show that if conductive evaporation can be neglected, the cloud shredding timescale must be $\sim15$ and 5 times longer, respectively, than the values from hydrodynamical simulations in order for cool cloud velocities to reach those seen in observations.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.00022  [pdf] - 1563973
Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations of Dust-Driven Winds
Comments: 12 pages, 10 figures, 1 table, Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-11-30, last modified: 2017-03-23
We study dusty winds driven by radiation pressure in the atmosphere of a rapidly star-forming environment. We apply the variable Eddington tensor algorithm to re-examine the two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic problem of a column of gas that is accelerated by a constant infrared radiation flux. In the absence of gravity, the system is primarily characterized by the initial optical depth of the gas. We perform several runs with different initial optical depth and resolution. We find that the gas spreads out along the vertical direction, as its mean velocity and velocity dispersion increase. In contrast to previous work using flux-limited diffusion algorithm, we find little evolution in the trapping factor. The momentum coupling between radiation and gas in the absence of gravity is similar to that with gravity. For Eddington ratio increasing with the height in the system, the momentum transfer from the radiation to the gas is not merely $\sim L/c$, but amplified by a factor of $1+\eta \tau_{\rm IR}$, where $\tau_{\rm IR}$ is the integrated infrared optical depth through the system, and $\eta\sim0.5-0.9$, decreasing with the optical depth. We apply our results to the atmosphere of galaxies and conclude that radiation pressure may be an important mechanism for driving winds in the most rapidly star-forming galaxies and starbursts.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.05300  [pdf] - 1534745
Objective Image Quality Assessment for High Resolution Photospheric Images by Median Filter Gradient Similarity
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-01-18
All next generation ground-based and space-based solar telescopes require a good quality assessment metric in order to evaluate their imaging performance. In this paper, a new image quality metric, the median filter gradient similarity (MFGS) is proposed for photospheric images. MFGS is a no-reference/blind objective image quality metric (IQM) by a measurement result between 0 and 1 and has been performed on short-exposure photospheric images captured by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) of the Fuxian Solar Observatory and by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode satellite, respectively. The results show that: (1)the measured value of MFGS changes monotonically from 1 to 0 with degradation of image quality; (2)there exists a linear correlation between the measured values of MFGS and root-mean-square-contrast (RMS-contrast) of granulation; (3)MFGS is less affected by the image contents than the granular RMS-contrast. Overall, MFGS is a good alternative for the quality assessment of photospheric images.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.01610  [pdf] - 1434245
Equation of state and hybrid star properties with the weakly interacting light U-boson in relativistic models
Comments: 18 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2016-06-14
It has been a puzzle whether quarks may exist in the interior of massive neutron stars, since the hadron-quark phase transition softens the equation of state (EOS) and reduce the neutron star (NS) maximum mass very significantly. In this work, we consider the light U-boson that increases the NS maximum mass appreciably through its weak coupling to fermions. The inclusion of the U-boson may thus allow the existence of the quark degrees of freedom in the interior of large mass neutron stars. Unlike the consequence of the U-boson in hadronic matter, the stiffening role of the U-boson in the hybrid EOS is not sensitive to the choice of the hadron phase models. In addition, we have also investigated the effect of the effective QCD correction on the hybrid EOS. This correction may reduce the coupling strength of the U-boson that is needed to satisfy NS maximum mass constraint. While the inclusion of the U-boson also increases the NS radius significantly, we find that appropriate in-medium effects of the U-boson may reduce the NS radii significantly, satisfying both the NS radius and mass constraints well.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.00661  [pdf] - 1411555
The most-luminous heavily-obscured quasars have a high merger fraction: morphological study of WISE-selected hot dust-obscured galaxies
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2016-05-02
Previous studies have shown that WISE-selected hyperluminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are powered by highly dust-obscured, possibly Compton-thick AGNs. High obscuration provides us a good chance to study the host morphology of the most luminous AGNs directly. We analyze the host morphology of 18 Hot DOGs at $z\sim3$ using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging. We find that Hot DOGs have a high merger fraction ($62\pm 14 \%$). By fitting the surface brightness profiles, we find that the distribution of S\'ersic indices in our Hot DOG sample peaks around 2, which suggests that most of Hot DOGs have transforming morphologies. We also derive the AGN bolometric luminosity ($\sim10^{14}L_\odot$) of our Hot DOG sample by using IR SEDs decomposition. The derived merger fraction and AGN bolometric luminosity relation is well consistent with the variability-based model prediction (Hickox et al. 2014). Both the high merger fraction in IR-luminous AGN sample and relatively low merger fraction in UV/optical-selected, unobscured AGN sample can be expected in the merger-driven evolutionary model. Finally, we conclude that Hot DOGs are merger-driven and may represent a transit phase during the evolution of massive galaxies, transforming from the dusty starburst dominated phase to the unobscured QSO phase.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.04362  [pdf] - 1327434
An Origin for Multi-Phase Gas in Galactic Winds and Halos
Comments: 15 pages, 5 figures. Accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-07-15, last modified: 2015-12-08
The physical origin of high velocity cool gas seen in galactic winds remains unknown. Following Wang (1995), we argue that radiative cooling in initially hot thermally-driven outflows can produce fast neutral atomic and photoionized cool gas. The inevitability of adiabatic cooling from the flow's initial 10^7-10^8K temperature and the shape of the cooling function for T<10^7K imply that outflows with hot gas mass-loss rate relative to star formation rate of beta=Mdot_hot/Mdot_star > 0.5 cool radiatively on scales ranging from the size of the energy injection region to tens of kpc. We highlight the beta and star formation rate surface density dependence of the column density, emission measure, radiative efficiency, and velocity. At r_cool, the gas produces X-ray and then UV/optical line emission with a total power bounded by 10^{-2} L_star if the flow is powered by steady-state star formation with luminosity L_star. The wind is thermally unstable at r_cool, potentially leading to a multi-phase medium. Cooled winds decelerate significantly in the extended gravitational potential of galaxies. The cool gas precipitated from hot outflows may explain its prevalence in galactic halos. We forward a picture of winds whereby cool clouds are initially accelerated by the ram pressure of the hot flow, but are rapidly shredded by hydrodynamical instabilities, thereby increasing beta, seeding radiative and thermal instability, and cool gas rebirth. If the cooled wind shocks as it sweeps up the circumgalactic medium, its cooling time is short, thus depositing cool gas far out into the halo. Finally, conduction can dominate energy transport in low-beta hot winds, leading to flatter temperature profiles than otherwise expected, potentially consistent with X-ray observations of some starbursts.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.6209  [pdf] - 1215188
Radio-mode feedback in local AGNs: dependence on the central black hole parameters
Comments: accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Submitted: 2014-06-24
Radio mode feedback, in which most of the energy of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is released in a kinetic form via radio-emitting jets, is thought to play an important role in the maintenance of massive galaxies in the present-day Universe. We study the link between radio emission and the properties of the central black hole in a large sample of local radio galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), based on the catalogue of Best and Heckman (2012). Our sample is mainly dominated by massive black holes (mostly in the range $10^8-10^9 M_{\odot}$) accreting at very low Eddington ratios (typically $\lambda < 0.01$). In broad agreement with previously reported trends, we find that radio galaxies are preferentially associated with the more massive black holes, and that the radio loudness parameter seems to increase with decreasing Eddington ratio. We compare our results with previous studies in the literature, noting potential biases. The majority of the local radio galaxies in our sample are currently in a radiatively inefficient accretion regime, where kinetic feedback dominates over radiative feedback. We discuss possible physical interpretations of the observed trends in the context of a two-stage feedback process involving a transition in the underlying accretion modes.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.3886  [pdf] - 836468
Design of the Readout Electronics for the Qualification Model of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter
Comments: 8 pages
Submitted: 2014-06-15
The DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientific satellite being developed in China, aimed at cosmic ray study, gamma ray astronomy, and searching for the clue of dark matter particles, with a planned mission period of more than 3 years and an orbit altitude of about 500 km. The BGO Calorimeter, which consists of 308 BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxid) crystal bars, 616 PMTs (photomultiplier tubes) and 1848 dynode signals, has approximately 32 radiation lengths. It is a crucial sub-detector of the DAMPE payload, with the functions of precisely measuring the energy of cosmic particles from 5 GeV to 10TeV, distinguishing positrons/electrons and gamma rays from hadron background, and providing trigger information for the whole DAMPE payload. The dynamic range for a single BGO crystal is about 2?105 and there are 1848 detector signals in total. To build such an instrument in space, the major design challenges for the readout electronics come from the large dynamic range, the high integrity inside the very compact structure, the strict power supply budget and the long term reliability to survive the hush environment during launch and in orbit. Currently the DAMPE mission is in the end of QM (Qualification Model) stage. This paper presents a detailed description of the readout electronics for the BGO calorimeter.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.1099  [pdf] - 1179708
Hot Galactic Winds Constrained by the X-Ray Luminosities of Galaxies
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, improved version following the referee's comments. Accepted for publication in ApJ. For a brief video explaining the key points of this paper, see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-O4WP88nup8
Submitted: 2013-10-03, last modified: 2014-02-05
Galactic superwinds may be driven by very hot outflows generated by overlapping supernovae within the host galaxy. We use the Chevalier & Clegg (CC85) wind model and the observed correlation between X-ray luminosities of galaxies and their SFRs to constrain the mass loss rates (\dot{M}_hot) across a wide range of star formation rates (SFRs), from dwarf starbursts to ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. We show that for fixed thermalization efficiency and mass loading rate, the X-ray luminosity of the hot wind scales as L_X ~ SFR^2, significantly steeper than is observed for star-forming galaxies: L_X ~ SFR. Using this difference we constrain the mass-loading and thermalization efficiency of hot galactic winds. For reasonable values of the thermalization efficiency (<~ 1) and for SFR >~ 10 M_sun/yr we find that \dot{M}_hot/SFR <~ 1, significantly lower than required by integrated constraints on the efficiency of stellar feedback in galaxies, and potentially too low to explain observations of winds from rapidly star-forming galaxies. In addition, we highlight the fact that heavily mass-loaded winds cannot be described by the adiabatic CC85 model because they become strongly radiative.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.7354  [pdf] - 786403
Effects of fermionic dark matter on properties of neutron stars
Comments: to be published in Phys. Rev. C (2014)
Submitted: 2013-05-31, last modified: 2014-02-01
By assuming that only gravitation exists between dark matter (DM) and normal matter (NM), we study the effects of fermionic DM on the properties of neutron stars using the two-fluid Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff formalism. It is found that the mass-radius relationship of the DM admixed neutron stars (DANSs) depends sensitively on the mass of DM candidates, the amount of DM, and interactions among DM candidates. The existence of DM in DANSs results in a spread of mass-radius relationships that cannot be interpreted with a unique equilibrium sequence. In some cases, the DM distribution can surpass the NM distribution to form DM halo. In particular, it is favorable to form an explicit DM halo, provided the repulsion of DM exists. It is interesting to find that the difference in particle number density distributions in DANSs and consequently in star radii caused by various density dependencies of nuclear symmetry energy tends to disappear as long as the repulsion of accumulated DM is sufficient. These phenomena indicate that the admixture of DM in neutron stars can significantly affect the astrophysical extraction of nuclear equation of state by virtue of neutron star measurements. In addition, the effect of the DM admixture on the star maximum mass is also investigated.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.5884  [pdf] - 750737
Reconstruction of new holographic scalar field models of dark energy in Brans-Dicke Universe
Comments: 12 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2013-11-21
Motivated by the work [K. Karami, J. Fehri, {{\it Phys. Lett. B}} {\bf 684}, 61 (2010)] and [A. Sheykhi, {{\it Phys. Lett. B}} {\bf 681}, 205 (2009)], we generalize their work to the new holographic dark energy model with $\rho_D=\frac{3\phi^2}{4\omega}(\mu H^2+\nu\dot{H})$ in the framework of Brans-Dicke cosmology. Concretely, we study the correspondence between the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence, dilaton scalar field and Chaplygin gas model with the new holographic dark energy model in the non-flat Brans-Dicke universe. Furthermore, we reconstruct the potentials and dynamics for these models. By analysis we can show that for new holographic quintessence and Chaplygin gas models, if the related parameters to the potentials satisfy some constraints, the accelerated expansion can be achieved in Brans-Dicke cosmology. Especially the counterparts of fields and potentials in general relativity can describe accelerated expansion of the universe. It is worth stressing that not only can we give some new results in the framework of Brans-Dicke cosmology, but also the previous results of the new holographic dark energy in Einstein gravity can be included as special cases given by us.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.4691  [pdf] - 1032734
Radiation Pressure Driven Galactic Winds from Self-Gravitating Discs
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-05-25, last modified: 2012-05-14
(Abridged) We study large-scale winds driven from uniformly bright self-gravitating discs radiating near the Eddington limit. We show that the ratio of the radiation pressure force to the gravitational force increases with height above the disc surface to a maximum of twice the value of the ratio at the disc surface. Thus, uniformly bright self-gravitating discs radiating at the Eddington limit are fundamentally unstable to driving large-scale winds. These results contrast with the spherically symmetric case, where super-Eddington luminosities are required for wind formation. We apply this theory to galactic winds from rapidly star-forming galaxies that approach the Eddington limit for dust. For hydrodynamically coupled gas and dust, we find that the asymptotic velocity of the wind is v_\infty ~ 1.5 v_rot and that v_\infty SFR^{0.36}, where v_rot is the disc rotation velocity and SFR is the star formation rate, both of which are in agreement with observations. However, these results of the model neglect the gravitational potential of the surrounding dark matter halo and an old passive stellar bulge or extended disc, which act to decrease v_\infty. A more realistic treatment shows that the flow can either be unbound, or bound, forming a "fountain flow" with a typical turning timescale of t_turn ~ 0.1-1 Gyr. We provide quantitative criteria and scaling relations for assessing whether or not a rapidly star-forming galaxy of given properties can drive unbound flows via the mechanism described in this paper. Importantly, we note that because t_turn is longer than the star formation timescale in the rapidly star-forming galaxies and ULIRGs for which our theory is most applicable, if rapidly star-forming galaxies are selected as such, they may be observed to have strong outflows, even though their winds are eventually bound on large scales.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.0016  [pdf] - 497886
The Very Massive and Hot LMC Star VFTS 682: Progenitor of a Future Dark Gamma-Ray Burst?
Comments: 12 pages, 2 figures, several small changes. To be published in Acta Astronomica. For a brief video explaining the key results of this paper, see http://www.youtube.com/user/OSUAstronomy
Submitted: 2011-11-30, last modified: 2012-04-10
VFTS 682, a very massive and very hot Wolf-Rayet (WR) star recently discovered in the Large Magellanic Cloud near the famous star cluster R136, might be providing us with a glimpse of a missing link in our understanding of Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs), including dark GRBs. It is likely its properties result from chemically homogeneous evolution (CHE), believed to be a key process for a massive star to become a GRB. It is also heavily obscured by dust extinction, which could make it a dark GRB upon explosion. Using Spitzer data we investigate the properties of interstellar dust in the vicinity of R136, and argue that its high obscuration is not unusual for its environment and that it could indeed be a slow runaway ("walkaway") from R136. Unfortunately, based on its current mass loss rate, VFTS 682 is unlikely to become a GRB, because it will lose too much angular momentum at its death. If it were to become a GRB, it probably would also not be dark, either escaping or destroying its surrounding dusty region. Nevertheless, it is a very interesting star, deserving further studies, and being one of only three presently identified WR stars (two others in the Small Magellanic Cloud) that seems to be undergoing CHE.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.1145  [pdf] - 1034741
Black Hole Mass Estimates Based on CIV are Consistent with Those Based on the Balmer Lines
Comments: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal. 37 text pages + 8 tables + 23 figures. Updated with comments by the referee and with a expanded discussion on literature data including new observations
Submitted: 2010-09-06, last modified: 2011-08-30
Using a sample of high-redshift lensed quasars from the CASTLES project with observed-frame ultraviolet or optical and near-infrared spectra, we have searched for possible biases between supermassive black hole (BH) mass estimates based on the CIV, Halpha and Hbeta broad emission lines. Our sample is based upon that of Greene, Peng & Ludwig, expanded with new near-IR spectroscopic observations, consistently analyzed high S/N optical spectra, and consistent continuum luminosity estimates at 5100A. We find that BH mass estimates based on the FWHM of CIV show a systematic offset with respect to those obtained from the line dispersion, sigma_l, of the same emission line, but not with those obtained from the FWHM of Halpha and Hbeta. The magnitude of the offset depends on the treatment of the HeII and FeII emission blended with CIV, but there is little scatter for any fixed measurement prescription. While we otherwise find no systematic offsets between CIV and Balmer line mass estimates, we do find that the residuals between them are strongly correlated with the ratio of the UV and optical continuum luminosities. Removing this dependency reduces the scatter between the UV- and optical-based BH mass estimates by a factor of approximately 2, from roughly 0.35 to 0.18 dex. The dispersion is smallest when comparing the CIV sigma_l mass estimate, after removing the offset from the FWHM estimates, and either Balmer line mass estimate. The correlation with the continuum slope is likely due to a combination of reddening, host contamination and object-dependent SED shapes. When we add additional heterogeneous measurements from the literature, the results are unchanged.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1011.1935  [pdf] - 1041816
Impact of Primordial Ultracompact Minihaloes on the Intergalactic Medium and First Structure Formation
Comments: 24 pages, 13 figures, 1 table, improved version following the referee's comments, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-11-08, last modified: 2011-08-09
(Abridged) Ultracompact Minihaloes (UCMHs), which formed by dark matter accretion onto primordial black holes (PBHs) or initial dark matter overdensity produced by the primordial density perturbation, provide a new type of compact dark matter structure to ionize and heat the IGM after matter-radiation equality z_eq, which is much earlier than the formation of the first cosmological dark halo structure and later first stars. We show that dark matter annihilation density contributed by UCMHs can totally dominated over the homogenous dark matter annihilation background even for a tiny UCMH abundance, and provide a new gamma-ray background in the early Universe. The IGM ionization fraction x_ion and gas temperature T_m can be increased from the recombination residual and adiabatically cooling in the absence of energy injection to the highest value of x_ ion 0.1 and T_m ~ 5000 K at z>10 for the upper bound UCMH abundance constrained by the CMB optical depth. A small fraction of UCMHs are seeded by PBHs. The X-ray emission from gas accretion onto PBHs may totally dominated over dark matter annihilation and become the main cosmic ionization source, but the constraints of gas accretion rate and X-ray absorption by the baryon accumulation within the UCMHs and accretion feedback show that X-ray emission can only be a promising source much later than UCMH annihilation at z<z_m<1000, where z_m depends on the masses of PBHs, their host UCMHs, and the dark matter particles. Also, UCMH radiation including both annihilation and X-ray emission can significantly suppress the low mass first baryonic structure formation. The effects of UCMHs radiation on the baryonic structure evolution are quite small for the gas temperature after virialization, but more significant to enhance the gas chemical quantities such as the ionization fraction and molecular hydrogen abundance in the baryonic objects.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.1634  [pdf] - 1034817
Hyperaccreting Disks around Neutrons Stars and Magnetars for GRBs: Neutrino Annihilation and Strong Magnetic Fields
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, Proceedings for Deciphering the Ancient Universe with GRBs, Kyoto, Japan, April, 2010
Submitted: 2010-09-08
Hyperaccreting disks around neutron stars or magnetars cooled via neutrino emission can be the potential central engine of GRBs. The neutron-star disk can cool more efficiently, produce much higher neutrino luminosity and neutrino annihilation luminosity than its black hole counterpart with the same accretion rate. The neutron star surface boundary layer could increase the annihilation luminosity as well. An ultra relativistic jet via neutrino annihilation can be produced along the stellar poles. Moreover, we investigate the effects of strong fields on the disks around magnetars. In general, stronger fields give higher disk densities, pressures, temperatures and neutrino luminosity; the neutrino annihilation mechanism and the magnetically-driven pulsar wind which extracts the stellar rotational energy can work together to generate and feed an even stronger ultra-relativistic jet along the stellar magnetic poles.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.5528  [pdf] - 902571
Hyperaccreting Disks around Magnetars for Gamma-Ray Bursts: Effects of Strong Magnetic Fields
Comments: 62 pages, 14 figures, 4 tables, improved version following the referee's comments, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2009-11-29, last modified: 2010-06-03
(Abridged) The hyperaccreting neutron star or magnetar disks cooled via neutrino emission can be a candidate of gamma-ray burst (GRB) central engines. The strong field $\geq10^{15}-10^{16}$ G of the magnetar can play a significant role in affecting the disk properties and even lead to the funnel accretion process. We investigate the effects of strong fields on the disks around magnetars, and discuss implications of such accreting magnetar systems for GRB and GRB-like events. We discuss quantum effects of the strong fields on the disk, and use the MHD conservation equations to describe the behavior of the disk flow coupled with a large scale field, which is generated by the star-disk interaction. In general, stronger fields give higher disk densities, pressures, temperatures and neutrino luminosity, and change the electron fraction and degeneracy state significantly. A magnetized disk is always viscously stable outside the Alfv\'{e}n radius, but will be thermally unstable near the Alfv\'{e}n radius where the magnetic field plays a more important role in transferring the angular momentum and heating the disk than the viscous stress. The funnel accretion process will be only important for an extremely strong field, which creates a magnetosphere inside the Alfv\'{e}n radius and truncates the plane disk. Because of higher temperature and more concentrated neutrino emission of the magnetar surface ring-like belt region covered by funnel accretion, the neutrino annihilation rate from the accreting magnetars can be much higher than that from accreting neutron stars without fields. Furthermore, the neutrino annihilation mechanism and the magnetically-driven pulsar wind from the magnetar surface can work together to generate and feed an ultra-relativistic jet along the stellar magnetic poles.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:0906.0842  [pdf] - 24930
Hyperaccreting Neutron-Star Disks, Magnetized Disks and Gamma-Ray Bursts
Comments: Master Thesis (Nanjing University), 261 Pages, minor typos corrected, some changes in Chapter 4
Submitted: 2009-06-04, last modified: 2009-12-22
This thesis focuses on the study of the hyperaccreting neutron-star disks and magnetized accretion flows. It is usually proposed that hyperaccreting disks surrounding stellar-mass black holes with a huge accretion rate are central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, hyperaccretion disks around neutron stars may exist in some GRB formation scenarios. We study the structure and neutrino emission of a hyperaccretion disk around a neutron star. We consider a steady-state hyperaccretion disk, and as a reasonable approximation, divide it into two regions, the inner and outer disks. The outer disk is similar to that of a black hole. The inner disk has a self-similar structure, such as the entropy-conservation or the advection structure, depending on the energy transfer and emission in the disk. We see that the neutron star disk can cool more efficiently, produce much higher neutrino luminosity and neutrino annihilation luminosity than a black hole disk. The neutrino emission from the neutron star surface boundary layer could increase the neutrino annihilation luminosity. Moreover, we study the effects of a global magnetic field on viscously-rotating and vertically-integrated accretion disks around compact objects using a self-similar treatment, and use two methods to study magnetized flows with convection. We also give a review on GRB progenitors, central engines and an outlook in this thesis.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.0431  [pdf] - 19963
Hyperaccreting Neutron-Star Disks and Neutrino Annihilation
Comments: 46 pages, 11 figures, 4 tables, improved version following the referee's comments, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2009-01-05, last modified: 2009-08-04
Newborn neutron stars surrounded by hyperaccreting and neutrino-cooled disks may exist in some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and/or supernovae (SNe). In this paper we further study the structure of such a neutron-star disk based on the two-region (i.e., inner & outer) disk scenario following our previous work, and calculate the neutrino annihilation luminosity from the disk in various cases. We investigate the effects of the viscosity parameter, energy parameter (measuring the neutrino cooling efficiency of the inner disk) and outflow strength on the structure of the entire disk as well as the effect of emission from the neutron star surface boundary emission on the total neutrino annihilation rate. The inner disk satisfies the entropy-conservation or the advection-dominated self-similar structure depending on the energy parameter. An outflow from the disk decreases the density and pressure but increases the thickness of the disk. Moreover, compared with the black-hole disk, the neutrino annihilation luminosity above the neutron-star disk is higher, and the neutrino emission from the boundary layer could increase the neutrino annihilation luminosity by about one order of magnitude higher than the disk without boundary emission. The neutron-star disk with the advection-dominated inner disk could produce the highest neutrino luminosity while the disk with an outflow has the lowest. Although a heavily mass-loaded outflow from the neutron star surface at early times of neutron star formation prevents the outflow material from being accelerated to a high bulk Lorentz factor, an energetic ultrarelativistic jet via neutrino annihilation can be produced above the stellar polar region at late times if the disk accretion rate and the neutrino emission luminosity from the surface boundary layer are sufficiently high.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.3254  [pdf] - 1000739
Self-similar structure of magnetized ADAFs and CDAFs
Comments: 22 pages, 5 figures, Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2008-05-21
(Abridged) We study the effects of a global magnetic field on viscously-rotating and vertically-integrated accretion disks around compact objects using a self-similar treatment. We extend Akizuki & Fukue's work (2006) by discussing a general magnetic field with three components ($r, \phi, z$) in advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). We also investigate the effects of a global magnetic field on flows with convection. For these purposes, we first adopt a simple form of the kinematic viscosity $\nu=\alpha c_{s}^{2}/\Omega_{K}$ to study magnetized ADAFs. Then we consider a more realistic model of the kinematic viscosity $\nu=\alpha c_{s}H$, which makes the infall velocity increase but the sound speed and toroidal velocity decrease. We next use two methods to study magnetized flows with convection, i.e., we take the convective coefficient $\alpha_{c}$ as a free parameter to discuss the effects of convection for simplicity. We establish the $\alpha_{c}-\alpha$ relation for magnetized flows using the mixing-length theory and compare this relation with the non-magnetized case. If $\alpha_{c}$ is set as a free parameter, then $|v_{r}|$ and $c_{s}$ increase for a large toroidal magnetic field, while $|v_{r}|$ decreases but $|v_{\phi}|$ increases (or decreases) for a strong and dominated radial (or vertical) magnetic field with increasing $\alpha_{c}$. In addition, the magnetic field makes the $\alpha_{c}-\alpha$ relation be distinct from that of non-magnetized flows, and allows the $\rho\propto r^{-1}$ or $\rho\propto r^{-2}$ structure for magnetized non-accreting convection-dominated accretion flows with $\alpha+g\alpha_{c}< 0$ (where $g$ is the parameter to determine the condition of convective angular momentum transport).
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:0712.0423  [pdf] - 7691
Hyperaccretion Disks around Neutron Stars
Comments: 44 pages, 10 figures, improved version following the referees' comments, main conclusions unchanged, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2007-12-03, last modified: 2008-05-03
(Abridged) We here study the structure of a hyperaccretion disk around a neutron star. We consider a steady-state hyperaccretion disk around a neutron star, and as a reasonable approximation, divide the disk into two regions, which are called inner and outer disks. The outer disk is similar to that of a black hole and the inner disk has a self-similar structure. In order to study physical properties of the entire disk clearly, we first adopt a simple model, in which some microphysical processes in the disk are simplified, following Popham et al. and Narayan et al. Based on these simplifications, we analytically and numerically investigate the size of the inner disk, the efficiency of neutrino cooling, and the radial distributions of the disk density, temperature and pressure. We see that, compared with the black-hole disk, the neutron star disk can cool more efficiently and produce a much higher neutrino luminosity. Finally, we consider an elaborate model with more physical considerations about the thermodynamics and microphysics in the neutron star disk (as recently developed in studying the neutrino-cooled disk of a black hole), and compare this elaborate model with our simple model. We find that most of the results from these two models are basically consistent with each other.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.1174  [pdf] - 8768
The Half-Integer Charged Particles of the Orbifold Models
Comments: 11pages, no figures
Submitted: 2008-01-08
In this paper, we consider half-integer charged particles predicted by models of orbifold compactification of the $E_8\times E_8$ heterotic string theory. We find that it is possible for half-integer charged particles to exist in our universe, and the location of half-interger charged particles in a galaxy should be in the centers of the galaxy. By qualitative analysis, we find half-interger charged particles may be helpful in explaining the formation of SMBH at the large redshift and solving the UHECR puzzle.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0604298  [pdf] - 81367
The Non-Gaussianity of Racetrack Inflation Models
Comments: 8 pages, no figures; PACS and Keywords are added; mistake is corrected
Submitted: 2006-04-13, last modified: 2006-05-22
In this paper, we use the result in [7] to calculate the non-Gaussianity of the racetrack models in [3, 5]. The two models give different non- Gaussianities. Both of them are reasonable.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510709  [pdf] - 77205
Non Gaussianity of General Multiple-Field Inflationary Models
Comments: 10 pages, no figure, references is added; mistakes is corrected
Submitted: 2005-10-25, last modified: 2006-04-13
Using the "$\delta N$-formalism", We obtain the expression of the non-Gaussianity of multiple-field inflationary models with the nontrivial field-space metric. Further, we rewritten the result by using the slow-rolling approximation.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0310127  [pdf] - 59790
The Exact Evolution Equation of the Curvature Perturbation for Closed Universe
Comments: 10 pages, no figures, Latex
Submitted: 2003-10-06
As is well known, the exact evolution equation of the curvature perturbation plays a very important role in investigation of the inflation power spectrum of the flat universe. However, its corresponding exact extension for the non-flat universes has not yet been given out clearly. The interest in the non-flat, specially closed, universes is being aroused recently. The need of this extension is pressing. We start with most elementary physical consideration and obtain finally this exact evolution equation of the curvature perturbation for the non-flat universes, as well as the evolutionary controlling parameter and the exact expression of the variable mass in this equation. We approximately do a primitive and immature analysis on the power spectrum of non-flat universes. This analysis shows that this exact evolution equation of the curvature perturbation for the non-flat universes is very complicated, and we need to do a lot of numerical and analytic work for this new equation in future in order to judge whether the universe is flat or closed by comparison between theories and observations.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0110193  [pdf] - 45251
The Eventual Quintessential Big Collapse of the Closed Universe with the Present Accelerative Phase
Comments: 24 pages, 4 figure, Latex
Submitted: 2001-10-08
Whether our universe with present day acceleration can eventually collapse is very interesting problem. We are also interesting in such problems, whether the universe is closed? Why it is so flat? How long to expend a period for a cycle of the universe? In this paper a simple ``slow-fast'' type of the quintessence potential is designed for the closed universe to realize the present acceleration of our universe and its eventual big collapse. A detail numerical simulation of the universe evolution demonstrates that it divides the seven stages, a very rich story. It is unexpected that the quintessential kinetic energy is dominated in the shrink stage of the universe with very rapid velocity of the energy increasing. A complete analytic analysis is given for each stage. Some very interesting new problems brought by this collapse are discussed. Therefore our model avoids naturally the future event horizon problem of the present accelerative expanding universe and maybe realize the infinite cycles of the universe, which supplies a mechanism to use naturally the anthropic principle. This paper shows that the understanding on the essence of the cosmological constant should contain a richer content.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0007218  [pdf] - 37056
The First Acoustics Peak CMBR and Cosmic Total Density
Comments: 7 pages, 1 figure, Latex
Submitted: 2000-07-16
Boomerang measured the first peak in CMBR to be at location of $l_D=196\pm 6$, which excites our strong interesting in it. A widely cited formula is $l_D\simeq 200\Omega_T^{-0.50}$ to estimate the cosmic total density. Weinberg shows it is not correct and should be $l_D\propto \Omega_T^{-1.58}$ near the interest point $(\Omega_m,\Omega_\Lambda)=(0.3,0.7)$. We show further that it should be $l_D\propto \Omega_T^{-1.43}\Omega_m^{-0.147}$ or $\Omega_T^{-1.92}\Omega_\Lambda^{0.343}$ near the same point in the more veracious sense if we consider the effect from the sound horizon. We draw a contour graph for the peak location, show that the recent data favor to a closed universe with about $\Omega_T\simeq 1.03$. If we insist on obtaining a flat universe, a point $(0.36,0.64)$, i.e., more matter and less vacuum energy, is still possible, which has a more right-side first peak $l_D=208$ in CMBR and a smaller acceleration parameter $-q_0=0.10$ for the $z=0.4$ redshift SNIa.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/0003079  [pdf] - 1618588
Quantum Creation of Closed Universe with Both Effects of Tunneling and Well
Comments: 8 pages, no figures, Latex
Submitted: 2000-03-20
A new ''twice loose shoe'' method in the Wheeler-DeWitt equation of the universe wave function on the cosmic scale factor a and a scalar field $\phi$ is suggested in this letter. We analysis the both affects come from the tunneling effect of a and the potential well effect of $\phi$, and obtain the initial values $a_0$ and $\phi_0$ about a primary closed universe which is born with the largest probability in the quantum manner. Our result is able to overcome the ''large field difficulty'' of the universe quantum creation probability with only tunneling effect. This new born universe has to suffer a startup of inflation, and then comes into the usual slow rolling inflation. The universe with the largest probability maybe has a ''gentle'' inflation or an eternal chaotic inflation, this depends on a new parameter q which describes the tunneling character.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9912458  [pdf] - 110121
Future Destiny of Quintessential Universe and Constraint on Model from Deceleration Parameter
Comments: 6 pages, no figures, Latex
Submitted: 1999-12-21
The evolution of the quintessence in various stages of the universe, the radiation-, matter-, and quintessence-dominated, is closely related with the tracking behavior and the deceleration parameter of the universe. We gave the explicit relation between the equation-of-state of the quintessence in the epoch of the matter-quintessence equality and the inverse power index of the quintessence potential, obtained the constraint on this potential parameter come from the present deceleration parameter, i.e., a low inverse power index. We point out that the low inverse power-law potential with a single term can not work for the tracking solution. In order to have both of the tracker and the suitable deceleration parameter it is necessary to introduce at least two terms in the quintessence potential. We give the future evolution of the quintessential universe.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/9906348  [pdf] - 116511
The Cosmological Constant as a Residual Energy in the Chaotic Inflationary Model
Comments: 7 pages, no figures, Latex
Submitted: 1999-06-12
A new idea of the cosmological constant is proposed in this paper. Due to the horizon is limited, the quantum fluctuation of the inflaton field is not zero, a nonzero vacuum energy is remained as a residual inflationary energy of an unusual potential, however the true stable vacuum energy is zero fortunately. A unified model of the cosmological constant and the chaotic inflation is proposed, which satisfies almost all cosmological phenomenology and will can be tested by data of the cosmic large scale structure.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:cond-mat/9708169  [pdf] - 110432
Propagation of a Topological Transition: the Rayleigh Instability
Comments: 15 pages, 7 figures, TeX
Submitted: 1997-08-21
The Rayleigh capillary instability of a cylindrical interface between two immiscible fluids is one of the most fundamental in fluid dynamics. As Plateau observed from energetic considerations and Rayleigh clarified through hydrodynamics, such an interface is linearly unstable to fission due to surface tension. In traditional descriptions of this instability it occurs everywhere along the cylinder at once, triggered by infinitesimal perturbations. Here we explore in detail a recently conjectured alternate scenario for this instability: front propagation. Using boundary integral techniques for Stokes flow, we provide numerical evidence that the viscous Rayleigh instability can indeed spread behind a front moving at constant velocity, in some cases leading to a periodic sequence of pinching events. These basic results are in quantitative agreement with the marginal stability criterion, yet there are important qualitative differences associated with the discontinuous nature of droplet fission. A number of experiments immediately suggest themselves in light of these results.