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Yèche, Ch.

Normalized to: Yèche, C.

56 article(s) in total. 908 co-authors, from 1 to 41 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 15,5.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.05828  [pdf] - 2048647
Observing Strategy for the Legacy Surveys
Comments: 10 pages, 3 tables and 5 figures
Submitted: 2020-02-13
The Legacy Surveys, a combination of three ground-based imaging surveys, have mapped 16,000 deg$^2$ in three optical bands ($g$, $r$, and $z$) to a depth 1--$2$~mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our work addresses one of the major challenges of wide-field imaging surveys conducted at ground-based observatories: the varying depth that results from varying observing conditions at Earth-bound sites. To mitigate these effects, two of the Legacy Surveys (the Dark Energy Camera Legacy Survey, or DECaLS; and the Mayall $z$-band Legacy Survey, or MzLS) employed a unique strategy to dynamically adjust the exposure times as rapidly as possible in response to the changing observing conditions. We present the tiling and observing strategies used by these surveys. We demonstrate that the tiling and dynamic observing strategies jointly result in a more uniform-depth survey that has higher efficiency for a given total observing time compared with the traditional approach of using fixed exposure times.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.02822  [pdf] - 2045525
The impact of AGN feedback on the 1D power spectra from the Ly$\alpha$ forest using the Horizon-AGN suite of simulations
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-02-07, last modified: 2020-02-10
The Lyman-$\alpha$ forest is a powerful probe for cosmology, but it is also strongly impacted by galaxy evolution and baryonic processes such as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) feedback, which can redistribute mass and energy on large scales. We constrain the signatures of AGN feedback on the 1D power spectrum of the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest using a series of eight hydro-cosmological simulations performed with the Adaptative Mesh Refinement code RAMSES. This series starts from the Horizon-AGN simulation and varies the sub-grid parameters for AGN feeding, feedback and stochasticity. These simulations cover the whole plausible range of feedback and feeding parameters according to the resulting galaxy properties. AGNs globally suppress the Lyman-$\alpha$ power at all scales. On large scales, the energy injection and ionization dominate over the supply of gas mass from AGN-driven galactic winds, thus suppressing power. On small scales, faster cooling of denser gas mitigates the suppression. This effect increases with decreasing redshift. We provide lower and upper limits of this signature at nine redshifts between $z=4.25$ and $z=2.0$, making it possible to account for it at post-processing stage in future work given that running simulations without AGN feedback can save considerable amounts of computing resources. Ignoring AGN feedback in cosmological inference analyses leads to strong biases with 2\% shift on $\sigma_8$ and 1\% shift on $n_s$, which represents twice the standards deviation of the current constraints on $n_s$.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.10741  [pdf] - 2040644
First Constraint on the Neutrino-Induced Phase Shift in the BAO Spectrum
Comments: 22 pages, 8 figures, 1 table; v2: extended version of published Nat. Phys. article
Submitted: 2018-03-28, last modified: 2020-01-31
The existence of the cosmic neutrino background is a fascinating prediction of the hot big bang model. These neutrinos were a dominant component of the energy density in the early universe and, therefore, played an important role in the evolution of cosmological perturbations. The energy density of the cosmic neutrino background has been measured using the abundances of light elements and the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A complementary and more robust probe is a distinct shift in the temporal phase of sound waves in the primordial plasma which is produced by fluctuations in the neutrino density and has recently been detected in the CMB. In this paper, we report on the first constraint on this neutrino-induced phase shift in the spectrum of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) of the BOSS DR12 data. Constraining the acoustic scale using Planck data while marginalizing over the effects of neutrinos in the CMB, we find a non-zero phase shift at greater than 95\% confidence. We also demonstrate the robustness of this result in simulations and forecasts. Besides providing a new test of the cosmic neutrino background, our work is the first application of the BAO signal to early universe physics and a non-trivial confirmation of the standard cosmological history.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.09073  [pdf] - 2001945
Hints, neutrino bounds and WDM constraints from SDSS DR14 Lyman-$\alpha$ and Planck full-survey data
Comments: submitted to JCAP
Submitted: 2019-11-20, last modified: 2019-11-21
The Ly-$\alpha$ forest 1D flux power spectrum is a powerful probe of several cosmological parameters. Assuming a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology including massive neutrinos, we find that the latest SDSS DR14 BOSS and eBOSS Ly-$\alpha$ forest data is in very good agreement with current weak lensing constraints on $(\Omega_m, \sigma_8)$ and has the same small level of tension with Planck. We did not identify a systematic effect in the data analysis that could explain this small tension, but we show that it can be reduced in extended cosmological models where the spectral index is not the same on the very different times and scales probed by CMB and Ly-$\alpha$ data. A particular case is that of a $\Lambda$CDM model including a running of the spectral index on top of massive neutrinos. With combined Ly-$\alpha$ and Planck data, we find a slight (3$\sigma$) preference for negative running, $\alpha_s= -0.010 \pm 0.004$ (68% CL). Neutrino mass bounds are found to be robust against different assumptions. In the $\Lambda$CDM model with running, we find $\sum m_\nu <0.11$ eV at the 95% confidence level for combined Ly-$\alpha$ and Planck (temperature and polarisation) data, or $\sum m_\nu < 0.09$ eV when adding CMB lensing and BAO data. We further provide strong and nearly model-independent bounds on the mass of thermal warm dark matter: $m_X > 10\;\mathrm{keV}$ (95% CL) from Ly-$\alpha$ data alone.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.03554  [pdf] - 1955293
The one-dimensional power spectrum from the SDSS DR14 Ly$\alpha$ forests
Comments: accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2018-12-09, last modified: 2019-09-04
We present a measurement of the 1D Ly$\alpha$ forest flux power spectrum, using the complete Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) and first extended-BOSS (eBOSS) quasars at $z_{\rm qso}>2.1$, corresponding to the fourteenth data release (DR14) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our results cover thirteen bins in redshift from $z_{\rm Ly\alpha}=2.2$ to 4.6, and scales up to $k=0.02\rm \,(km/s)^{-1}$. From a parent sample of 180,413 visually inspected spectra, we selected the 43,751 quasars with the best quality; this data set improves the previous result from the ninth data release (DR9), both in statistical precision (achieving a reduction by a factor of two) and in redshift coverage. We also present a thorough investigation of identified sources of systematic uncertainties that affect the measurement. The resulting 1D power spectrum of this work is in excellent agreement with the one from the BOSS DR9 data.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.03400  [pdf] - 1958109
Baryon acoustic oscillations at z = 2.34 from the correlations of Ly$\alpha$ absorption in eBOSS DR14
Comments: accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2019-04-06, last modified: 2019-08-19
We measure the imprint of primordial baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the correlation function of Ly$\alpha$ absorption in quasar spectra from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) and the extended BOSS (eBOSS) in Data Release 14 (DR14) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV. In addition to 179,965 spectra with absorption in the Lyman-$\alpha$ (Ly$\alpha$) region, we use, for the first time, Ly$\alpha$ absorption in the Lyman-$\beta$ region of 56,154 spectra. We measure the Hubble distance, $D_H$, and the comoving angular diameter distance, $D_M$, relative to the sound horizon at the drag epoch $r_d$ at an effective redshift $z=2.34$. Using a physical model of the correlation function outside the BAO peak, we find $D_H(2.34)/r_d=8.86\pm 0.29$ and $D_M(2.34)/r_d=37.41\pm 1.86$, within 1$\sigma$ from the flat-$\Lambda$CDM model consistent with CMB anisotropy measurements. With the addition of polynomial "broadband" terms, the results remain within one standard deviation of the CMB-inspired model. Combined with the quasar-Ly$\alpha$ cross-correlation measurement presented in a companion paper Blomqvist19, the BAO measurements at $z=2.35$ are within 1.7$\sigma$ of the predictions of this model.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.03430  [pdf] - 1958110
Baryon acoustic oscillations from the cross-correlation of Ly$\alpha$ absorption and quasars in eBOSS DR14
Comments: 18 pages, 14 figures, matches the published version by A&A
Submitted: 2019-04-06, last modified: 2019-08-17
We present a measurement of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale at redshift $z=2.35$ from the three-dimensional correlation of Lyman-$\alpha$ (Ly$\alpha$) forest absorption and quasars. The study uses 266,590 quasars in the redshift range $1.77<z<3.5$ from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 14 (DR14). The sample includes the first two years of observations by the SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS), providing new quasars and re-observations of BOSS quasars for improved statistical precision. Statistics are further improved by including Ly$\alpha$ absorption occurring in the Ly$\beta$ wavelength band of the spectra. From the measured BAO peak position along and across the line of sight, we determined the Hubble distance $D_{H}$ and the comoving angular diameter distance $D_{M}$ relative to the sound horizon at the drag epoch $r_{d}$: $D_{H}(z=2.35)/r_{d}=9.20\pm 0.36$ and $D_{M}(z=2.35)/r_{d}=36.3\pm 1.8$. These results are consistent at $1.5\sigma$ with the prediction of the best-fit spatially-flat cosmological model with the cosmological constant reported for the Planck (2016) analysis of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Combined with the Ly$\alpha$ auto-correlation measurement presented in a companion paper, the BAO measurements at $z=2.34$ are within $1.7\sigma$ of the predictions of this model.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.07192  [pdf] - 1918434
The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer
Comments: White paper submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2019-07-16
The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer is a next-generation massively multiplexed spectroscopic facility currently under development in Hawaii. It is completely dedicated to large-scale spectroscopic surveys and will enable transformative science. In this white paper we summarize the science case and describe the current state of the project.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.03158  [pdf] - 1853622
Cosmology with the MaunaKea Spectroscopic Explorer
Comments: 18 pages, 4 figures, to be appeared as one chapter in "The Detailed Science Case of the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE)"
Submitted: 2019-03-07, last modified: 2019-03-21
This document summarizes the science cases related to cosmology studies with the MaunaKea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE), a highly-multiplexed (4332 fibers), wide FOV (1.5 sq deg), large aperture (11.25 m in diameter), optical/NIR (360nm to 1300nm) facility. The MSE High-z Cosmology Survey is designed to probe a large volume of the Universe with a galaxy density sufficient to measure the extremely-large-scale density fluctuations required to explore primordial non-Gaussianity and therefore inflation. We expect a measurement of the local parameter $f_{NL}$ to a precision $\sigma(f_{NL}) = 1.8$. Combining the MSE High-z Cosmology Survey data with data from a next generation CMB stage 4 experiment and existing DESI data will provide the first $5\sigma$ confirmation of the neutrino mass hierarchy from astronomical observations. In addition, the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) observed within the sample will provide measurements of the distance-redshift relationship in six different redshift bins between $z=1.6$ and 4.0, each with an accuracy of $\sim0.6\%$. The simultaneous measurements of Redshift Space Distortions (RSD) constrain the amplitude of the fluctuations, at a level ranging from $1.9\%$ to $3.6\%$. The proposed survey covers 10,000 ${\rm deg}^2$, measuring redshifts for three classes of target objects: Emission Line Galaxies (ELGs) with $1.6<z<2.4$, Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) with $2.4<z<4.0$, and quasars $2.1<z<3.5$. The ELGs and LBGs will be used as direct tracers of the underlying density field, while the Lyman-$\alpha$ forests in the quasar spectra will be utilized to probe structure. Exposures of duration 1,800sec will guarantee a redshift determination efficiency of $90\%$ for ELGS and at least $50\%$ for LBGs. The survey will represent 100 nights per year for a 5-year MSE program. Finally, three ideas for additional projects of cosmological interest are proposed.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.09208  [pdf] - 1854198
Inflation and Dark Energy from spectroscopy at $z > 2$
Ferraro, Simone; Wilson, Michael J.; Abidi, Muntazir; Alonso, David; Ansarinejad, Behzad; Armstrong, Robert; Asorey, Jacobo; Avelino, Arturo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bandura, Kevin; Battaglia, Nicholas; Bavdhankar, Chetan; Bernal, José Luis; Beutler, Florian; Biagetti, Matteo; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blazek, Jonathan; Bolton, Adam S.; Borrill, Julian; Frye, Brenda; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Bull, Philip; Burgess, Cliff; Byrnes, Christian T.; Cai, Zheng; Castander, Francisco J; Castorina, Emanuele; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Chaves-Montero, Jonás; Chen, Shi-Fan; Chen, Xingang; Balland, Christophe; Yèche, Christophe; Cohn, J. D.; Coulton, William; Courtois, Helene; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; D'Amico, Guido; Dawson, Kyle; Delabrouille, Jacques; Dey, Arjun; Doré, Olivier; Douglass, Kelly A.; Yutong, Duan; Dvorkin, Cora; Eggemeier, Alexander; Eisenstein, Daniel; Fan, Xiaohui; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foreman, Simon; García-Bellido, Juan; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Green, Daniel; Guy, Julien; Hahn, ChangHoon; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hathi, Nimish; Hawken, Adam J.; Hernández-Aguayo, César; Hložek, Renée; Huterer, Dragan; Ishak, Mustapha; Kamionkowski, Marc; Karagiannis, Dionysios; Keeley, Ryan E.; Kehoe, Robert; Khatri, Rishi; Kim, Alex; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Krause, Elisabeth; Krolewski, Alex; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Landriau, Martin; Levi, Michael; Liguori, Michele; Linder, Eric; Lukić, Zarija; de la Macorra, Axel; Plazas, Andrés A.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Martini, Paul; Masui, Kiyoshi; McDonald, Patrick; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Newburgh, Laura; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Niz, Gustavo; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Palunas, Povilas; Percival, Will J.; Piacentini, Francesco; Pieri, Matthew M.; Piro, Anthony L.; Prakash, Abhishek; Rhodes, Jason; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Rudie, Gwen C.; Samushia, Lado; Sasaki, Misao; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schlegel, David J.; Schmittfull, Marcel; Schubnell, Michael; Sehgal, Neelima; Senatore, Leonardo; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shafieloo, Arman; Shan, Huanyuan; Simon, Joshua D.; Simon, Sara; Slepian, Zachary; Slosar, Anže; Sridhar, Srivatsan; Stebbins, Albert; Escoffier, Stephanie; Switzer, Eric R.; Tarlé, Gregory; Trodden, Mark; Uhlemann, Cora; Urenña-López, L. Arturo; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Vargas-Magaña, M.; Wang, Yi; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Xu, Weishuang; Yu, Byeonghee; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Zhu, Hong-Ming
Comments: Science white paper submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey
Submitted: 2019-03-21
The expansion of the Universe is understood to have accelerated during two epochs: in its very first moments during a period of Inflation and much more recently, at $z < 1$, when Dark Energy is hypothesized to drive cosmic acceleration. The undiscovered mechanisms behind these two epochs represent some of the most important open problems in fundamental physics. The large cosmological volume at $2 < z < 5$, together with the ability to efficiently target high-$z$ galaxies with known techniques, enables large gains in the study of Inflation and Dark Energy. A future spectroscopic survey can test the Gaussianity of the initial conditions up to a factor of ~50 better than our current bounds, crossing the crucial theoretical threshold of $\sigma(f_{NL}^{\rm local})$ of order unity that separates single field and multi-field models. Simultaneously, it can measure the fraction of Dark Energy at the percent level up to $z = 5$, thus serving as an unprecedented test of the standard model and opening up a tremendous discovery space.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.08695  [pdf] - 1773582
The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer Book 2018
Hill, Alexis; Flagey, Nicolas; McConnachie, Alan; Szeto, Kei; Anthony, Andre; Ariño, Javier; Babas, Ferdinand; Bagnoud, Gregoire; Baker, Gabriella; Barrick, Gregory; Bauman, Steve; Benedict, Tom; Berthod, Christophe; Bilbao, Armando; Bizkarguenaga, Alberto; Blin, Alexandre; Bradley, Colin; Brousseau, Denis; Brown, Rebecca; Brzeski, Jurek; Brzezik, Walter; Caillier, Patrick; Campo, Ramón; Carton, Pierre-Henri; Chu, Jiaru; Churilov, Vladimir; Crampton, David; Crofoot, Lisa; Dale, Laurie; de Bilbao, Lander; de la Maza, Markel Sainz; Devost, Daniel; Edgar, Michael; Erickson, Darren; Farrell, Tony; Fouque, Pascal; Fournier, Paul; Garrido, Javier; Gedig, Mike; Geyskens, Nicolas; Gilbert, James; Gillingham, Peter; de Rivera, Guillermo González; Green, Greg; Grigel, Eric; Hall, Patrick; Ho, Kevin; Horville, David; Hu, Hongzhuan; Irusta, David; Isani, Sidik; Jahandar, Farbod; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Kielty, Collin; Kulkarni, Neelesh; Lahidalga, Leire; Laurent, Florence; Lawrence, Jon; Laychak, Mary Beth; Lee, Jooyoung; Liu, Zhigang; Loewen, Nathan; López, Fernando; Lorentz, Thomas; Lorgeoux, Guillaume; Mahoney, Billy; Mali, Slavko; Manuel, Eric; Martínez, Sofía; Mazoukh, Celine; Messaddeq, Younès; Migniau, Jean-Emmanuel; Mignot, Shan; Monty, Stephanie; Morency, Steeve; Mouser, Yves; Muller, Ronny; Muller, Rolf; Murga, Gaizka; Murowinski, Rick; Nicolov, Victor; Pai, Naveen; Pawluczyk, Rafal; Pazder, John; Pécontal, Arlette; Petric, Andreea; Prada, Francisco; Rai, Corinne; Ricard, Coba; Roberts, Jennifer; Rodgers, J. Michael; Rodgers, Jane; Ruan, Federico; Russelo, Tamatea; Salmom, Derrick; Sánchez, Justo; Saunders, Will; Scott, Case; Sheinis, Andy; Simons, Douglas; Smedley, Scott; Tang, Zhen; Teran, Jose; Thibault, Simon; Thirupathi, Sivarani; Tresse, Laurence; Troy, Mitchell; Urrutia, Rafael; van Vuuren, Emile; Venkatesan, Sudharshan; Venn, Kim; Vermeulen, Tom; Villaver, Eva; Waller, Lew; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jianping; Williams, Eric; Wilson, Matt; Withington, Kanoa; Yèche, Christophe; Yong, David; Zhai, Chao; Zhang, Kai; Zhelem, Ross; Zhou, Zengxiang
Comments: 5 chapters, 160 pages, 107 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-19, last modified: 2018-10-24
(Abridged) This is the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer 2018 book. It is intended as a concise reference guide to all aspects of the scientific and technical design of MSE, for the international astronomy and engineering communities, and related agencies. The current version is a status report of MSE's science goals and their practical implementation, following the System Conceptual Design Review, held in January 2018. MSE is a planned 10-m class, wide-field, optical and near-infrared facility, designed to enable transformative science, while filling a critical missing gap in the emerging international network of large-scale astronomical facilities. MSE is completely dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy of samples of between thousands and millions of astrophysical objects. It will lead the world in this arena, due to its unique design capabilities: it will boast a large (11.25 m) aperture and wide (1.52 sq. degree) field of view; it will have the capabilities to observe at a wide range of spectral resolutions, from R2500 to R40,000, with massive multiplexing (4332 spectra per exposure, with all spectral resolutions available at all times), and an on-target observing efficiency of more than 80%. MSE will unveil the composition and dynamics of the faint Universe and is designed to excel at precision studies of faint astrophysical phenomena. It will also provide critical follow-up for multi-wavelength imaging surveys, such as those of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Gaia, Euclid, the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, the Square Kilometre Array, and the Next Generation Very Large Array.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.09179  [pdf] - 1721277
Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer Low Moderate Resolution Spectrograph Conceptual Design
Comments: 20 pages; Proceedings of SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2018; Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy VII
Submitted: 2018-07-23
The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE) Project is a planned replacement for the existing 3.6-m Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) into a 10-m class dedicated wide field highly multiplexed fibre fed spectroscopic facility. MSE seeks to tackle basic science questions ranging from the origin of stars and stellar systems, Galaxy archaeology at early times, galaxy evolution across cosmic time, to cosmology and the nature of dark matter and dark energy. MSE will be a primary follow-up facility for many key future photometric and astrometric surveys, as well as a major component in the study of the multi-wavelength Universe. The MSE is based on a prime focus telescope concept which illuminate 3200 fibres or more. These fibres are feeding a Low Moderate Resolution (LMR) spectrograph and a High Resolution (HR). The LMR will provide 2 resolution modes at R>2500 and R>5000 on a wavelength range of 360 to 950 nm and a resolution of R>3000 on the 950 nm to 1300 nm bandwidth. Possibly the H band will be also covered by a second NIR mode from ranging from 1450 to 1780 nm. The HR will have a resolution of R>39000 on the 360 to 600 nm wavelength range and R>20000 on the 600 to 900 nm bandwidth. This paper presents the LMR design after its Conceptual Design Review held in June 2017. It focuses on the general concept, optical and mechanical design of the instrument. It describes the associated preliminary expected performances especially concerning optical and thermal performances.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.05029  [pdf] - 1690329
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog: Fourteenth Data Release
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. The catalog is available at https://data.sdss.org/sas/dr14/eboss/qso/DR14Q/DR14Q_v4_4.fits
Submitted: 2017-12-13, last modified: 2018-01-14
We present the Data Release 14 Quasar catalog (DR14Q) from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). This catalog includes all SDSS-IV/eBOSS objects that were spectroscopically targeted as quasar candidates and that are confirmed as quasars via a new automated procedure combined with a partial visual inspection of spectra, have luminosities $M_{\rm i} \left[ z=2 \right] < -20.5$ (in a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology with $H_0 = 70 \ {\rm km \ s^{-1} \ Mpc ^{-1}}$, $\Omega_{\rm M} = 0.3$, and $\Omega_{\rm \Lambda} = 0.7$), and either display at least one emission line with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) larger than $500 \ {\rm km \ s^{-1}}$ or, if not, have interesting/complex absorption features. The catalog also includes previously spectroscopically-confirmed quasars from SDSS-I, II and III. The catalog contains 526,356 quasars 144,046 are new discoveries since the beginning of SDSS-IV) detected over 9,376 deg$^2$ (2,044 deg$^2$ having new spectroscopic data available) with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra. The catalog is estimated to have about 0.5% contamination. The catalog identifies 21,877 broad absorption line quasars and lists their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents SDSS five-band CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.03062  [pdf] - 1644201
The clustering of the SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey DR14 quasar sample: measurement of the growth rate of structure from the anisotropic correlation function between redshift 0.8 and 2.2
Comments: 25 pages, 22 figures
Submitted: 2018-01-09
We present the clustering measurements of quasars in configuration space based on the Data Release 14 (DR14) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. This dataset includes 148,659 quasars spread over the redshift range $0.8\leq z \leq 2.2$ and spanning 2112.9 square degrees. We use the Convolution Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (CLPT) approach with a Gaussian Streaming (GS) model for the redshift space distortions of the correlation function and demonstrate its applicability for dark matter halos hosting eBOSS quasar tracers. At the effective redshift $z_{\rm eff} = 1.52$, we measure the linear growth rate of structure $f\sigma_{8}(z_{\rm eff})= 0.426 \pm 0.077$, the expansion rate $H(z_{\rm eff})= 159^{+12}_{-13}(r_{s}^{\rm fid}/r_s){\rm km.s}^{-1}.{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, and the angular diameter distance $D_{A}(z_{\rm eff})=1850^{+90}_{-115}\,(r_s/r_{s}^{\rm fid}){\rm Mpc}$, where $r_{s}$ is the sound horizon at the end of the baryon drag epoch and $r_{s}^{\rm fid}$ is its value in the fiducial cosmology. The quoted errors include both systematic and statistical contributions. The results on the evolution of distances are consistent with the predictions of flat $\Lambda$-Cold Dark Matter ($\Lambda$-CDM) cosmology with Planck parameters, and the measurement of $f\sigma_{8}$ extends the validity of General Relativity (GR) to higher redshifts($z>1$) This paper is released with companion papers using the same sample. The results on the cosmological parameters of the studies are found to be in very good agreement, providing clear evidence of the complementarity and of the robustness of the first full-shape clustering measurements with the eBOSS DR14 quasar sample.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.03118  [pdf] - 1604793
Constraints from Ly-$\alpha$ forests on non-thermal dark matter including resonantly-produced sterile neutrinos
Comments: Accepted for publication in JCAP. Improvement of exclusion contours derived with the high-resolution data compared to V1 version
Submitted: 2017-06-09, last modified: 2017-11-09
We use BOSS DR9 quasars to constrain 2 cases of dark matter models: cold-plus-warm (C+WDM) where the warm component is a thermal relic, and sterile neutrinos resonantly produced in the presence of a lepton asymmetry (RPSN). We establish constraints on the relic mass m_x and its relative abundance $F=\Omega_{wdm}/\Omega_{dm}$ using a suite of hydrodynamical simulations in 28 C+WDM configurations. We find that the 3 sigma bounds approximately follow F ~ $0.35 (keV/m_x)^{-1.37}$ from BOSS alone. We also establish constraints on sterile neutrino mass and mixing angle by producing the non-linear flux power spectrum of 8 RPSN models, where the input linear power spectrum is computed directly from the particles distribution functions. We find values of lepton asymmetries for which sterile neutrinos as light as 6.5 keV (resp. 3.5 keV) are consistent with BOSS at the 2 sigma (resp. 3sigma) level. These limits tighten by close to a factor of 2 for lepton asymmetries departing from those yielding the coolest distribution functions. Our Ly-a forest bounds can be strengthened if we include higher-resolution data from XQ-100, HIRES and MIKE. At these smaller scales, the flux power spectrum exhibits a suppression that can be due to Doppler broadening, IGM pressure smoothing or free-streaming of WDM particles. In the current work, we show that if one extrapolates temperatures from lower redshifts via broken power laws in T_0 and gamma, then our 3 sigma C+WDM bounds strengthen to F~ $0.20 (keV/m_x)^{-1.37}$, and the lightest RPSN consistent with our extended data set have masses of 7.0 keV at the 3 sigma level. Using dedicated hydrodynamical simulations, we show that a 7 keV sterile neutrino produced in a lepton asymmetry $L = 8 \times 10^{-6}$ is consistent at 1.9 sigma (resp. 3.1 sigma) with BOSS (resp. BOSS + higher-resolution), for the thermal history models tested in this work.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.02225  [pdf] - 1608420
Baryon acoustic oscillations from the complete SDSS-III Ly$\alpha$-quasar cross-correlation function at $z=2.4$
Comments: accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2017-08-07, last modified: 2017-10-04
We present a measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the cross-correlation of quasars with the Ly$\alpha$-forest flux-transmission at a mean redshift $z=2.40$. The measurement uses the complete SDSS-III data sample: 168,889 forests and 234,367 quasars from the SDSS Data Release DR12. In addition to the statistical improvement on our previous study using DR11, we have implemented numerous improvements at the analysis level allowing a more accurate measurement of this cross-correlation. We also developed the first simulations of the cross-correlation allowing us to test different aspects of our data analysis and to search for potential systematic errors in the determination of the BAO peak position. We measure the two ratios $D_{H}(z=2.40)/r_{d} = 9.01 \pm 0.36$ and $D_{M}(z=2.40)/r_{d} = 35.7 \pm 1.7$, where the errors include marginalization over the non-linear velocity of quasars and the metal - quasar cross-correlation contribution, among other effects. These results are within $1.8\sigma$ of the prediction of the flat-$\Lambda$CDM model describing the observed CMB anisotropies. We combine this study with the Ly$\alpha$-forest auto-correlation function [2017A&A...603A..12B], yielding $D_{H}(z=2.40)/r_{d} = 8.94 \pm 0.22$ and $D_{M}(z=2.40)/r_{d} = 36.6 \pm 1.2$, within $2.3\sigma$ of the same flat-$\Lambda$CDM model.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.09126  [pdf] - 1582147
Constraining the mass of light bosonic dark matter using SDSS Lyman-$\alpha$ forest
Comments: Matches accepted version
Submitted: 2017-03-27, last modified: 2017-08-21
If a significant fraction of the dark matter in the Universe is made of an ultra-light scalar field, named fuzzy dark matter (FDM) with a mass $m_a$ of the order of $10^{-22}-10^{-21}$ eV, then its de Broglie wavelength is large enough to impact the physics of large scale structure formation. In particular, the associated cut-off in the linear matter power spectrum modifies the structure of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at the scales probed by the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest of distant quasars. We study this effect by making use of dedicated cosmological simulations which take into account the hydrodynamics of the IGM. We explore heuristically the amplitude of quantum pressure for the FDM masses considered here and conclude that quantum effects should not modify significantly the non-linear evolution of matter density at the scales relevant to the measured Lyman-$\alpha$ flux power, and for $m_a \geq 10^{-22}$ eV. We derive a scaling law between $m_a$ and the mass of the well-studied thermal warm dark matter (WDM) model that is best adapted to the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest data, and differs significantly from the one infered by a simple linear extrapolation. By comparing FDM simulations with the Lyman-$\alpha$ flux power spectra determined from the BOSS survey, and marginalizing over relevant nuisance parameters, we exclude FDM masses in the range $10^{-22} \leq m_a < 2.3\times 10^{-21}$ eV at 95 % CL. Adding higher-resolution Lyman-$\alpha$ spectra extends the exclusion range up to $2.9\times 10^{-21}$ eV. This provides a significant constraint on FDM models tailored to solve the "small-scale problems" of $\Lambda$CDM.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.00052  [pdf] - 1581688
Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Mapping the Milky Way, Nearby Galaxies, and the Distant Universe
Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Abolfathi, Bela; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Alonso-García, Javier; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett; Aquino-Ortíz, Erik; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barger, Kathleen A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Bates, Dominic; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Médéric; Borissova, Jura; Bosch, Remco van den; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam J.; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cappellari, Michele; Carigi, Maria Leticia Delgado; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Carrera, Ricardo; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Chew, Yilen Gómez Maqueo; Chiappini, Cristina; Choi, Peter Doohyun; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comparat, Johan; da Costa, Luiz; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Cuadra, Daniel Garrido; Cunha, Katia; Damke, Guillermo J.; Darling, Jeremy; Davies, Roger; Dawson, Kyle; de la Macorra, Axel; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Di Mille, Francesco; Diamond-Stanic, Aleks; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Donor, John; Downes, Juan José; Drory, Niv; Bourboux, Hélion du Mas des; Duckworth, Christopher J.; Dwelly, Tom; Dyer, Jamie; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Mike; Escoffier, Stephanie; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Feuillet, Diane K.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Fredrickson, Alexander; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbany, Lluís; Garcia-Dias, R.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Gaulme, Patrick; Geisler, Doug; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Goddard, Daniel; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul J.; Grier, Catherine J.; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hahn, ChangHoon; Hall, Matthew; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Fred; Hernández, Jonay I. Gonzalez; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Holzer, Parker H.; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Héctor J.; Ilha, Gabriele da Silva; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivory, KeShawn; Jackson, Kelly; Jensen, Trey W.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jönsson, Henrik; Jullo, Eric; Kamble, Vikrant; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Klaene, Mark; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Law, David R.; Lazarz, Daniel; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Liang, Fu-Heng; Li, Cheng; LI, Hongyu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Yen-Ting; de Lis, Sara Bertran; Liu, Chao; Lizaola, Miguel Angel C. de Icaza; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; MacDonald, Nicholas K.; Machado, Alice Deconto; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio Antonio Geimba; Maiolino, Roberto; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, Arturo; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McDermid, Richard M.; McGrath, Brianne; McGreer, Ian D.; Peña, Nicolás Medina; Melendez, Matthew; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Minchev, Ivan; Minniti, Dante; Miyaji, Takamitsu; More, Surhud; Mulchaey, John; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Muna, Demitri; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Nascimento, Janaina Correa do; Negrete, Alenka; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Ntelis, Pierros; O'Connell, Julia E.; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palicio, Pedro Alonso; Pan, Kaike; Parikh, Taniya; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patten, Alim Y.; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Pisani, Alice; Poleski, Radosław; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Queiroz, Anna Bárbara de Andrade; Raddick, M. Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Rembold, Sandro Barboza; Richstein, Hannah; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Roman-Lopes, A.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Rosado, Margarita; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Rykoff, Eli S.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Aguado, David Sánchez; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Santana, Felipe A.; Santiago, Basílio Xavier; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schimoia, Jaderson da Silva; Schlafly, Edward F.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schuster, William J.; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shao, Zhengyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Simon, Joshua D.; Skinner, Danielle; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sobreira, Flavia; Somers, Garrett; Souto, Diogo; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan; Stauffer, Fritz; Steinmetz, Matthias; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suárez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Suzuki, Nao; Szigeti, Laszlo; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Teske, Johanna; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Toledo, Hector Hernandez; de la Torre, Sylvain; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas W.; Valenzuela, Octavio; Valpuesta, Inma Martinez; Vargas-González, Jaime; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vivek, M.; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wild, Vivienne; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yèche, Christophe; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zoccali, Manuela; Zou, Hu
Comments: Published in Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2017-02-28, last modified: 2017-06-29
We describe the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV), a project encompassing three major spectroscopic programs. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2) is observing hundreds of thousands of Milky Way stars at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio in the near-infrared. The Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey is obtaining spatially-resolved spectroscopy for thousands of nearby galaxies (median redshift of z = 0.03). The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) is mapping the galaxy, quasar, and neutral gas distributions between redshifts z = 0.6 and 3.5 to constrain cosmology using baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions, and the shape of the power spectrum. Within eBOSS, we are conducting two major subprograms: the SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources (SPIDERS), investigating X-ray AGN and galaxies in X-ray clusters, and the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), obtaining spectra of variable sources. All programs use the 2.5-meter Sloan Foundation Telescope at Apache Point Observatory; observations there began in Summer 2014. APOGEE-2 also operates a second near-infrared spectrograph at the 2.5-meter du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, with observations beginning in early 2017. Observations at both facilities are scheduled to continue through 2020. In keeping with previous SDSS policy, SDSS-IV provides regularly scheduled public data releases; the first one, Data Release 13, was made available in July 2016.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.04718  [pdf] - 1583396
Clustering of quasars in SDSS-IV eBOSS : study of potential systematics and bias determination
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-05-12
We study the first year of the eBOSS quasar sample in the redshift range $0.9<z<2.2$ which includes 68,772 homogeneously selected quasars. We show that the main source of systematics in the evaluation of the correlation function arises from inhomogeneities in the quasar target selection, particularly related to the extinction and depth of the imaging data used for targeting. We propose a weighting scheme that mitigates these systematics. We measure the quasar correlation function and provide the most accurate measurement to date of the quasar bias in this redshift range, $b_Q = 2.45 \pm 0.05$ at $\bar z=1.55$, together with its evolution with redshift. We use this information to determine the minimum mass of the halo hosting the quasars and the characteristic halo mass, which we find to be both independent of redshift within statistical error. Using a recently-measured quasar-luminosity-function we also determine the quasar duty cycle. The size of this first year sample is insufficient to detect any luminosity dependence to quasar clustering and this issue should be further studied with the final $\sim$500,000 eBOSS quasar sample.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.00338  [pdf] - 1582298
The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: final Emission Line Galaxy Target Selection
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS, 18 pages
Submitted: 2017-04-02
We describe the algorithm used to select the Emission Line Galaxy (ELG) sample at $z \sim 0.85$ for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV, using photometric data from the DECam Legacy Survey. Our selection is based on a selection box in the $g-r$ vs. $r-z$ colour-colour space and a cut on the $g$-band magnitude, to favour galaxies in the desired redshift range with strong [OII] emission. It provides a target density of 200 deg$^{-2}$ on the North Galactic Cap (NGC) and of 240 deg$^{-2}$ on the South Galactic Cap (SGC), where we use a larger selection box because of deeper imaging. We demonstrate that this selection passes the eBOSS requirements in terms of homogeneity. About 50,000 ELGs have been observed since the observations have started in 2016, September. These roughly match the expected redshift distribution, though the measured efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The efficiency can be increased by enlarging the redshift range and with incoming pipeline improvement. The cosmological forecast based on these first data predict $\sigma_{D_V}/D_V = 0.023$, in agreement with previous forecasts. Lastly, we present the stellar population properties of the ELG SGC sample. Once observations are completed, this sample will be suited to provide a cosmological analysis at $z \sim 0.85$, and will pave the way for the next decade of massive spectroscopic cosmological surveys, which heavily rely on ELGs. The target catalogue over the SGC will be released along with DR14.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.00176  [pdf] - 1581338
Measurement of BAO correlations at $z=2.3$ with SDSS DR12 \lya-Forests
Comments: 22 pages, accepted A&A
Submitted: 2017-02-01, last modified: 2017-03-27
We use flux-transmission correlations in \Lya forests to measure the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). The study uses spectra of 157,783 quasars in the redshift range $2.1\le z \le 3.5$ from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 (DR12). Besides the statistical improvements on our previous studies using SDSS DR9 and DR11, we have implemented numerous improvements in the analysis procedure, allowing us to construct a physical model of the correlation function and to investigate potential systematic errors in the determination of the BAO peak position. The Hubble distance, $\DHub=c/H(z)$, relative to the sound horizon is $\DHub(z=2.33)/r_d=9.07 \pm 0.31$. The best-determined combination of comoving angular-diameter distance, $\DM$, and the Hubble distance is found to be $\DHub^{0.7}\DM^{0.3}/r_d=13.94\pm0.35$. This value is $1.028\pm0.026$ times the prediction of the flat-\lcdm model consistent with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy spectrum. The errors include marginalization over the effects of unidentified high-density absorption systems and fluctuations in ultraviolet ionizing radiation. Independently of the CMB measurements, the combination of our results and other BAO observations determine the open-\lcdm density parameters to be $\om=0.296 \pm 0.029$, $\ol=0.699 \pm 0.100$ and $\Omega_k = -0.002 \pm 0.119$.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.06934  [pdf] - 1532740
The SDSS-IV eBOSS: emission line galaxy catalogues at z=0.8 and study of systematic errors in the angular clustering
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 16 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2016-11-21
We present two wide-field catalogs of photometrically-selected emission line galaxies (ELGs) at z=0.8 covering about 2800 deg^2 over the south galactic cap. The catalogs were obtained using a Fisher discriminant technique described in a companion paper. The two catalogs differ by the imaging used to define the Fisher discriminant: the first catalog includes imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, the second also includes information from the South Galactic Cap U-band Sky Survey (SCUSS). Containing respectively 560,045 and 615,601 objects, they represent the largest ELG catalogs available today and were designed for the ELG programme of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). We study potential sources of systematic variation in the angular distribution of the selected ELGs due to fluctuations of the observational parameters. We model the influence of the observational parameters using a multivariate regression and implement a weighting scheme that allows effective removal of all of the systematic errors induced by the observational parameters. We show that fluctuations in the imaging zero-points of the photometric bands have minor impact on the angular distribution of objects in our catalogs. We compute the angular clustering of both catalogs and show that our weighting procedure effectively removes spurious clustering on large scales. We fit a model to the small scale angular clustering, showing that the selections have similar biases of 1.35/D_a(z) and 1.28/D_a(z). Both catalogs are publicly available.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.06483  [pdf] - 1531339
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog: twelfth data release
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. The catalog is publicly available here: http://www.sdss.org/dr12/algorithms/boss-dr12-quasar-catalog
Submitted: 2016-08-23
We present the Data Release 12 Quasar catalog (DR12Q) from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the SDSS-III. This catalog includes all SDSS-III/BOSS objects that were spectroscopically targeted as quasar candidates during the full survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra, have luminosities Mi[z=2]<-20.5 (in a LCDM cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega _L=0.7), and either display at least one emission line with a full width at half maximum (FWHM)larger than 500 km/s or, if not, have interesting/complex absorption features. The catalog also includes previously known quasars (mostly from SDSS-I and II) that were reobserved by BOSS. The catalog contains 297,301 quasars detected over 9,376 square degrees with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra. The number of quasars with z>2.15 is about an order of magnitude greater than the number of z>2.15 quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 29,580 broad absorption line quasars and lists their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-based photometry together with some information on the optical morphology and the selection criteria. When available, the catalog also provides information on the optical variability of quasars using SDSS and PTF multi-epoch photometry. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra, covering the wavelength region 3,600-10,500A at a spectral resolution in the range 1,300<R<2,500, can be retrieved from the SDSS Catalog Archive Server.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.04356  [pdf] - 1445263
Clustering properties of $g$-selected galaxies at $z\sim0.8$
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2015-07-15, last modified: 2016-07-26
Current and future large redshift surveys, as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-IV/eBOSS) or the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), will use emission-line galaxies (ELG) to probe cosmological models by mapping the large-scale structure of the Universe in the redshift range $0.6 < z < 1.7$. With current data, we explore the halo-galaxy connection by measuring three clustering properties of $g$-selected ELGs as matter tracers in the redshift range $0.6 < z < 1$: (i) the redshift-space two-point correlation function using spectroscopic redshifts from the BOSS ELG sample and VIPERS; (ii) the angular two-point correlation function on the footprint of the CFHT-LS; (iii) the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal around the ELGs using the CFHTLenS. We interpret these observations by mapping them onto the latest high-resolution MultiDark Planck N-body simulation, using a novel (Sub)Halo-Abundance Matching technique that accounts for the ELG incompleteness. ELGs at $z\sim0.8$ live in halos of $(1\pm 0.5)\times10^{12}\,h^{-1}$M$_{\odot}$ and 22.5$\pm2.5$% of them are satellites belonging to a larger halo. The halo occupation distribution of ELGs indicates that we are sampling the galaxies in which stars form in the most efficient way, according to their stellar-to-halo mass ratio.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.01981  [pdf] - 1453177
Lyman-alpha Forests cool Warm Dark Matter
Comments: 25 pages, 8 figures. Accepted in JCAP. Contents presented at the 2015 SDSS-IV collaboration meeting in Madrid, Spain; 2016 eBOSS collaboration meeting at the EPFL (Lausanne), CH; and the 28th Rencontres de Blois (2016)
Submitted: 2015-12-07, last modified: 2016-07-20
The free-streaming of keV-scale particles impacts structure growth on scales that are probed by the Lyman-alpha forest of distant quasars. Using an unprecedentedly large sample of medium-resolution QSO spectra from the ninth data release of SDSS, along with a state-of-the-art set of hydrodynamical simulations to model the Lyman-alpha forest in the non-linear regime, we issue one of the tightest bounds to date, from Ly-$\alpha$ data alone, on pure dark matter particles : $m_X > 4.09 \: \rm{keV}$ (95% CL) for early decoupled thermal relics such as a hypothetical gravitino, and correspondingly $m_s > 24.4 \: \rm{keV}$ (95% CL) for a non-resonantly produced right-handed neutrino. This limit depends on the value on $n_s$, and Planck measures a higher value of $n_s$ than SDSS-III/BOSS. Our bounds thus change slightly when Ly-$\alpha$ data are combined with CMB data from Planck 2016. The limits shift to $m_X > 2.96 \: \rm{keV}$ (95% CL) and $m_s > 16.0 \: \rm{keV}$ (95% CL). Thanks to SDSS-III data featuring smaller uncertainties and covering a larger redshift range than SDSS-I data, our bounds confirm the most stringent results established by previous works and are further at odds with a purely non-resonantly produced sterile neutrino as dark matter.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.03155  [pdf] - 1580060
The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological analysis of the DR12 galaxy sample
Comments: 38 pages, 20 figures, 12 tables. Submitted to MNRAS. Clustering data and likelihoods are made available at https://sdss3.org/science/boss_publications.php
Submitted: 2016-07-11
We present cosmological results from the final galaxy clustering data set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our combined galaxy sample comprises 1.2 million massive galaxies over an effective area of 9329 deg^2 and volume of 18.7 Gpc^3, divided into three partially overlapping redshift slices centred at effective redshifts 0.38, 0.51, and 0.61. We measure the angular diameter distance DM and Hubble parameter H from the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method after applying reconstruction to reduce non-linear effects on the BAO feature. Using the anisotropic clustering of the pre-reconstruction density field, we measure the product DM*H from the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the growth of structure, quantified by f{\sigma}8(z), from redshift-space distortions (RSD). We combine measurements presented in seven companion papers into a set of consensus values and likelihoods, obtaining constraints that are tighter and more robust than those from any one method. Combined with Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background measurements, our distance scale measurements simultaneously imply curvature {\Omega}_K =0.0003+/-0.0026 and a dark energy equation of state parameter w = -1.01+/-0.06, in strong affirmation of the spatially flat cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant ({\Lambda}CDM). Our RSD measurements of f{\sigma}_8, at 6 per cent precision, are similarly consistent with this model. When combined with supernova Ia data, we find H0 = 67.3+/-1.0 km/s/Mpc even for our most general dark energy model, in tension with some direct measurements. Adding extra relativistic species as a degree of freedom loosens the constraint only slightly, to H0 = 67.8+/-1.2 km/s/Mpc. Assuming flat {\Lambda}CDM we find {\Omega}_m = 0.310+/-0.005 and H0 = 67.6+/-0.5 km/s/Mpc, and we find a 95% upper limit of 0.16 eV/c^2 on the neutrino mass sum.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.02875  [pdf] - 1431153
The evolution of the [OII], H{\beta} and [OIII] emission-line luminosity functions over the last nine billions years
Comments: 11 pages. Accepted in MNRAS. Data available at http://projects.ift.uam-csic.es/skies-universes/ via the page emission line luminosity functions
Submitted: 2016-05-10, last modified: 2016-06-30
Emission line galaxies are one of the main tracers of the large-scale structure to be targeted by the next-generation dark energy surveys. To provide a better understanding of the properties and statistics of these galaxies, we have collected spectroscopic data from the VVDS and DEEP2 deep surveys and estimated the galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) of three distinct emission lines, [OII] ($0.5 < z < 1.3$), H{\beta} ($0.3 < z < 0.8$) and [OIII] ($0.3 < z < 0.8$). Our measurements are based on 35,639 emission line galaxies and cover a volume of $\sim10^7$Mpc$^3$. We present the first measurement of the H{\beta} LF at these redshifts. We have also compiled LFs from the literature that were based on independent data or covered different redshift ranges, and we fit the entire set over the whole redshift range with analytic Schechter and Saunders models, assuming a natural redshift dependence of the parameters. We find that the characteristic luminosity ($L_*$) and density ($\phi_*$) of all LFs increase with redshift. Using the Schechter model over the redshift ranges considered, we find that, for [OII] emitters, the characteristic luminosity $L_*(z=0.5)=3.2\times10^{41}$ erg/s increases by a factor of $2.7 \pm 0.2$ from z=0.5 to 1.3; for H{\beta} emitters $L_*(z=0.3)=1.3\times10^{41}$ erg/s increases by a factor of $2.0 \pm 0.2$ from z=0.3 to 0.8; and for [OIII] emitters $L_*(z=0.3)=7.3\times10^{41}$ erg/s increases by a factor of $3.5 \pm 0.4$ from z=0.3 to 0.8.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.07306  [pdf] - 1376501
Quasar Host Environments: The view from Planck
Comments: 14 pages, 11 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2015-09-24, last modified: 2016-03-18
We measure the far-infrared emission of the general quasar (QSO) population using Planck observations of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey QSO sample. By applying multi-component matched multi-filters to the seven highest Planck frequencies, we extract the amplitudes of dust, synchrotron and thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signals for nearly 300,000 QSOs over the redshift range $0.1<z<5$. We bin these individually low signal-to-noise measurements to obtain the mean emission properties of the QSO population as a function of redshift. The emission is dominated by dust at all redshifts, with a peak at $z \sim 2$, the same location as the peak in the general cosmic star formation rate. Restricting analysis to radio-loud QSOs, we find synchrotron emission with a monochromatic luminosity at $100\,\rm{GHz}$ (rest-frame) rising from $\overline{L_{\rm synch}}=0$ to $0.2 \, {\rm L_\odot} {\rm Hz}^{-1}$ between $z=0$ and 3. The radio-quiet subsample does not show any synchrotron emission, but we detect thermal SZ between $z=2.5$ and 4; no significant SZ emission is seen at lower redshifts. Depending on the supposed mass for the halos hosting the QSOs, this may or may not leave room for heating of the halo gas by feedback from the QSO.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.08216  [pdf] - 1356389
The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS): a cosmological forecast
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures, 6 tables; matches the published version on MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-10-28, last modified: 2016-02-11
We present a science forecast for the eBOSS survey, part of the SDSS-IV project, which is a spectroscopic survey using multiple tracers of large-scale structure, including luminous red galaxies (LRGs), emission line galaxies (ELGs) and quasars (both as a direct probe of structure and through the Ly-$\alpha$ forest). Focusing on discrete tracers, we forecast the expected accuracy of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO), the redshift-space distortion (RSD) measurements, the $f_{\rm NL}$ parameter quantifying the primordial non-Gaussianity, the dark energy and modified gravity parameters. We also use the line-of-sight clustering in the Ly-$\alpha$ forest to constrain the total neutrino mass. We find that eBOSS LRGs ($0.6<z<1.0$) (combined with the BOSS LRGs at $z>0.6$), ELGs ($0.6<z<1.2$) and Clustering Quasars (CQs) ($0.6<z<2.2$) can achieve a precision of 1%, 2.2% and 1.6% precisions, respectively, for spherically averaged BAO distance measurements. Using the same samples, the constraint on $f\sigma_8$ is expected to be 2.5%, 3.3% and 2.8% respectively. For primordial non-Gaussianity, eBOSS alone can reach an accuracy of $\sigma(f_{\rm NL})\sim10-15$, depending on the external measurement of the galaxy bias and our ability to model large-scale systematic errors. eBOSS can at most improve the dark energy Figure of Merit (FoM) by a factor of $3$ for the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) parametrisation, and can well constrain three eigenmodes for the general equation-of-state parameter (Abridged).
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.01797  [pdf] - 1336838
The SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: selecting emission line galaxies using the Fisher discriminant
Comments: Version published in A&A
Submitted: 2015-05-07, last modified: 2016-01-07
We present a new selection technique of producing spectroscopic target catalogues for massive spectroscopic surveys for cosmology. This work was conducted in the context of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS), which will use ~200 000 emission line galaxies (ELGs) at 0.6<zspec<1.0 to obtain a precise baryon acoustic oscillation measurement. Our proposed selection technique is based on optical and near-infrared broad-band filter photometry. We used a training sample to define a quantity, the Fisher discriminant (linear combination of colours), which correlates best with the desired properties of the target: redshift and [OII] flux. The proposed selections are simply done by applying a cut on magnitudes and this Fisher discriminant. We used public data and dedicated SDSS spectroscopy to quantify the redshift distribution and [OII] flux of our ELG target selections. We demonstrate that two of our selections fulfil the initial eBOSS/ELG redshift requirements: for a target density of 180 deg^2, ~70% of the selected objects have 0.6<zspec<1.0 and only ~1% of those galaxies in the range 0.6<zspec<1.0 are expected to have a catastrophic zspec estimate. Additionally, the stacked spectra and stacked deep images for those two selections show characteristic features of star-forming galaxies. The proposed approach using the Fisher discriminant could, however, be used to efficiently select other galaxy populations, based on multi-band photometry, providing that spectroscopic information is available. This technique could thus be useful for other future massive spectroscopic surveys such as PFS, DESI, and 4MOST.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.05607  [pdf] - 1358866
The Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Variability Selection and Quasar Luminosity Function
Comments: 15 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2015-09-18, last modified: 2015-12-08
The SDSS-IV/eBOSS has an extensive quasar program that combines several selection methods. Among these, the photometric variability technique provides highly uniform samples, unaffected by the redshift bias of traditional optical-color selections, when $z= 2.7 - 3.5$ quasars cross the stellar locus or when host galaxy light affects quasar colors at $z < 0.9$. Here, we present the variability selection of quasars in eBOSS, focusing on a specific program that led to a sample of 13,876 quasars to $g_{\rm dered}=22.5$ over a 94.5 deg$^2$ region in Stripe 82, an areal density 1.5 times higher than over the rest of the eBOSS footprint. We use these variability-selected data to provide a new measurement of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) in the redshift range $0.68<z<4.0$. Our sample is denser, reaches deeper than those used in previous studies of the QLF, and is among the largest ones. At the faint end, our QLF extends to $M_g(z\!=\!2)=-21.80$ at low redshift and to $M_g(z\!=\!2)=-26.20$ at $z\sim 4$. We fit the QLF using two independent double-power-law models with ten free parameters each. The first model is a pure luminosity-function evolution (PLE) with bright-end and faint-end slopes allowed to be different on either side of $z=2.2$. The other is a simple PLE at $z<2.2$, combined with a model that comprises both luminosity and density evolution (LEDE) at $z>2.2$. Both models are constrained to be continuous at $z=2.2$. They present a flattening of the bright-end slope at large redshift. The LEDE model indicates a reduction of the break density with increasing redshift, but the evolution of the break magnitude depends on the parameterization. The models are in excellent accord, predicting quasar counts that agree within 0.3\% (resp., 1.1\%) to $g<22.5$ (resp., $g<23$). The models are also in good agreement over the entire redshift range with models from previous studies.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.1074  [pdf] - 1330925
Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements
Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Busca, Nicolás G.; Carithers, William; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Delubac, Timothée; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Goff, J. -M. Le; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Gott, J. Richard; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Howlett, Cullan; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lee, Khee-Gan; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; McBride, Cameron K.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Reid, Beth; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Samushia, Lado; Santos, Ricardo Tanausú Génova; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A.; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo
Comments: 38 pages, 20 figures, BOSS collaboration paper; v2: fixed inconsistent definitions of DH, added references; v3: version accepted by PRD, corrected error resulting in significantly weaker constraints on decaying dark matter model
Submitted: 2014-11-04, last modified: 2015-10-09
We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Type Ia supernova (SN) data. We take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Ly-alpha forest (LyaF) in the BOSS survey of SDSS-III. BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy, and in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Combining BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a 1.7% measurement of $H_0=67.3 \pm1.1$ km/s/Mpc. This measurement assumes standard pre-recombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat LCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For open LCDM, our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields $\Omega_m=0.301 \pm 0.008$ and curvature $\Omega_k=-0.003 \pm 0.003$. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints remain consistent with flat LCDM. While the overall $\chi^2$ of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2-2.5 sigma) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshifts remain consistent with our constraints. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit of 0.56 eV on the summed mass of neutrino species, improving to 0.26 eV if we include Planck CMB lensing. Standard dark energy models constrained by our data predict a level of matter clustering that is high compared to most, but not all, observational estimates. (Abridged)
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.07979  [pdf] - 1330980
Near-ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Star-forming Galaxies from eBOSS: Signatures of Ubiquitous Galactic-scale Outflows
Comments: 32 pages, 28 figures, 2 tables. Submitted to ApJ. Comments are most welcome
Submitted: 2015-07-28
We present the rest-frame near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectroscopy of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 0.6<z<1.2 from the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) in SDSS-IV. One of the eBOSS programs is to obtain 2 arcsec (about 15 kpc) fiber spectra of about 200,000 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) at redshift z>0.6. We use the data from the pilot observations of this program, including 8620 spectra of SFGs at 0.6<z<1.2. The median composite spectra of these SFGs at 2200 Ang < \lambda < 4000 Ang feature asymmetric, preferentially blueshifted non-resonant emission, Fe II*, and blueshifted resonant absorption, e.g., Fe II and Mg II, indicating ubiquitous outflows driven by star formation at these redshifts. For the absorption lines, we find a variety of velocity profiles with different degrees of blueshift. Comparing our new observations with the literature, we do not observe the non-resonant emission in the small-aperture (<40 pc) spectra of local star-forming regions with the Hubble Space Telescope, and find the observed line ratios in the SFG spectra to be different from those in the spectra of local star-forming regions, as well as those of quasar absorption-line systems in the same redshift range. We introduce an outflow model that can simultaneously explain the multiple observed properties and suggest that the variety of absorption velocity profiles and the line ratio differences are caused by scattered fluorescent emission filling in on top of the absorption in the large-aperture eBOSS spectra. We develop an observation-driven, model-independent method to correct the emission-infill to reveal the true absorption profiles. Our results show that eBOSS and future dark-energy surveys (e.g., DESI and PFS) will provide rich datasets of NUV spectroscopy for astrophysical applications.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.00963  [pdf] - 1449756
The Eleventh and Twelfth Data Releases of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Final Data from SDSS-III
Alam, Shadab; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, F.; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Beers, Timothy C.; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, A. Shelden; Brandt, W. N.; Brauer, D. E.; Brinkmann, J.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cai, Zheng; Capozzi, Diego; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Carrera, Ricardo; Chen, Yen-Chi; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Clerc, Nicolas; Comparat, Johan; Covey, Kevin; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Cunha, Katia; da Costa, Luiz N.; Da Rio, Nicola; Davenport, James R. A.; Dawson, Kyle S.; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Dwelly, Tom; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Feuillet, Diane; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Finoguenov, Alexis; Flaherty, Kevin; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foster, Jonathan; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbraith-Frew, J. G.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, Ana E. García; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Ghezzi, Luan; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; Goddard, Daniel; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Hernández, Jonay I. González; Grebel, Eva K.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Grieves, Nolan; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Fred R.; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Jiang, Linhua; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Klaene, Mark A.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koenig, Xavier P.; Lam, Charles R.; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Licquia, Timothy C.; Liu, Jian; Long, Daniel C.; López-Corredoira, Martín; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H.; Mack, Claude E.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Manera, Marc; Mao, Qingqing; Maraston, Claudia; Marchwinski, Robert C.; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; Martig, Marie; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McGehee, Peregrine M.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Miller, Adam A.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; More, Surhud; Morice-Atkinson, Xan; Morrison, Heather L.; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam D.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Neyrinck, Mark; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; O'Connell, Julia E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; O'Connell, Ross; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Audrey E.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Osumi, Keisuke; Owen, Russell; Padgett, Deborah L.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Paegert, Martin; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Park, Changbom; Pâris, Isabelle; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Pellejero-Ibanez, M.; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; de Mello, Gustavo F. Porto; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Reid, Beth A.; Rich, James; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Rodríguez-Rottes, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John J.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schwope, Axel D.; Scóccola, C. G.; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shane, Neville; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Sobreira, Flávia; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Tayar, Jamie; Terrien, Ryan C.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Verde, Licia; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; White, Martin; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhimin; Zhu, Guangtun; Zou, Hu
Comments: DR12 data are available at http://www.sdss3.org/dr12. 30 pages. 11 figures. Accepted to ApJS
Submitted: 2015-01-05, last modified: 2015-05-21
The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 sq. deg of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 stars from the Multi-Object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The APOGEE outputs now include measured abundances of 15 different elements for each star. In total, SDSS-III added 2350 sq. deg of ugriz imaging; 155,520 spectra of 138,099 stars as part of the Sloan Exploration of Galactic Understanding and Evolution 2 (SEGUE-2) survey; 2,497,484 BOSS spectra of 1,372,737 galaxies, 294,512 quasars, and 247,216 stars over 9376 sq. deg; 618,080 APOGEE spectra of 156,593 stars; and 197,040 MARVELS spectra of 5,513 stars. Since its first light in 1998, SDSS has imaged over 1/3 of the Celestial sphere in five bands and obtained over five million astronomical spectra.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.04088  [pdf] - 1351419
Large-scale clustering of Lyman-alpha emission intensity from SDSS/BOSS
Comments: 32 pages, 29 figures. Submitted to MNRAS. Video summary of the paper at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9E6Ap66G5h0
Submitted: 2015-04-15
(Abridged) We detect the large-scale structure of Lya emission in the Universe at redshifts z=2-3.5 by measuring the cross-correlation of Lya surface brightness with quasars in SDSS/BOSS. We use a million spectra targeting Luminous Red Galaxies at z<0.8, after subtracting a best fit model galaxy spectrum from each one, as an estimate of the high-redshift Lya surface brightness. The quasar-Lya emission cross-correlation we detect has a shape consistent with a LambdaCDM model with Omega_M =0.30^+0.10-0.07. The predicted amplitude of this cross-correlation is proportional to the product of the mean Lya surface brightness, <mu_alpha>, the amplitude of mass fluctuations, and the quasar and Lya emission bias factors. Using known values, we infer <mu_alpha>(b_alpha/3) = (3.9 +/- 0.9) x 10^-21 erg/s cm^-2 A^-1 arcsec^-2, where b_alpha is the Lya emission bias factor. If the dominant sources of Lya emission are star forming galaxies, we infer rho_SFR = (0.28 +/- 0.07) (3/b_alpha) /yr/Mpc^3 at z=2-3.5. For b_alpha=3, this value is a factor of 21-35 above previous estimates from individually detected Lya emitters, although consistent with the total rho_SFR derived from dust-corrected, continuum UV surveys. 97% of the Lya emission in the Universe at these redshifts is therefore undetected in previous surveys of Lya emitters. Our measurement is much greater than seen from stacking analyses of faint halos surrounding previously detected Lya emitters, but we speculate that it arises from similar Lya halos surrounding all luminous star-forming galaxies. We also detect redshift space anisotropy of the quasar-Lya emission cross-correlation, finding evidence at the 3.0 sigma level that it is radially elongated, consistent with distortions caused by radiative-transfer effects (Zheng et al. (2011)). Our measurements represent the first application of the intensity mapping technique to optical observations.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.2597  [pdf] - 1055651
Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Photometric Quasar Clustering: Probing the Initial Conditions of the Universe using the Largest Volume
Comments: 35 pages, 15 figures
Submitted: 2013-11-11, last modified: 2015-03-25
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has surveyed 14,555 square degrees of the sky, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present the large-scale clustering of 1.6 million quasars between z = 0.5 and z = 2.5 that have been classified from this imaging, representing the highest density of quasars ever studied for clustering measurements. This data set spans ~11,000 square degrees and probes a volume of 80(Gpc/h)^3. In principle, such a large volume and medium density of tracers should facilitate high-precision cosmological constraints. We measure the angular clustering of photometrically classified quasars using an optimal quadratic estimator in four redshift slices with an accuracy of ~25% over a bin width of l ~10 - 15 on scales corresponding to matter-radiation equality and larger (l ~ 2 - 30). Observational systematics can strongly bias clustering measurements on large scales, which can mimic cosmologically relevant signals such as deviations from Gaussianity in the spectrum of primordial perturbations. We account for systematics by employing a new method recently proposed by Agarwal et al. (2014) to the clustering of photometrically classified quasars. We carefully apply our methodology to mitigate known observational systematics and further remove angular bins that are contaminated by unknown systematics. Combining quasar data with the photometric luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample of Ross et al. (2011) and Ho et al. (2012), and marginalizing over all bias and shot noise-like parameters, we obtain a constraint on local primordial non-Gaussianity of fNL = -113+/-154 (1\sigma error). [Abridged]
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.7244  [pdf] - 1222810
Constraint on neutrino masses from SDSS-III/BOSS Ly$\alpha$ forest and other cosmological probes
Comments: 38 pages, 14 figures, version accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2014-10-27, last modified: 2015-01-12
We present constraints on the parameters of the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model in the presence of massive neutrinos, using the one-dimensional Ly$\alpha$ forest power spectrum obtained with the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by Palanque-Delabrouille et al. (2013), complemented by additional cosmological probes. The interpretation of the measured Ly$\alpha$ spectrum is done using a second-order Taylor expansion of the simulated power spectrum. BOSS Ly$\alpha$ data alone provide better bounds than previous Ly$\alpha$ results, but are still poorly constraining, especially for the sum of neutrino masses $\sum m_\nu$, for which we obtain an upper bound of 1.1~eV (95\% CL), including systematics for both data and simulations. Ly$\alpha$ constraints on $\Lambda$CDM parameters and neutrino masses are compatible with CMB bounds from the Planck collaboration. Interestingly, the combination of Ly$\alpha$ with CMB data reduces the uncertainties significantly, due to very different directions of degeneracy in parameter space, leading to the strongest cosmological bound to date on the total neutrino mass, $\sum m_\nu < 0.15$~eV at 95\% CL (with a best-fit in zero). Adding recent BAO results further tightens this constraint to $\sum m_\nu < 0.14$~eV at 95\% CL. This bound is nearly independent of the statistical approach used, and of the different combinations of CMB and BAO data sets considered in this paper in addition to Ly$\alpha$. Given the measured values of the two squared mass differences $\Delta m^2$, this result tends to favor the normal hierarchy scenario against the inverted hierarchy scenario for the masses of the active neutrino species.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.1801  [pdf] - 926607
Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Ly{\alpha} forest of BOSS DR11 quasars
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. 17 pages, 18 figures
Submitted: 2014-04-07, last modified: 2014-12-15
We report a detection of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the flux-correlation function of the Ly{\alpha} forest of high-redshift quasars with a statistical significance of five standard deviations. The study uses 137,562 quasars in the redshift range $2.1\le z \le 3.5$ from the Data Release 11 (DR11) of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of SDSS-III. This sample contains three times the number of quasars used in previous studies. The measured position of the BAO peak determines the angular distance, $D_A(z=2.34)$ and expansion rate, $H(z=2.34)$, both on a scale set by the sound horizon at the drag epoch, $r_d$. We find $D_A/r_d=11.28\pm0.65(1\sigma)^{+2.8}_{-1.2}(2\sigma)$ and $D_H/r_d=9.18\pm0.28(1\sigma)\pm0.6(2\sigma)$ where $D_H=c/H$. The optimal combination, $\sim D_H^{0.7}D_A^{0.3}/r_d$ is determined with a precision of $\sim2\%$. For the value $r_d=147.4~{\rm Mpc}$, consistent with the CMB power spectrum measured by Planck, we find $D_A(z=2.34)=1662\pm96(1\sigma)~{\rm Mpc}$ and $H(z=2.34)=222\pm7(1\sigma)~{\rm km\,s^{-1}Mpc^{-1}}$. Tests with mock catalogs and variations of our analysis procedure have revealed no systematic uncertainties comparable to our statistical errors. Our results agree with the previously reported BAO measurement at the same redshift using the quasar-Ly{\alpha} forest cross-correlation. The auto-correlation and cross-correlation approaches are complementary because of the quite different impact of redshift-space distortion on the two measurements. The combined constraints from the two correlation functions imply values of $D_A/r_d$ and $D_H/r_d$ that are, respectively, 7% low and 7% high compared to the predictions of a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model with the best-fit Planck parameters. With our estimated statistical errors, the significance of this discrepancy is $\approx 2.5\sigma$.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.6472  [pdf] - 1202981
New approach for precise computation of Lyman-alpha forest power spectrum with hydrodynamical simulations
Comments: 30 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in JCAP. Has a companion paper Rossi et al. (2014)
Submitted: 2014-01-24, last modified: 2014-06-11
We present a suite of cosmological N-body simulations with cold dark matter and baryons aiming at modeling the low-density regions of the IGM as probed by the Lyman-$\alpha$ forests at high redshift. The simulations are designed to match the requirements imposed by the quality of BOSS and eBOSS data. They are made using either 2x768$^3$ or 2x192$^3$ particles, spanning volumes ranging from (25 Mpc.h$^{-1})^3$ for high-resolution simulations to (100 Mpc.h$^{-1})^3$ for large-volume ones. Using a splicing technique, the resolution is further enhanced to reach the equivalent of simulations with 2x3072$^3$= 58 billion particles in a (100 Mpc.h$^{-1}$)^3 box size, i.e. a mean mass per gas particle of 1.2x10$^5$M_sun.h$^{-1}$. We show that the resulting power spectrum is accurate at the 2% level over the full range from a few Mpc to several tens of Mpc. We explore the effect on the one-dimensional transmitted-flux power spectrum of 4 cosmological parameters ($n_s, \sigma_8, \Omega_m, H_0$) and 2 astrophysical parameters ($T_0, \gamma$) related to the heating rate of the IGM. By varying the input parameters around a central model chosen to be in agreement with the latest Planck results, we built a grid of simulations that allows the study of the impact on the flux power spectrum of these six relevant parameters. We improve upon previous studies by not only measuring the effect of each parameter individually, but also probing the impact of the simultaneous variation of each pair of parameters. We thus provide a full second-order expansion, including cross-terms, around our central model. We check the validity of the second-order expansion with independent simulations obtained either with different cosmological parameters or different seeds. Finally, a comparison to the one-dimensional Ly-$\alpha$ forest power spectrum obtained with BOSS shows an excellent agreement.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.2954  [pdf] - 807284
Characterizing unknown systematics in large scale structure surveys
Comments: 24 pages, 6 figures; Expanded discussion of results, added figure 2; Version to be published in JCAP
Submitted: 2013-09-11, last modified: 2014-04-07
Photometric large scale structure (LSS) surveys probe the largest volumes in the Universe, but are inevitably limited by systematic uncertainties. Imperfect photometric calibration leads to biases in our measurements of the density fields of LSS tracers such as galaxies and quasars, and as a result in cosmological parameter estimation. Earlier studies have proposed using cross-correlations between different redshift slices or cross-correlations between different surveys to reduce the effects of such systematics. In this paper we develop a method to characterize unknown systematics. We demonstrate that while we do not have sufficient information to correct for unknown systematics in the data, we can obtain an estimate of their magnitude. We define a parameter to estimate contamination from unknown systematics using cross-correlations between different redshift slices and propose discarding bins in the angular power spectrum that lie outside a certain contamination tolerance level. We show that this method improves estimates of the bias using simulated data and further apply it to photometric luminous red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a case study.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.7735  [pdf] - 1173047
The Tenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment
Ahn, Christopher P.; Alexandroff, Rachael; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Bautista, Julian E.; Beers, Timothy C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Borde, Arnaud; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, Alaina Shelden; Brandt, W. N.; Brauer, Dorothée; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Busca, Nicolás G.; Carithers, William; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Carnero, Aurelio R.; Carr, Michael A.; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Crepp, Justin R.; Cristiani, Stefano; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Cunha, Katia; da Costa, Luiz N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; De Lee, Nathan; Dean, Janice D. R.; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Epstein, Courtney R.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fabbian, D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Favole, Ginevra; Castellá, Bruno Femenía; Alvar, Emma Fernández; Feuillet, Diane; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbraith-Frew, J. G.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, Ana E. García; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; Hernández, Jonay I. González; Gott, J. Richard; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Halverson, Samuel; Harding, Paul; Harris, David W.; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Frederick R.; Davó, Artemio Herrero; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Ivans, Inese I.; Jackson, Kelly M.; Jiang, Peng; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kirkby, David; Kinemuchi, K.; Klaene, Mark A.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koesterke, Lars; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Long, Daniel C.; Loomis, Craig P.; Lucatello, Sara; Lupton, Robert H.; Ma, Bo; Mack, Claude E.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Mészáros, Sz.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Montesano, Francesco; More, Surhud; Morrison, Heather L.; Muna, Demitri; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Myers, Adam D.; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; O'Connell, Julia E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; O'Connell, Ross; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Pâris, Isabelle; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Perottoni, Hélio Dotto; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Rebolo, Rafael; Reid, Beth A.; Richards, Jonathan C.; Riffel, Rogério; Robin, Annie C.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Roy, Arpita; Rubiño-Martin, J. A.; Sabiu, Cristiano G.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Simmons, Audrey E.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sobreira, Flavia; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Terrien, Ryan C.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Vandenberg, Jan; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; White, Martin; White, Simon D. M.; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun
Comments: 15 figures; 1 table. Accepted to ApJS. DR10 is available at http://www.sdss3.org/dr10 v3 fixed 3 diacritic markings in the arXiv HTML listing of the author names
Submitted: 2013-07-29, last modified: 2014-01-17
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has been in operation since 2000 April. This paper presents the tenth public data release (DR10) from its current incarnation, SDSS-III. This data release includes the first spectroscopic data from the Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), along with spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) taken through 2012 July. The APOGEE instrument is a near-infrared R~22,500 300-fiber spectrograph covering 1.514--1.696 microns. The APOGEE survey is studying the chemical abundances and radial velocities of roughly 100,000 red giant star candidates in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. DR10 includes 178,397 spectra of 57,454 stars, each typically observed three or more times, from APOGEE. Derived quantities from these spectra (radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities) are also included.DR10 also roughly doubles the number of BOSS spectra over those included in the ninth data release. DR10 includes a total of 1,507,954 BOSS spectra, comprising 927,844 galaxy spectra; 182,009 quasar spectra; and 159,327 stellar spectra, selected over 6373.2 square degrees.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.5896  [pdf] - 749261
The one-dimensional Ly-alpha forest power spectrum from BOSS
Comments: 21 pages, 26 figures, tables available online at http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/559/A85
Submitted: 2013-06-25, last modified: 2013-11-19
We have developed two independent methods to measure the one-dimensional power spectrum of the transmitted flux in the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest. The first method is based on a Fourier transform, and the second on a maximum likelihood estimator. The two methods are independent and have different systematic uncertainties. The determination of the noise level in the data spectra was subject to a novel treatment, because of its significant impact on the derived power spectrum. We applied the two methods to 13,821 quasar spectra from SDSS-III/BOSS DR9 selected from a larger sample of over 60,000 spectra on the basis of their high quality, large signal-to-noise ratio, and good spectral resolution. The power spectra measured using either approach are in good agreement over all twelve redshift bins from $<z> = 2.2$ to $<z> = 4.4$, and scales from 0.001 $\rm(km/s)^{-1}$ to $0.02 \rm(km/s)^{-1}$. We determine the methodological and instrumental systematic uncertainties of our measurements. We provide a preliminary cosmological interpretation of our measurements using available hydrodynamical simulations. The improvement in precision over previously published results from SDSS is a factor 2--3 for constraints on relevant cosmological parameters. For a $\Lambda$CDM model and using a constraint on $H_0$ that encompasses measurements based on the local distance ladder and on CMB anisotropies, we infer $\sigma_8 =0.83\pm0.03$ and $n_s= 0.97\pm0.02$ based on \ion{H}{i} absorption in the range $2.1<z<3.7$.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.4870  [pdf] - 1180835
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: tenth data release
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. The catalog is available at http://www.sdss3.org/dr10/algorithms/qso_catalog.php (Note that there is a slight delay for the website to appear online)
Submitted: 2013-11-19
We present the Data Release 10 Quasar (DR10Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the first 2.5 years of the survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra. The catalog also includes known quasars (mostly from SDSS-I and II) that were reobserved by BOSS. The catalog contains 166,583 quasars (74,454 are new discoveries since SDSS-DR9) detected over 6,373 deg$^{2}$ with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra. The number of quasars with $z>2.15$ (117,668) is $\sim$5 times greater than the number of $z>2.15$ quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII, MgII). The catalog identifies 16,461 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag and information on the optical morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3,600-10,500\AA\ at a spectral resolution in the range 1,300$<$R$<$2,500; the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS Catalog Archive Server. We also provide a supplemental list of an additional 2,376 quasars that have been identified among the galaxy targets of the SDSS-III/BOSS.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.0615  [pdf] - 739071
Measuring galaxy [OII] emission line doublet with future ground-based wide-field spectroscopic surveys
Comments: 5 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2013-10-02
The next generation of wide-field spectroscopic redshift surveys will map the large-scale galaxy distribution in the redshift range 0.7< z<2 to measure baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO). The primary optical signature used in this redshift range comes from the [OII] emission line doublet, which provides a unique redshift identification that can minimize confusion with other single emission lines. To derive the required spectrograph resolution for these redshift surveys, we simulate observations of the [OII] (3727,3729) doublet for various instrument resolutions, and line velocities. We foresee two strategies about the choice of the resolution for future spectrographs for BAO surveys. For bright [OII] emitter surveys ([OII] flux ~30.10^{-17} erg /cm2/s like SDSS-IV/eBOSS), a resolution of R~3300 allows the separation of 90 percent of the doublets. The impact of the sky lines on the completeness in redshift is less than 6 percent. For faint [OII] emitter surveys ([OII] flux ~10.10^{-17} erg /cm2/s like DESi), the detection improves continuously with resolution, so we recommend the highest possible resolution, the limit being given by the number of pixels (4k by 4k) on the detector and the number of spectroscopic channels (2 or 3).
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.3403  [pdf] - 1172686
Detection of Ly\beta auto-correlations and Ly\alpha-Ly\beta cross-correlations in BOSS Data Release 9
Comments: 26 pages, 10 figures; matches version accepted by JCAP
Submitted: 2013-07-12, last modified: 2013-08-19
The Lyman-$\beta$ forest refers to a region in the spectra of distant quasars that lies between the rest-frame Lyman-$\beta$ and Lyman-$\gamma$ emissions. The forest in this region is dominated by a combination of absorption due to resonant Ly$\alpha$ and Ly$\beta$ scattering. When considering the 1D Ly$\beta$ forest in addition to the 1D Ly$\alpha$ forest, the full statistical description of the data requires four 1D power spectra: Ly$\alpha$ and Ly$\beta$ auto-power spectra and the Ly$\alpha$-Ly$\beta$ real and imaginary cross-power spectra. We describe how these can be measured using an optimal quadratic estimator that naturally disentangles Ly$\alpha$ and Ly$\beta$ contributions. Using a sample of approximately 60,000 quasar sight-lines from the BOSS Data Release 9, we make the measurement of the one-dimensional power spectrum of fluctuations due to the Ly$\beta$ resonant scattering. While we have not corrected our measurements for resolution damping of the power and other systematic effects carefully enough to use them for cosmological constraints, we can robustly conclude the following: i) Ly$\beta$ power spectrum and Ly$\alpha$-Ly$\beta$ cross spectra are detected with high statistical significance; ii) the cross-correlation coefficient is $\approx 1$ on large scales; iii) the Ly$\beta$ measurements are contaminated by the associated OVI absorption, which is analogous to the SiIII contamination of the Ly$\alpha$ forest. Measurements of the Ly$\beta$ forest will allow extension of the usable path-length for the Ly$\alpha$ measurements while allowing a better understanding of the physics of intergalactic medium and thus more robust cosmological constraints.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.3459  [pdf] - 1159067
Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Lyman-alpha Forest Fluctuations in BOSS Data Release 9
Comments: v2: replaced with version accepted by JCAP: a few co-authors, modest expansion and clarification of the text, references added, no change in results
Submitted: 2013-01-15, last modified: 2013-03-20
We use the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 9 (DR9) to detect and measure the position of the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the three-dimensional correlation function in the Lyman-alpha forest flux fluctuations at a redshift z=2.4. The feature is clearly detected at significance between 3 and 5 sigma (depending on the broadband model and method of error covariance matrix estimation) and is consistent with predictions of the standard LCDM model. We assess the biases in our method, stability of the error covariance matrix and possible systematic effects. We fit the resulting correlation function with several models that decouple the broadband and acoustic scale information. For an isotropic dilation factor, we measure 100x(alpha_iso-1) = -1.6 ^{+2.0+4.3+7.4}_{-2.0-4.1-6.8} (stat.) +/- 1.0 (syst.) (multiple statistical errors denote 1,2 and 3 sigma confidence limits) with respect to the acoustic scale in the fiducial cosmological model (flat LCDM with Omega_m=0.27, h=0.7). When fitting separately for the radial and transversal dilation factors we find marginalised constraints 100x(alpha_par-1) = -1.3 ^{+3.5+7.6 +12.3}_{-3.3-6.7-10.2} (stat.) +/- 2.0 (syst.) and 100x(alpha_perp-1) = -2.2 ^{+7.4+17}_{-7.1-15} +/- 3.0 (syst.). The dilation factor measurements are significantly correlated with cross-correlation coefficient of ~ -0.55. Errors become significantly non-Gaussian for deviations over 3 standard deviations from best fit value. Because of the data cuts and analysis method, these measurements give tighter constraints than a previous BAO analysis of the BOSS DR9 Lyman-alpha forest sample, providing an important consistency test of the standard cosmological model in a new redshift regime.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.2616  [pdf] - 652300
Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Ly-\alpha\ forest of BOSS quasars
Comments: accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2012-11-12, last modified: 2013-02-14
We report a detection of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the three-dimensional correlation function of the transmitted flux fraction in the \Lya forest of high-redshift quasars. The study uses 48,640 quasars in the redshift range $2.1\le z \le 3.5$ from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III). At a mean redshift $z=2.3$, we measure the monopole and quadrupole components of the correlation function for separations in the range $20\hMpc<r<200\hMpc$. A peak in the correlation function is seen at a separation equal to $(1.01\pm0.03)$ times the distance expected for the BAO peak within a concordance $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. This first detection of the BAO peak at high redshift, when the universe was strongly matter dominated, results in constraints on the angular diameter distance $\da$ and the expansion rate $H$ at $z=2.3$ that, combined with priors on $H_0$ and the baryon density, require the existence of dark energy. Combined with constraints derived from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) observations, this result implies $H(z=2.3)=(224\pm8){\rm km\,s^{-1}Mpc^{-1}}$, indicating that the time derivative of the cosmological scale parameter $\dot{a}=H(z=2.3)/(1+z)$ is significantly greater than that measured with BAO at $z\sim0.5$. This demonstrates that the expansion was decelerating in the range $0.7<z<2.3$, as expected from the matter domination during this epoch. Combined with measurements of $H_0$, one sees the pattern of deceleration followed by acceleration characteristic of a dark-energy dominated universe.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.3456  [pdf] - 1159066
Fitting Methods for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Lyman-{\alpha} Forest Fluctuations in BOSS Data Release 9
Comments: Submitted to JCAP, 38 pages, 26 figures
Submitted: 2013-01-15
We describe fitting methods developed to analyze fluctuations in the Lyman-{\alpha} forest and measure the parameters of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We apply our methods to BOSS Data Release 9. Our method is based on models of the three-dimensional correlation function in physical coordinate space, and includes the effects of redshift-space distortions, anisotropic non-linear broadening, and broadband distortions. We allow for independent scale factors along and perpendicular to the line of sight to minimize the dependence on our assumed fiducial cosmology and to obtain separate measurements of the BAO angular and relative velocity scales. Our fitting software and the input files needed to reproduce our main BOSS Data Release 9 results are publicly available.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.5166  [pdf] - 1152261
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: ninth data release
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A, Catalog available online at http://www.sdss3.org/dr9/algorithms/qso_catalog.php
Submitted: 2012-10-18
We present the Data Release 9 Quasar (DR9Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the survey, are spectrocopically confirmed as quasars via visual inspection, have luminosities Mi[z=2]<-20.5 (in a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology with H0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, $\Omega_{\rm M}$ = 0.3, and $\Omega_{\Lambda}$ = 0.7) and either display at least one emission line with full width at half maximum (FWHM) larger than 500 km/s or, if not, have interesting/complex absorption features. It includes as well, known quasars (mostly from SDSS-I and II) that were reobserved by BOSS. This catalog contains 87,822 quasars (78,086 are new discoveries) detected over 3,275 deg$^{2}$ with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra newly derived from a training set of 8,632 spectra from SDSS-DR7. The number of quasars with $z>2.15$ (61,931) is ~2.8 times larger than the number of z>2.15 quasars previously known. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 7,533 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object the catalog presents five-band (u,g,r,i,z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1209.3266  [pdf] - 1151412
BAORadio: A digital pipeline for radio interferometry and 21 cm mapping of large scale structures
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2012-09-14
3D mapping of matter distribution in the universe through the 21 cm radio emission of atomic hydrogen HI is a complementary approach to optical surveys for the study of the Large Scale Structures, in particular for measuring the BAO (Baryon Acoustic Oscillation) scale up to redshifts z < 3, and therefore constraining dark energy parameters. We propose a novel method to map the HI mass distribution in three dimensions in radio, without detecting or identifying individual compact sources. This method would require an instrument with a large instantaneous bandwidth (> 100 MHz) and high sensitivity, while a rather modest angular resolution (~ 10 arcmin) should be sufficient. These requirements can be met by a dense interferometric array or a phased array (FPA) in the focal plane of a large primary reflector, representing a total collecting area of a few thousand square meters with few hundred simultaneous beams covering a 20 to 100 square degrees field of view. We describe the development and qualification of an electronic and data processing system for digital radio interferometry and beam forming suitable for such instruments with several hundred receiver elements.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.7137  [pdf] - 1125200
The Ninth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey
Collaboration, SDSS-III; :; Ahn, Christopher P.; Alexandroff, Rachael; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Bailey, Éric Aubourg Stephen; Barnes, Rory; Bautista, Julian; Beers, Timothy C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Borde, Arnaud; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, W. N.; Brinkmann, J.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Busca, N. G.; Carithers, William; Carnero, Aurelio R.; Carr, Michael A.; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Chen, Yanmei; Chiappini, Cristina; Comparat, Johan; Connolly, Natalia; Crepp, Justin R.; Cristiani, Stefano; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Davenport, James R. A.; Dawson, Kyle S.; de Putter, Roland; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, S.; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Castellá, Bruno Femení a; Alvar, Emma Fernández; Ferreira, Leticia D.; Ak, N. Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, A. E. García; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; Hernández, Jonay I. González; Grebel, Eva K.; Gunn, James E.; Haggard, Daryl; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Harris, David W.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Frederick R.; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, J.; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivezić, Zeljko; Jacobson, Heather R.; Jiang, Linhua; Johansson, Jonas; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A.; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Long, Daniel C.; Loomis, Craig P.; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H.; Ma, Bo; Ma, Zhibo; MacDonald, Nicholas; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Makler, Martin; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Meszaros, Sz.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Montesano, Francesco; Morrison, Heather L.; Muna, Demitri; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Myers, Adam D.; Neto, A. F.; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Parihar, Prachi; Pâris, Isabelle; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Pérez-Ráfols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pforr, Janine; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; de Mello, G. F. Porto; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rebolo, Rafael; Rich, James; Richards, Gordon T.; Robin, Annie C.; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rubiño-Martin, J. A.; Samushia, Lado; Almeida, J. Sanchez; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schlegel, David J.; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schwope, Axel D.; Scóccola, C. G.; Seljak, Uros; Sheldon, Erin; Shen, Yue; Shu, Yiping; Simmerer, Jennifer; Simmons, Audrey E.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Slosar, A.; Sobreira, Flavia; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tal, Tomer; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy A.; Magaña, M. Vargas; Verde, Licia; Viel, Matteo; Vikas, Shailendra K.; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; West, Andrew A.; White, Martin; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yanny, Brian; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun; Zinn, Joel C.
Comments: 9 figures; 2 tables. Submitted to ApJS. DR9 is available at http://www.sdss3.org/dr9
Submitted: 2012-07-30
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) presents the first spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This ninth data release (DR9) of the SDSS project includes 535,995 new galaxy spectra (median z=0.52), 102,100 new quasar spectra (median z=2.32), and 90,897 new stellar spectra, along with the data presented in previous data releases. These spectra were obtained with the new BOSS spectrograph and were taken between 2009 December and 2011 July. In addition, the stellar parameters pipeline, which determines radial velocities, surface temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities of stars, has been updated and refined with improvements in temperature estimates for stars with T_eff<5000 K and in metallicity estimates for stars with [Fe/H]>-0.5. DR9 includes new stellar parameters for all stars presented in DR8, including stars from SDSS-I and II, as well as those observed as part of the SDSS-III Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration-2 (SEGUE-2). The astrometry error introduced in the DR8 imaging catalogs has been corrected in the DR9 data products. The next data release for SDSS-III will be in Summer 2013, which will present the first data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) along with another year of data from BOSS, followed by the final SDSS-III data release in December 2014.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1108.1474  [pdf] - 1083264
21 cm observation of LSS at z~1 Instrument sensitivity and foreground subtraction
Comments: 16 pages, 18 figures submitted to Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A)
Submitted: 2011-08-06
Large Scale Structures (LSS) in the universe can be traced using the neutral atomic hydrogen HI through its 21cm emission. Such a 3D matter distribution map can be used to test the Cosmological model and to constrain the Dark Energy properties or its equation of state. A novel approach, called intensity mapping can be used to map the HI distribution, using radio interferometers with large instantaneous field of view and waveband. In this paper, we study the sensitivity of different radio interferometer configurations, or multi-beam instruments for the observation of large scale structures and BAO oscillations in 21cm and we discuss the problem of foreground removal. For each configuration, we determine instrument response by computing the (u,v) or Fourier angular frequency plane coverage using visibilities. The (u,v) plane response is the noise power spectrum, hence the instrument sensitivity for LSS P(k) measurement. We describe also a simple foreground subtraction method to separate LSS 21 cm signal from the foreground due to the galactic synchrotron and radio sources emission. We have computed the noise power spectrum for different instrument configuration as well as the extracted LSS power spectrum, after separation of 21cm-LSS signal from the foregrounds. We have also obtained the uncertainties on the Dark Energy parameters for an optimized 21 cm BAO survey. We show that a radio instrument with few hundred simultaneous beams and a collecting area of ~10000 m^2 will be able to detect BAO signal at redshift z ~ 1 and will be competitive with optical surveys.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.5659  [pdf] - 408729
BAORadio : Cartographie 3D de la distribution de gaz H$_I$ dans l'Univers
Comments:
Submitted: 2011-06-28
3D mapping of matter distribution in the universe through the 21 cm radio emission of atomic hydrogen is a complementary approach to optical surveys for the study of the Large Scale Structures, in particular for measuring the BAO (Baryon Acoustic Oscillation) scale up to redshifts z <~ 3 and constrain dark energy. We propose to carry such a survey through a novel method, called intensity mapping, without detecting individual galaxies radio emission. This method requires a wide band instrument, 100 MHz or larger, and multiple beams, while a rather modest angular resolution of 10 arcmin would be sufficient. The instrument would have a few thousand square meters of collecting area and few hundreds of simultaneous beams. These constraints could be fulfilled with a dense array of receivers in interferometric mode, or a phased array at the focal plane of a large antenna.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.0606  [pdf] - 1076381
The SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Quasar Target Selection for Data Release Nine
Comments: 33 pages, 26 figures, 12 tables and a whole bunch of quasars. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2011-05-03
The SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), a five-year spectroscopic survey of 10,000 deg^2, achieved first light in late 2009. One of the key goals of BOSS is to measure the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations in the distribution of Ly-alpha absorption from the spectra of a sample of ~150,000 z>2.2 quasars. Along with measuring the angular diameter distance at z\approx2.5, BOSS will provide the first direct measurement of the expansion rate of the Universe at z > 2. One of the biggest challenges in achieving this goal is an efficient target selection algorithm for quasars over 2.2 < z < 3.5, where their colors overlap those of stars. During the first year of the BOSS survey, quasar target selection methods were developed and tested to meet the requirement of delivering at least 15 quasars deg^-2 in this redshift range, out of 40 targets deg^-2. To achieve these surface densities, the magnitude limit of the quasar targets was set at g <= 22.0 or r<=21.85. While detection of the BAO signature in the Ly-alpha absorption in quasar spectra does not require a uniform target selection, many other astrophysical studies do. We therefore defined a uniformly-selected subsample of 20 targets deg^-2, for which the selection efficiency is just over 50%. This "CORE" subsample will be fixed for Years Two through Five of the survey. In this paper we describe the evolution and implementation of the BOSS quasar target selection algorithms during the first two years of BOSS operations. We analyze the spectra obtained during the first year. 11,263 new z>2.2 quasars were spectroscopically confirmed by BOSS. Our current algorithms select an average of 15 z > 2.2 quasars deg^-2 from 40 targets deg^-2 using single-epoch SDSS imaging. Multi-epoch optical data and data at other wavelengths can further improve the efficiency and completeness of BOSS quasar target selection. [Abridged]
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.2024  [pdf] - 966633
A Principal Component Analysis of quasar UV spectra at z~3
Comments: 15 pages, 18 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2011-04-11
From a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of 78 z~3 high quality quasar spectra in the SDSS-DR7, we derive the principal components characterizing the QSO continuum over the full wavelength range available. The shape of the mean continuum, is similar to that measured at low-z (z~1), but the equivalent width of the emission lines are larger at low redshift. We calculate the correlation between fluxes at different wavelengths and find that the emission line fluxes in the red part of the spectrum are correlated with that in the blue part. We construct a projection matrix to predict the continuum in the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest from the red part of the spectrum. We apply this matrix to quasars in the SDSS-DR7 to derive the evolution with redshift of the mean flux in the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest due to the absorption by the intergalactic neutral hydrogen. A change in the evolution of the mean flux is apparent around z~3 in the sense of a steeper decrease of the mean flux at higher redshifts. The same evolution is found when the continuum is estimated from the extrapolation of a power-law continuum fitted in the red part of the quasar spectrum if a correction, derived from simple simulations, is applied. Our findings are consistent with previous determinations using high spectral resolution data. We provide the PCA eigenvectors over the wavelength range 1020-2000 \AA\ and the distribution of their weights that can be used to simulate QSO mock spectra.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.3614  [pdf] - 14763
Reconstruction of HI power spectra with radio-interferometers to study dark energy
Comments:
Submitted: 2008-07-23
Among the tools available for the study of the dark energy driving the expansion of the Universe, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and their effects on the matter power spectrum are particularly attractive. It was recently proposed to study these oscillations by mapping the 21cm emission of the neutral hydrogen in the redshift range $0.5<z<3$. We discuss here the precision of such measurements using radio-interferometers consisting of arrays of dishes or north-south oriented cylinders. We then discuss the resulting uncertainties on the BAO scales and the sensitivity to the parameters of the Dark Energy equation of state.