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Wyatt, P. L.

Normalized to: Wyatt, P.

16 article(s) in total. 175 co-authors, from 1 to 8 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 17,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.2944  [pdf] - 1172640
The NASA Exoplanet Archive: Data and Tools for Exoplanet Research
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 4 figures
Submitted: 2013-07-10
We describe the contents and functionality of the NASA Exoplanet Archive, a database and tool set funded by NASA to support astronomers in the exoplanet community. The current content of the database includes interactive tables containing properties of all published exoplanets, Kepler planet candidates, threshold-crossing events, data validation reports and target stellar parameters, light curves from the Kepler and CoRoT missions and from several ground-based surveys, and spectra and radial velocity measurements from the literature. Tools provided to work with these data include a transit ephemeris predictor, both for single planets and for observing locations, light curve viewing and normalization utilities, and a periodogram and phased light curve service. The archive can be accessed at http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.6997  [pdf] - 930906
Spectroscopy of Type Ia Supernovae by the Carnegie Supernova Project
Comments: 43 pages, 23 figures, and 11 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ on May 21, 2013. Spectra will be made available in http://csp.obs.carnegiescience.edu
Submitted: 2013-05-30
This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts, and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2(SiII4130) and pW6(SiII5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of ~0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a ~2--3-sigma correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1108.2308  [pdf] - 1083343
TERMS Photometry of Known Transiting Exoplanets
Comments: 12 pages; 6 figures; 9 tables; accepted for publication in AJ; two references updated and minor improvements made to match the version to be published
Submitted: 2011-08-10, last modified: 2011-08-24
The Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey (TERMS) conducts radial velocity and photometric monitoring of known exoplanets in order to refine planetary orbits and predictions of possible transit times. This effort is primarily directed towards planets not known to transit, but a small sample of our targets consist of known transiting systems. Here we present precision photometry for 6 WASP planets acquired during their transit windows. We perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis for each planet and combine these data with previous measurements to redetermine the period and ephemerides for these planets. These observations provide recent mid-transit times which are useful for scheduling future observations. Our results improve the ephemerides of WASP-4b, WASP-5b and WASP-6b and reduce the uncertainties on the mid-transit time for WASP-29b. We also confirm the orbital, stellar and planetary parameters of all 6 systems.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.1996  [pdf] - 1052014
Preliminary Results from NEOWISE: An Enhancement to the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer for Solar System Science
Comments: ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2011-02-09
The \emph{Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} has surveyed the entire sky at four infrared wavelengths with greatly improved sensitivity and spatial resolution compared to its predecessors, the \emph{Infrared Astronomical Satellite} and the \emph{Cosmic Background Explorer}. NASA's Planetary Science Division has funded an enhancement to the \WISE\ data processing system called "NEOWISE" that allows detection and archiving of moving objects found in the \WISE\ data. NEOWISE has mined the \WISE\ images for a wide array of small bodies in our Solar System, including Near-Earth Objects (NEOs), Main Belt asteroids, comets, Trojans, and Centaurs. By the end of survey operations in February 2011, NEOWISE identified over 157,000 asteroids, including more than 500 NEOs and $\sim$120 comets. The NEOWISE dataset will enable a panoply of new scientific investigations.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.2441  [pdf] - 1033074
Accurate Coordinates and 2MASS Cross-IDs for (Almost) All Gliese Catalog Stars
Comments: accepted to PASP, Full version of Table 1 available electronically
Submitted: 2010-06-12
We provide precise J2000, epoch 2000 coordinates and cross-identifications to sources in the 2MASS point source catalog for nearly all stars in the Gliese, Gliese and Jahreiss, and Woolley catalogs of nearby stars. The only Gliese objects where we were not successful are two Gliese sources that are actually QSOs, two proposed companions to brighter stars which we believe do not exist, four stars included in one of the catalogs but identified there as only optical companions, one probable plate flaw, and two stars which simply remain un-recovered. For the 4251 recovered stars, 2693 have coordinates based on Hipparcos positions, 1549 have coordinates based on 2MASS data, and 9 have positions from other astrometric sources. All positions have been calculated at epoch 2000 using proper motions from the literature, which are also given here.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.3330  [pdf] - 1017985
The Carnegie Supernova Project: First Photometry Data Release of Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae
Comments: 93 pages, 8 figures, accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2009-10-17
The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is a five-year survey being carried out at the Las Campanas Observatory to obtain high-quality light curves of ~100 low-redshift Type Ia supernovae in a well-defined photometric system. Here we present the first release of photometric data that contains the optical light curves of 35 Type Ia supernovae, and near-infrared light curves for a subset of 25 events. The data comprise 5559 optical (ugriBV) and 1043 near-infrared (YJHKs) data points in the natural system of the Swope telescope. Twenty-eight supernovae have pre-maximum data, and for 15 of these, the observations begin at least 5 days before B maximum. This is one of the most accurate datasets of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae published to date. When completed, the CSP dataset will constitute a fundamental reference for precise determinations of cosmological parameters, and serve as a rich resource for comparison with models of Type Ia supernovae.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.3317  [pdf] - 341105
The Carnegie Supernova Project: Analysis of the First Sample of Low-Redshift Type-Ia Supernovae
Comments: 76 pages, 20 figures, accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2009-10-17
We present the analysis of the first set of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project. Well-sampled, high-precision optical (ugriBV) and near-infrared (NIR; YJHKs) light curves obtained in a well-understood photometric system are used to provide light-curve parameters, and ugriBVYJH template light curves. The intrinsic colors at maximum light are calibrated to compute optical--NIR color excesses for the full sample, thus allowing the properties of the reddening law in the host galaxies to be studied. A low value of Rv~1.7, is derived when using the entire sample of SNe. However, when the two highly reddened SNe in the sample are excluded, a value Galactic standard of Rv~3.2 is obtained. The colors of these two events are well matched by a reddening model due to circumstellar dust. The peak luminosities are calibrated using a two-parameter linear fit to the decline rates and the colors, or alternatively, the color excesses. In both cases, dispersions in absolute magnitude of 0.12--0.16 mag are obtained, depending on the filter-color combination. In contrast to the results obtained from color excesses, these fits give Rv~1--2, even when the two highly reddened SNe are excluded. This discrepancy suggests that, beyond the "normal" interstellar reddening produced in the host galaxies, there is an intrinsic dispersion in the colors of SNe Ia which is correlated with luminosity but independent of the decline rate. Finally, a Hubble diagram is produced by combining the results of the fits for each filter. The resulting scatter of 0.12 mag appears to be limited by peculiar velocities as evidenced by the strong correlation between the distance-modulus residuals among the different filters. The implication is that the actual precision of SN Ia distances is 3--4%.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.4524  [pdf] - 364060
The Carnegie Supernova Project: First Near-Infrared Hubble Diagram to z~0.7
Comments: 44 pages, 23 figures, 9 tables; Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2009-07-26
The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is designed to measure the luminosity distance for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as a function of redshift, and to set observational constraints on the dark energy contribution to the total energy content of the Universe. The CSP differs from other projects to date in its goal of providing an I-band {rest-frame} Hubble diagram. Here we present the first results from near-infrared (NIR) observations obtained using the Magellan Baade telescope for SNe Ia with 0.1 < z < 0.7. We combine these results with those from the low-redshift CSP at z <0.1 (Folatelli et al. 2009). We present light curves and an I-band Hubble diagram for this first sample of 35 SNe Ia and we compare these data to 21 new SNe Ia at low redshift. These data support the conclusion that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating. When combined with independent results from baryon acoustic oscillations (Eisenstein et al. 2005), these data yield Omega_m = 0.27 +/- 0.0 (statistical), and Omega_DE = 0.76 +/- 0.13 (statistical) +/- 0.09 (systematic), for the matter and dark energy densities, respectively. If we parameterize the data in terms of an equation of state, w, assume a flat geometry, and combine with baryon acoustic oscillations, we find that w = -1.05 +/- 0.13 (statistical) +/- 0.09 (systematic). The largest source of systematic uncertainty on w arises from uncertainties in the photometric calibration, signaling the importance of securing more accurate photometric calibrations for future supernova cosmology programs. Finally, we conclude that either the dust affecting the luminosities of SNe Ia has a different extinction law (R_V = 1.8) than that in the Milky Way (where R_V = 3.1), or that there is an additional intrinsic color term with luminosity for SNe Ia independent of the decline rate.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.3405  [pdf] - 1002983
The LAEX and NASA portals for CoRoT public data
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2009-07-20
* Aims. We describe here the main functionalities of the LAEX (Laboratorio de Astrofisica Estelar y Exoplanetas/Laboratory for Stellar Astrophysics and Exoplanets) and NASA portals for CoRoT Public Data. The CoRoT archive at LAEX was opened to the community in January 2009 and is managed in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory. NStED (NASA Star and Exoplanet Database) serves as the CoRoT portal for the US astronomical community. NStED is a general purpose stellar and exoplanet archive with the aim of providing support for NASA planet finding and characterisation goals, and the planning and support of NASA and other space missions. CoRoT data at LAEX and NStED can be accessed at http://sdc.laeff.inta.es/corotfa/ and http://nsted.ipac.caltech.edu,respectively. * Methods. Based on considerable experience with astronomical archives, the aforementioned archives are designed with the aim of delivering science-quality data in a simple and efficient way. * Results. LAEX and NStED not only provide access to CoRoT Public Data but furthermore serve a variety of observed and calculated astrophysical data. In particular, NStED provides scientifically validated information on stellar and planetary data related to the search for and characterization of extrasolar planets, and LAEX makes any information from Virtual Observatory services available to the astronomical community.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.2505  [pdf] - 22376
The NASA/IPAC/NExScI Star and Exoplanet Database
Comments: 4 pages, AIP style
Submitted: 2009-03-13
The NASA/IPAC/NExScI Star and Exoplanet Database (NStED) is a general purpose stellar archive which supports NASA planet-finding and planet-characterization goals, stellar astrophysics, and the planning of NASA and other space missions. There are two principal components of NStED: a database of 140,000 nearby stars and exoplanet-hosting stars, and an archive dedicated to high precision photometric surveys for transiting exoplanets (NStED-ETSS). We present summaries of these components. The NStED stellar database currently serves published parameters for 140,000 stars. These parameters include coordinates, multiplicity, proper motion, parallax, spectral type, multiband photometry, radial velocity, metallicity, chromospheric and coronal activity index, rotation velocity/period, infrared excess. NStED-ETSS currently serves data from the TrES survey of the Kepler field as well as dedicated photometric surveys of four stellar clusters. NStED-ETSS aims to serve both the surveys and the broader astronomical community by archiving these data and making them available in a homogeneous format.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:0806.4611  [pdf] - 13995
The NStED Stellar and Exoplanet Hosting Star Service
Comments: To appear in the Proceedings of the 253rd IAU Symposium: "Transiting Planets", May 2008, Cambridge, MA. 4 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2008-06-27
The NASA Star and Exoplanet Database (NStED) is a general purpose stellar archive with the aim of providing support for NASA's planet finding and characterization goals, stellar astrophysics, and the planning of NASA and other space missions. There are two principal components of NStED: a database of (currently) 140,000 nearby stars and exoplanet-hosting stars, and an archive dedicated to high precision photometric surveys for transiting exoplanets. We present a summary of the NStED stellar database, functionality, tools, and user interface. NStED currently serves the following kinds of data for 140,000 stars (where available): coordinates, multiplicity, proper motion, parallax, spectral type, multiband photometry, radial velocity, metallicity, chromospheric and coronal activity index, and rotation velocity/period. Furthermore, the following derived quantities are given wherever possible: distance, effective temperature, mass, radius, luminosity, space motions, and physical/angular dimensions of habitable zone. Queries to NStED can be made using constraints on any combination of the above parameters. In addition, NStED provides tools to derive specific inferred quantities for the stars in the database, cross-referenced with available extra-solar planetary data for those host stars. NStED can be accessed at http://nsted.ipac.caltech.edu
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:0806.3979  [pdf] - 13853
The NStED Exoplanet Transit Survey Service
Comments: To appear in the Proceedings of the 253rd IAU Symposium: "Transiting Planets", May 2008, Cambridge, MA. 4 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2008-06-24
The NASA Star and Exoplanet Database (NStED) is a general purpose stellar archive with the aim of providing support for NASA's planet finding and characterization goals, stellar astrophysics, and the planning of NASA and other space missions. There are two principal components of NStED: a database of (currently) 140,000 nearby stars and exoplanet-hosting stars, and an archive dedicated to high-precision photometric surveys for transiting exoplanets. We present a summary of the latter component: the NStED Exoplanet Transit Survey Service (NStED-ETSS), along with its content, functionality, tools, and user interface. NStED-ETSS currently serves data from the TrES Survey of the Kepler Field as well as dedicated photometric surveys of four stellar clusters. <CA>NStED-ETSS aims to serve both the surveys and the broader astronomical community by archiving these data and making them available in a homogeneous format. Examples of usability of ETSS include investigation of any time-variable phenomena in data sets not studied by the original survey team, application of different techniques or algorithms for planet transit detections, combination of data from different surveys for given objects, statistical studies, etc. NStED-ETSS can be accessed at \tt{http://nsted.ipac.caltech.edu}
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0611295  [pdf] - 86681
The Peculiar SN 2005hk: Do Some Type Ia Supernovae Explode as Deflagrations?
Comments: Accepted by PASP, to appear in April 2007 issue, 63 pages, 16 figures, 11 tables
Submitted: 2006-11-09, last modified: 2007-03-26
We present extensive u'g'r'i'BVRIYJHKs photometry and optical spectroscopy of SN 2005hk. These data reveal that SN 2005hk was nearly identical in its observed properties to SN 2002cx, which has been called ``the most peculiar known type Ia supernova.'' Both supernovae exhibited high ionization SN 1991T-like pre-maximum spectra, yet low peak luminosities like SN 1991bg. The spectra reveal that SN 2005hk, like SN 2002cx, exhibited expansion velocities that were roughly half those of typical type Ia supernovae. The R and I light curves of both supernovae were also peculiar in not displaying the secondary maximum observed for normal type Ia supernovae. Our YJH photometry of SN 2005hk reveals the same peculiarity in the near-infrared. By combining our optical and near-infrared photometry of SN 2005hk with published ultraviolet light curves obtained with the Swift satellite, we are able to construct a bolometric light curve from ~10 days before to ~60 days after B maximum. The shape and unusually low peak luminosity of this light curve, plus the low expansion velocities and absence of a secondary maximum at red and near-infrared wavelengths, are all in reasonable agreement with model calculations of a 3D deflagration which produces ~0.25 M_sun of 56Ni.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0512039  [pdf] - 1456456
The Carnegie Supernova Project: The Low-Redshift Survey
Comments: 45 pages, 13 figures, 3 tables, accepted by PASP
Submitted: 2005-12-01
Supernovae are essential to understanding the chemical evolution of the Universe. Type Ia supernovae also provide the most powerful observational tool currently available for studying the expansion history of the Universe and the nature of dark energy. Our basic knowledge of supernovae comes from the study of their photometric and spectroscopic properties. However, the presently available data sets of optical and near-infrared light curves of supernovae are rather small and/or heterogeneous, and employ photometric systems that are poorly characterized. Similarly, there are relatively few supernovae whose spectral evolution has been well sampled, both in wavelength and phase, with precise spectrophotometric observations. The low-redshift portion of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) seeks to remedy this situation by providing photometry and spectrophotometry of a large sample of supernovae taken on telescope/filter/detector systems that are well understood and well characterized. During a five-year program which began in September 2004, we expect to obtain high-precision u'g'r'i'BVYJHKs light curves and optical spectrophotometry for about 250 supernovae of all types. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the CSP survey observing and data reduction methodology. In addition, we present preliminary photometry and spectra obtained for a few representative supernovae during the first observing campaign.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0408096  [pdf] - 66587
The sub-energetic GRB 031203 as a cosmic analogue to GRB 980425
Comments: To Appear in Nature, August 5, 2004
Submitted: 2004-08-04
Over the six years since the discovery of the gamma-ray burst GRB 980425, associated with the nearby (distance, ~40 Mpc) supernova 1998bw, astronomers have fiercely debated the nature of this event. Relative to bursts located at cosmological distances, (redshift, z~1), GRB 980425 was under-luminous in gamma-rays by three orders of magnitude. Radio calorimetry showed the explosion was sub-energetic by a factor of 10. Here, we report observations of the radio and X-ray afterglow of the recent z=0.105 GRB 031203 and demonstrate that it too is sub-energetic. Our result, when taken together with the low gamma-ray luminosity, suggest that GRB 031203 is the first cosmic analogue to GRB 980425. We find no evidence that this event was a highly collimated explosion viewed off-axis. Like GRB 980425, GRB 031203 appears to be an intrinsically sub-energetic gamma-ray burst. Such sub-energetic events have faint afterglows. Intensive follow-up of faint bursts with smooth gamma-ray light curves (common to both GRBs 031203 and 980425) may enable us to reveal their expected large population.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0403608  [pdf] - 163502
The J-band Light Curve of SN 2003lw, Associated with GRB 031203
Comments: Submitted to ApJL. See full resolution version at http://www.astro.caltech.edu/~avishay/grb031203.pdf
Submitted: 2004-03-25
At z=0.1055, the gamma-ray burst GRB 031203 is one of the two nearest GRBs known. Using observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) and Chandra X-ray Observatory, we derive sub-arcsecond localizations of the radio and X-ray afterglow of this GRB. We present near-infrared observations of the supernova SN 2003lw, which exploded in the host galaxy of the GRB 031203. Our deep, high resolution Magellan/PANIC data establish that this SN is spatially coincident with the radio and X-ray localizations of the afterglow of GRB 031203 to sub-arcsecond precision, and is thus firmly associated with the GRB. We use image differencing to subtract the bright emission from the host galaxy, and measure the time evolution of the SN between ~5 and ~50 days after the GRB. The resulting light curve has a shape which is quite different from that of the two SNe previously associated with GRBs, SN 1998bw and SN 2003dh. With SN 2003lw securely associated with this burst, we confirm that all three GRBs with redshifts z<0.3 were accompanied by SN explosions.