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Vansyngel, Flavien

Normalized to: Vansyngel, F.

14 article(s) in total. 421 co-authors, from 1 to 11 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 77,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.07159  [pdf] - 2034686
First Detection of Spectral Variations of Anomalous Microwave Emission with QUIJOTE and C-BASS
Comments: 18 pages, 7 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-01-20
Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) is a significant component of Galactic diffuse emission in the frequency range $10$-$60\,$GHz and a new window into the properties of sub-nanometre-sized grains in the interstellar medium. We investigate the morphology of AME in the $\approx10^{\circ}$ diameter $\lambda$ Orionis ring by combining intensity data from the QUIJOTE experiment at $11$, $13$, $17$ and $19\,$GHz and the C-Band All Sky Survey (C-BASS) at $4.76\,$GHz, together with 19 ancillary datasets between $1.42$ and $3000\,$GHz. Maps of physical parameters at $1^{\circ}$ resolution are produced through Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) fits of spectral energy distributions (SEDs), approximating the AME component with a log-normal distribution. AME is detected in excess of $20\,\sigma$ at degree-scales around the entirety of the ring along photodissociation regions (PDRs), with three primary bright regions containing dark clouds. A radial decrease is observed in the AME peak frequency from $\approx35\,$GHz near the free-free region to $\approx21\,$GHz in the outer regions of the ring, which is the first detection of AME spectral variations across a single region. A strong correlation between AME peak frequency, emission measure and dust temperature is an indication for the dependence of the AME peak frequency on the local radiation field. The AME amplitude normalised by the optical depth is also strongly correlated with the radiation field, giving an overall picture consistent with spinning dust where the local radiation field plays a key role.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.07495  [pdf] - 1945993
PICO: Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins
Comments: APC White Paper submitted to the Astro2020 decadal panel; 10 page version of the 50 page mission study report arXiv:1902.10541
Submitted: 2019-08-20
The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins (PICO) is a proposed probe-scale space mission consisting of an imaging polarimeter operating in frequency bands between 20 and 800 GHz. We describe the science achievable by PICO, which has sensitivity equivalent to more than 3300 Planck missions, the technical implementation, the schedule and cost.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06212  [pdf] - 1844974
Planck 2018 results. XII. Galactic astrophysics using polarized dust emission
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M. I. R.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Green, G.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2019-03-07
We present 353 GHz full-sky maps of the polarization fraction $p$, angle $\psi$, and dispersion of angles $S$ of Galactic dust thermal emission produced from the 2018 release of Planck data. We confirm that the mean and maximum of $p$ decrease with increasing $N_H$. The uncertainty on the maximum polarization fraction, $p_\mathrm{max}=22.0$% at 80 arcmin resolution, is dominated by the uncertainty on the zero level in total intensity. The observed inverse behaviour between $p$ and $S$ is interpreted with models of the polarized sky that include effects from only the topology of the turbulent Galactic magnetic field. Thus, the statistical properties of $p$, $\psi$, and $S$ mostly reflect the structure of the magnetic field. Nevertheless, we search for potential signatures of varying grain alignment and dust properties. First, we analyse the product map $S \times p$, looking for residual trends. While $p$ decreases by a factor of 3--4 between $N_H=10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $N_H=2\times 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$, $S \times p$ decreases by only about 25%, a systematic trend observed in both the diffuse ISM and molecular clouds. Second, we find no systematic trend of $S \times p$ with the dust temperature, even though in the diffuse ISM lines of sight with high $p$ and low $S$ tend to have colder dust. We also compare Planck data with starlight polarization in the visible at high latitudes. The agreement in polarization angles is remarkable. Two polarization emission-to-extinction ratios that characterize dust optical properties depend only weakly on $N_H$ and converge towards the values previously determined for translucent lines of sight. We determine an upper limit for the polarization fraction in extinction of 13%, compatible with the $p_\mathrm{max}$ observed in emission. These results provide strong constraints for models of Galactic dust in diffuse gas.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.10541  [pdf] - 1842579
PICO: Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins
Comments: Probe class mission study submitted to NASA and 2020 Decadal Panel. Executive summary: 2.5 pages; Science: 28 pages; Total: 50 pages, 36 figures
Submitted: 2019-02-26, last modified: 2019-03-05
The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins (PICO) is an imaging polarimeter that will scan the sky for 5 years in 21 frequency bands spread between 21 and 799 GHz. It will produce full-sky surveys of intensity and polarization with a final combined-map noise level of 0.87 $\mu$K arcmin for the required specifications, equivalent to 3300 Planck missions, and with our current best-estimate would have a noise level of 0.61 $\mu$K arcmin (6400 Planck missions). PICO will either determine the energy scale of inflation by detecting the tensor to scalar ratio at a level $r=5\times 10^{-4}~(5\sigma)$, or will rule out with more than $5\sigma$ all inflation models for which the characteristic scale in the potential is the Planck scale. With LSST's data it could rule out all models of slow-roll inflation. PICO will detect the sum of neutrino masses at $>4\sigma$, constrain the effective number of light particle species with $\Delta N_{\rm eff}<0.06~(2\sigma)$, and elucidate processes affecting the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring the optical depth to reionization with errors limited by cosmic variance and by constraining the evolution of the amplitude of linear fluctuations $\sigma_{8}(z)$ with sub-percent accuracy. Cross-correlating PICO's map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect with LSST's gold sample of galaxies will precisely trace the evolution of thermal pressure with $z$. PICO's maps of the Milky Way will be used to determine the make up of galactic dust and the role of magnetic fields in star formation efficiency. With 21 full sky legacy maps in intensity and polarization, which cannot be obtained in any other way, the mission will enrich many areas of astrophysics. PICO is the only single-platform instrument with the combination of sensitivity, angular resolution, frequency bands, and control of systematic effects that can deliver this compelling, timely, and broad science.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.08274  [pdf] - 1814232
QUIJOTE Scientific results. III. Microwave spectrum of intensity and polarization in the Taurus molecular cloud Complex and L1527
Comments: Accepted for publication in the MNRAS, 27 pages, 19 Figures, 12 Tables
Submitted: 2018-12-19, last modified: 2019-01-14
We present new intensity and polarization observations of the Taurus molecular cloud (TMC) region in the frequency range 10-20 GHz with the Multi-Frequency Instrument (MFI) mounted on the first telescope of the QUIJOTE experiment. From the combination of the QUIJOTE data with the WMAP 9-yr data release, the Planck second data release, the DIRBE maps and ancillary data, we detect an anomalous microwave emission (AME) component with flux density $S_{\rm AME, peak} = 43.0 \pm 7.9\,$Jy in the Taurus Molecular Cloud (TMC) and $S_{\rm AME, peak} = 10.7 \pm 2.7\,$Jy in the dark cloud nebula L1527, which is part of the TMC. In the TMC the diffuse AME emission peaks around a frequency of 19 GHz, compared with an emission peak about a frequency of 25 GHz in L1527. In the TMC, the best constraint on the level of AME polarisation is obtained at the Planck channel of 28.4 GHz, with an upper limit $\pi_{\rm AME}<$4.2$\,\%$ (95$\,\%$ C. L.), which reduces to $\pi_{\rm AME} <$3.8$\,\%$ (95$\,\%$ C.L.) if the intensity of all the free-free, synchrotron and thermal dust components are negligible at this frequency. The same analysis in L1527 leads to $\pi_{\rm AME}<$5.3$\%$ (95$\,\%$C.L.), or $\pi_{\rm AME}<$4.5$\,\%$ (95$\%$C.L.) under the same assumption. We find that in the TMC and L1527 on average about $80\%$ of the HII gas should be mixed with thermal dust. Our analysis shows how the QUIJOTE-MFI 10-20 GHz data provides key information to properly separate the synchrotron, free-free and AME components.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.04945  [pdf] - 1782697
Planck 2018 results. XI. Polarized dust foregrounds
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Final version to appear in A&A
Submitted: 2018-01-15, last modified: 2018-11-12
The study of polarized dust emission has become entwined with the analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. We use new Planck maps to characterize Galactic dust emission as a foreground to the CMB polarization. We present Planck EE, BB, and TE power spectra of dust polarization at 353 GHz for six nested sky regions covering from 24 to 71 % of the sky. We present power-law fits to the angular power spectra, yielding evidence for statistically significant variations of the exponents over sky regions and a difference between the values for the EE and BB spectra. The TE correlation and E/B power asymmetry extend to low multipoles that were not included in earlier Planck polarization papers. We also report evidence for a positive TB dust signal. Combining data from Planck and WMAP, we determine the amplitudes and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of polarized foregrounds, including the correlation between dust and synchrotron polarized emission, for the six sky regions as a function of multipole. This quantifies the challenge of the component separation procedure required for detecting the reionization and recombination peaks of primordial CMB B modes. The SED of polarized dust emission is fit well by a single-temperature modified blackbody emission law from 353 GHz to below 70 GHz. For a dust temperature of 19.6 K, the mean spectral index for dust polarization is $\beta_{\rm d}^{P} = 1.53\pm0.02 $. By fitting multi-frequency cross-spectra, we examine the correlation of the dust polarization maps across frequency. We find no evidence for decorrelation. If the Planck limit for the largest sky region applies to the smaller sky regions observed by sub-orbital experiments, then decorrelation might not be a problem for CMB experiments aiming at a primordial B-mode detection limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r\simeq0.01$ at the recombination peak.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06206  [pdf] - 1747982
Planck 2018 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Argüeso, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Molinari, D.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Peel, M.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seljebotn, D. S.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2018-09-11
We present a final description of the data-processing pipeline for the Planck, Low Frequency Instrument (LFI), implemented for the 2018 data release. Several improvements have been made with respect to the previous release, especially in the calibration process and in the correction of instrumental features such as the effects of nonlinearity in the response of the analogue-to-digital converters. We provide a brief pedagogical introduction to the complete pipeline, as well as a detailed description of the important changes implemented. Self-consistency of the pipeline is demonstrated using dedicated simulations and null tests. We present the final version of the LFI full sky maps at 30, 44, and 70 GHz, both in temperature and polarization, together with a refined estimate of the Solar dipole and a final assessment of the main LFI instrumental parameters.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06207  [pdf] - 1717310
Planck 2018 results. III. High Frequency Instrument data processing and frequency maps
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Accepted for publication on A&A (AA/2018/32909)
Submitted: 2018-07-17
This paper presents the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) data processing procedures for the Planck 2018 release. Major improvements in mapmaking have been achieved since the previous 2015 release. They enabled the first significant measurement of the reionization optical depth parameter using HFI data. This paper presents an extensive analysis of systematic effects, including the use of simulations to facilitate their removal and characterize the residuals. The polarized data, which presented a number of known problems in the 2015 Planck release, are very significantly improved. Calibration, based on the CMB dipole, is now extremely accurate and in the frequency range 100 to 353 GHz reduces intensity-to-polarization leakage caused by calibration mismatch. The Solar dipole direction has been determined in the three lowest HFI frequency channels to within one arc minute, and its amplitude has an absolute uncertainty smaller than $0.35\mu$K, an accuracy of order $10^{-4}$. This is a major legacy from the HFI for future CMB experiments. The removal of bandpass leakage has been improved by extracting the bandpass-mismatch coefficients for each detector as part of the mapmaking process; these values in turn improve the intensity maps. This is a major change in the philosophy of "frequency maps", which are now computed from single detector data, all adjusted to the same average bandpass response for the main foregrounds. Simulations reproduce very well the relative gain calibration of detectors, as well as drifts within a frequency induced by the residuals of the main systematic effect. Using these simulations, we measure and correct the small frequency calibration bias induced by this systematic effect at the $10^{-4}$ level. There is no detectable sign of a residual calibration bias between the first and second acoustic peaks in the CMB channels, at the $10^{-3}$ level.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.06987  [pdf] - 1698011
The LiteBIRD Satellite Mission - Sub-Kelvin Instrument
Suzuki, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Alonso, D.; Arnold, K.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barron, D.; Basak, S.; Beckman, S.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Calabrese, E.; Chinone, Y.; Cho, H-M.; Cukierman, A.; Curtis, D. W.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Dominjon, A.; Dotani, T.; Duband, L.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Duval, J. M.; Elleflot, T.; Eriksen, H. K.; Errard, J.; Fischer, J.; Fujino, T.; Funaki, T.; Fuskeland, U.; Ganga, K.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Grain, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Hamada, T.; Hasebe, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hattori, M.; Hayes, L.; Hazumi, M.; Hidehira, N.; Hill, C. A.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Iida, T.; Imada, H.; Inoue, M.; Inoue, Y.; D., K.; Ishino, H.; Jeong, O.; Kanai, H.; Kaneko, D.; Kashima, S.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Keskitalo, R.; Kibayashi, A.; Kida, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kisner, T.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Komatsu, K.; Kuo, C. L.; Kurinsky, N. A.; Kusaka, A.; Lazarian, A.; Lee, A. T.; Li, D.; Linder, E.; Maffei, B.; Mangilli, A.; Maki, M.; Matsumura, T.; Matsuura, S.; Meilhan, D.; Mima, S.; Minami, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Montier, L.; Nagai, M.; Nagasaki, T.; Nagata, R.; Nakajima, M.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Naruse, M.; Nishino, H.; Nitta, T.; Noguchi, T.; Ogawa, H.; Oguri, S.; Okada, N.; Okamoto, A.; Okamura, T.; Otani, C.; Patanchon, G.; Pisano, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Remazeilles, M.; Richards, P. L.; Sakai, S.; Sakurai, Y.; Sato, Y.; Sato, N.; Sawada, M.; Segawa, Y.; Sekimoto, Y.; Seljak, U.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shimizu, T.; Shinozaki, K.; Stompor, R.; Sugai, H.; Sugita, H.; Suzuki, J.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takaku, R.; Takakura, S.; Takatori, S.; Tanabe, D.; Taylor, E.; Thompson, K. L.; Thorne, B.; Tomaru, T.; Tomida, T.; Tomita, N.; Tristram, M.; Tucker, C.; Turin, P.; Tsujimoto, M.; Uozumi, S.; Utsunomiya, S.; Uzawa, Y.; Vansyngel, F.; Wehus, I. K.; Westbrook, B.; Willer, M.; Whitehorn, N.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, R.; Yamasaki, N.; Yamashita, T.; Yoshida, M.
Comments: 7 pages 2 figures Journal of Low Temperature Physics - Special edition - LTD17 Proceeding
Submitted: 2018-01-22, last modified: 2018-03-15
Inflation is the leading theory of the first instant of the universe. Inflation, which postulates that the universe underwent a period of rapid expansion an instant after its birth, provides convincing explanation for cosmological observations. Recent advancements in detector technology have opened opportunities to explore primordial gravitational waves generated by the inflation through B-mode (divergent-free) polarization pattern embedded in the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies. If detected, these signals would provide strong evidence for inflation, point to the correct model for inflation, and open a window to physics at ultra-high energies. LiteBIRD is a satellite mission with a goal of detecting degree-and-larger-angular-scale B-mode polarization. LiteBIRD will observe at the second Lagrange point with a 400 mm diameter telescope and 2,622 detectors. It will survey the entire sky with 15 frequency bands from 40 to 400 GHz to measure and subtract foregrounds. The U.S. LiteBIRD team is proposing to deliver sub-Kelvin instruments that include detectors and readout electronics. A lenslet-coupled sinuous antenna array will cover low-frequency bands (40 GHz to 235 GHz) with four frequency arrangements of trichroic pixels. An orthomode-transducer-coupled corrugated horn array will cover high-frequency bands (280 GHz to 402 GHz) with three types of single frequency detectors. The detectors will be made with Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers cooled to a 100 milli-Kelvin base temperature by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.The TES bolometers will be read out using digital frequency multiplexing with Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) amplifiers. Up to 78 bolometers will be multiplexed with a single SQUID amplidier. We report on the sub-Kelvin instrument design and ongoing developments for the LiteBIRD mission.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.08725  [pdf] - 1705207
On the statistics of the polarized submillimetre emission maps from thermal dust in the turbulent, magnetized, diffuse ISM
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2018-02-23
[abridged] The interstellar medium is now widely recognized to display features ascribable to magnetized turbulence. With the public release of Planck data and the current balloon-borne and ground-based experiments, the growing amount of data tracing the polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust in the submillimetre provides choice diagnostics to constrain the properties of this magnetized turbulence. We aim to constrain these properties in a statistical way, focusing in particular on the power spectral index of the turbulent component of the interstellar magnetic field in a diffuse molecular cloud, the Polaris Flare. We present an analysis framework which is based on simulating polarized thermal dust emission maps using model dust density (proportional to gas density) and magnetic field cubes, integrated along the line of sight, and comparing these statistically to actual data. The model fields are derived from fBm processes, which allow a precise control of their one- and two-point statistics. We explore the nine-dimensional parameter space of these models through a MCMC analysis, which yields best-fitting parameters and associated uncertainties. We find that the power spectrum of the turbulent component of the magnetic field in the Polaris Flare molecular cloud scales with wavenumber as a power law with a spectral index $2.8\pm 0.2$. It complements a uniform field whose norm in the POS is approximately twice the norm of the fluctuations of the turbulent component. The density field is well represented by a log-normally distributed field with a mean gas density $40\,\mathrm{cm}^{-3}$ and a power spectrum with as spectral index $1.7^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$. The agreement between the Planck data and the simulated maps for these best-fitting parameters is quantified by a $\chi^2$ value that is only slightly larger than unity.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.02577  [pdf] - 1767312
Statistical simulations of the dust foreground to CMB polarization
Comments: 14 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2016-11-08, last modified: 2017-04-27
The characterization of the dust polarization foreground to the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is a necessary step towards the detection of the B-mode signal associated with primordial gravitational waves. We present a method to simulate maps of polarized dust emission on the sphere, similarly to what is done for the CMB anisotropies. This method builds on the understanding of Galactic polarization stemming from the analysis of Planck data. It relates the dust polarization sky to the structure of the Galactic magnetic field and its coupling with interstellar matter and turbulence. The Galactic magnetic field is modelled as a superposition of a mean uniform field and a random component with a power-law power spectrum of exponent $\alpha_{\rm M}$. The model parameters are constrained to fit the power spectra of dust polarization EE, BB and TE measured using Planck data. We find that the slopes of the E and B power spectra of dust polarization are matched for $\alpha_{\rm M} = -2.5$. The model allows us to compute multiple realizations of the Stokes Q and U maps for different realizations of the random component of the magnetic field, and to quantify the variance of dust polarization spectra for any given sky area outside of the Galactic plane. The simulations reproduce the scaling relation between the dust polarization power and the mean total dust intensity including the observed dispersion around the mean relation. We also propose a method to carry out multi-frequency simulations including the decorrelation measured recently by Planck, using a given covariance matrix of the polarization maps. These simulations are well suited to optimize component separation methods and to quantify the confidence with which the dust and CMB B-modes can be separated in present and future experiments. We also provide an astrophysical perspective on our modeling of the dust polarization spectra.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.02418  [pdf] - 1574565
Modelling and simulation of large-scale polarized dust emission over the southern Galactic cap using the GASS HI data
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures. A&A accepted
Submitted: 2016-11-08, last modified: 2017-02-23
The Planck survey has quantified polarized Galactic foregrounds and established that they are a main limiting factor in the quest for the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode signal induced by primordial gravitational waves during cosmic inflation. Accurate separation of the Galactic foregrounds therefore binds this quest to our understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM). The two most relevant empirical results from analysis of Planck data are line of sight depolarization arising from fluctuations of the Galactic magnetic field orientation and alignment of filamentary dust structures with the magnetic field at high Galactic latitude. Furthermore, Planck and HI emission data in combination indicate that most of the filamentary dust structures are in the cold neutral medium. The goal of this paper is to test whether these salient observational results, taken together, can account fully for the statistical properties of the dust polarization over a selected low column density region comprising 34 % of the southern Galactic cap ($b \le -30\deg$). To do this, we construct a dust model that incorporates HI column density maps as tracers of the dust intensity structures and a phenomenological description of the Galactic magnetic field. By adjusting the parameters of the dust model, we were able to reproduce the Planck dust observations at 353 GHz in the selected region. Realistic simulations of the polarized dust emission enabled by such a dust model are useful for testing the accuracy of component separation methods, studying non-Gaussianity, and constraining the amount of decorrelation with frequency.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.01029  [pdf] - 1530576
Planck intermediate results. XLIV. The structure of the Galactic magnetic field from dust polarization maps of the southern Galactic cap
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arzoumanian, D.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Neveu, J.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Soler, J. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-04-04
We study the statistical properties of interstellar dust polarization at high Galactic latitude, using the Stokes parameter Planck maps at 353 GHz. Our aim is to advance the understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM), and to provide a model of the polarized dust foreground for cosmic microwave background component-separation procedures. Focusing on the southern Galactic cap, we examine the statistical distributions of the polarization fraction ($p$) and angle ($\psi$) to characterize the ordered and turbulent components of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) in the solar neighbourhood. We relate patterns at large angular scales in polarization to the orientation of the mean (ordered) GMF towards Galactic coordinates $(l_0,b_0)=(70^\circ \pm 5^\circ,24^\circ \pm 5^\circ)$. The histogram of $p$ shows a wide dispersion up to 25 %. The histogram of $\psi$ has a standard deviation of $12^\circ$ about the regular pattern expected from the ordered GMF. We use these histograms to build a phenomenological model of the turbulent component of the GMF, assuming a uniform effective polarization fraction ($p_0$) of dust emission. To model the Stokes parameters, we approximate the integration along the line of sight (LOS) as a sum over a set of $N$ independent polarization layers, in each of which the turbulent component of the GMF is obtained from Gaussian realizations of a power-law power spectrum. We are able to reproduce the observed $p$ and $\psi$ distributions using: a $p_0$ value of (26 $\pm$ 3)%; a ratio of 0.9 $\pm$ 0.1 between the strengths of the turbulent and mean components of the GMF; and a small value of $N$. We relate the polarization layers to the density structure and to the correlation length of the GMF along the LOS.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.0858  [pdf] - 1382040
Semi-blind Bayesian inference of CMB map and power spectrum
Comments: 11 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2014-09-02
We present a new blind formulation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) inference problem. The approach relies on a phenomenological model of the multi-frequency microwave sky without the need for physical models of the individual components. For all-sky and high resolution data, it unifies parts of the analysis that have previously been treated separately, such as component separation and power spectrum inference. We describe an efficient sampling scheme that fully explores the component separation uncertainties on the inferred CMB products such as maps and/or power spectra. External information about individual components can be incorporated as a prior giving a flexible way to progressively and continuously introduce physical component separation from a maximally blind approach. We connect our Bayesian formalism to existing approaches such as Commander, SMICA and ILC, and discuss possible future extensions.