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Vagnozzi, S.

Normalized to: Vagnozzi, S.

32 article(s) in total. 331 co-authors, from 1 to 12 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 2,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.02289  [pdf] - 2059733
Bounds on light sterile neutrino mass and mixing from cosmology and laboratory searches
Comments: 29 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2020-03-04
We provide a consistent framework to set limits on properties of light sterile neutrinos coupled to all three active neutrinos using a combination of the latest cosmological data and terrestrial measurements from oscillations, $\beta$-decay and neutrinoless double-$\beta$ decay ($0\nu\beta\beta$) experiments. We directly constrain the full $3+1$ active-sterile mixing matrix elements $|U_{\alpha4}|^2$, with $\alpha \in ( e,\mu ,\tau )$, and the mass-squared splitting $\Delta m^2_{41} \equiv m_4^2-m_1^2$. We find that results for a $3+1$ case differ from previously studied $1+1$ scenarios where the sterile is only coupled to one of the neutrinos, which is largely explained by parameter space volume effects. Limits on the mass splitting and the mixing matrix elements are currently dominated by the cosmological data sets. The exact results are slightly prior dependent, but we reliably find all matrix elements to be constrained below $|U_{\alpha4}|^2 \lesssim 10^{-3}$. Short-baseline neutrino oscillation hints in favor of eV-scale sterile neutrinos are in serious tension with these bounds, irrespective of prior assumptions. We also translate the bounds from the cosmological analysis into constraints on the parameters probed by laboratory searches, such as $m_\beta$ or $m_{\beta \beta}$, the effective mass parameters probed by $\beta$-decay and $0\nu\beta\beta$ searches, respectively. When allowing for mixing with a light sterile neutrino, cosmology leads to upper bounds of $m_\beta < 0.09$ eV and $m_{\beta \beta} < 0.07$ eV at 95\% C.L, more stringent than the limits from current laboratory experiments.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.02986  [pdf] - 2054144
Concerns regarding the use of black hole shadows as standard rulers
Comments: 12 pages, 1 figure. Added references and improved discussion on weak lensing. Version accepted for publication in Class. Quant. Grav
Submitted: 2020-01-09, last modified: 2020-02-24
Recently, Tsupko et al. have put forward the very interesting proposal to use the shadows of high-redshift supermassive black holes (SMBHs) as standard rulers. This would in principle allow us to probe the expansion history within a redshift range which would otherwise be challenging to access. In this note, we critically examine this proposal, and identify a number of important issues which had been previously overlooked. These include difficulties in obtaining reliable SMBH mass estimates and reaching the required angular resolution, and an insufficient knowledge of the accretion dynamics of high-redshift SMBHs. While these issues currently appear to prevent high-redshift SMBH shadows from being used as robust standard rulers, we hope that our flagging them early will help in making this probe theoretically mature by the time it will be experimentally feasible.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.09853  [pdf] - 2061591
Non-minimal dark sector physics and cosmological tensions
Comments: 19 pages, 5 figures, added Bayesian evidence computation and further discussions. Version accepted for publication in PRD
Submitted: 2019-10-22, last modified: 2020-02-13
We explore whether non-standard dark sector physics might be required to solve the existing cosmological tensions. The properties we consider in combination are an interaction between the dark matter and dark energy components, and a dark energy equation of state $w$ different from that of the canonical cosmological constant $w=-1$. In principle, these two parameters are independent. In practice, to avoid early-time, superhorizon instabilities, their allowed parameter spaces are correlated. We analyze three classes of extended interacting dark energy models in light of the 2019 Planck CMB results and Cepheid-calibrated local distance ladder $H_0$ measurements of Riess et al. (R19), as well as recent BAO and SNeIa distance data. We find that in quintessence coupled dark energy models, where $w > -1$, the evidence for a non-zero coupling between the two dark sectors can surpass the $5\sigma$ significance. On the other hand, in phantom coupled dark energy models, there is no such preference for a non-zero dark sector coupling. All the models we consider significantly raise the value of the Hubble constant easing the $H_0$ tension. The addition of low-redshift BAO and SNeIa measurements leaves some residual tension with R19 but at a level that could be justified by a statistical fluctuation. Bayesian evidence considerations mildly disfavour both the coupled quintessence and phantom models, while mildly favouring a coupled vacuum scenario, even when late-time datasets are considered. We conclude that non-minimal dark energy cosmologies, such as coupled quintessence, phantom, or vacuum models, are still an interesting route towards softening existing cosmological tensions, even when low-redshift datasets and Bayesian evidence considerations are taken into account. (abstract severely abridged)
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.12374  [pdf] - 2052620
Do we have any hope of detecting scattering between dark energy and baryons through cosmology?
Comments: 15 pages, 7 figures. Title changed, minor modifications added comments on non-linearities. Version accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-11-27, last modified: 2020-01-29
We consider the possibility that dark energy and baryons might scatter off each other. The type of interaction we consider leads to a pure momentum exchange, and does not affect the background evolution of the expansion history. We parametrize this interaction in an effective way at the level of Boltzmann equations. We compute the effect of dark energy-baryon scattering on cosmological observables, focusing on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropy power spectrum and the matter power spectrum. Surprisingly, we find that even huge dark energy-baryon cross-sections $\sigma_{xb} \sim {\cal O}({\rm b})$, which are generically excluded by non-cosmological probes such as collider searches or precision gravity tests, only leave an insignificant imprint on the observables considered. In the case of the CMB temperature power spectrum, the only imprint consists in a sub-percent enhancement or depletion of power (depending whether or not the dark energy equation of state lies above or below $-1$) at very low multipoles, which is thus swamped by cosmic variance. These effects are explained in terms of differences in how gravitational potentials decay in the presence of a dark energy-baryon scattering, which ultimately lead to an increase or decrease in the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe power. Even smaller related effects are imprinted on the matter power spectrum. The imprints on the CMB are not expected to be degenerate with the effects due to altering the dark energy sound speed. We conclude that, while strongly appealing, the prospects for a direct detection of dark energy through cosmology do not seem feasible when considering realistic dark energy-baryon cross-sections. As a caveat, our results hold to linear order in perturbation theory.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.08231  [pdf] - 2042332
Magnetically charged black holes from non-linear electrodynamics and the Event Horizon Telescope
Comments: 28 pages, 9 figures, 4 tables, accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2019-12-17, last modified: 2020-01-20
Non-linear electrodynamics (NLED) theories are well-motivated extensions of QED in the strong field regime, and have long been studied in the search for regular black hole (BH) solutions. We consider two well-studied and well-motivated NLED models coupled to General Relativity: the Euler-Heisenberg model and the Bronnikov model. After carefully accounting for the effective geometry induced by the NLED corrections, we determine the shadows of BHs within these two models. We then compare these to the shadow of the supermassive BH M87* recently imaged by the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration. In doing so, we are able to extract upper limits on the black hole magnetic charge, thus providing novel constraints on fundamental physics from this new extraordinary probe.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.05344  [pdf] - 2006600
Dawn of the dark: unified dark sectors and the EDGES Cosmic Dawn 21-cm signal
Comments: 18 pages, 3 Tables, 2 figures; version accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2019-07-10, last modified: 2019-11-12
While the origin and composition of dark matter and dark energy remains unknown, it is possible that they might represent two manifestations of a single entity, as occurring in unified dark sector models. On the other hand, advances in our understanding of the dark sector of the Universe might arise from Cosmic Dawn, the epoch when the first stars formed. In particular, the first detection of the global 21-cm absorption signal at Cosmic Dawn from the EDGES experiment opens up a new arena wherein to test models of dark matter and dark energy. Here, we consider generalized and modified Chaplygin gas models as candidate unified dark sector models. We first constrain these models against Cosmic Microwave Background data from the \textit{Planck} satellite, before exploring how the inclusion of the global 21-cm signal measured by EDGES can improve limits on the model parameters, finding that the uncertainties on the parameters of the Chaplygin gas models can be reduced by a factor between $1.5$ and $10$. We also find that within the generalized Chaplygin gas model, the tension between the CMB and local determinations of the Hubble constant $H_0$ is reduced from $\approx 4\sigma$ to $\approx 1.3\sigma$. In conclusion, we find that the global 21-cm signal at Cosmic Dawn can provide an extraordinary window onto the physics of unified dark sectors.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.12983  [pdf] - 2052564
Testing the rotational nature of the supermassive object M87* from the circularity and size of its first image
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, Accepted in PRD
Submitted: 2019-04-29, last modified: 2019-08-15
The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration has recently released the first image of a black hole (BH), opening a new window onto tests of general relativity in the strong field regime. In this paper, we derive constraints on the nature of M87* (the supermassive object at the centre of the galaxy M87), exploiting the fact that its shadow appears to be highly circular, and using measurements of its angular size. We first consider the simple case where M87* is assumed to be a Kerr BH. We find that the inferred circularity of M87* excludes Kerr BHs with observation angle $\theta_{\rm obs} \gtrsim 45^{\circ}$ for dimensionless rotational parameter $0.95 \lesssim a_* \leq 1$ whereas the observation angle is unbounded for $a_* \lesssim 0.9$. We then consider the possibility that M87* might be a superspinar, i.e. an object described by the Kerr solution and spinning so fast that it violates the Kerr bound by having $|a_*| > 1$. We find that, within certain regions of parameter space, the inferred circularity and size of the shadow of M87* do not exclude the possibility that this object might be a superspinar.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.07953  [pdf] - 2034375
Revisiting a negative cosmological constant from low-redshift data
Comments: v3: 15 pages, 1 table containing 6 figures, updated title to reflect title in the published version, added publication details. Version published in Symmetry as an invited feature paper in the special issue "Anomalies and Tensions of the Cosmic Microwave Background"
Submitted: 2019-07-18, last modified: 2019-08-13
Persisting tensions between high-redshift and low-redshift cosmological observations suggest the dark energy sector of the Universe might be more complex than the positive cosmological constant of the $\Lambda$CDM model. Motivated by string theory, wherein symmetry considerations make consistent AdS backgrounds (\textit (i.e.) maximally symmetric spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant) ubiquitous, we explore a scenario where the dark energy sector consists of two components: a negative cosmological constant, with a dark energy component with equation of state $w_{\phi}$ on top. We test the consistency of the model against low-redshift Baryon Acoustic Oscillation and Type Ia Supernovae distance measurements, assessing two alternative choices of distance anchors: the sound horizon at baryon drag determined by the \textit{Planck} collaboration, and the Hubble constant determined by the SH0ES program. We find no evidence for a negative cosmological constant, and mild indications for an effective phantom dark energy component on top. A model comparison analysis reveals the $\Lambda$CDM model is favoured over our negative cosmological constant model. While our results are inconclusive, should low-redshift tensions persist with future data, it would be worth reconsidering and further refining our toy negative cosmological constant model by considering realistic string constructions.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.04281  [pdf] - 1938610
Interacting dark energy after the latest Planck, DES, and $H_0$ measurements: an excellent solution to the $H_0$ and cosmic shear tensions
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures. Comments are welcome
Submitted: 2019-08-12
We examine the most well-studied model featuring non-gravitational interactions between dark matter and dark energy in light of the latest cosmological observations. Our data includes Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurements from the Planck 2018 legacy data release, galaxy clustering and cosmic shear measurements from the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 results, and the 2019 local distance ladder measurement of the Hubble constant $H_0$ from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find that the presence of interactions among the two dark sectors can bring the significance level of the long-standing $H_0$ tension below the $1\sigma$ level. The very same model also significantly reduces the $\Omega_{\rm m}-\sigma_8$ tension between CMB and cosmic shear measurements. Interactions between the dark components of our Universe remain therefore as an extremely promising solution to these persisting cosmological tensions. The results presented in this paper are among the first constraints on exotic physics from the Planck 2018 legacy dataset. In a companion paper, we will further investigate these tensions when allowing for more freedom in the dark energy sector.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.08286  [pdf] - 1938431
Listening to the sound of dark sector interactions with gravitational wave standard sirens
Comments: 16 pages, 3 tables, 4 figures; version published in JCAP
Submitted: 2019-05-20, last modified: 2019-07-25
We consider two stable Interacting Dark Matter -- Dark Energy models and confront them against current Cosmic Microwave Background data from the \textit{Planck} satellite. We then generate luminosity distance measurements from ${\cal O}(10^3)$ mock Gravitational Wave events matching the expected sensitivity of the proposed Einstein Telescope. We use these to forecast how the addition of Gravitational Wave standard sirens data can improve current limits on the Dark Matter -- Dark Energy coupling strength ($\xi$). We find that the addition of Gravitational Waves data can reduce the current uncertainty by a factor of $5$. Moreover, if the underlying cosmological model truly features Dark Matter -- Dark Energy interactions with a value of $\xi$ within the currently allowed $1\sigma$ upper limit, the addition of Gravitational Wave data would help disentangle such an interaction from the standard case of no interaction at a significance of more than $3\sigma$.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.08010  [pdf] - 1918991
Cosmological searches for the neutrino mass scale and mass ordering
Comments: Stockholm University PhD thesis, defended on June 10, 2019. Chapter 4 is a textbook-level review on neutrino cosmology, particularly suited for newcomers in the field. Advisor: Prof. Katherine Freese. Opponent: Prof. Alessandra Silvestri. ISBN: 978-91-7797-729-2. For full text on SU's website see http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:su:diva-167815. Abstract severely abridged
Submitted: 2019-07-18
In this thesis, I describe a number of recent important developments in neutrino cosmology on three fronts. Firstly, focusing on Large-Scale Structure (LSS) data, I will show that current cosmological probes contain a wealth of information on the sum of the neutrino masses. I report on the analysis leading to the currently best upper limit on the sum of the neutrino masses of $0.12\,{\rm eV}$. I show how cosmological data exhibits a weak preference for the normal neutrino mass ordering because of parameter space volume effects, and propose a simple method to quantify this preference. Secondly, I will discuss how galaxy bias represents a severe limitation towards fully capitalizing on the neutrino information hidden in LSS data. I propose a method for calibrating the scale-dependent galaxy bias using CMB lensing-galaxy cross-correlations. Moreover, in the presence of massive neutrinos, the usual definition of bias becomes inadequate, as it leads to a scale-dependence on large scales which has never been accounted for. I show that failure to define the bias appropriately will be a problem for future LSS surveys, and propose a simple recipe to account for the effect of massive neutrinos on galaxy bias. Finally, I discuss implications of correlations between neutrino parameters and other cosmological parameters. In non-phantom dynamical dark energy models, the upper limit on the sum of the neutrino masses becomes tighter than the $\Lambda$CDM limit. Therefore, such models exhibit an even stronger preference for the normal ordering, and their viability could be jeopardized should near-future laboratory experiments determine that the mass ordering is inverted. I then discuss correlations between neutrino and inflationary parameters. I find that our determination of inflationary parameters is stable against assumptions about the neutrino sector. (abridged)
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.07569  [pdf] - 1918937
New physics in light of the $H_0$ tension: an alternative view
Comments: 23 pages, 10 figures. Comments on this non-standard hybrid Bayesian-frequentist approach are very welcome. The busy reader should skip to Fig. 1, 2, 4, 5, and 10
Submitted: 2019-07-17
The strong discrepancy between local distance ladder and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) estimates of the Hubble constant $H_0$ could be pointing towards new physics beyond the concordance $\Lambda$CDM model. Several attempts to address this tension through new physics rely on extended cosmological models, featuring extra free parameters beyond the 6 $\Lambda$CDM parameters. However, marginalizing over additional parameters has the effect of broadening the uncertainties on the inferred parameters, and it is often the case that within these models the tension is addressed due to larger uncertainties rather than a genuine shift in the central value of $H_0$. In this paper I consider an alternative viewpoint: what happens if one chooses to \textit{fix} the extra parameters to non-standard values instead of varying them? Focusing on the dark energy equation of state $w$ and the effective number of relativistic species $N_{\rm eff}$, I find that fixing $w \approx -1.3$ or $N_{\rm eff} \approx 3.95$ leads to a high-redshift estimate of $H_0$ in \textit{perfect} agreement with the local distance ladder estimate, without broadening the uncertainty on the former. These two figures can have interesting implications for model-building activity. While such non-standard models are strongly disfavoured with respect to the baseline $\Lambda$CDM model, Bayesian evidence considerations show that they nonetheless perform surprisingly better than the corresponding extended models where $w$ and/or $N_{\rm eff}$ are allowed to vary, when reducing the $H_0$ tension to the same level of statistical significance. Finally, I estimate dimensionless multipliers relating variations in $H_0$ to variations in $w$ and $N_{\rm eff}$, which can be used to swiftly repeat the analysis of this paper in light of future more precise local distance ladder estimate of $H_0$, should the tension persist.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.08284  [pdf] - 1976842
The Simons Observatory: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Adachi, Shunsuke; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Atkins, Zachary; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Lizancos, Anton Baleato; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bhandarkar, Tanay; Bhimani, Sanah; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bolliet, Boris; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Carl, Fred. M; Cayuso, Juan; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Clark, Susan; Clarke, Philip; Contaldi, Carlo; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Coulton, Will; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Bouhargani, Hamza El; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Fergusson, James; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Halpern, Mark; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hensley, Brandon; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hoang, Thuong D.; Hoh, Jonathan; Hotinli, Selim C.; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Johnson, Matthew; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Kofman, Anna; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kusaka, Akito; LaPlante, Phil; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Liu, Jia; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McCarrick, Heather; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Mertens, James; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Moore, Jenna; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Murata, Masaaki; Naess, Sigurd; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Nicola, Andrina; Niemack, Mike; Nishino, Haruki; Nishinomiya, Yume; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Pagano, Luca; Partridge, Bruce; Perrotta, Francesca; Phakathi, Phumlani; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Rotti, Aditya; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Saunders, Lauren; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Shellard, Paul; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sifon, Cristobal; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Smith, Kendrick; Sohn, Wuhyun; Sonka, Rita; Spergel, David; Spisak, Jacob; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Treu, Jesse; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Wang, Yuhan; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Young, Edward; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zannoni, Mario; Zhang, Hezi; Zheng, Kaiwen; Zhu, Ningfeng; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1808.07445
Submitted: 2019-07-16
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment sited on Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert in Chile that promises to provide breakthrough discoveries in fundamental physics, cosmology, and astrophysics. Supported by the Simons Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and with contributions from collaborating institutions, SO will see first light in 2021 and start a five year survey in 2022. SO has 287 collaborators from 12 countries and 53 institutions, including 85 students and 90 postdocs. The SO experiment in its currently funded form ('SO-Nominal') consists of three 0.4 m Small Aperture Telescopes (SATs) and one 6 m Large Aperture Telescope (LAT). Optimized for minimizing systematic errors in polarization measurements at large angular scales, the SATs will perform a deep, degree-scale survey of 10% of the sky to search for the signature of primordial gravitational waves. The LAT will survey 40% of the sky with arc-minute resolution. These observations will measure (or limit) the sum of neutrino masses, search for light relics, measure the early behavior of Dark Energy, and refine our understanding of the intergalactic medium, clusters and the role of feedback in galaxy formation. With up to ten times the sensitivity and five times the angular resolution of the Planck satellite, and roughly an order of magnitude increase in mapping speed over currently operating ("Stage 3") experiments, SO will measure the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations to exquisite precision in six frequency bands from 27 to 280 GHz. SO will rapidly advance CMB science while informing the design of future observatories such as CMB-S4.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.12421  [pdf] - 2052570
Hunting for extra dimensions in the shadow of M87*
Comments: v3: references added, version published in PRD
Submitted: 2019-05-29, last modified: 2019-07-12
The Event Horizon Telescope has recently provided the first image of the dark shadow around the supermassive black hole M87*. The observation of a highly circular shadow provides strong limits on deviations of M87*'s quadrupole moment from the Kerr value. We show that the absence of such a deviation can be used to constrain the physics of extra dimensions of spacetime. Focusing on the Randall-Sundrum AdS$_5$ brane-world scenario, we show that the observation of M87*'s dark shadow sets the limit $\ell \lesssim 170\,{\rm AU}$, where $\ell$ is the AdS$_5$ curvature radius. This limit is among the first quantitative constraints on exotic physics obtained from the extraordinary first ever image of the dark shadow of a black hole.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.06424  [pdf] - 1881523
The zoo plot meets the swampland: mutual (in)consistency of single-field inflation, string conjectures, and cosmological data
Comments: 5 pages, 1 figure. The busy reader should skip directly to Fig. 1, where the swampland-allowed region is mapped onto the $n_S$-$r$ plane. v2: added discussion on the refined swampland conjecture, basic conclusions unchanged. v3: version accepted for publication in Class. Quant. Grav
Submitted: 2018-08-20, last modified: 2019-04-16
We consider single-field inflation in light of string-motivated "swampland" conjectures suggesting that effective scalar field theories with a consistent UV completion must have field excursion $\Delta \phi \lesssim M_{\rm Pl}$, in combination with a sufficiently steep potential, $M_{\rm Pl} V_\phi/V \gtrsim {\cal O}(1)$. Here, we show that the swampland conjectures are inconsistent with existing observational constraints on single-field inflation. Focusing on the observationally favoured class of concave potentials, we map the allowed swampland region onto the $n_S$-$r$ "zoo plot" of inflationary models, and find that consistency with the Planck satellite and BICEP2/Keck Array requires $M_{\rm Pl} V_\phi/V \lesssim 0.1$ and $-0.02 \lesssim M_{\rm Pl}^2 V_{\phi\phi}/V < 0$, in strong tension with swampland conjectures. Extension to non-canonical models such as DBI Inflation does not significantly weaken the bound.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.10834  [pdf] - 1862243
New solar metallicity measurements
Comments: 6 pages, extended version of contribution to proceedings of the 51st Rencontres de Moriond, Cosmology Session, published as communication in Atoms
Submitted: 2017-03-31, last modified: 2019-04-04
In the past years, a systematic downward revision of the metallicity of the Sun has led to the "solar modeling problem", namely the disagreement between predictions of standard solar models and inferences from helioseismology. Recent solar wind measurements of the metallicity of the Sun, however, provide once more an indication of a high-metallicity Sun. Because of the effects of possible residual fractionation, the derived value of the metallicity $Z_{\odot} = 0.0196 \pm 0.0014$ actually represents a lower limit to the true metallicity of the Sun. However, when compared with helioseismological measurements, solar models computed using these new abundances fail to restore agreement, owing to the implausibly high abundance of refractory (Mg, Si, S, Fe) elements, which correlates with a higher core temperature and hence an overproduction of solar neutrinos. Moreover, the robustness of these measurements is challenged by possible first ionization potential fractionation processes. I will discuss these solar wind measurements, which leave the "solar modeling problem" unsolved.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.07445  [pdf] - 1841339
The Simons Observatory: Science goals and forecasts
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Dusatko, John; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Fuzia, Brittany; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; He, Yizhou; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Howe, Logan; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Kernasovskiy, Sarah S.; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kuenstner, Stephen E.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Kusaka, Akito; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Leon, David; Leung, Jason S. -Y.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lowry, Lindsay; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Niemack, Michael; Nishino, Haruki; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Page, Lyman; Partridge, Bruce; Peloton, Julien; Perrotta, Francesca; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Siritanasak, Praween; Smith, Kendrick; Smith, Stephen R.; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward J.; Xu, Zhilei; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zhang, Hezi; Zhu, Ningfeng
Comments: This paper presents an overview of the Simons Observatory science goals, details about the instrument will be presented in a companion paper. The author contribution to this paper is available at https://simonsobservatory.org/publications.php (Abstract abridged) -- matching version published in JCAP
Submitted: 2018-08-22, last modified: 2019-03-01
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a new cosmic microwave background experiment being built on Cerro Toco in Chile, due to begin observations in the early 2020s. We describe the scientific goals of the experiment, motivate the design, and forecast its performance. SO will measure the temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background in six frequency bands: 27, 39, 93, 145, 225 and 280 GHz. The initial configuration of SO will have three small-aperture 0.5-m telescopes (SATs) and one large-aperture 6-m telescope (LAT), with a total of 60,000 cryogenic bolometers. Our key science goals are to characterize the primordial perturbations, measure the number of relativistic species and the mass of neutrinos, test for deviations from a cosmological constant, improve our understanding of galaxy evolution, and constrain the duration of reionization. The SATs will target the largest angular scales observable from Chile, mapping ~10% of the sky to a white noise level of 2 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, to measure the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, at a target level of $\sigma(r)=0.003$. The LAT will map ~40% of the sky at arcminute angular resolution to an expected white noise level of 6 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, overlapping with the majority of the LSST sky region and partially with DESI. With up to an order of magnitude lower polarization noise than maps from the Planck satellite, the high-resolution sky maps will constrain cosmological parameters derived from the damping tail, gravitational lensing of the microwave background, the primordial bispectrum, and the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects, and will aid in delensing the large-angle polarization signal to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio. The survey will also provide a legacy catalog of 16,000 galaxy clusters and more than 20,000 extragalactic sources.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.06382  [pdf] - 1878660
Cosmological window onto the string axiverse and the supersymmetry breaking scale
Comments: 13 pages, 4 figures. Abstract shortened, title slightly shortened, accepted for publication in PRD
Submitted: 2018-09-17, last modified: 2019-02-28
In the simplest picture, the masses of string axions populating the axiverse depend on two parameters: the supersymmetry breaking scale $M_{\rm susy}$ and the action $S$ of the string instantons responsible for breaking the axion shift symmetry. In this work, we explore whether cosmological data can be used to probe these two parameters. Adopting string-inspired flat priors on $\log_{10}M_{\rm susy}$ and $S$, and imposing that $M_{\rm susy}$ be sub-Planckian, we find $S=198\pm28$. These bounds suggest that cosmological data complemented with string-inspired priors select a quite narrow axion mass range within the axiverse, $\log_{10}(m_a/{\rm eV}) = -21.5^{+1.3}_{-2.3}$. We find that $M_{\rm susy}$ remains unconstrained due to a fundamental parameter degeneracy with $S$. We explore the significant impact of other choices of priors on the results, and we comment on similar findings in recent previous literature.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.08694  [pdf] - 1849837
Scale-dependent galaxy bias, CMB lensing-galaxy cross-correlation, and neutrino masses
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2018-02-23, last modified: 2018-12-05
One of the most powerful cosmological datasets when it comes to constraining neutrino masses is represented by galaxy power spectrum measurements, $P_{gg}(k)$. The constraining power of $P_{gg}(k)$ is however severely limited by uncertainties in the modeling of the scale-dependent galaxy bias $b(k)$. In this Letter we present a new method to constrain $b(k)$ by using the cross-correlation between the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) lensing signal and galaxy maps ($C_\ell^{\rm \kappa g}$) using a simple but theoretically well-motivated parametrization for $b(k)$. We apply the method using $C_\ell^{\rm \kappa g}$ measured by cross-correlating Planck lensing maps and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 11 (DR11) CMASS galaxy sample, and $P_{gg}(k)$ measured from the BOSS DR12 CMASS sample. We detect a non-zero scale-dependence at moderate significance, which suggests that a proper modeling of $b(k)$ is necessary in order to reduce the impact of non-linearities and minimize the corresponding systematics. The accomplished increase in constraining power of $P_{gg}(k)$ is demonstrated by determining a 95% C.L. upper bound on the sum of the three active neutrino masses $M_{\nu}$ of $M_{\nu}<0.19\, {\rm eV}$. This limit represents a significant improvement over previous bounds with comparable datasets. Our method will prove especially powerful and important as future large-scale structure surveys will overlap more significantly with the CMB lensing kernel providing a large cross-correlation signal.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.02620  [pdf] - 1797138
Mimicking dark matter and dark energy in a mimetic model compatible with GW170817
Comments: 29 pages, 2 figures. Version accepted for publication in Phys. Dark Univ
Submitted: 2018-03-07, last modified: 2018-10-01
The recent observation of the the gravitational wave event GW170817 and of its electromagnetic counterpart GRB170817A, from a binary neutron star merger, has established that the speed of gravitational waves deviates from the speed of light by less than one part in $10^{15}$. As a consequence, many extensions of General Relativity are inevitably ruled out. Among these we find the most relevant sectors of Horndeski gravity. In its original formulation, mimetic gravity is able to mimic cosmological dark matter, has tensorial perturbations that travel exactly at the speed of light but has vanishing scalar perturbations and this fact persists if we combine mimetic with Horndeski gravity. In this work, we show that implementing the mimetic gravity action with higher-order terms that break the Horndeski structure yields a cosmological model that satisfies the constraint on the speed of gravitational waves and mimics both dark energy and dark matter with a non-vanishing speed of sound. In this way, we are able to reproduce the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model without introducing particle cold dark matter.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.08553  [pdf] - 1797624
Constraints on the sum of the neutrino masses in dynamical dark energy models with $w(z) \geq -1$ are tighter than those obtained in $\Lambda$CDM
Comments: 20 pages, 6 figures, added substantial discussion in text and Appendix A showing that including information from neutrino oscillations does not impact our results, accepted for publication in Phys. Rev. D. The busy reader who wants to see the main results should look at Table 1, Figure 1, and Figure 4
Submitted: 2018-01-25, last modified: 2018-09-16
We explore cosmological constraints on the sum of the three active neutrino masses $M_{\nu}$ in the context of dynamical dark energy (DDE) models with equation of state (EoS) parametrized as a function of redshift $z$ by $w(z)=w_0+w_a\,z/(1+z)$, and satisfying $w(z)\geq-1$ for all $z$. We perform a Bayesian analysis and show that, within these models, the bounds on $M_{\nu}$ \textit{do not degrade} with respect to those obtained in the $\Lambda$CDM case; in fact the bounds are slightly tighter, despite the enlarged parameter space. We explain our results based on the observation that, for fixed choices of $w_0\,,w_a$ such that $w(z)\geq-1$ (but not $w=-1$ for all $z$), the upper limit on $M_{\nu}$ is tighter than the $\Lambda$CDM limit because of the well-known degeneracy between $w$ and $M_{\nu}$. The Bayesian analysis we have carried out then integrates over the possible values of $w_0$-$w_a$ such that $w(z)\geq-1$, all of which correspond to tighter limits on $M_{\nu}$ than the $\Lambda$CDM limit. We find a 95\% confidence level (C.L.) upper bound of $M_{\nu}<0.13\,\mathrm{eV}$. This bound can be compared with $M_{\nu}<0.16\,\mathrm{eV}$ at 95\%~C.L., obtained within the $\Lambda$CDM model, and $M_{\nu}<0.41\,\mathrm{eV}$ at 95\%~C.L., obtained in a DDE model with arbitrary EoS (which allows values of $w < -1$). Contrary to the results derived for DDE models with arbitrary EoS, we find that a dark energy component with $w(z)\geq-1$ is unable to alleviate the tension between high-redshift observables and direct measurements of the Hubble constant $H_0$. Finally, in light of the results of this analysis, we also discuss the implications for DDE models of a possible determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy by laboratory searches. (abstract abridged)
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.08252  [pdf] - 1797144
Tale of stable interacting dark energy, observational signatures, and the $H_0$ tension
Comments: 21 pages, 6 Figures, 6 Tables; Accepted in JCAP
Submitted: 2018-05-21, last modified: 2018-08-30
We investigate the observational consequences of a novel class of stable interacting dark energy (IDE) models, featuring interactions between dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE). In the first part of our work, we start by considering two IDE models which are known to present early-time linear perturbation instabilities. Applying a transformation depending on the dark energy equation of state (EoS) to the DM-DE coupling, we then obtain two novel stable IDE models. Subsequently, we derive robust and accurate constraints on the parameters of these models, assuming a constant EoS $w_x$ for the DE fluid, in light of some of the most recent publicly available cosmological data. These include Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropy measurements from the \textit{Planck} satellite, a selection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillation measurements, Supernovae Type-Ia luminosity distance measurements from the JLA sample, and measurements of the Hubble parameter up to redshift $2$ from cosmic chronometers. Our analysis displays a mild preference for the DE fluid residing in the phantom region ($w_x<-1$), with significance up to 95\% confidence level, while we obtain new upper limits on the coupling parameter between the dark components. The preference for a phantom DE suggests a coupling function $Q<0$, thus a scenario where energy flows from the DE to the DM. We also examine the possibility of addressing the $H_0$ and $\sigma_8$ tensions, finding that only the former can be partially alleviated. Finally, we perform a Bayesian model comparison analysis to quantify the possible preference for the two IDE models against the standard concordance $\Lambda$CDM model, finding that the latter is always preferred with the strength of the evidence ranging from positive to very strong.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.04672  [pdf] - 1797159
Bias due to neutrinos must not uncorrect'd go
Comments: 12 pages, 2 figures, abstract abridged. Version accepted for publication in JCAP. The busy reader should skip to Sec. IID, V, and the figures. A "Note added" between conclusions and acknowledgements explains our choice of title
Submitted: 2018-07-12, last modified: 2018-08-24
In cosmologies with massive neutrinos, the galaxy bias defined with respect to the total matter field (cold dark matter, baryons, and non-relativistic neutrinos) depends on the sum of the neutrino masses $M_{\nu}$, and becomes scale-dependent even on large scales. This effect has been usually neglected given the sensitivity of current surveys, but becomes a severe systematic for future surveys aiming to provide the first detection of non-zero $M_{\nu}$. The effect can be corrected for by defining the bias with respect to the density field of cold dark matter and baryons instead of the total matter field. In this work, we provide a simple prescription for correctly mitigating the neutrino-induced scale-dependent bias effect in a practical way. We clarify a number of subtleties regarding how to properly implement this correction in the presence of redshift-space distortions and non-linear evolution of perturbations. We perform a MCMC analysis on simulated galaxy clustering data that match the expected sensitivity of the \textit{Euclid} survey. We find that the neutrino-induced scale-dependent bias can lead to important shifts in both the inferred mean value of $M_{\nu}$, as well as its uncertainty. We show how these shifts propagate to other cosmological parameters correlated with $M_{\nu}$, such as the cold dark matter physical density $\Omega_{cdm} h^2$ and the scalar spectral index $n_s$. In conclusion, we find that correctly accounting for the neutrino-induced scale-dependent bias will be of crucial importance for future galaxy clustering analyses. We encourage the cosmology community to correctly account for this effect using the simple prescription we present in our work. The tools necessary to easily correct for the neutrino-induced scale-dependent bias will be made publicly available in an upcoming release of the Boltzmann solver \texttt{CLASS}.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.06628  [pdf] - 1958032
Brane-world extra dimensions in light of GW170817
Comments: 9 pages, 3 figures, version accepted by PRD. The MCMC code, chains, and scripts to reproduce our results and plots can be found at http://github.com/sunnyvagnozzi/Braneworld-extra-dimensions
Submitted: 2017-11-16, last modified: 2018-03-15
The search for extra dimensions is a challenging endeavor to probe physics beyond the Standard Model. The joint detection of gravitational waves (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) signals from the merging of a binary system of compact objects like neutron stars (NS), can help constrain the geometry of extra dimensions beyond our 3+1 spacetime ones. A theoretically well-motivated possibility is that our observable Universe is a 3+1-dimensional hypersurface, or brane, embedded in a higher 4+1-dimensional Anti-de Sitter (AdS$_5$) spacetime, in which gravity is the only force which propagates through the infinite bulk space, while other forces are confined to the brane. In these types of brane-world models, GW and EM signals between two points on the brane would, in general, travel different paths. This would result in a time-lag between the detection of GW and EM signals emitted simultaneously from the same source. We consider the recent near-simultaneous detection of the GW event GW170817 from the LIGO/Virgo collaboration, and its EM counterpart, the short gamma-ray burst GRB170817A detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and the INTEGRAL Anti-Coincidence Shield spectrometer. Assuming the standard $\Lambda$-Cold Dark Matter ($\Lambda$CDM) scenario and performing a likelihood analysis which takes into account astrophysical uncertainties associated to the measured time-lag, we set an upper limit of $\ell \lesssim 0.535\,$Mpc at $68\%$ confidence level on the AdS$_5$ radius of curvature $\ell$. Although the bound is not competitive with current Solar System constraints, it is the first time that data from a multi-messenger GW-EM measurement is used to constrain extra-dimensional models. Thus, our work provides a proof-of-principle for the possibility of using multi-messenger astronomy for probing the geometry of our space-time.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.08172  [pdf] - 1797120
Unveiling $\nu$ secrets with cosmological data: neutrino masses and mass hierarchy
Comments: Accepted for publication in PRD. Major structural changes from V1, some discussions moved to appendices, but conclusions completely unchanged. 27 pages, 7 figures. Comments are very welcome
Submitted: 2017-01-27, last modified: 2017-11-15
Using some of the latest cosmological datasets publicly available, we derive the strongest bounds in the literature on the sum of the three active neutrino masses, $M_\nu$, within the assumption of a background flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. In the most conservative scheme, combining Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) data, as well as the up-to-date constraint on the optical depth to reionization ($\tau$), the tightest $95\%$ confidence level (C.L.) upper bound we find is $M_\nu<0.151$~eV. The addition of Planck high-$\ell$ polarization data, which however might still be contaminated by systematics, further tightens the bound to $M_\nu<0.118$~eV. A proper model comparison treatment shows that the two aforementioned combinations disfavor the IH at $\sim 64\%$~C.L. and $\sim 71\%$~C.L. respectively. In addition, we compare the constraining power of measurements of the full-shape galaxy power spectrum versus the BAO signature, from the BOSS survey. Even though the latest BOSS full shape measurements cover a larger volume and benefit from smaller error bars compared to previous similar measurements, the analysis method commonly adopted results in their constraining power still being less powerful than that of the extracted BAO signal. Our work uses only cosmological data; imposing the constraint $M_\nu>0.06\,{\rm eV}$ from oscillations data would raise the quoted upper bounds by ${\cal O}(0.1\sigma)$ and would not affect our conclusions.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.05960  [pdf] - 1562435
Solar models in light of new high metallicity measurements from solar wind data
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-03-18, last modified: 2017-03-22
We study the impact of new metallicity measurements, from solar wind data, on the solar model. The "solar modelling problem" refers to the persisting discrepancy between helioseismological observations and predictions of solar models computed implementing state-of-the-art photospheric abundances. We critically reassess the problem, in particular considering the new set of abundances of von Steiger \& Zurbuchen 2016, determined through the \textit{in situ} collection of solar wind samples from polar coronal holes. This new set of abundances indicates a solar metallicity $Z_{\odot} \geq 0.0196 \pm 0.0014$, significantly higher than the currently established value. The new values hint at an abundance of volatile elements (i.e. C, N, O, Ne) close to previous results of Grevesse \& Sauval 1998, whereas the abundance of refractory elements (i.e. Mg, Si, S, Fe) is considerably increased. Using the Linear Solar Model formalism, we determine the variation of helioseismological observables in response to the changes in elemental abundances, in order to explore the consistency of these new measurements with constraints from helioseismology. We find that, for observables that are particularly sensitive to the abundance of volatile elements, in particular the radius of the convective zone boundary (CZB) and the sound speed around the radius of CZB, improved agreement over previous models is obtained. Conversely, the high abundance of refractories correlates with a higher core temperature, resulting in an overproduction of neutrinos and a huge increase in the surface Helium abundance. We conclude that the "solar modelling problem" remains unsolved.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.04585  [pdf] - 1547771
Comment on "Strong Evidence for the Normal Neutrino Hierarchy"
Comments: 2 pages, no figures, comment on arXiv:1703.03425
Submitted: 2017-03-14
In the preprint arxiv:1703.03425 "strong evidence" for the normal neutrino mass ordering is claimed. The authors obtain Bayesian odds of 42:1 in favour of the normal ordering. Their conclusion is based on adopting a flat logarithmic prior for the three neutrino masses. Such an assumption favours a hierarchical spectrum for the masses, which is much easier to accommodate for the normal mass ordering, and hence their prior assumption makes the inverted ordering much less likely a priori. We argue that the claimed "evidence" for normal ordering is almost entirely driven by the adopted prior and not due to the data itself.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.08830  [pdf] - 1797118
Impact of neutrino properties on the estimation of inflationary parameters from current and future observations
Comments: 24 pages, 12 figures; abstract abridged
Submitted: 2016-10-27
We study the impact of assumptions about neutrino properties on the estimation of inflationary parameters from cosmological data, with a specific focus on the allowed contours in the $n_s/r$ plane. We study the following neutrino properties: (i) the total neutrino mass $ M_\nu =\sum_i m_i$; (ii) the number of relativistic degrees of freedom $N_{eff}$; and (iii) the neutrino hierarchy: whereas previous literature assumed 3 degenerate neutrino masses or two massless neutrino species (that do not match neutrino oscillation data), we study the cases of normal and inverted hierarchy. Our basic result is that these three neutrino properties induce $< 1 \sigma$ shift of the probability contours in the $n_s/r$ plane with both current or upcoming data. We find that the choice of neutrino hierarchy has a negligible impact. However, the minimal cutoff on the total neutrino mass $M_{\nu,{min}}=0 $ that accompanies previous works using the degenerate hierarchy does introduce biases in the $n_s/r$ plane and should be replaced by $M_{\nu,min}= 0.059$ eV as required by oscillation data. Using current CMB data from Planck and Bicep/Keck, marginalizing over $ M_\nu$ and over $r$ can lead to a shift in the mean value of $n_s$ of $\sim0.3\sigma$ towards lower values. However, once BAO measurements are included, the standard contours in the $n_s/r$ plane are basically reproduced. Larger shifts of the contours in the $n_s/r$ plane (up to 0.8$\sigma$) arise for nonstandard values of $N_{eff}$. We also provide forecasts for the future CMB experiments COrE and Stage-IV and show that the incomplete knowledge of neutrino properties, taken into account by a marginalization over $M_\nu$, could induce a shift of $\sim0.4\sigma$ towards lower values in the determination of $n_s$ (or a $\sim 0.8\sigma$ shift if one marginalizes over $N_{eff}$). Comparison to specific inflationary models is shown.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.02467  [pdf] - 1797116
Solving the small-scale structure puzzles with dissipative dark matter
Comments: About 20 pages
Submitted: 2016-02-08, last modified: 2016-06-15
Small-scale structure is studied in the context of dissipative dark matter, arising for instance in models with a hidden unbroken Abelian sector, so that dark matter couples to a massless dark photon. The dark sector interacts with ordinary matter via gravity and photon-dark photon kinetic mixing. Mirror dark matter is a theoretically constrained special case where all parameters are fixed except for the kinetic mixing strength, $\epsilon$. In these models, the dark matter halo around spiral and irregular galaxies takes the form of a dissipative plasma which evolves in response to various heating and cooling processes. It has been argued previously that such dynamics can account for the inferred cored density profiles of galaxies and other related structural features. Here we focus on the apparent deficit of nearby small galaxies ("missing satellite problem"), which these dissipative models have the potential to address through small-scale power suppression by acoustic and diffusion damping. Using a variant of the extended Press-Schechter formalism, we evaluate the halo mass function for the special case of mirror dark matter. Considering a simplified model where $M_{\text{baryons}} \propto M_{\text{halo}}$, we relate the halo mass function to more directly observable quantities, and find that for $\epsilon/10^{-10} \approx 2$ such a simplified description is compatible with the measured galaxy luminosity and velocity functions. On scales $M_{\text{halo}} \lesssim 10^8 \ M_\odot$, diffusion damping exponentially suppresses the halo mass function, suggesting a nonprimordial origin for dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies, which we speculate were formed via a top-down fragmentation process as the result of nonlinear dissipative collapse of larger density perturbation. This could explain the planar orientation of satellite galaxies around Andromeda and the Milky Way.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.04320  [pdf] - 1797117
On the improvement of cosmological neutrino mass bounds
Comments: 9 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2016-05-13
The most recent measurements of the temperature and low-multipole polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from the Planck satellite, when combined with galaxy clustering data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) in the form of the full shape of the power spectrum, and with Baryon Acoustic Oscillation measurements, provide a $95\%$ confidence level (CL) upper bound on the sum of the three active neutrinos $\sum m _\nu< 0.183$ eV, among the tightest neutrino mass bounds in the literature, to date, when the same datasets are taken into account. This very same data combination is able to set, at $\sim70\%$ CL, an upper limit on $\sum m _\nu$ of $0.0968$ eV, a value that approximately corresponds to the minimal mass expected in the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy scenario. If high-multipole polarization data from Planck is also considered, the $95\%$ CL upper bound is tightened to $\sum m _\nu< 0.176$ eV. Further improvements are obtained by considering recent measurements of the Hubble parameter. These limits are obtained assuming a specific non-degenerate neutrino mass spectrum; they slightly worsen when considering other degenerate neutrino mass schemes. Current cosmological data, therefore, start to be mildly sensitive to the neutrino mass ordering. Low-redshift quantities, such as the Hubble constant or the reionization optical depth, play a very important role when setting the neutrino mass constraints. We also comment on the eventual shifts in the cosmological bounds on $\sum m_\nu$ when possible variations in the former two quantities are addressed.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.0762  [pdf] - 1797115
Diurnal modulation signal from dissipative hidden sector dark matter
Comments: 12 pages, 4 figures, clarifying comments and references added
Submitted: 2014-12-01, last modified: 2015-06-07
We consider a simple generic dissipative dark matter model: a hidden sector featuring two dark matter particles charged under an unbroken $U(1)'$ interaction. Previous work has shown that such a model has the potential to explain dark matter phenomena on both large and small scales. In this framework, the dark matter halo in spiral galaxies features nontrivial dynamics, with the halo energy loss due to dissipative interactions balanced by a heat source. Ordinary supernovae can potentially supply this heat provided kinetic mixing interaction exists with strength $\epsilon \sim 10^{-9}$. This type of kinetically mixed dark matter can be probed in direct detection experiments. Importantly, this self-interacting dark matter can be captured within the Earth and shield a dark matter detector from the halo wind, giving rise to a diurnal modulation effect. We estimate the size of this effect for detectors located in the Southern hemisphere, and find that the modulation is large ($\gtrsim 10\%$) for a wide range of parameters.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.7174  [pdf] - 2057653
Dissipative hidden sector dark matter
Comments: Some adjustments, 40 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2014-09-25, last modified: 2014-12-15
A simple way of explaining dark matter without modifying known Standard Model physics is to require the existence of a hidden (dark) sector, which interacts with the visible one predominantly via gravity. We consider a hidden sector containing two stable particles charged under an unbroken $U(1)^{'}$ gauge symmetry, hence featuring dissipative interactions. The massless gauge field associated with this symmetry, the dark photon, can interact via kinetic mixing with the ordinary photon. In fact, such an interaction of strength $\epsilon \sim 10 ^{-9}$ appears to be necessary in order to explain galactic structure. We calculate the effect of this new physics on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and its contribution to the relativistic energy density at Hydrogen recombination. We then examine the process of dark recombination, during which neutral dark states are formed, which is important for large-scale structure formation. Galactic structure is considered next, focussing on spiral and irregular galaxies. For these galaxies we modelled the dark matter halo (at the current epoch) as a dissipative plasma of dark matter particles, where the energy lost due to dissipation is compensated by the energy produced from ordinary supernovae (the core-collapse energy is transferred to the hidden sector via kinetic mixing induced processes in the supernova core). We find that such a dynamical halo model can reproduce several observed features of disk galaxies, including the cored density profile and the Tully-Fisher relation. We also discuss how elliptical and dwarf spheroidal galaxies could fit into this picture. Finally, these analyses are combined to set bounds on the parameter space of our model, which can serve as a guideline for future experimental searches.