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Uchida, H.

Normalized to: Uchida, H.

87 article(s) in total. 547 co-authors, from 1 to 47 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 4,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.01406  [pdf] - 2105839
Gravitational waves from breaking of an extra $U(1)$ in $SO(10)$ grand unification
Comments: 21 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2020-06-02
In a class of gauged $U(1)$ extended Standard Models (SMs), the breaking of the $U(1)$ symmetry is not only a source for Majorana masses of right-handed (RH) neutrinos crucial for the seesaw mechanism, but also a source of stochastic gravitational wave (GW) background. Such $U(1)$ extended models are well-motivated from the viewpoint of grand unification. In this paper, we discuss a successful ultraviolet completion of a $U(1)$ extended SM by an $SO(10)$ grand unified model through an intermediate step of $SU(5) \times U(1)$ unification. With a parameter set that is compatible with the $SO(10)$ grand unification, we find that a first-order phase transition associated with the $U(1)$ symmetry breaking can be strong enough to generate GWs with a detectable size of amplitude. We also find that the resultant GW amplitude reduces and its peak frequency becomes higher as the RH neutrino masses increase.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.08462  [pdf] - 2120001
Probing Cosmic Rays with Fe K$\alpha$ Line Structures Generated by Multiple Ionization Process
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures Accepted for publication in Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan
Submitted: 2020-05-18, last modified: 2020-05-20
Supernova remnants (SNRs) have been regarded as major acceleration sites of Galactic cosmic rays. Recent X-ray studies revealed neutral Fe K$\alpha$ line emission from dense gas in the vicinity of some SNRs, which can be best interpreted as K-shell ionization of Fe atoms in the gas by sub-relativistic particles accelerated in the SNRs. In this Letter, we propose a novel method of constraining the composition of particles accelerated in SNRs, which is currently unknown. When energetic heavy ions collide with target atoms, their strong Coulomb field can easily cause simultaneous ejection of multiple inner-shell electrons of the target. This results in shifts in characteristic X-ray line energies, forming distinctive spectral structures. Detection of such structures in the neutral Fe K$\alpha$ line strongly supports the particle ionization scenario, and furthermore provides direct evidence of heavy ions in the accelerated particles. We construct a model for the Fe K$\alpha$ line structures by various projectile ions utilizing atomic-collision data.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.04626  [pdf] - 2092526
Evidence for Resonance Scattering in the X-ray Grating Spectrum of the Supernova Remnant N49
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, Accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2020-05-10
Resonance scattering (RS) is an important process in astronomical objects, because it affects measurements of elemental abundances and distorts surface brightness of the object. It is predicted that RS can occur in plasmas of supernova remnants (SNRs). Although several authors reported hints of RS in SNRs, no strong observational evidence has been established so far. We perform a high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the SNR N49 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer aboard XMM-Newton. The RGS spectrum of N49 shows a high G-ratio of O VII He$\alpha$ lines as well as O VIII Ly$\beta$/$\alpha$ and Fe XVII (3s-2p)/(3d-2p) ratios which cannot be explained by the emission from a thin thermal plasma. These line ratios can be well explained by the effect of RS. Our result implies that RS has a large impact particularly on a measurement of the oxygen abundance.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.10035  [pdf] - 2091731
Time Variability of Nonthermal X-ray Stripes in Tycho's Supernova Remnant with Chandra
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2020-03-22, last modified: 2020-04-15
Analyzing Chandra data of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) taken in 2000, 2003, 2007, 2009, and 2015, we search for time variable features of synchrotron X-rays in the southwestern part of the SNR, where stripe structures of hard X-ray emission were previous found. By comparing X-ray images obtained at each epoch, we discover a knot-like structure in the northernmost part of the stripe region became brighter particularly in 2015. We also find a bright filamentary structure gradually became fainter and narrower as it moved outward. Our spectral analysis reveal that not only the nonthermal X-ray flux but also the photon indices of the knot-like structure change from year to year. During the period from 2000 to 2015, the small knot shows brightening of $\sim 70\%$ and hardening of $\Delta \Gamma \sim 0.45$. The time variability can be explained if the magnetic field is amplified to $\sim 100~\mathrm{\mu G}$ and/or if magnetic turbulence significantly changes with time.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.08129  [pdf] - 2050311
Deep XMM-Newton Observations Reveal the Origin of Recombining Plasma in the Supernova Remnant W44
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-12-17, last modified: 2019-12-24
Recent X-ray studies revealed over-ionized recombining plasmas (RPs) in a dozen mixed-morphology (MM) supernova remnants (SNRs). However, the physical process of the over-ionization has not been fully understood yet. Here we report on spatially resolved spectroscopy of X-ray emission from W44, one of the over-ionized MM-SNRs, using XMM-Newton data from deep observations, aiming to clarify the physical origin of the over-ionization. We find that combination of low electron temperature and low recombination timescale is achieved in the region interacting with dense molecular clouds. Moreover, a clear anti-correlation between the electron temperature and the recombining timescale is obtained from each of the regions with and without the molecular clouds. The results are well explained if the plasma was over-ionized by rapid cooling through thermal conduction with the dense clouds hit by the blast wave of W44. Given that a few other over-ionized SNRs show evidence for adiabatic expansion as the major driver of the rapid cooling, our new result indicates that both processes can contribute to over-ionization in SNRs, with the dominant channel depending on the evolutionary stage.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.04836  [pdf] - 1945759
Discovery of Shocked Molecular Clouds Associated with the Shell-Type Supernova Remnant RX J0046.5$-$7308 in the Small Magellanic Cloud
Comments: 15 pages, 2 tables, 7 figures, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal (ApJ, in press)
Submitted: 2019-04-09, last modified: 2019-08-03
RX J0046.5$-$7308 is a shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We carried out new $^{12}$CO($J$ = 1-0, 3-2) observations toward the SNR using Mopra and the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment. We found eight molecular clouds (A-H) along the X-ray shell of the SNR. The typical cloud size and mass are $\sim$10-15 pc and $\sim$1000-3000 $M_{\odot}$, respectively. The X-ray shell is slightly deformed and has the brightest peak in the southwestern shell where two molecular clouds A and B are located. The four molecular clouds A, B, F, and G have high intensity ratios of $^{12}$CO($J$ = 3-2) / $^{12}$CO($J$ = 1-0) $> 1.2$, which are not attributable to any identified internal infrared sources or high-mass stars. The HI cavity and its expanding motion are found toward the SNR, which are likely created by strong stellar winds from a massive progenitor. We suggest that the molecular clouds A-D, F, and G and HI clouds within the wind-blown cavity at $V_\mathrm{LSR} = 117.1$-122.5 km s$^{-1}$ are to be associated with the SNR. The X-ray spectroscopy reveals the dynamical age of $26000^{+1000}_{-2000}$ yr and the progenitor mass of $\gtrsim 30$ $M_{\odot}$, which is also consistent with the proposed scenario. We determine physical conditions of the giant molecular cloud LIRS 36A using the large velocity gradient analysis with archival datasets of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array; the kinematic temperature is $72^{+50}_{-37}$ K and the number density of molecular hydrogen is $1500^{+600}_{-300}$ cm$^{-3}$. The next generation of $\gamma$-ray observations will allow us to study the pion-decay $\gamma$-rays from the molecular clouds in the SMC SNR.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.00171  [pdf] - 1893553
Radiation hardness of a p-channel notch CCD developed for the X-ray CCD camera onboard the XRISM satellite
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, published in Journal of Instrumentation (JINST)
Submitted: 2019-06-01
We report the radiation hardness of a p-channel CCD developed for the X-ray CCD camera onboard the XRISM satellite. This CCD has basically the same characteristics as the one used in the previous Hitomi satellite, but newly employs a notch structure of potential for signal charges by increasing the implant concentration in the channel. The new device was exposed up to approximately $7.9 \times 10^{10} \mathrm{~protons~cm^{-2}}$ at 100 MeV. The charge transfer inefficiency was estimated as a function of proton fluence with an ${}^{55} \mathrm{Fe}$ source. A device without the notch structure was also examined for comparison. The result shows that the notch device has a significantly higher radiation hardness than those without the notch structure including the device adopted for Hitomi. This proves that the new CCD is radiation tolerant for space applications with a sufficient margin.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.13381  [pdf] - 1953537
Measurement of Charge Cloud Size in X-ray SOI Pixel Sensors
Comments: 9 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science
Submitted: 2019-05-30
We report on a measurement of the size of charge clouds produced by X-ray photons in X-ray SOI (Silicon-On-Insulator) pixel sensor named XRPIX. We carry out a beam scanning experiment of XRPIX using a monochromatic X-ray beam at 5.0 keV collimated to $\sim 10$ $\mu$m with a 4-$\mu$m$\phi$ pinhole, and obtain the spatial distribution of single-pixel events at a sub-pixel scale. The standard deviation of charge clouds of 5.0 keV X-ray is estimated to be $\sigma_{\rm cloud} = 4.30 \pm 0.07$ $\mu$m. Compared to the detector response simulation, the estimated charge cloud size is well explained by a combination of photoelectron range, thermal diffusion, and Coulomb repulsion. Moreover, by analyzing the fraction of multi-pixel events in various energies, we find that the energy dependence of the charge cloud size is also consistent with the simulation.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.10829  [pdf] - 1953532
Subpixel Response of SOI Pixel Sensor for X-ray Astronomy with Pinned Depleted Diode: First Result from Mesh Experiment
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, , Conference proceedings for PIXEL2018
Submitted: 2019-05-26
We have been developing a monolithic active pixel sensor, ``XRPIX``, for the Japan led future X-ray astronomy mission ``FORCE`` observing the X-ray sky in the energy band of 1-80 keV with angular resolution of better than 15``. XRPIX is an upper part of a stack of two sensors of an imager system onboard FORCE, and covers the X-ray energy band lower than 20 keV. The XRPIX device consists of a fully depleted high-resistivity silicon sensor layer for X-ray detection, a low resistivity silicon layer for CMOS readout circuit, and a buried oxide layer in between, which is fabricated with 0.2 $\mu$ m CMOS silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology. Each pixel has a trigger circuit with which we can achieve a 10 $\mu$ s time resolution, a few orders of magnitude higher than that with X-ray astronomy CCDs. We recently introduced a new type of a device structure, a pinned depleted diode (PDD), in the XRPIX device, and succeeded in improving the spectral performance, especially in a readout mode using the trigger function. In this paper, we apply a mesh experiment to the XRPIX devices for the first time in order to study the spectral response of the PDD device at the subpixel resolution. We confirmed that the PDD structure solves the significant degradation of the charge collection efficiency at the pixel boundaries and in the region under the pixel circuits, which is found in the single SOI structure, the conventional type of the device structure. On the other hand, the spectral line profiles are skewed with low energy tails and the line peaks slightly shift near the pixel boundaries, which contribute to a degradation of the energy resolution.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.12571  [pdf] - 1874661
Evaluation of Kyoto's Event-Driven X-ray Astronomical SOI Pixel Sensor with a Large Imaging Area
Comments: 5 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2019-04-29
We have been developing monolithic active pixel sensors, named ``XRPIX'', based on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) pixel technology for future X-ray astronomy satellites. XRPIX has the function of event trigger and hit address outputs. This function allows us to read out analog signals only of hit pixels on trigger timing, which is referred to as the event-driven readout mode. Recently, we processed ``XRPIX5b'' with the largest imaging area of 21.9~mm $\times$ 13.8~mm in the XRPIX series. X-ray spectra are successfully obtained from all the pixels, and the readout noise is 46~e$^-$~(rms) in the frame readout mode. The gain variation was measured to be 1.2\%~(FWHM) among the pixels. We successfully obtain the X-ray image in the event-driven readout mode.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.02554  [pdf] - 1875356
Ionization age of iron ejecta in the Galactic Type Ia supernova remnant G306.3-0.9
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, 3 tables. Accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2019-03-06
We present a 190 ks observation of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9 with Suzaku. To study ejecta properties of this possible Type Ia SNR, the absolute energy scale at the Fe-K band was calibrated to a level of uncertainty less than 10 eV by a cross-calibration with the Hitomi microcalorimeter using the Perseus cluster spectra. This enabled us for the first time to accurately determine the ionization state of the Fe K$\alpha$ line of this SNR. The ionization timescale ($\tau$) of the Fe ejecta was measured to be $\log_{10} \tau$ (cm$^{-3}$ s) $=10.24\pm0.03$, significantly smaller than previous measurements. Marginally detected K$\alpha$ lines of Cr and Mn have consistent ionization timescales with Fe. The global spectrum was well fitted with shocked interstellar matter (ISM) and at least two ejecta components with different ionization timescales for Fe and intermediate mass elements (IME) such as S and Ar. One plausible interpretation of the one-order-of-magnitude shorter timescale of Fe than that of IME ($\log_{10} \tau = 11.17\pm0.07$) is a chemically stratified structure of ejecta. By comparing the X-ray absorption column to the HI distribution decomposed along the line of sight, we refined the distance to be $\sim$20 kpc. The large ISM-to-ejecta shocked mass ratio of $\sim$100 and dynamical timescale of $\sim$6 kyr place the SNR in the late Sedov phase. These properties are consistent with a stratified ejecta structure that has survived the mixing processes expected in an evolved supernova remnant.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.08260  [pdf] - 1820712
Gravitational waves from very massive stars collapsing to a black hole
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, accepted to PRD
Submitted: 2019-01-24
We compute gravitational waves emitted by the collapse of a rotating very massive star (VMS) core leading directly to a black hole in axisymmetric numerical-relativity simulations. The evolved rotating VMS is derived by a stellar evolution calculation and its initial mass and the final carbon-oxygen core mass are $320M_\odot$ and $\approx 150M_\odot$, respectively. We find that for the moderately rapidly rotating cases, the peak strain amplitude and the corresponding frequency of gravitational waves are $\sim 10^{-22}$ and $f \approx 300$--600\,Hz for an event at the distance of $D=50$~Mpc. Such gravitational waves will be detectable only for $D \lesssim 10$~Mpc by second generation detectors, advanced LIGO, advanced VIRGO, and KAGRA, even if the designed sensitivity for these detectors is achieved. However, third-generation detectors will be able to detect such gravitational waves for an event up to $D \sim 100$~Mpc. The detection of the gravitational-wave signal will provide a potential opportunity for verifying the presence of VMSs with mass $\gtrsim 300M_\odot$ and their pair-unstable collapse in the universe.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.06616  [pdf] - 1830574
High Forbidden-to-resonance Line Ratio of OVII Discovered in the Cygnus Loop
Comments: 10 pages, including 4 figures and 2 tables, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-12-17
Charge exchange (CX) is an important process in shock physics since it indicates an interaction between downstream ions and ambient neutral hydrogen, suggesting a presence of a collisionless shock. We present a high-resolution spectroscopy of an X-ray bright spot in a nearby supernova remnant (SNR), the Cygnus Loop, with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) onboard XMM-Newton. The target is a compact knotty structure called "southwestern knot (SW-K)" located at the outer edge of the shell, where the blast wave is likely interacting with dense surrounding materials. The RGS spectrum of the SW-K shows details of the line features below ~ 1 keV, where we discover a high forbidden-to-resonance line ratio of OVII He$\alpha$. The soft-band (10-35 \AA) spectrum is well explained by a thermal component with a CX X-ray emission obscured by neutral and ionized absorbers. The presence of the CX X-ray emission will provide new insights into the shock physics of SNRs. The high-resolution spectroscopy also reveals that the CNO, Ne and Fe abundances are truly lower than the solar values (0.2-0.4 solar) at the SW-K region . Our result gives a clue to solving the previously known "low-abundance problem" reported from a number of evolved SNRs.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.05803  [pdf] - 1798380
Performance of SOI Pixel Sensors Developed for X-ray Astronomy
Comments: 5 pages, 9 figures, submitted to Conference Record of IEEE NSS-MIC 2018
Submitted: 2018-12-14
We have been developing monolithic active pixel sensors for X-rays based on the silicon-on-insulator technology. Our device consists of a low-resistivity Si layer for readout CMOS electronics, a high-resistivity Si sensor layer, and a SiO$_2$ layer between them. This configuration allows us both high-speed readout circuits and a thick (on the order of $100~\mu{\rm m}$) depletion layer in a monolithic device. Each pixel circuit contains a trigger output function, with which we can achieve a time resolution of $\lesssim 10~\mu{\rm s}$. One of our key development items is improvement of the energy resolution. We recently fabricated a device named XRPIX6E, to which we introduced a pinned depleted diode (PDD) structure. The structure reduces the capacitance coupling between the sensing area in the sensor layer and the pixel circuit, which degrades the spectral performance. With XRPIX6E, we achieve an energy resolution of $\sim 150$~eV in full width at half maximum for 6.4-keV X-rays. In addition to the good energy resolution, a large imaging area is required for practical use. We developed and tested XRPIX5b, which has an imaging area size of $21.9~{\rm mm} \times 13.8~{\rm mm}$ and is the largest device that we ever fabricated. We successfully obtain X-ray data from almost all the $608 \times 384$ pixels with high uniformity.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.04426  [pdf] - 1791355
Evidence for Rapid Adiabatic Cooling as an Origin of the Recombining Plasma in the Supernova Remnant W49B Revealed by NuSTAR Observations
Comments: 4 figures, 1 table, Published in ApJ Letter
Submitted: 2018-11-11, last modified: 2018-12-03
X-ray observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the last decade have shown that the presence of recombining plasmas is somewhat common in a certain type of object. The SNR W49B is the youngest, hottest, and most highly ionized among such objects and hence provides crucial information about how the recombination phase is reached during the early evolutionary phase of SNRs. In particular, spectral properties of radiative recombination continuum (RRC) from Fe are the key for constraining the detailed plasma conditions. Here we present imaging and spectral studies of W49B with Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), utilizing the highest-ever sensitivity to the Fe RRC at > 8.8keV. We confirm that the Fe RRC is the most prominent at the western part of the SNR because of the lowest electron temperature (~ 1.2 keV) achieved there. Our spatially-resolved spectral analysis reveals a positive correlation between the electron temperature and the recombination timescale with a uniform initial temperature of ~ 4 keV, which is consistent with the rapid adiabatic cooling scenario as an origin of the overionization. This work demonstrates NuSTAR's suitability for studies of thermal emission, in addition to hard nonthermal X-rays, from young and middle-aged SNRs.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.07036  [pdf] - 1769536
NuSTAR Detection of Nonthermal Bremsstrahlung from the Supernova Remnant W49B
Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables, accepted for publication in ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2018-10-16
We report on NuSTAR observations of the mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR) W49B, focusing on its nonthermal emission. Whereas radio observations as well as recent gamma-ray observations evidenced particle acceleration in this SNR, nonthermal X-ray emission has not been reported so far. With the unprecedented sensitivity of NuSTAR in the hard X-ray band, we detect a significant power-law-like component extending up to $\sim 20~{\rm keV}$, most probably of nonthermal origin. The newly discovered component has a photon index of $\Gamma =1.4^{+1.0}_{-1.1}$ with an energy flux between 10 and 20 keV of $(3.3 \pm 0.7) \times 10^{-13}~{\rm erg}~{\rm cm}^{-2}~{\rm s}^{-1}$. The emission mechanism is discussed based on the NuSTAR data combined with those in other wavelengths in the literature. The NuSTAR data, in terms both of the spectral slope and of the flux, are best interpreted as nonthermal electron bremsstrahlung. If this scenario is the case, then the NuSTAR emission provides a new probe to sub-relativistic particles accelerated in the SNR.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.05373  [pdf] - 1779705
Suzaku X-ray observations of the mixed-morphology supernova remnant CTB 1
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-10-12
We present an X-ray study of the mixed-morphology supernova remnant CTB 1 (G116.9+0.2) observed with Suzaku. The 0.6-2.0 keV spectra in the northeast breakout region of CTB 1 are well represented by a collisional ionization-equilibrium plasma model with an electron temperature of ~ 0.3 keV, whereas those in the southwest inner-shell region can be reproduced by a recombining plasma model with an electron temperature of ~ 0.2 keV, an initial ionization temperature of ~ 3 keV, and an ionization parameter of ~ 9 $\times$ 10$^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$s. This is the first detection of the recombining plasma in CTB 1. The electron temperature in the inner-shell region decreases outwards, which implies that the recombining plasma is likely formed by the thermal conduction via interaction with the surrounding cold interstellar medium. The Ne abundance is almost uniform in the observed regions whereas Fe is more abundant toward the southwest of the remnant, suggesting an asymmetric ejecta distribution. We also detect a hard tail above the 2 keV band that is fitted with a power-law function with a photon index of 2-3. The flux of the hard tail in the 2-10 keV band is ~ 5 $\times$ 10$^{-13}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and is peaked at the center of CTB 1. Its origin is unclear but one possibility is a putative pulsar wind nebula associated with CTB 1.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.00704  [pdf] - 1791089
Detection of polarized gamma-ray emission from the Crab nebula with Hitomi Soft Gamma-ray Detector
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iwai, Masachika; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Uchida, Yuusuke
Comments: 19 pages, 18 figures, 6 tables. Accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2018-10-01
We present the results from the Hitomi Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) observation of the Crab nebula. The main part of SGD is a Compton camera, which in addition to being a spectrometer, is capable of measuring polarization of gamma-ray photons. The Crab nebula is one of the brightest X-ray / gamma-ray sources on the sky, and, the only source from which polarized X-ray photons have been detected. SGD observed the Crab nebula during the initial test observation phase of Hitomi. We performed the data analysis of the SGD observation, the SGD background estimation and the SGD Monte Carlo simulations, and, successfully detected polarized gamma-ray emission from the Crab nebula with only about 5 ks exposure time. The obtained polarization fraction of the phase-integrated Crab emission (sum of pulsar and nebula emissions) is (22.1 $\pm$ 10.6)% and, the polarization angle is 110.7$^o$ + 13.2 / $-$13.0$^o$ in the energy range of 60--160 keV (The errors correspond to the 1 sigma deviation). The confidence level of the polarization detection was 99.3%. The polarization angle measured by SGD is about one sigma deviation with the projected spin axis of the pulsar, 124.0$^o$ $\pm$0.1$^o$.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.10425  [pdf] - 1875215
Performance of the Silicon-On-Insulator Pixel Sensor for X-ray Astronomy, XRPIX6E, Equipped with Pinned Depleted Diode Structure
Comments: 13 pages, 5 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in NIMA on September 27, 2018
Submitted: 2018-09-27
We have been developing event driven X-ray Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) pixel sensors, called "XRPIX", for the next generation of X-ray astronomy satellites. XRPIX is a monolithic active pixel sensor, fabricated using the SOI CMOS technology, and is equipped with the so-called "Event-Driven readout", which allows reading out only hit pixels by using the trigger circuit implemented in each pixel. The current version of XRPIX has lower spectral performance in the Event-Driven readout mode than in the Frame readout mode, which is due to the interference between the sensor layer and the circuit layer. The interference also lowers the gain. In order to suppress the interference, we developed a new device, "XRPIX6E" equipped with the Pinned Depleted Diode structure. A sufficiently highly-doped buried p-well is formed at the interface between the buried oxide layer and the sensor layer, and acts as a shield layer. XRPIX6E exhibits improved spectral performances both in the Event-Driven readout mode and in the Frame readout mode in comparison to previous devices. The energy resolutions in full width at half maximum at 6.4 keV are 236 $\pm$ 1 eV and 335 $\pm$ 4 eV in the Frame and Event-Driven readout modes, respectively. There are differences between the readout noise and the spectral performance in the two modes, which suggests that some mechanism still degrades the performance in the Event-Driven readout mode.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.10502  [pdf] - 1818688
Black Hole Formation and Explosion from Rapidly Rotating Very Massive Stars
Comments: 19 pages, 16 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2018-09-27
We explore the formation process of a black hole (BH) through the pair-instability collapse of a rotating Population III very massive star in axisymmetric numerical relativity. As the initial condition, we employ a progenitor star which is obtained by evolving a rapidly rotating zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) star with mass $320M_\odot$ until it reaches a pair instability region. We find that for such rapidly rotating model, a fraction of the mass, $\sim 10M_\odot$, forms a torus surrounding the remnant BH of mass $\sim 130M_\odot$ and an outflow is driven by a hydrodynamical effect. We also perform simulations, artificially reducing the initial angular velocity of the progenitor star, and find that only a small or no torus is formed and no outflow is driven. We discuss the possible evolution scenario of the remnant torus for the rapidly rotating model by considering the viscous and recombination effects and show that if the energy of $\sim 10^{52}$ erg is injected from the torus to the envelope, the luminosity and timescale of the explosion could be of the orders of $10^{43}$ erg/s and yrs, respectively. We also point out the possibility for observing gravitational waves associated with the BH formation for the rapidly rotating model by ground-based gravitational-wave detectors.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.11005  [pdf] - 1724281
Kyoto's Event-Driven X-ray Astronomy SOI pixel sensor for the FORCE mission
Comments: 11 pages, 10 figures, Proceedings Volume 10709, High Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy VIII
Submitted: 2018-07-29
We have been developing monolithic active pixel sensors, X-ray Astronomy SOI pixel sensors, XRPIXs, based on a Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) CMOS technology as soft X-ray sensors for a future Japanese mission, FORCE (Focusing On Relativistic universe and Cosmic Evolution). The mission is characterized by broadband (1-80 keV) X-ray imaging spectroscopy with high angular resolution ($<15$~arcsec), with which we can achieve about ten times higher sensitivity in comparison to the previous missions above 10~keV. Immediate readout of only those pixels hit by an X-ray is available by an event trigger output function implemented in each pixel with the time resolution higher than $10~{\rm \mu sec}$ (Event-Driven readout mode). It allows us to do fast timing observation and also reduces non-X-ray background dominating at a high X-ray energy band above 5--10~keV by adopting an anti-coincidence technique. In this paper, we introduce our latest results from the developments of the XRPIXs. (1) We successfully developed a 3-side buttable back-side illumination device with an imaging area size of 21.9~mm$\times$13.8~mm and an pixel size of $36~{\rm \mu m} \times 36~{\rm \mu m}$. The X-ray throughput with the device reaches higher than 0.57~kHz in the Event-Driven readout mode. (2) We developed a device using the double SOI structure and found that the structure improves the spectral performance in the Event-Driven readout mode by suppressing the capacitive coupling interference between the sensor and circuit layers. (3) We also developed a new device equipped with the Pinned Depleted Diode structure and confirmed that the structure reduces the dark current generated at the interface region between the sensor and the SiO$_2$ insulator layers. The device shows an energy resolution of 216~eV in FWHM at 6.4~keV in the Event-Driven readout mode.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.11314  [pdf] - 1690462
Study of Nature of Corona in Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures, 8 tables, submitted to PASJ
Submitted: 2018-05-29
We study X-ray spectra of four Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s), Mrk 110, SWIFT J2127.4+5654, IGR J16185-5928, and WKK 4438, using Suzaku and NuSTAR data. The spectra of the four sources are reproduced with a model consisting of a cutoff power law component, a reflection component, and a soft excess component. The photon indices of all the sources are found to be ~ 2. The cutoff energies are constrained to be ~ 40 keV for Mrk 110, SWIFT J2127.4+5654, and WKK 4438, whereas a lower limit of 155 keV is obtained for IGR J16185-5928. We find that the NLS1s in our sample have systematically softer spectra and lower cutoff energies than Broad Line Seyfert 1 galaxies reported in the literature. We also perform spectral fittings with a model in which the cutoff power law is replaced with the thermal Comptonization model in order to directly obtain the electron temperature of the corona (kTe). The fits give kTe ~ 10-20 keV for Mrk 110 and SWIFT J2127.4+5654, and lower limits of kTe > 18 keV for IGR J16185-5928 and kTe > 5 keV for WKK 4438. We divide the NuSTAR data of SWIFT J2127.4+5654 into three periods according to the flux. The spectral fits in the three periods hint that kTe is the lower in the higher flux period. The results of the four sources suggest a possible anti-correlation between kTe and the ratio of the luminosity of Compton up-scattered photons to the Eddington luminosity. The anti-correlation can be explained by a simple model in which electrons in the corona are cooled and heated through inverse Compton scattering and Coulomb collisions with protons, respectively.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.06690  [pdf] - 1709486
Spatially resolved spectroscopy of nonthermal X-rays in RX J1713.7-3946 with Chandra
Comments: 8 pages, 7 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in PASJ on May 17, 2018
Submitted: 2018-05-17
The young shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 has been studied as a suitable target to test the SNR paradigm for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. We present a spatially resolved spectroscopy of the nonthermal X-ray emission in RX J1713.7-3946 with Chandra. In order to obtain X-ray properties of the filamentary structures and their surrounding regions, we divide the southeastern (SE), southwestern (SW), and northwestern (NW) parts of the SNR into subregions on the typical order of several 10" and extract spectra from each subregion. Their photon indices are significantly different among the subregions with a range of 1.8 < {\Gamma} < 3. In the SE part, the clear filaments are harder ({\Gamma} ~ 2.0) than the surrounding regions. This is a common feature often observed in young SNRs and naturally interpreted as a consequence of synchrotron cooling. On the other hand, the bright filamentary regions do not necessarily coincide with the hardest regions in the SW and NW parts. We also find the SW filamentary region is rather relatively soft ({\Gamma} ~ 2.7). In addition, we find that hard regions with photon indices of 2.0-2.2 exist around the bright emission although they lie in the downstream region and does not appear to be the blast wave shock front. Both two aforementioned characteristic regions in SW are located close to peaks of the interstellar gas. We discuss possible origins of the spatial variation of the photon indices, paying particular attention to the shock-cloud interactions.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.05068  [pdf] - 1842300
Hitomi X-ray Observation of the Pulsar Wind Nebula G21.5$-$0.9
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iwai, Masachika; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sato, Toshiki; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Łukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Sato, Toshiki; Nakaniwa, Nozomu; Murakami, Hiroaki; Guest, Benson
Comments: 16 pages, 8 figures, 4 tables. Accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2018-02-14
We present results from the Hitomi X-ray observation of a young composite-type supernova remnant (SNR) G21.5$-$0.9, whose emission is dominated by the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) contribution. The X-ray spectra in the 0.8-80 keV range obtained with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS), Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) and Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) show a significant break in the continuum as previously found with the NuSTAR observation. After taking into account all known emissions from the SNR other than the PWN itself, we find that the Hitomi spectra can be fitted with a broken power law with photon indices of $\Gamma_1=1.74\pm0.02$ and $\Gamma_2=2.14\pm0.01$ below and above the break at $7.1\pm0.3$ keV, which is significantly lower than the NuSTAR result ($\sim9.0$ keV). The spectral break cannot be reproduced by time-dependent particle injection one-zone spectral energy distribution models, which strongly indicates that a more complex emission model is needed, as suggested by recent theoretical models. We also search for narrow emission or absorption lines with the SXS, and perform a timing analysis of PSR J1833$-$1034 with the HXI and SGD. No significant pulsation is found from the pulsar. However, unexpectedly, narrow absorption line features are detected in the SXS data at 4.2345 keV and 9.296 keV with a significance of 3.65 $\sigma$. While the origin of these features is not understood, their mere detection opens up a new field of research and was only possible with the high resolution, sensitivity and ability to measure extended sources provided by an X-ray microcalorimeter.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.02814  [pdf] - 1659691
The Origin of Recombining Plasma and the Detection of the Fe-K Line in the Supernova Remnant W28
Comments: 9 page, 6 figures, 4 tables, accepted in PASJ on February 8, 2018
Submitted: 2018-02-08
Overionized recombining plasmas (RPs) have been discovered from a dozen of mixed- morphology (MM) supernova remnants (SNRs). However their formation process is still under debate. As pointed out by many previous studies, spatial variations of plasma temperature and ionization state provide clues to understand the physical origin of RPs. We report on a spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy of W28, which is one of the largest MM SNRs found in our Galaxy. Two observations with Suzaku XIS cover the center of W28 to the northeastern rim where the shock is interacting with molecular clouds. The X-ray spectra in the inner regions are well reproduced by a combination of two-RP model with different temperatures and ionization states, whereas that in northeastern rim is explained with a single-RP model. Our discovery of the RP in the northeastern rim suggests an effect of thermal conduction between the cloud and hot plasma, which may be the production process of the RP. The X-ray spectrum of the north- eastern rim also shows an excess emission of the Fe I K{\alpha} line. The most probable process to explain the line would be inner shell ionization of Fe in the molecular cloud by cosmic-ray particles accelerated in W28.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.06932  [pdf] - 1635756
Soft X-ray Imager aboard Hitomi (ASTRO-H)
Comments: 28 pages, 23 figures, 3 tables, accepted for publication in JATIS
Submitted: 2018-01-21, last modified: 2018-02-02
The Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) is an imaging spectrometer using charge-coupled devices (CCDs) aboard the Hitomi X-ray observatory. The SXI sensor has four CCDs with an imaging area size of $31~{\rm mm} \times 31~{\rm mm}$ arranged in a $2 \times 2$ array. Combined with the X-ray mirror, the Soft X-ray Telescope, the SXI detects X-rays between $0.4~{\rm keV}$ and $12~{\rm keV}$ and covers a $38^{\prime} \times 38^{\prime}$ field-of-view. The CCDs are P-channel fully-depleted, back-illumination type with a depletion layer thickness of $200~\mu{\rm m}$. Low operation temperature down to $-120~^\circ{\rm C}$ as well as charge injection is employed to reduce the charge transfer inefficiency of the CCDs. The functionality and performance of the SXI are verified in on-ground tests. The energy resolution measured is $161$-$170~{\rm eV}$ in full width at half maximum for $5.9~{\rm keV}$ X-rays. In the tests, we found that the CTI of some regions are significantly higher. A method is developed to properly treat the position-dependent CTI. Another problem we found is pinholes in the Al coating on the incident surface of the CCDs for optical light blocking. The Al thickness of the contamination blocking filter is increased in order to sufficiently block optical light.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.07881  [pdf] - 1641458
Evidence for a neutral iron line generated by MeV protons from supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, 3 tables. Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2018-01-24
Supernova remnants (SNRs) have been prime candidates for Galactic cosmic-ray accelerators. When low-energy cosmic-ray protons (LECRp) collide with interstellar gas, they ionize neutral iron atoms and emit the neutral iron line (Fe I K$\alpha$) at 6.40keV. We search for the iron K-shell line in seven SNRs from the Suzaku archive data of the Galactic plane in the $6^{\circ} \lesssim l \lesssim 40^{\circ}, |b| < 1^{\circ}$ region. All these SNRs interact with molecular clouds. We discover Fe I K$\alpha$ line emissions from five SNRs (W28, Kes 67, Kes 69, Kes 78, and W44). The spectra and morphologies suggest that the Fe I K$\alpha$ line is produced by interactions between LECRp and the adjacent cold gas. The proton energy density is estimated to be $\gtrsim$ 10-100 eV cm$^{-3}$, which is more than 10 times higher than that in the ambient interstellar medium.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.06612  [pdf] - 1670556
Temperature Structure in the Perseus Cluster Core Observed with Hitomi
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furukawa, Maki; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iwai, Masachika; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Kato, Yuichi; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Łukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shiníchiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shiníchiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen
Comments: 29 pages, 19 figures, 9 tables. Accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2017-12-18
The present paper investigates the temperature structure of the X-ray emitting plasma in the core of the Perseus cluster using the 1.8--20.0 keV data obtained with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) onboard the Hitomi Observatory. A series of four observations were carried out, with a total effective exposure time of 338 ks and covering a central region $\sim7'$ in diameter. The SXS was operated with an energy resolution of $\sim$5 eV (full width at half maximum) at 5.9 keV. Not only fine structures of K-shell lines in He-like ions but also transitions from higher principal quantum numbers are clearly resolved from Si through Fe. This enables us to perform temperature diagnostics using the line ratios of Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe, and to provide the first direct measurement of the excitation temperature and ionization temperature in the Perseus cluster. The observed spectrum is roughly reproduced by a single temperature thermal plasma model in collisional ionization equilibrium, but detailed line ratio diagnostics reveal slight deviations from this approximation. In particular, the data exhibit an apparent trend of increasing ionization temperature with increasing atomic mass, as well as small differences between the ionization and excitation temperatures for Fe, the only element for which both temperatures can be measured. The best-fit two-temperature models suggest a combination of 3 and 5 keV gas, which is consistent with the idea that the observed small deviations from a single temperature approximation are due to the effects of projection of the known radial temperature gradient in the cluster core along the line of sight. Comparison with the Chandra/ACIS and the XMM-Newton/RGS results on the other hand suggests that additional lower-temperature components are present in the ICM but not detectable by Hitomi SXS given its 1.8--20 keV energy band.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.05407  [pdf] - 1670550
Atomic data and spectral modeling constraints from high-resolution X-ray observations of the Perseus cluster with Hitomi
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hell, Natalie; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iwai, Masachika; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Łukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Raassen, A. J. J.
Comments: 46 pages, 25 figures, 11 tables. Accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2017-12-14
The Hitomi SXS spectrum of the Perseus cluster, with $\sim$5 eV resolution in the 2-9 keV band, offers an unprecedented benchmark of the atomic modeling and database for hot collisional plasmas. It reveals both successes and challenges of the current atomic codes. The latest versions of AtomDB/APEC (3.0.8), SPEX (3.03.00), and CHIANTI (8.0) all provide reasonable fits to the broad-band spectrum, and are in close agreement on best-fit temperature, emission measure, and abundances of a few elements such as Ni. For the Fe abundance, the APEC and SPEX measurements differ by 16%, which is 17 times higher than the statistical uncertainty. This is mostly attributed to the differences in adopted collisional excitation and dielectronic recombination rates of the strongest emission lines. We further investigate and compare the sensitivity of the derived physical parameters to the astrophysical source modeling and instrumental effects. The Hitomi results show that an accurate atomic code is as important as the astrophysical modeling and instrumental calibration aspects. Substantial updates of atomic databases and targeted laboratory measurements are needed to get the current codes ready for the data from the next Hitomi-level mission.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.02365  [pdf] - 1670537
Hitomi Observations of the LMC SNR N132D: Highly Redshifted X-ray Emission from Iron Ejecta
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iwai, Masachika; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sato, Toshiki; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Łukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen
Comments: 18 pages, 15 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publication by PASJ
Submitted: 2017-12-06
We present Hitomi observations of N132D, a young, X-ray bright, O-rich core-collapse supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Despite a very short observation of only 3.7 ks, the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) easily detects the line complexes of highly ionized S K and Fe K with 16-17 counts in each. The Fe feature is measured for the first time at high spectral resolution. Based on the plausible assumption that the Fe K emission is dominated by He-like ions, we find that the material responsible for this Fe emission is highly redshifted at ~800 km/s compared to the local LMC interstellar medium (ISM), with a 90% credible interval of 50-1500 km/s if a weakly informative prior is placed on possible line broadening. This indicates (1) that the Fe emission arises from the supernova ejecta, and (2) that these ejecta are highly asymmetric, since no blue-shifted component is found. The S K velocity is consistent with the local LMC ISM, and is likely from swept-up ISM material. These results are consistent with spatial mapping that shows the He-like Fe concentrated in the interior of the remnant and the S tracing the outer shell. The results also show that even with a very small number of counts, direct velocity measurements from Doppler-shifted lines detected in extended objects like supernova remnants are now possible. Thanks to the very low SXS background of ~1 event per spectral resolution element per 100 ks, such results are obtainable during short pointed or slew observations with similar instruments. This highlights the power of high-spectral-resolution imaging observations, and demonstrates the new window that has been opened with Hitomi and will be greatly widened with future missions such as the X-ray Astronomy Recovery Mission (XARM) and Athena.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.07727  [pdf] - 1670519
Glimpse of the highly obscured HMXB IGR J16318-4848 with Hitomi
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iwai, Masachika; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier O.; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Łukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Nakaniwa, Nozomi
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures, 2 tables, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2017-11-21
We report a Hitomi observation of IGR J16318-4848, a high-mass X-ray binary system with an extremely strong absorption of N_H~10^{24} cm^{-2}. Previous X-ray studies revealed that its spectrum is dominated by strong fluorescence lines of Fe as well as continuum emission. For physical and geometrical insight into the nature of the reprocessing material, we utilize the high spectroscopic resolving power of the X-ray microcalorimeter (the soft X-ray spectrometer; SXS) and the wide-band sensitivity by the soft and hard X-ray imager (SXI and HXI) aboard Hitomi. Even though photon counts are limited due to unintended off-axis pointing, the SXS spectrum resolves Fe K{\alpha_1} and K{\alpha_2} lines and puts strong constraints on the line centroid and width. The line width corresponds to the velocity of 160^{+300}_{-70} km s^{-1}. This represents the most accurate, and smallest, width measurement of this line made so far from any X-ray binary, much less than the Doppler broadening and shift expected from speeds which are characteristic of similar systems. Combined with the K-shell edge energy measured by the SXI and HXI spectra, the ionization state of Fe is estimated to be in the range of Fe I--IV. Considering the estimated ionization parameter and the distance between the X-ray source and the absorber, the density and thickness of the materials are estimated. The extraordinarily strong absorption and the absence of a Compton shoulder component is confirmed. These characteristics suggest reprocessing materials which are distributed in a narrow solid angle or scattering primarily with warm free electrons or neutral hydrogen.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.06425  [pdf] - 1608662
Toward the Understanding of the Physical Origin of Recombining Plasma in the Supernova Remnant IC 443
Comments: 15 pages, 10 figures, 6 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ on 16 Nov 2017
Submitted: 2017-11-17, last modified: 2017-11-19
We perform a spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis of X-ray emission from the supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443 with Suzaku. All the spectra are well reproduced by a model consisting of a collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) and two recombining plasma (RP) components. Although previous X-ray studies found an RP in the northeastern region, this is the first report on RPs in the other parts of the remnant. The electron temperature $kT_e$ of the CIE component is almost uniform at $\sim 0.2$ keV across the remnant. The CIE plasma has metal abundances consistent with solar and is concentrated toward the rim of the remnant, suggesting that it is of shocked interstellar medium origin. The two RP components have different $kT_e$: one in the range of 0.16$-$0.28 keV and the other in the range of 0.48$-$0.67 keV. The electron temperatures of both RP components decrease toward the southeast, where the SNR shock is known to be interacting with a molecular cloud. We also find the normalization ratio of the lower-$kT_e$ RP to higher-$kT_e$ RP components increases toward the southeast. Both results suggest the X-ray emitting plasma in the southeastern region is significantly cooled by some mechanism. One of the plausible cooling mechanisms is thermal conduction between the hot plasma and the molecular cloud. If the cooling proceeds faster than the recombination timescale of the plasma, the same mechanism can account for the recombining plasma as well.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.06289  [pdf] - 1670512
Hitomi Observation of Radio Galaxy NGC 1275: The First X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectroscopy of Fe-K{\alpha} Line Emission from an Active Galactic Nucleus
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iwai, Masachika; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier O.; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Łukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Kawamuro, Taiki
Comments: 20 pages, 8 figures, 6 tables, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2017-11-16
The origin of the narrow Fe-K{\alpha} fluorescence line at 6.4 keV from active galactic nuclei has long been under debate; some of the possible sites are the outer accretion disk, the broad line region, a molecular torus, or interstellar/intracluster media. In February-March 2016, we performed the first X-ray microcalorimeter spectroscopy with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) onboard the Hitomi satellite of the Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxy NGC 1275 at the center of the Perseus cluster of galaxies. With the high energy resolution of ~5 eV at 6 keV achieved by Hitomi/SXS, we detected the Fe-K{\alpha} line with ~5.4 {\sigma} significance. The velocity width is constrained to be 500-1600 km s$^{-1}$ (FWHM for Gaussian models) at 90% confidence. The SXS also constrains the continuum level from the NGC 1275 nucleus up to ~20 keV, giving an equivalent width ~20 eV of the 6.4 keV line. Because the velocity width is narrower than that of broad H{\alpha} line of ~2750 km s$^{-1}$, we can exclude a large contribution to the line flux from the accretion disk and the broad line region. Furthermore, we performed pixel map analyses on the Hitomi/SXS data and image analyses on the Chandra archival data, and revealed that the Fe-K{\alpha} line comes from a region within ~1.6 kpc from the NGC 1275 core, where an active galactic nucleus emission dominates, rather than that from intracluster media. Therefore, we suggest that the source of the Fe-K{\alpha} line from NGC 1275 is likely a low-covering fraction molecular torus or a rotating molecular disk which probably extends from a pc to hundreds pc scale in the active galactic nucleus system.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.00240  [pdf] - 1670501
Atmospheric gas dynamics in the Perseus cluster observed with Hitomi
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Canning, Rebecca E. A.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashi, Tasuku; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Shota; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iwai, Masachika; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Łukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Keigo; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Wang, Qian H. S.; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen
Comments: 52 pages, 16 figures, 8 tables, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2017-11-01
Extending the earlier measurements reported in Hitomi collaboration (2016, Nature, 535, 117), we examine the atmospheric gas motions within the central 100~kpc of the Perseus cluster using observations obtained with the Hitomi satellite. After correcting for the point spread function of the telescope and using optically thin emission lines, we find that the line-of-sight velocity dispersion of the hot gas is remarkably low and mostly uniform. The velocity dispersion reaches maxima of approximately 200~km~s$^{-1}$ toward the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) and toward the AGN inflated north-western `ghost' bubble. Elsewhere within the observed region, the velocity dispersion appears constant around 100~km~s$^{-1}$. We also detect a velocity gradient with a 100~km~s$^{-1}$ amplitude across the cluster core, consistent with large-scale sloshing of the core gas. If the observed gas motions are isotropic, the kinetic pressure support is less than 10\% of the thermal pressure support in the cluster core. The well-resolved optically thin emission lines have Gaussian shapes, indicating that the turbulent driving scale is likely below 100~kpc, which is consistent with the size of the AGN jet inflated bubbles. We also report the first measurement of the ion temperature in the intracluster medium, which we find to be consistent with the electron temperature. In addition, we present a new measurement of the redshift to the brightest cluster galaxy NGC~1275.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.04648  [pdf] - 1670493
Measurements of resonant scattering in the Perseus cluster core with Hitomi SXS
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Greg V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier O.; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sato, Toshiki; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shinichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Furukawa, Maki; Ogorzalek, Anna
Comments: 30 pages, 17 figure, 6 tables, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2017-10-11
Thanks to its high spectral resolution (~5 eV at 6 keV), the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on board Hitomi enables us to measure the detailed structure of spatially resolved emission lines from highly ionized ions in galaxy clusters for the first time. In this series of papers, using the SXS we have measured the velocities of gas motions, metallicities and the multi-temperature structure of the gas in the core of the Perseus cluster. Here, we show that when inferring physical properties from line emissivities in systems like Perseus, the resonant scattering (RS) effect should be taken into account. In the Hitomi waveband, RS mostly affects the FeXXV He$\alpha$ line ($w$) - the strongest line in the spectrum. The flux measured by Hitomi in this line is suppressed by a factor ~1.3 in the inner ~30 kpc, compared to predictions for an optically thin plasma; the suppression decreases with the distance from the center. The $w$ line also appears slightly broader than other lines from the same ion. The observed distortions of the $w$ line flux, shape and distance dependence are all consistent with the expected effect of the resonant scattering in the Perseus core. By measuring the ratio of fluxes in optically thick ($w$) and thin (FeXXV forbidden, He$\beta$, Ly$\alpha$) lines, and comparing these ratios with predictions from Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations, the velocities of gas motions have been obtained. The results are consistent with the direct measurements of gas velocities from line broadening described elsewhere in this series, although the systematic and statistical uncertainties remain significant. Further improvements in the predictions of line emissivities in plasma models, and deeper observations with future X-ray missions will enable RS measurements to provide powerful constraints on the amplitude and anisotropy of clusters gas motions.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.08829  [pdf] - 1670475
In-orbit performance of the soft X-ray imaging system aboard Hitomi (ASTRO-H)
Comments: Accepted for publication in PASJ. 17 pages, 18 figures
Submitted: 2017-09-26
We describe the in-orbit performance of the soft X-ray imaging system consisting of the Soft X-ray Telescope and the Soft X-ray Imager aboard Hitomi. Verification and calibration of imaging and spectroscopic performance are carried out making the best use of the limited data of less than three weeks. Basic performance including a large field of view of 38'x38' is verified with the first light image of the Perseus cluster of galaxies. Amongst the small number of observed targets, the on-minus-off pulse image for the out-of-time events of the Crab pulsar enables us to measure a half power diameter of the telescope as about 1.3'. The average energy resolution measured with the onboard calibration source events at 5.89 keV is 179 pm 3 eV in full width at half maximum. Light leak and cross talk issues affected the effective exposure time and the effective area, respectively, because all the observations were performed before optimizing an observation schedule and parameters for the dark level calculation. Screening the data affected by these two issues, we measure the background level to be 5.6x10^{-6} counts s^{-1} arcmin^{-2} cm^{-2} in the energy band of 5-12 keV, which is seven times lower than that of the Suzaku XIS-BI.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.08801  [pdf] - 1670460
Hitomi X-ray studies of Giant Radio Pulses from the Crab pulsar
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iwai, Masachika; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier O.; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Oshimizu, Kenya; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Ł ukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shiníchiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shiníchiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Terasawa, Toshio; Sekido, Mamoru; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Kawai, Eiji; Misawa, Hiroaki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Yamazaki, Ryo; Kobayashi, Eiji; Kisaka, Shota; Aoki, Takahiro
Comments: 18 pages, 7 figure, 6 tables, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2017-07-27, last modified: 2017-08-07
To search for giant X-ray pulses correlated with the giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar, we performed a simultaneous observation of the Crab pulsar with the X-ray satellite Hitomi in the 2 -- 300 keV band and the Kashima NICT radio observatory in the 1.4 -- 1.7 GHz band with a net exposure of about 2 ks on 25 March 2016, just before the loss of the Hitomi mission.The timing performance of the Hitomi instruments was confirmed to meet the timing requirement and about 1,000 and 100 GRPs were simultaneously observed at the main and inter-pulse phases, respectively, and we found no apparent correlation between the giant radio pulses and the X-ray emission in either the main or inter-pulse phases.All variations are within the 2 sigma fluctuations of the X-ray fluxes at the pulse peaks, and the 3 sigma upper limits of variations of main- or inter- pulse GRPs are 22\% or 80\% of the peak flux in a 0.20 phase width, respectively, in the 2 -- 300 keV band.The values become 25\% or 110\% for main or inter-pulse GRPs, respectively, when the phase width is restricted into the 0.03 phase.Among the upper limits from the Hitomi satellite, those in the 4.5-10 keV and the 70-300 keV are obtained for the first time, and those in other bands are consistent with previous reports.Numerically, the upper limits of main- and inter-pulse GRPs in the 0.20 phase width are about (2.4 and 9.3) $\times 10^{-11}$ erg cm$^{-2}$, respectively. No significant variability in pulse profiles implies that the GRPs originated from a local place within the magnetosphere and the number of photon-emitting particles temporally increases.However, the results do not statistically rule out variations correlated with the GRPs, because the possible X-ray enhancement may appear due to a $>0.02$\% brightening of the pulse-peak flux under such conditions.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.00054  [pdf] - 1670449
Search for Thermal X-ray Features from the Crab nebula with Hitomi Soft X-ray Spectrometer
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Greg V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier O.; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sato, Toshiki; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shinichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Tominaga, Nozomu; Moriya, Takashi J.
Comments: PASJ in press. Figures are now properly included
Submitted: 2017-06-30, last modified: 2017-07-04
The Crab nebula originated from a core-collapse supernova (SN) explosion observed in 1054 A.D. When viewed as a supernova remnant (SNR), it has an anomalously low observed ejecta mass and kinetic energy for an Fe-core collapse SN. Intensive searches were made for a massive shell that solves this discrepancy, but none has been detected. An alternative idea is that the SN1054 is an electron-capture (EC) explosion with a lower explosion energy by an order of magnitude than Fe-core collapse SNe. In the X-rays, imaging searches were performed for the plasma emission from the shell in the Crab outskirts to set a stringent upper limit to the X-ray emitting mass. However, the extreme brightness of the source hampers access to its vicinity. We thus employed spectroscopic technique using the X-ray micro-calorimeter onboard the Hitomi satellite. By exploiting its superb energy resolution, we set an upper limit for emission or absorption features from yet undetected thermal plasma in the 2-12 keV range. We also re-evaluated the existing Chandra and XMM-Newton data. By assembling these results, a new upper limit was obtained for the X-ray plasma mass of <~ 1Mo for a wide range of assumed shell radius, size, and plasma temperature both in and out of the collisional equilibrium. To compare with the observation, we further performed hydrodynamic simulations of the Crab SNR for two SN models (Fe-core versus EC) under two SN environments (uniform ISM versus progenitor wind). We found that the observed mass limit can be compatible with both SN models if the SN environment has a low density of <~ 0.03 cm-3 (Fe core) or <~ 0.1 cm-3 (EC) for the uniform density, or a progenitor wind density somewhat less than that provided by a mass loss rate of 10-5 Mo yr-1 at 20 km s-1 for the wind environment.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.00433  [pdf] - 1582303
Gravitational Collapse of Rotating Supermassive Stars including Nuclear Burning Effects
Comments: 20 pages, 22 figures, 3 tables, submitted to PRD
Submitted: 2017-04-03
Supermassive stars (SMSs) of mass $\gtrsim 10^5 M_\odot$ are candidates for seeds of supermassive black holes found in the center of many massive galaxies. We simulate the gravitational collapse of a rigidly rotating SMS core including nuclear burning effects in axisymmetric numerical-relativity simulation. We find that for realistic initial conditions, the nuclear burning does not play an important role. After the collapse, a torus surrounding a rotating black hole is formed and a fraction of the torus material is ejected. We quantitatively study the relation between the properties of these objects and rotation. We find that if a SMS core is sufficiently rapidly rotating, the torus and outflow mass have approximately $6\%$ and $1\%$ of the initial mass, respectively. The typical average velocity and the total kinetic energy of the outflow are $0.2~c$ and $10^{54-56}$ erg where $c$ is the speed of light. Finally, we briefly discuss the possibility for observing the torus and outflow.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.07420  [pdf] - 1542696
Hitomi constraints on the 3.5 keV line in the Perseus galaxy cluster
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix A.; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith A.; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger D.; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Shota; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Itoh, Masayuki; Iwai, Masachika; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kara, Erin; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Katsuta, Junichiro; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Khangulyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; King, Ashley L.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Shu; Koyama, Katsuji; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Moseley, Harvey; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Toshio; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakano, Toshio; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Nomachi, Masaharu; O'Dell, Steve L.; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F. Scott; Pottschmidt, Katja; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Russell, Helen R.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Keisuke; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, C. Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor P.; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wik, Daniel R.; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen
Comments: Discussion of systematics significantly expanded. 9 pages, 5 figures; ApJ Lett. in press
Submitted: 2016-07-25, last modified: 2017-02-27
High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with Hitomi was expected to resolve the origin of the faint unidentified E=3.5 keV emission line reported in several low-resolution studies of various massive systems, such as galaxies and clusters, including the Perseus cluster. We have analyzed the Hitomi first-light observation of the Perseus cluster. The emission line expected for Perseus based on the XMM-Newton signal from the large cluster sample under the dark matter decay scenario is too faint to be detectable in the Hitomi data. However, the previously reported 3.5 keV flux from Perseus was anomalously high compared to the sample-based prediction. We find no unidentified line at the reported high flux level. Taking into account the XMM measurement uncertainties for this region, the inconsistency with Hitomi is at a 99% significance for a broad dark-matter line and at 99.7% for a narrow line from the gas. We do not find anomalously high fluxes of the nearby faint K line or the Ar satellite line that were proposed as explanations for the earlier 3.5 keV detections. We do find a hint of a broad excess near the energies of high-n transitions of Sxvi (E=3.44 keV rest-frame) -- a possible signature of charge exchange in the molecular nebula and another proposed explanation for the unidentified line. While its energy is consistent with XMM pn detections, it is unlikely to explain the MOS signal. A confirmation of this interesting feature has to wait for a more sensitive observation with a future calorimeter experiment.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.04164  [pdf] - 1534582
Localized Recombining Plasma in G166.0+4.3: A Supernova Remnant with an Unusual Morphology
Comments: 8 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2017-01-15
We observed the Galactic mixed-morphology supernova remnant G166.0+4.3 with Suzaku. The X-ray spectrum in the western part of the remnant is well represented by a one-component ionizing plasma model. The spectrum in the northeastern region can be explained by two components. One is the Fe-rich component with the electron temperature $kT_e = 0.87_{-0.03}^{+0.02}$ keV. The other is the recombining plasma component of lighter elements with $kT_e = 0.46\pm0.03$ keV, the initial temperature $kT_{init} = 3$ keV (fixed) and the ionization parameter $n_et = (6.1_{-0.4}^{+0.5}) \times 10^{11} \rm cm^{-3} s$. As the formation process of the recombining plasma, two scenarios, the rarefaction and thermal conduction, are considered. The former would not be favored since we found the recombining plasma only in the northeastern region whereas the latter would explain the origin of the RP. In the latter scenario, an RP is anticipated in a part of the remnant where blast waves are in contact with cool dense gas. The emission measure suggests higher ambient gas density in the northeastern region. The morphology of the radio shell and a GeV gamma-ray emission also suggest a molecular cloud in the region.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.04487  [pdf] - 1439909
The Quiescent Intracluster Medium in the Core of the Perseus Cluster
Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Itoh, Masayuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kara, Erin; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Katsuta, Junichiro; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard; Khangulyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; King, Ashley; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Shu; Koyama, Katsuji; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric; Miller, Jon; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Moseley, Harvey; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Toshio; Mushotzky, Richard; Nagino, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakano, Toshio; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Nomachi, Masaharu; O'Dell, Steve; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F. Scott; Pottschmidt, Katja; Ramsey, Brian; Reynolds, Christopher; Russell, Helen; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemitsos, Peter; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Keisuke; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wik, Daniel; Wilkins, Dan; Williams, Brian; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaok, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yuasa, Takayuki; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen
Comments: 31 pages, 11 Figs, published in Nature July 8
Submitted: 2016-07-15
Clusters of galaxies are the most massive gravitationally-bound objects in the Universe and are still forming. They are thus important probes of cosmological parameters and a host of astrophysical processes. Knowledge of the dynamics of the pervasive hot gas, which dominates in mass over stars in a cluster, is a crucial missing ingredient. It can enable new insights into mechanical energy injection by the central supermassive black hole and the use of hydrostatic equilibrium for the determination of cluster masses. X-rays from the core of the Perseus cluster are emitted by the 50 million K diffuse hot plasma filling its gravitational potential well. The Active Galactic Nucleus of the central galaxy NGC1275 is pumping jetted energy into the surrounding intracluster medium, creating buoyant bubbles filled with relativistic plasma. These likely induce motions in the intracluster medium and heat the inner gas preventing runaway radiative cooling; a process known as Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback. Here we report on Hitomi X-ray observations of the Perseus cluster core, which reveal a remarkably quiescent atmosphere where the gas has a line-of-sight velocity dispersion of 164+/-10 km/s in a region 30-60 kpc from the central nucleus. A gradient in the line-of-sight velocity of 150+/-70 km/s is found across the 60 kpc image of the cluster core. Turbulent pressure support in the gas is 4% or less of the thermodynamic pressure, with large scale shear at most doubling that estimate. We infer that total cluster masses determined from hydrostatic equilibrium in the central regions need little correction for turbulent pressure.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.07147  [pdf] - 1447824
Gravitational waves from supermassive stars collapsing to a supermassive black hole
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, PRD accepted
Submitted: 2016-06-22
We derive the gravitational waveform from the collapse of a rapidly rotating supermassive star (SMS) core leading directly to a seed of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in axisymmetric numerical-relativity simulations. We find that the peak strain amplitude of gravitational waves emitted during the black-hole formation is $\approx 5 \times 10^{-21}$ at the frequency $f \approx 5$\,mHz for an event at the cosmological redshift $z=3$, if the collapsing SMS core is in the hydrogen-burning phase. Such gravitational waves will be detectable by space laser interferometric detectors like eLISA with signal-to-noise ratio $\approx 10$, if the sensitivity is as high as LISA for $f=1$--10\,mHz. The detection of the gravitational-wave signal will provide a potential opportunity for testing the direct-collapse scenario for the formation of a seed of SMBHs.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.00643  [pdf] - 1389011
Stability of rigidly rotating supermassive stars against gravitational collapse
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-04-03
We revisit secular stability against quasi-radial collapse for rigidly rotating supermassive stars (SMSs) in general relativity. We suppose that the SMSs are in a nuclear-burning phase and can be modeled by polytropic equations of state with the polytropic index $n_p$ slightly smaller than $3$. The stability is determined in terms of the turning-point method. We find a fitting formula of the stability condition for the plausible range of $n_p$ ($2.95 \alt n_p \alt 3$) for SMSs. This condition reconfirms that, while non-rotating SMSs with mass $\sim 10^5M_\odot$--$10^6M_\odot$ may undergo a general-relativistically induced quasi-radial collapse, rigidly rotating SMSs with a ratio of rotational to gravitational potential energy ($\beta$) of $\sim 10^{-2}$ are likely to be stable against collapse unless they are able to accrete $\sim 5$ times more mass during the (relatively brief) hydrogen-burning phase of their evolution. We discuss implications of our results.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.06540  [pdf] - 1377686
Improvement of Spectroscopic Performance using a Charge-sensitive Amplifier Circuit for an X-Ray Astronomical SOI Pixel Detector
Comments: 8 pages, 10 figures, Published for publication in JINST (published 5 June 2015), Conference proceedings for the 7th International Workshop on Semiconductor Pixel Detectors for Particles and Imaging (PIXEL2014), 1 - 5 Sep 2014, Niagara Falls
Submitted: 2016-03-21
We have been developing monolithic active pixel sensors series, named "XRPIX," based on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) pixel technology, for future X-ray astronomical satellites. The XRPIX series offers high coincidence time resolution ({\rm \sim}1 {\rm \mu}s), superior readout time ({\rm \sim}10 {\rm \mu}s), and a wide energy range (0.5--40 keV). In the previous study, we successfully demonstrated X-ray detection by event-driven readout of XRPIX2b. We here report recent improvements in spectroscopic performance. We successfully increased the gain and reduced the readout noise in XRPIX2b by decreasing the parasitic capacitance of the sense-node originated in the buried p-well (BPW). On the other hand, we found significant tail structures in the spectral response due to the loss of the charge collection efficiency when a small BPW is employed. Thus, we increased the gain in XRPIX3b by introducing in-pixel charge sensitive amplifiers instead of having even smaller BPW. We finally achieved the readout noise of 35 e{\rm ^{-}} (rms) and the energy resolution of 320 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV without significant loss of the charge collection efficiency.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.05265  [pdf] - 1319685
Suzaku study on the Ejecta of the Supernova Remnant G272.2$-$3.2
Comments: 16 pages, 5 figures, and 3 tables, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2015-10-18
We report re-analyses of the Suzaku observations of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), G272.2$-$3.2, for which the previous studies were limited below 3 keV. With careful data reduction and background subtraction, we discover the K-shell lines of Ar, Ca, and Fe above 3 keV. The X-ray spectrum of G272.2$-$3.2 consists of two components, a low-temperature collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma ($kT_{\rm e} \sim 0.2$ keV) and a high-temperature non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plasma ($kT_{\rm e} = 0.6$-$3$ keV). The CIE plasma has solar abundances over the entire area, hence it would originate from the interstellar medium. On the other hand, the abundances of the NEI plasma increase toward the inner region, suggesting the ejecta origin. The line center energy of the Fe K-shell emission ($\sim 6.4$ keV) suggests that the ejecta are recently heated by the reverse shock, a common feature in Type Ia SNRs.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.07913  [pdf] - 1258943
N49: the first robust discovery of a recombining plasma in an extra galactic supernova remnant
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures, Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-05-28
Recent discoveries of recombining plasmas (RPs) in supernova remnants (SNRs) have dramatically changed our understanding of SNR evolution. To date, a dozen of RP SNRs have been identified in the Galaxy. Here we present Suzaku deep observations of four SNRs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), N49, N49B, N23, and DEM L71, for accurate determination of their plasma state. Our uniform analysis reveals that only N49 is in the recombining state among them, which is the first robust discovery of a RP from an extra-galactic SNR. Given that RPs have been identified only in core-collapse SNRs, our result strongly suggests a massive star origin of this SNR. On the other hand, no clear evidence for a RP is confirmed in N23, from which detection of recombination lines and continua was previously claimed. Comparing the physical properties of the RP SNRs identified so far, we find that all of them are categorized into the "mixed-morphology" class and interacting with surrounding molecular clouds. This might be a key to solve formation mechanisms of the RPs.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.1356  [pdf] - 1223459
The ASTRO-H X-ray Astronomy Satellite
Takahashi, Tadayuki; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Asai, Makoto; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Azzarello, Philipp; Baluta, Chris; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Marshall; Bialas, Thomas; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brenneman, Laura; Brown, Greg; Cackett, Edward; Canavan, Edgar; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Doty, John; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi; Gandhi, Poshak; Gilmore, Kirk; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haas, Daniel; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harayama, Atsushi; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Iyomoto, Naoko; Jewell, Chris; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Katsuta, Junichiro; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawano, Taro; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangulyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kimball, Mark; Kimura, Masashi; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Konami, Saori; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Koujelev, Alex; Koyama, Katsuji; Krimm, Hans; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; LaMassa, Stephanie; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Franccois; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Masters, Candace; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; Mcguinness, Daniel; McNamara, Brian; Miko, Joseph; Miller, Jon; Miller, Eric; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Koji; Mori, Hideyuki; Moroso, Franco; Muench, Theodore; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Toshio; Mushotzky, Richard; Nagano, Housei; Nagino, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Natsukari, Chikara; Nishioka, Yusuke; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, St'ephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Pohl, Martin; Pontius, James; Porter, F. Scott; Pottschmidt, Katja; Ramsey, Brian; Reis, Rubens; Reynolds, Christopher; Ricci, Claudio; Russell, Helen; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sato, Goro; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Serlemitsos, Peter; Seta, Hiromi; Shibano, Yasuko; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Simionescu, Aurora; Simmons, Cynthia; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Takeda, Shin-ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor; Wada, Atsushi; Watanabe, Shin; Watanabe, Tomomi; Werner, Norbert; White, Nicholas; Wilkins, Dan; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yuasa, Takayuki; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; ZuHone, John
Comments: 24 pages, 18 figures, Proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Instrumentation "Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray"
Submitted: 2014-12-03
The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions developed by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), with a planned launch in 2015. The ASTRO-H mission is equipped with a suite of sensitive instruments with the highest energy resolution ever achieved at E > 3 keV and a wide energy range spanning four decades in energy from soft X-rays to gamma-rays. The simultaneous broad band pass, coupled with the high spectral resolution of Delta E < 7 eV of the micro-calorimeter, will enable a wide variety of important science themes to be pursued. ASTRO-H is expected to provide breakthrough results in scientific areas as diverse as the large-scale structure of the Universe and its evolution, the behavior of matter in the gravitational strong field regime, the physical conditions in sites of cosmic-ray acceleration, and the distribution of dark matter in galaxy clusters at different redshifts.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.1169  [pdf] - 1937982
ASTRO-H White Paper - Young Supernova Remnants
Comments: 38 pages, 19 figures, ASTRO-H White Paper
Submitted: 2014-12-02
Thanks to the unprecedented spectral resolution and sensitivity of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) to soft thermal X-ray emission, ASTRO-H will open a new discovery window for understanding young, ejecta-dominated, supernova remnants (SNRs). In particular we study how ASTRO-H observations will address, comprehensively, three key topics in SNR research: (1) using abundance measurements to unveil SNR progenitors, (2) using spatial and velocity distribution of the ejecta to understand supernova explosion mechanisms, (3) revealing the link between the thermal plasma state of SNRs and the efficiency of their particle acceleration.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.1166  [pdf] - 1937981
ASTRO-H White Paper - Older Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae
Comments: 25 pages, 17 figures, ASTRO-H White Paper
Submitted: 2014-12-02
Most supernova remnants (SNRs) are old, in the sense that their structure has been profoundly modified by their interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). Old SNRs are very heterogenous in terms of their appearance, reflecting differences in their evolutionary state, the environments in which SNe explode and in the explosion products. Some old SNRs are seen primarily as a result of a strong shock wave interacting with the ISM. Others, the so-called mixed-morphology SNRs, show central concentrations of emission, which may still show evidence of emission from the ejecta. Yet others, the pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), are seen primarily as a result of emission powered by a pulsar; these SNRs often lack the detectable thermal emission from the primary shock. The underlying goal in all studies of old SNRs is to understand these differences, in terms of the SNe that created them, the nature of the ISM into which they are expanding, and the fundamental physical processes that govern their evolution. Here we identify three areas of study where ASTRO-H can make important contributions. These are constraining abundances and physical processes in mature limb-brightened SNRs, understanding the puzzling nature of mixed-morphology SNRs, and exploring the nature of PWNe. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on-board ASTRO-H will, as a result of its high spectral resolution, be the primary tool for addressing problems associated with old SNRs, supported by hard X-ray observations with the Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) to obtain broad band X-ray coverage.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.1172  [pdf] - 1937985
ASTRO-H White Paper - New Spectral Features
Comments: 37 pages, 19 figures, ASTRO-H White Paper
Submitted: 2014-12-02
This white paper addresses selected new (to X-ray astronomy) physics and data analysis issues that will impact ASTRO-H SWG observations as a result of its high-spectral-resolution X-ray microcalorimeter, the focussing hard X-ray optics and corresponding detectors, and the low background soft gamma-ray detector. We concentrate on issues of atomic and nuclear physics, including basic bound-bound and bound-free transitions as well as scattering and radiative transfer. The major topic categories include the physics of charge exchange, solar system X-ray sources, advanced spectral model, radiative transfer, and hard X-ray emission lines and sources.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.6809  [pdf] - 1223330
Global Distribution of Ionizing and Recombining Plasmas in the Supernova Remnant G290.1$-$0.8
Comments: 15 pages, 3 figures, and 3 tables, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2014-11-25
We report on the Suzaku results of the mixed-morphology supernova remnant (SNR) G290.1$-$0.8 (MSH 11-61A). The SNR has an asymmetric structure extended to the southeast and the northwest. In the X-ray spectra of the center and the northwest regions, we discover recombining plasma features with the strong Si Ly$\alpha$ and radiative recombination continuum at $\sim$ 2.7 keV. These features are the most significant in the northwest region, and the spectra are well-reproduced with a recombining plasma of $kT_{\rm e} = 0.5$ keV. Whereas the spectra of other regions are expressed by an ionizing plasma of $kT_{\rm e} = 0.6$ keV. The recombining plasma has over-solar abundances, while the ionizing plasma has roughly solar abundances. Hence they are likely ejecta and interstellar medium (ISM) origin, respectively. The recombining plasma in the northwest of G290.1$-$0.8 would be generated by a break-out of the supernova ejecta from a high density circumstellar medium to a low density ISM.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.0502  [pdf] - 869600
Search for bosonic superweakly interacting massive dark matter particles with the XMASS-I detector
Comments: 12 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2014-06-02, last modified: 2014-08-21
Bosonic superweakly interacting massive particles (super-WIMPs) are a candidate for warm dark matter. With the absorption of such a boson by a xenon atom these dark matter candidates would deposit an energy equivalent to their rest mass in the detector. This is the first direct detection experiment exploring the vector super-WIMPs in the mass range between 40 and 120 keV. Using 165.9 days of data no significant excess above background was observed in the fiducial mass of 41 kg. The present limit for the vector super-WIMPs excludes the possibility that such particles constitute all of dark matter. The absence of a signal also provides the most stringent direct constraint on the coupling constant of pseudoscalar super-WIMPs to electrons. The unprecedented sensitivity was achieved exploiting the low background at a level $10^{-4}$ kg$^{-1}$keV$_{ee}^{-1}$day$^{-1}$ in the detector.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.4737  [pdf] - 1425198
Search for inelastic WIMP nucleus scattering on $^{129}$Xe in data from the XMASS-I experiment
Comments: 13 pages, 7 figures, to be published in PTEP
Submitted: 2014-01-19, last modified: 2014-04-29
A search for inelastic scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) on the isotope $^{129}$Xe was done in data taken with the single phase liquid xenon detector XMASS at the Kamioka Observatory. Using a restricted volume containing 41 kg of LXe at the very center of our detector we observed no significant excess of events in 165.9 days of data. Our background reduction allowed us to derive our limits without explicitly subtracting the remaining events which are compatible with background expectations and derive for e.g. a 50 GeV WIMP an upper limit for its inelastic cross section on $^{129}$Xe nuclei of 3.2 pb at the 90% confidence level.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.6898  [pdf] - 1208631
Abundances in the Ejecta of Core Collapse Supernova Remnants, G350.1-0.3 and G349.7+0.2
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2014-03-26
We present Suzaku results of the two Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs), G350.1-0.3 and G349.7+0.2. We find Al and Ni K alpha lines from both the SNRs for the first time, in addition to previously detected K-shell lines of Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca and Fe. The spectra are well described by two optically thin thermal plasmas: a low-temperature (low-kT) plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium and a high-temperature (high-kT) plasma in non-equilibrium ionization. Since the low-kT plasma has solar metal abundances, it is thought to be of interstellar medium origin. The high-kT plasma has super-solar abundances, hence it is likely to be of ejecta origin. The abundance patterns of the ejecta components are similar to those of core-collapse supernovae with the progenitor mass of ~15-25 M_solar for G350.1-0.3 and ~35-40 M_solar for G349.7+0.2. We find extremely high abundances of Ni compared to Fe (Z_Ni/Z_Fe ~8). Based on the measured column densities between the SNRs and the near sky background, we propose that G350.1-0.3 and G349.7+0.2 are located at the distance of 9+/-3 kpc and 12+/-5 kpc, respectively. Then the ejecta masses are estimated to be ~13 M_solar and ~24 M_solar for G350.1-0.3 and G349.7+0.2, respectively. These values are consistent with the progenitor mass of ~15-25 M_solar and ~35-40 M_solar for G350.1-0.3 and G349.7+0.2, respectively.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.5850  [pdf] - 800832
Discovery of Enhanced Radiative Recombination Continua of He-like Iron and Calcium from IC 443 and Its Implications
Comments: 4 pages, 5 figures, published in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-03-24
We present deep observations of the Galactic supernova remnant IC 443 with the {\it Suzaku X-ray satellite}. We find prominent K-shell lines from iron and nickel, together with a triangle residual at 8--10~keV, which corresponds to the energy of the radiative recombination continuum (RRC) of He-like iron. In addition, the wavy residuals have been seen at $\sim$5.1 and $\sim$5.5~keV. We confirm that the residuals show the first enhanced RRCs of He- and H-like calcium found in supernova remnants. These facts provide robust evidence for the recombining plasma. We reproduce the plasma in the 3.7--10~keV band using a recombining plasma model at the electron temperature 0.65~keV. The recombination parameter $n_{\rm e}t$ ($n_{\rm e}$ is electron density and $t$ is elapsed time after formation of a recombining plasma) and abundances of iron and nickel are strongly correlated, and hence the errors are large. On the other hand, the ratio of nickel to iron relative to the solar abundances is well constrained to 11$^{+4}_{-3}$ (1$\sigma$). A possibility is that the large abundance ratio is a result of an asymmetric explosion of the progenitor star.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.5154  [pdf] - 1208499
Discriminating the Progenitor Type of Supernova Remnants with Iron K-Shell Emission
Comments: Accepted by ApJL; 5 pages with just 1 table and 1 figure
Submitted: 2014-03-20
Supernova remnants (SNRs) retain crucial information about both their parent explosion and circumstellar material left behind by their progenitor. However, the complexity of the interaction between supernova ejecta and ambient medium often blurs this information, and it is not uncommon for the basic progenitor type (Ia or core-collapse) of well-studied remnants to remain uncertain. Here we present a powerful new observational diagnostic to discriminate between progenitor types and constrain the ambient medium density of SNRs solely using Fe K-shell X-ray emission. We analyze all extant Suzaku observations of SNRs and detect Fe K alpha emission from 23 young or middle-aged remnants, including five first detections (IC 443, G292.0+1.8, G337.2-0.7, N49, and N63A). The Fe K alpha centroids clearly separate progenitor types, with the Fe-rich ejecta in Type Ia remnants being significantly less ionized than in core-collapse SNRs. Within each progenitor group, the Fe K alpha luminosity and centroid are well correlated, with more luminous objects having more highly ionized Fe. Our results indicate that there is a strong connection between explosion type and ambient medium density, and suggest that Type Ia supernova progenitors do not substantially modify their surroundings at radii of up to several parsecs. We also detect a K-shell radiative recombination continuum of Fe in W49B and IC 443, implying a strong circumstellar interaction in the early evolutionary phases of these core-collapse remnants.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.1633  [pdf] - 1203237
Suzaku Discovery of Fe K-Shell Line from the O-Rich SNR G292.0+1.8
Comments: 14 pages, 5 figures and 1 table, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2014-02-07
We report the Suzaku/XIS results of the Galactic oxygen-rich supernova remnant (SNR), G292.0+1.8, a remnant of a core-collapse supernova. The X-ray spectrum of G292.0+1.8 consists of two type plasmas, one is in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) and the other is in non-equilibrium ionization (NEI). The CIE plasma has nearly solar abundances, and hence would be originated from the circumstellar and interstellar mediums. The NEI plasma has super-solar abundances, and the abundance pattern indicates that the plasma originates from the supernova ejecta with a main sequence of 30-35 Msolar. Iron K-shell line at energy of 6.6 keV is detected for the first time in the NEI plasma.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.0003  [pdf] - 765804
Serendipitous ALMA detection of a distant CO-emitting galaxy with a buried active galactic nucleus beyond the nearby merging galaxies VV114
Comments: 5 pages, 3 tables, 2 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2013-12-30
We report the detection of a distant star-forming galaxy, ALMA J010748.3-173028, which is identified by a 13-sigma emission line at 99.75 GHz (SdV = 3.1 Jy km/s), behind the nearby merging galaxies VV114 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Band 3. We also find an 880-um counterpart with ALMA Band 7 (S_880um = 11.2 mJy). A careful comparison of the intensities of the line and the continuum suggests that the line is a redshifted 12CO transition. A photometric redshift analysis using the infrared to radio data favors a CO redshift of z = 2.467, although z = 3.622 is acceptable. We also find a hard X-ray counterpart, suggesting the presence of a luminous (L_X ~ 10^44 erg/s) active galactic nucleus obscured by a large hydrogen column (N_H ~ 2 x 10^23 cm^-2 if z = 2.47). A cosmological simulation shows that the chance detection rate of a CO-emitting galaxy at z > 1 with \ge 1 Jy km/s is ~ 10^-3 per single ALMA field of view and 7.5-GHz bandwidth at 99.75 GHz. This demonstrates that ALMA has sufficient sensitivity to find an emission-line galaxy such as ALMA J010748.3-173028 even by chance, although the likelihood of stumbling across such a source is not high.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.4236  [pdf] - 1179981
Discovery of the recombining plasma in the south of the Galactic center; a relic of the past Galactic center activity?
Comments: 19 pages, 5 figures, published by ApJ
Submitted: 2013-10-15
We report Suzaku results for soft X-ray emission to the south of the Galactic center (GC). The emission (hereafter "GC South") has an angular size of ~42' x 16' centered at (l, b) ~ (0.0, -1.4), and is located in the largely extended Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). The X-ray spectrum of GC South exhibits emission lines from highly ionized atoms. Although the X-ray spectrum of the GRXE can be well fitted with a plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), that of GC South cannot be fitted with a plasma in CIE, leaving hump-like residuals at ~2.5 and 3.5 keV, which are attributable to the radiative recombination continua of the K-shells of Si and S, respectively. In fact, GC South spectrum is well fitted with a recombination-dominant plasma model; the electron temperature is 0.46 keV while atoms are highly ionized (kT = 1.6 keV) in the initial epoch, and the plasma is now in a recombining phase at a relaxation scale (plasma density x elapsed time) of 5.3 x 10^11 s cm^-3. The absorption column density of GC South is consistent with that toward the GC region. Thus GC South is likely to be located in the GC region (~8 kpc distance). The size of the plasma, the mean density, and the thermal energy are estimated to be 97 pc x 37 pc, 0.16 cm^-3, and 1.6 x 10^51 erg, respectively. We discuss possible origins of the recombination-dominant plasma as a relic of past activity in the GC region.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1212.6153  [pdf] - 753387
Search for solar axions in XMASS, a large liquid-xenon detector
Comments:
Submitted: 2012-12-26, last modified: 2013-05-29
XMASS, a low-background, large liquid-xenon detector, was used to search for solar axions that would be produced by bremsstrahlung and Compton effects in the Sun. With an exposure of 5.6ton days of liquid xenon, the model-independent limit on the coupling for mass $\ll$ 1keV is $|g_{aee}|< 5.4\times 10^{-11}$ (90% C.L.), which is a factor of two stronger than the existing experimental limit. The bounds on the axion masses for the DFSZ and KSVZ axion models are 1.9 and 250eV, respectively. In the mass range of 10-40keV, this study produced the most stringent limit, which is better than that previously derived from astrophysical arguments regarding the Sun to date.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.4489  [pdf] - 1171466
Asymmetric Ejecta Distribution in SN 1006
Comments: 11 pages, 12 figures, 4 tables, formatted using emulateapj.cls. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2013-05-20
We present the results from deep X-ray observations (~400 ks in total) of SN 1006 by the X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku. The thermal spectrum from the entire supernova remnant (SNR) exhibits prominent emission lines of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. The observed abundance pattern in the ejecta components is in good agreement with that predicted by a standard model of Type Ia supernovae (SNe). The spatially resolved analysis reveals that the distribution of the O-burning and incomplete Si-burning products (Si, S, and Ar) is asymmetric, while that of the C-burning products (O, Ne, and Mg) is relatively uniform in the SNR interior. The peak position of the former is clearly shifted by 5' (~3.2 pc at a distance of 2.2 kpc) to the southeast from the SNR's geometric center. Using the SNR age of ~1000 yr, we constrain the velocity asymmetry (in projection) of ejecta to be ~3100 km/s. The abundance of Fe is also significantly higher in the southeast region than in the northwest region. Given that the non-uniformity is observed only among the heavier elements (Si through Fe), we argue that SN 1006 originates from an asymmetric explosion, as is expected from recent multi-dimensional simulations of Type Ia SNe, although we cannot eliminate the possibility that an inhomogeneous ambient medium induced the apparent non-uniformity. Possible evidence for the Cr K-shell line and line broadening in the Fe K-shell emission is also found.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.6607  [pdf] - 1165548
Dynamics of X-Ray-Emitting Ejecta in the Oxygen-Rich Supernova Remnant Puppis A Revealed by the XMM-Newton RGS
Comments: 21 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2013-03-22
Using the unprecedented spectral resolution of the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) onboard XMM-Newton, we reveal dynamics of X-ray--emitting ejecta in the oxygen-rich supernova remnant Puppis A. The RGS spectrum shows prominent K-shell lines, including O VII He_alpha forbidden and resonance, O VIII Ly_alpha, O VIII Ly_beta, and Ne IX He_alpha resonance, from an ejecta knot positionally coincident with an optical oxygen-rich filament (the so-called Omega filament in the northeast of the remnant). We find that the line centroids are blueshifted by 1480+/-140+/-60 km/s (the first and second term errors are measurement and calibration uncertainties, respectively), which is fully consistent with that of the optical Omega filament. Line broadening at 654 eV (corresponding to O VIII Ly_alpha) is obtained to be less than ~0.9 eV, indicating an oxygen temperature of less than ~30 keV. Analysis of XMM-Newton MOS spectra shows an electron temperature of ~0.8 keV and an ionization timescale of ~2e10 cm^-3 s. We show that the oxygen and electron temperatures as well as the ionization timescale can be reconciled if the ejecta knot was heated by a collisionless shock whose velocity is ~600-1200 km/s and was subsequently equilibrated due to Coulomb interactions. The RGS spectrum also shows relatively weak K-shell lines of another ejecta feature located near the northeastern edge of the remnant, from which we measure redward Doppler velocities of 650+/-70+/-60 km/s.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.5404  [pdf] - 620998
Light WIMP search in XMASS
Comments: 13 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2012-11-22, last modified: 2013-01-16
A search for light dark matter using low-threshold data from the single phase liquid xenon scintillation detector XMASS, has been conducted. Using the entire 835 kg inner volume as target, the analysis threshold can be lowered to 0.3 keVee (electron-equivalent) to search for light dark matter. With low-threshold data corresponding to a 5591.4 kg$\cdot$day exposure of the detector and without discriminating between nuclear-recoil and electronic events, XMASS excludes part of the parameter space favored by other experiments.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.2815  [pdf] - 831840
XMASS detector
Comments: 21 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2013-01-13
The XMASS project aims to detect dark matter, pp and $^{7}$Be solar neutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay using ultra pure liquid xenon. The first phase of the XMASS experiment searches for dark matter. In this paper, we describe the XMASS detector in detail, including its configuration, data acquisition equipment and calibration system.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.4378  [pdf] - 1152176
The ASTRO-H X-ray Observatory
Takahashi, Tadayuki; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Henri AartsFelix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Asai, Makoto; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Azzarello, Philipp; Baluta, Chris; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Mark; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brown, Greg; Cackett, Ed; Chernyakova, Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Doty, John; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi; Gandhi, Poshak; Gendreau, Keith; Gilmore, Kirk; Haas, Daniel; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawahara, Hajime; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangaluyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kimura, Masashi; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Koujelev, Alex; Koyama, Katsuji; Krimm, Hans; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; LaMassa, Stephanie; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Marchand, Genevieve; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian; Miller, Jon; Miller, Eric; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard; Nagano, Housei; Nagino, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Natsukari, Chikara; Nishioka, Yusuke; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F. Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Reis, Rubens; Reynolds, Christopher; Russell, Helen; Safi-Harb, Samar; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sanders, Jeremy; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Kosuke; Sawada, Makoto; Serlemitsos, Peter; Seta, Hiromi; Shibano, Yasuko; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Simionescu, Aurora; Simmons, Cynthia; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takeda, Shin-ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor; Wada, Atsushi; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; White, Nicholas; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yuasa, Takayuki
Comments: 22 pages, 17 figures, Proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Instrumentation "Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2012: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray"
Submitted: 2012-10-16
The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe via a suite of four instruments, covering a very wide energy range, from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. These instruments include a high-resolution, high-throughput spectrometer sensitive over 0.3-2 keV with high spectral resolution of Delta E < 7 eV, enabled by a micro-calorimeter array located in the focal plane of thin-foil X-ray optics; hard X-ray imaging spectrometers covering 5-80 keV, located in the focal plane of multilayer-coated, focusing hard X-ray mirrors; a wide-field imaging spectrometer sensitive over 0.4-12 keV, with an X-ray CCD camera in the focal plane of a soft X-ray telescope; and a non-focusing Compton-camera type soft gamma-ray detector, sensitive in the 40-600 keV band. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution, will enable the pursuit of a wide variety of important science themes.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1209.5496  [pdf] - 568343
High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A with the XMM-Newton RGS
Comments: Correcting the author list
Submitted: 2012-09-25, last modified: 2012-09-26
We present high-resolution X-ray spectra of cloud-shock interaction regions in the eastern and northern rims of the Galactic supernova remnant Puppis A, using the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard the XMM-Newton satellite. A number of emission lines including K alpha triplets of He-like N, O, and Ne are clearly resolved for the first time. Intensity ratios of forbidden to resonance lines in the triplets are found to be higher than predictions by thermal emission models having plausible plasma parameters. The anomalous line ratios cannot be reproduced by effects of resonance scattering, recombination, or inner-shell ionization processes, but could be explained by charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. Our observations thus provide observational support for charge-exchange X-ray emission in supernova remnants.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.0113  [pdf] - 1125232
Recombining Plasma and Hard X-ray Filament in the Mixed-Morphology Supernova Remnant W44
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2012-08-01
We report new features of the typical mixed-morphology (MM) supernova remnant (SNR) W44. In the X-ray spectra obtained with Suzaku, radiative recombination continua (RRCs) of highly ionized atoms are detected for the first time. The spectra are well reproduced by a thermal plasma in a recombining phase. The best-fit parameters suggest that the electron temperature of the shock-heated matters cooled down rapidly from $\sim1$,keV to $\sim 0.5$,keV, possibly due to adiabatic expansion (rarefaction) occurred $\sim20,000$ years ago. We also discover hard X-ray emission which shows an arc-like structure spatially-correlated with a radio continuum filament. The surface brightness distribution shows a clear anti-correlation with $^{12}$CO (J=2-1) emission from a molecular cloud observed with NANTEN2. While the hard X-ray is most likely due to a synchrotron enhancement in the vicinity of the cloud, no current model can quantitatively predict the observed flux.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.4367  [pdf] - 1124249
Discovery of a Pulsar Wind Nebula Candidate in the Cygnus Loop
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2012-06-19
We report on a discovery of a diffuse nebula containing a pointlike source in the southern blowout region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, based on Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. The X-ray spectra from the nebula and the pointlike source are well represented by an absorbed power-law model with photon indices of 2.2+/-0.1 and 1.6+/-0.2, respectively. The photon indices as well as the flux ratio of F_nebula/F_pointlike ~ 4 lead us to propose that the system is a pulsar wind nebula, although pulsations have not yet been detected. If we attribute its origin to the Cygnus Loop supernova, then the 0.5-8 keV luminosity of the nebula is computed to be 2.1e31 (d/540pc)^2 ergs/s, where d is the distance to the Loop. This implies a spin-down loss-energy E_dot ~ 2.6e35 (d/540pc)^2 ergs/s. The location of the neutron star candidate, ~2 degrees away from the geometric center of the Loop, implies a high transverse velocity of ~1850 (d/540pc)(t/10kyr)^{-1} km/s, assuming the currently accepted age of the Cygnus Loop.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.4188  [pdf] - 1123511
A Suzaku Study of Ejecta Structure and Origin of Hard X-ray Emission in the Supernova Remnant G156.2+5.7
Comments: 10 pages 8 figures, accepted for PASJ
Submitted: 2012-05-18
We report an X-ray study of the evolved Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G156.2+5.7 based on six pointing observations with Suzaku. The remnant's large extent (100$\arcmin$ in diameter) allows us to investigate its radial structure in the northwestern and eastern directions from the apparent center. The X-ray spectra were well fit with a two-component non-equilibrium ionization model representing the swept-up interstellar medium (ISM) and the metal-rich ejecta. We found prominent central concentrations of Si, S and Fe from the ejecta component; the lighter elements of O, Ne and Mg were distributed more uniformly. The temperature of the ISM component suggests a slow shock (610-960 km s$^{-1}$), hence the remnant's age is estimated to be 7,000-15,000 yr, assuming its distance to be $\sim$1.1 kpc. G156.2+5.7 has also been thought to emit hard, non-thermal X-rays, despite being considerably older than any other such remnant. In response to a recent discovery of a background cluster of galaxies (2XMM J045637.2+522411), we carefully excluded its contribution, and reexamined the origin of the hard X-ray emission. We found that the residual hard X-ray emission is consistent with the expected level of the cosmic X-ray background. Thus, no robust evidence for the non-thermal emission was obtained from G156.2+5.7. These results are consistent with the picture of an evolved SNR.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.1594  [pdf] - 1678413
Suzaku View of the Supernova Remnant RCW 86: X-Ray Studies of Newly-Discovered Fe-Rich Ejecta
Comments: Published by PASJ
Submitted: 2012-02-07
We report on results of imaging and spectral analysis of the supernova remnant (SNR) RCW 86 observed with Suzaku. The SNR is known to exhibit K-shell emission of low ionized Fe, possibly originating from supernova ejecta. We revealed the global distribution of the Fe-rich plasma in the entire remnant, for the first time; the Fe-K emission was clearly detected from the west, north, and south regions, in addition to the X-ray brighter shells of southwest and northeast, where the presence of the Fe-rich ejecta has already been reported. The spectrum of each region is well represented by a three-component model consisting of low- and high-temperature thermal plasmas and a non-thermal emission. The lower-temperature component, with elemental abundances of near the solar values, likely originates from the forward shocked interstellar medium, while the Fe-rich ejecta is described by the hotter plasma. From the morphologies of the forward and reverse shocks in the west region, the total ejecta mass is estimated to be 1-2M_sun for the typical explosion energy of ~ 1 x 10^{51} erg. The integrated flux of the Fe-K emission from the entire SNR roughly corresponds to a total Fe mass of about 1M_sun. Both of these estimates suggest a Type Ia supernova origin of this SNR. We also find possible evidence of an Fe-rich clump located beyond the forward-shock front in the north rim, which is reminiscent of ejecta knots observed in the Tycho and Vela SNRs.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1108.3157  [pdf] - 398626
The SPICA coronagraphic instrument (SCI) for the study of exoplanets
Comments: 22 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2011-08-16
We present the SPICA Coronagraphic Instrument (SCI), which has been designed for a concentrated study of extra-solar planets (exoplanets). SPICA mission provides us with a unique opportunity to make high contrast observations because of its large telescope aperture, the simple pupil shape, and the capability for making infrared observations from space. The primary objectives for the SCI are the direct coronagraphic detection and spectroscopy of Jovian exoplanets in infrared, while the monitoring of transiting planets is another important target. The specification and an overview of the design of the instrument are shown. In the SCI, coronagraphic and non-coronagraphic modes are applicable for both an imaging and a spectroscopy. The core wavelength range and the goal contrast of the coronagraphic mode are 3.5--27$\mu$m, and 10$^{-6}$, respectively. Two complemental designs of binary shaped pupil mask coronagraph are presented. The SCI has capability of simultaneous observations of one target using two channels, a short channel with an InSb detector and a long wavelength channel with a Si:As detector. We also give a report on the current progress in the development of key technologies for the SCI.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1103.4872  [pdf] - 1052933
Suzaku Detection of Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission outside Vela X
Comments: 18 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ (Suzaku Special Issue)
Submitted: 2011-03-24
Vela X is a large, 3x2 degrees, radio-emitting pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the Vela pulsar in the Vela supernova remnant. Using four Suzaku/XIS observations pointed just outside Vela X, we find hard X-ray emission extending throughout the fields of view. The hard X-ray spectra are well represented by a power-law. The photon index is measured to be constant at Gamma~2.4, similar to that of the southern outer part of Vela X. The power-law flux decreases with increasing distance from the pulsar. These properties lead us to propose that the hard X-ray emission is associated with the Vela PWN. The larger X-ray extension found in this work strongly suggests that distinct populations relativistic electrons form the X-ray PWN and Vela X, as was recently inferred from multiwavelength spectral modeling of Vela X.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1103.1669  [pdf] - 1052581
Possible Charge-Exchange X-Ray Emission in the Cygnus Loop Detected with Suzaku
Comments: Published in ApJ
Submitted: 2011-03-08
X-ray spectroscopic measurements of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant indicate that metal abundances throughout most of the remnant's rim are depleted to about 0.2 times the solar value. However, recent X-ray studies have revealed in some narrow regions along the outermost rim anomalously "enhanced" abundances (up to about 1 solar). The reason for these anomalous abundances is not understood. Here, we examine X-ray spectra in annular sectors covering nearly the entire rim of the Cygnus Loop using Suzaku (21 pointings) and XMM-Newton (1 pointing). We find that spectra in the "enhanced" abundance regions commonly show a strong emission feature at about 0.7 keV. This feature is likely a complex of He-like O K(gamma + delta + epsilon), although other possibilities cannot be fully excluded. The intensity of this emission relative to He-like O Kalpha appears to be too high to be explained as thermal emission. This fact, as well as the spatial concentration of the anomalous abundances in the outermost rim, leads us to propose an origin from charge-exchange processes between neutrals and H-like O. We show that the presence of charge-exchange emission could lead to the inference of apparently "enhanced" metal abundances using pure thermal emission models. Accounting for charge-exchange emission, the actual abundances could be uniformly low throughout the rim. The overall abundance depletion remains an open question.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.1495  [pdf] - 1051962
First Detection of Ar-K Line Emission from the Cygnus Loop
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2011-02-07
We observed the Cygnus Loop with XMM-Newton (9 pointings) and Suzaku (32 pointings) between 2002 and 2008. The total effective exposure time is 670.2 ks. By using all of the available data, we intended to improve a signal-to-noise ratio of the spectrum. Accordingly, the accumulated spectra obtained by the XIS and the EPIC show some line features around 3 keV that are attributed to the S He$\beta$ and Ar He$\alpha$ lines, respectively. Since the Cygnus Loop is an evolved ($\sim$10,000 yr) supernova remnant whose temperature is relatively low ($<$1 keV) compared with other young remnants, its spectrum is generally faint above 3.0 keV, no emission lines, such as the Ar-K line have ever been detected. The detection of the Ar-K line is the first time and we found that its abundance is significantly higher than that of the solar value; 9.0$^{+4.0}_{-3.8}$ and 8.4$^{+2.5}_{-2.7}$ (in units of solar), estimated from the XIS and the EPIC spectra, respectively. We conclude that the Ar-K line originated from the ejecta of the Cygnus Loop. Follow-up X-ray observations to tightly constrain the abundances of Ar-rich ejecta will be useful to accurately estimate the progenitor's mass.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.4972  [pdf] - 1041498
The ASTRO-H Mission
Takahashi, Tadayuki; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Felix; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Mark; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brown, Greg; Chernyakova, Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; Cottam, Jean; Crow, John; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gandhi, Poshak; Gendreau, Keith; Gilmore, Kirk; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Naoki; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Katagiri, Hideaki; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangaluyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Kotani, Taro; Koyama, Katsuji; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; Miller, Jon; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Koji; Mori, Hideyuki; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Toshio; Mushotzky, Richard; Nakagawa, Yujin; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Parmer, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Porter, Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Reynolds, Christopher; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sambruna, Rita; Sato, Goro; Sato, Yoichi; Serlemitsos, Peter; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tozuka, Miyako; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Watanabe, Shin; White, Nicholas; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa
Comments: 18 pages, 12 figures, Proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Instrumentation "Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2010: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray"
Submitted: 2010-10-24
The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe by performing high-resolution, high-throughput spectroscopy with moderate angular resolution. ASTRO-H covers very wide energy range from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. ASTRO-H allows a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (5-80 keV) provided by multilayer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3-12 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry an X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope (0.4-12 keV) and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector (40-600 keV) . The micro-calorimeter system is developed by an international collaboration led by ISAS/JAXA and NASA. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution of Delta E ~7 eV provided by the micro-calorimeter will enable a wide variety of important science themes to be pursued.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.3731  [pdf] - 316001
Line-of-sight Shell Structure of the Cygnus Loop
Comments: 8 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2009-10-19
We conducted a comprehensive study on the shell structure of the Cygnus Loop using 41 observation data obtained by the Suzaku and the XMM-Newton satellites. To investigate the detailed plasma structure of the Cygnus Loop, we divided our fields of view into 1042 box regions. From the spectral analysis, the spectra obtained from the limb of the Loop are well fitted by the single-component non-equilibrium ionization plasma model. On the other hand, the spectra obtained from the inner regions are well fitted by the two-component model. As a result, we confirmed that the low-temperature and the high-temperature components originated from the surrounding interstellar matter (ISM) and the ejecta of the Loop, respectively. From the best-fit results, we showed a flux distribution of the ISM component. The distribution clearly shows the limb-brightening structure, and we found out some low-flux regions. Among them, the south blowout region has the lowest flux. We also found other large low-flux regions at slightly west and the northeast from the center. We estimated the former thin shell region to be 1.3 degrees in diameter and concluded that there exists a blowout along the line of sight in addition to the south blowout. We also calculated the emission measure distribution of the ISM component and showed that the Cygnus Loop is far from the result obtained by a simple Sedov evolution model. From the results, we support that the Cygnus Loop originated from a cavity explosion. The emission measure distribution also suggests that the cavity-wall density is higher in the northeast than that in the southwest. These results suggest that the thickness of the cavity wall surrounding the Cygnus Loop is not uniform.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.3430  [pdf] - 1001344
The Abundance Inhomogeneity in the Northern Rim of the Cygnus Loop
Comments: 15 pages, 7 figures, PASJ, Vol.61, No.3
Submitted: 2009-01-22
We observed the northern rim of the Cygnus Loop with the \textit{Suzaku} observatory in 5 pointings (P21-P25). From the spatially resolved analysis, all the spectra are well fitted by the single component of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma model. From the best-fit parameters, we found that the abundances of the heavy elements are significantly lower than the solar values except those at the outermost edge in P21 and P22. The origin of the depleted metal abundances is still unclear while such deficiencies have been reported from many other rim observations of the Loop. To explain these depletion at the rim regions, we considered the several possibilities. The effects of the resonance-line-scattering and the grain condensation lower the values of the abundances. However, these are not sufficient to account for the abundance depletion observed. We found that the abundances at the outermost edge in P21 and P22 are higher than those at the other regions. From the morphological point of view, it is reasonable to consider that this abundance inhomogeneity is derived from the breakout or the thinness of the cavity wall of the Loop.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.3433  [pdf] - 1001345
The Ejecta Distributions of the Heavy Elements in the Cygnus Loop
Comments: 15 pages, 5 figures, PASJ, Vol.61, No.2
Submitted: 2009-01-22
We analyzed the metal distribution of the Cygnus Loop using 14 and 7 pointings observation data obtained by the \textit{Suzaku} and the \textit{XMM-Newton} observatories. The spectral analysis shows that all the spectra are well fitted by the two-$kT_e$ non-equilibrium ionization plasma model as shown by the earlier observations. From the best-fit parameters of the high-$kT_e$ component, we calculated the emission measures about various elements and showed the metal distribution of the ejecta component. We found that the distributions of Si and Fe are centered at the southwest of the geometric center toward the blow-out region. From the best-fit parameters, we also estimated the progenitor mass of the Cygnus Loop from our field of view and the metal rich region with a radius of 25 arcmin from the metal center. The result from the metal circle is similar to that from our entire FOV, which suggests the mixing of the metal. From the results, we estimated the mass of the progenitor star at 12-15\MO.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:0812.0339  [pdf] - 19054
Forward Shock Proper Motions of Kepler's Supernova Remnant
Comments:
Submitted: 2008-12-01
The X-ray structure of Kepler's supernova remnant shows a rounded shape delineated by forward shocks. We measure proper motions of the forward shocks on overall rims of the remnant, by using archival Chandra data taken in two epochs with time difference of 6.09 yr. The proper motions of the forward shocks on the northern rim are measured to be from 0.076" (+/-0.032"+/-0.016") to 0.110" (+/-0.014"+/-0.016") per yr, while those on the rest of the rims are measured to be from 0.150" (+/-0.017"+/-0.016") to 0.300" (+/-0.048"+/-0.016") per yr, here the first-term errors are statistical uncertainties and the second-term errors are systematic uncertainties. Combining the best-estimated shock velocity of 1660+/-120 km/sec measured for Balmer-dominated filaments in the northern and central portions of the remnant (Sankrit et al. 2005) with the proper motions derived for the forward shocks on the northern rim, we estimate the distance of 3.3 (2.9-4.9) kpc to the remnant. We measure the expansion indices to be 0.47-0.82 for most of the rims. These values are consistent with those expected in Type-Ia SN explosion models, in which the ejecta and the circumstellar medium have power-law density profiles whose indices are 5-7 and 0-2, respectively. Also, we should note the slower expansion on the northern rim than that on the southern rim. This is likely caused by the inhomogeneous circumstellar medium; the density of the circumstellar medium is higher in the north than that in the south of the remnant. The newly estimated geometric center, around which we believe the explosion point exists, is located at about 5" offset in the north of the radio center.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.5209  [pdf] - 17953
Another Abundance Inhomogeneity in the South East Limb of the Cygnus Loop
Comments: 14pages 7figures
Submitted: 2008-10-29
We have observed the south-east (SE) limb of the Cygnus Loop with {\it Suzaku}. Our spatially-resolved spectroscopic study shows that a one-$kT_\mathrm{e}$ non-equilibrium ionization model represents our spectra fairly well. We find that the metal abundances obtained are all depleted relative to the solar values with a positional dependency along the radial direction of the Cygnus Loop. The abundances in the very edge of the limb shows about half the solar value, whereas other regions inside the Loop show about 0.2 times the solar value which has been believed as a typical value for the Cygnus Loop limb. The "enhanced" abundance in the very edge in the SE limb is quite similar to that found in the north-east (NE) limb of the Loop, and thus this is another evidence of abundance inhomogeneity in the limb regions of the Loop. The radio map shows a quite different feature: the NE limb is in the radio bright region while the SE limb shows almost no radio. Therefore, the metal abundance variation in the SE limb can not attribute to the non-thermal emission. The abundance inhomogeneity as well as the metal depletion down to 0.2 times the solar value still remain an open question.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.4704  [pdf] - 17834
Suzaku Observations across the Cygnus Loop from the Northeastern to the Southwestern Rim
Comments: 16 pages 7 figures accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2008-10-26, last modified: 2008-10-29
We have observed the Cygnus Loop from the northeast (NE) rim to the southwest (SW) rim using Suzaku in 10 pointings that is just north of previous XMM-Newton observations. The observation data obtained were divided into 45 rectangular regions where the width were configured so that each region holds 8000$-$12000 photons. The spectrum acquired from each region was fitted either with one-kTe-component non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) model or with two-kTe-component NEI model. The two-kTe-component model yields significantly better fit in almost all the non-rim regions. Judging from abundances and flux, the high-kTe-component (0.4$-$0.8keV) must be the ejecta origin, while the low-\kTe-component ($\sim$0.3keV) comes from the swept-up matter. We found that swept-up matter shell is very thin in just southwest of center of the Loop. Together with previous observations, we estimate the diameter of this thin shell region to be $1^{\circ}$. We also found that the ejecta distributions were asymmteric to the geometric center: the ejecta of O, Ne and Mg were distributed more in the NE, while the ejecta of Si and Fe were distributed more in the SW of the Cygnus Loop. We calculated the masses for various metals and estimated the origin of the Cygnus Loop as the 12-15M$_\odot$ core-collapse explosion.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.0873  [pdf] - 1000970
New CTI Correction Method for the Spaced-Row Charge Injection of the Suzaku X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer
Comments: 7 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2008-10-06
The charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) of the X-ray CCDs on board the Suzaku satellite (X-ray Imaging Spectrometers; XIS) has increased since the launch due to radiation damage, and the energy resolution has been degraded. To improve the CTI, we have applied a spaced-row charge injection (SCI) technique to the XIS in orbit; by injecting charges into CCD rows periodically, the CTI is actively decreased. The CTI in the SCI mode depends on the distance between a signal charge and a preceding injected row, and the pulse height shows periodic positional variations. Using in-flight data of onboard calibration sources and of the strong iron line from the Perseus cluster of galaxies, we studied the variation in detail. We developed a new method to correct the variation. By applying the new method, the energy resolution (FWHM) at 5.9 keV at March 2008 is ~155 eV for the front-illuminated CCDs and ~175 eV for the back-illuminated CCD.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.3665  [pdf] - 16568
Energy-Scale Calibration of the Suzaku X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer Using the Checker Flag Charge Injection Technique in Orbit
Comments: 8 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ (Suzaku 3rd special issue)
Submitted: 2008-09-22
The X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) on board the Suzaku satellite is an X-ray CCD camera system that has superior performance such as a low background, high quantum efficiency, and good energy resolution in the 0.2-12 keV band. Because of the radiation damage in orbit, however, the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) has increased, and hence the energy scale and resolution of the XIS has been degraded since the launch of July 2005. The CCD has a charge injection structure, and the CTI of each column and the pulse-height dependence of the CTI are precisely measured by a checker flag charge injection (CFCI) technique. Our precise CTI correction improved the energy resolution from 230 eV to 190 eV at 5.9 keV in December 2006. This paper reports the CTI measurements with the CFCI experiments in orbit. Using the CFCI results, we have implemented the time-dependent energy scale and resolution to the Suzaku calibration database.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.0594  [pdf] - 15933
The Plasma Structure of the Southwestern Region of the Cygnus Loop with the XMM-Newton Observatory
Comments: 10 pages, 28 figures, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2008-09-03
We observed the southwestern region of the Cygnus Loop in two pointings with \textit{XMM-Newton}. The region observed is called the "blow-out" region that is extended further in the south. The origin of the "blow-out" is not well understood while it is suggested that there is another supernova remnant here in radio observation. To investigate the detail structure of this region in X-ray, we divided our fields of view into 33 box regions. The spectra are well fitted by a two-component nonequilibrium ionization model. The emission measure distributions of heavy elements decrease from the inner region to the outer region of the Loop. Then, we also divided our fields of view into 26 annular sectors to examine the radial plasma structure. Judging from metal abundances obtained, it is consistent with that the X-ray emission is the Cygnus Loop origin and we concluded that high-$kT_{e}$ component ($\sim$0.4 keV) originates from the ejecta while low-$kT_{e}$ component ($\sim$0.2 keV) is derived from the swept-up interstellar medium. The flux of low-$kT_{e}$ component is much less than that of high-$kT_{e}$ component, suggesting the ISM component is very thin. Also, the relative abundances in the ejecta component shows similar values to those obtained from previous observations of the Cygnus Loop. We find no evidence in X-ray that the nature of the "blow-out" region originated from the extra supernova remnant. From the ejecta component, we calculated the masses for various metals and estimated the origin of the Cygnus Loop as the core-collapse explosion rather than the Type Ia supernova.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.0173  [pdf] - 1530022
Abundance Inhomogeneity in the Northeastern Rim of the Cygnus Loop Revealed by Suzaku Observatory
Comments: 13 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2008-03-02
We present the results of a spatially resolved spectral analysis from four Suzaku observations covering the northeastern rim of the Cygnus Loop. A two-kT_e non-ionization equilibrium (NEI) model fairly well represents our data, which confirms the NEI condition of the plasma there. The metal abundances are depleted relative to the solar values almost everywhere in our field of view. We find abundance inhomogeneities across the field: the northernmost region (Region A) has enhanced absolute abundances compared with other regions. In addition, the relative abundances of Mg/O and Fe/O in Region A are lower than the solar values, while those in the other regions are twice higher than the solar values. As far as we are concerned, neither a circumstellar medium, fragments of ejecta, nor abundance inhomogeneities of the local interstellar medium around the Cygnus Loop can explain the relatively enhanced abundance in Region A. This point is left as an open question for future work.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0601569  [pdf] - 1233706
Discovery of a Featureless X-Ray Spectrum in the Supernova Remnant Shell of G330.2+1.0
Comments: PASJ, in press
Submitted: 2006-01-25
We report here on the first pointed X-ray observation of the supernova remnant (SNR) G330.2+1.0. The X-ray morphology is characterized by an extended shell. Its X-ray spectrum is well represented by a single power-law function with a photon index of $\gamma\simeq 2.8$ and interstellar absorption of $n_{\rm H}\simeq2.6\times 10^{22}$[cm$^{-2}$]. We interpret this emission as synchrotron radiation from accelerated electrons at the SNR shock, as seen in SN 1006. The surface brightness of the X-ray emission is anti-correlated with the radio emission, and the power-law spectrum is dominated at the western shell where the radio emission is weak. The co-existence of two distinct (radio bright/X-ray faint and radio faint/X-ray bright) shells in a single supernova remnant challenges our understanding of the particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms in different interstellar environments. The object may be a good target for searching TeV gamma-rays and molecular gas surrounding the blast shock. We also report on the nature of a bright point-like source (AX J1601-5143) to the south of the SNR.