sort results by

Use logical operators AND, OR, NOT and round brackets to construct complex queries. Whitespace-separated words are treated as ANDed.

Show articles per page in mode

Tsurumi, N.

Normalized to: Tsurumi, N.

7 article(s) in total. 176 co-authors, from 1 to 7 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 39,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.06663  [pdf] - 1231850
Reanalyses of Anomalous Gravitational Microlensing Events in the OGLE-III Early Warning System Database with Combined Data
Comments: 10 pages, 4 tables, 9 figures. Accepted in ApJ, Author list updated
Submitted: 2015-02-23, last modified: 2015-03-02
We reanalyze microlensing events in the published list of anomalous events that were observed from the OGLE lensing survey conducted during 2004-2008 period. In order to check the existence of possible degenerate solutions and extract extra information, we conduct analyses based on combined data from other survey and follow-up observation and consider higher-order effects. Among the analyzed events, we present analyses of 8 events for which either new solutions are identified or additional information is obtained. We find that the previous binary-source interpretations of 5 events are better interpreted by binary-lens models. These events include OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2007-BLG-159, OGLE-2007-BLG-491, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, and OGLE-2008-BLG-210. With additional data covering caustic crossings, we detect finite-source effects for 6 events including OGLE-2006-BLG-215, OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2006-BLG-450, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. Among them, we are able to measure the Einstein radii of 3 events for which multi-band data are available. These events are OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. For OGLE-2008-BLG-143, we detect higher-order effect induced by the changes of the observer's position caused by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we present degenerate solutions resulting from the known close/wide or ecliptic degeneracy. Finally, we note that the masses of the binary companions of the lenses of OGLE-2006-BLG-450 and OGLE-2008-BLG-210 are in the brown-dwarf regime.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.7926  [pdf] - 1216001
OGLE-2013-BLG-0102LA,B: Microlensing binary with components at star/brown-dwarf and brown-dwarf/planet boundaries
Comments: 6 figures, 2 tables, ApJ submitted
Submitted: 2014-07-29, last modified: 2014-11-04
We present the analysis of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0102. The light curve of the event is characterized by a strong short-term anomaly superposed on a smoothly varying lensing curve with a moderate magnification $A_{\rm max}\sim 1.5$. It is found that the event was produced by a binary lens with a mass ratio between the components of $q = 0.13$ and the anomaly was caused by the passage of the source trajectory over a caustic located away from the barycenter of the binary. From the analysis of the effects on the light curve due to the finite size of the source and the parallactic motion of the Earth, the physical parameters of the lens system are determined. The measured masses of the lens components are $M_{1} = 0.096 \pm 0.013~M_{\odot}$ and $M_{2} = 0.012 \pm 0.002~M_{\odot}$, which correspond to near the hydrogen-burning and deuterium-burning mass limits, respectively. The distance to the lens is $3.04 \pm 0.31~{\rm kpc}$ and the projected separation between the lens components is $0.80 \pm 0.08~{\rm AU}$.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.1115  [pdf] - 1215402
A Terrestrial Planet in a ~1 AU Orbit Around One Member of a ~15 AU Binary
Comments: Published in Science, Main and supplementary material combined
Submitted: 2014-07-03
We detect a cold, terrestrial planet in a binary-star system using gravitational microlensing. The planet has low mass (2 Earth masses) and lies projected at $a_{\perp,ph}$ ~ 0.8 astronomical units (AU) from its host star, similar to the Earth-Sun distance. However, the planet temperature is much lower, T<60 Kelvin, because the host star is only 0.10--0.15 solar masses and therefore more than 400 times less luminous than the Sun. The host is itself orbiting a slightly more massive companion with projected separation $a_{\perp,ch}=$10--15 AU. Straightforward modification of current microlensing search strategies could increase their sensitivity to planets in binary systems. With more detections, such binary-star/planetary systems could place constraints on models of planet formation and evolution. This detection is consistent with such systems being very common.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.2134  [pdf] - 1208276
MOA-2013-BLG-220Lb: Massive Planetary Companion to Galactic-Disk Host
Comments: 2 tables, 2 figures
Submitted: 2014-03-09, last modified: 2014-05-29
We report the discovery of MOA-2013-BLG-220Lb, which has a super-Jupiter mass ratio $q=3.01\pm 0.02\times 10^{-3}$ relative to its host. The proper motion, $\mu=12.5\pm 1\, {\rm mas}\,{\rm yr}^{-1}$, is one of the highest for microlensing planets yet discovered, implying that it will be possible to separately resolve the host within $\sim 7$ years. Two separate lines of evidence imply that the planet and host are in the Galactic disk. The planet could have been detected and characterized purely with follow-up data, which has important implications for microlensing surveys, both current and into the LSST era.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.3092  [pdf] - 1208350
Candidate Gravitational Microlensing Events for Future Direct Lens Imaging
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, 6 tables, submitted to ApJ. For a brief video explaining the key results of this paper, please visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_dzT8NydJI
Submitted: 2014-03-12
The mass of the lenses giving rise to Galactic microlensing events can be constrained by measuring the relative lens-source proper motion and lens flux. The flux of the lens can be separated from that of the source, companions to the source, and unrelated nearby stars with high-resolution images taken when the lens and source are spatially resolved. For typical ground-based adaptive optics (AO) or space-based observations, this requires either inordinately long time baselines or high relative proper motions. We provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic Bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens mass with future high-resolution imaging. We investigate all events from 2004 -- 2013 that display detectable finite-source effects, a feature that allows us to measure the proper motion. In total, we present 20 events with mu >~ 8 mas/yr. Of these, 14 were culled from previous analyses while 6 are new, including OGLE-2004-BLG-368, MOA-2005-BLG-36, OGLE-2012-BLG-0211, OGLE-2012-BLG-0456, MOA-2012-BLG-532, and MOA-2013-BLG-029. In <~12 years the lens and source of each event will be sufficiently separated for ground-based telescopes with AO systems or space telescopes to resolve each component and further characterize the lens system. Furthermore, for the most recent events, comparison of the lens flux estimates from images taken immediately to those estimated from images taken when the lens and source are resolved can be used to empirically check the robustness of the single-epoch method currently being used to estimate lens masses for many events.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.3951  [pdf] - 1202249
A Sub-Earth-Mass Moon Orbiting a Gas Giant Primary or a High Velocity Planetary System in the Galactic Bulge
Comments: 32 pages with 9 included figures
Submitted: 2013-12-13
We present the first microlensing candidate for a free-floating exoplanet-exomoon system, MOA-2011-BLG-262, with a primary lens mass of M_host ~ 4 Jupiter masses hosting a sub-Earth mass moon. The data are well fit by this exomoon model, but an alternate star+planet model fits the data almost as well. Nevertheless, these results indicate the potential of microlensing to detect exomoons, albeit ones that are different from the giant planet moons in our solar system. The argument for an exomoon hinges on the system being relatively close to the Sun. The data constrain the product M pi_rel, where M is the lens system mass and pi_rel is the lens-source relative parallax. If the lens system is nearby (large pi_rel), then M is small (a few Jupiter masses) and the companion is a sub-Earth-mass exomoon. The best-fit solution has a large lens-source relative proper motion, mu_rel = 19.6 +- 1.6 mas/yr, which would rule out a distant lens system unless the source star has an unusually high proper motion. However, data from the OGLE collaboration nearly rule out a high source proper motion, so the exoplanet+exomoon model is the favored interpretation for the best fit model. However, the alternate solution has a lower proper motion, which is compatible with a distant (so stellar) host. A Bayesian analysis does not favor the exoplanet+exomoon interpretation, so Occam's razor favors a lens system in the bulge with host and companion masses of M_host = 0.12 (+0.19 -0.06) M_solar and m_comp = 18 (+28 -100 M_earth, at a projected separation of a_perp ~ 0.84 AU. The existence of this degeneracy is an unlucky accident, so current microlensing experiments are in principle sensitive to exomoons. In some circumstances, it will be possible to definitively establish the low mass of such lens systems through the microlensing parallax effect. Future experiments will be sensitive to less extreme exomoons.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.2428  [pdf] - 1179818
A Super-Jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406
Tsapras, Y.; Choi, J. -Y.; Street, R. A.; Han, C.; Bozza, V.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Udalski, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Sumi, T.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Ipatov, S.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Andersen, J. M.; Novati, S. Calchi; Damerdji, Y.; Diehl, C.; Elyiv, A.; Giannini, E.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Juncher, D.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Vilela, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Barry, R.; Batista, V.; Bhattacharya, A.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J.; P`ere, C.; Pollard, K. R.; Wouters, D.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hwang, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kavka, A.; Koo, J. -R.; Lee, C. -U.; Maoz, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Shin, I. -G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Tan, T. G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yonehara, P. C. M. Yock A.
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2013-10-09, last modified: 2013-12-05
We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the lightcurve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a $2.73\pm 0.43\ M_{\rm J}$ planet orbiting a $0.44\pm 0.07\ M_{\odot}$ early M-type star. The distance to the lens is $4.97\pm 0.29$\ kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is $3.45\pm 0.26$ AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.