sort results by

Use logical operators AND, OR, NOT and round brackets to construct complex queries. Whitespace-separated words are treated as ANDed.

Show articles per page in mode

Tolan, J. E.

Normalized to: Tolan, J.

33 article(s) in total. 365 co-authors, from 1 to 33 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 50,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.05197  [pdf] - 2093193
Optical characterization of the Keck Array and BICEP3 CMB Polarimeters from 2016 to 2019
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures. Accepted by the Journal of Low Temperature Physics (Proceedings of the 18th International Workshop on Low Temperature Detectors)
Submitted: 2020-02-12
The BICEP/Keck experiment (BK) is a series of small-aperture refracting telescopes observing degree-scale Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization from the South Pole in search of a primordial $B$-mode signature. This $B$-mode signal arises from primordial gravitational waves interacting with the CMB, and has amplitude parametrized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. Since 2016, BICEP3 and the Keck Array have been observing with 4800 total antenna-coupled transition-edge sensor detectors, with frequency bands spanning 95, 150, 220, and 270 GHz. Here we present the optical performance of these receivers from 2016 to 2019, including far-field beams measured in situ with an improved chopped thermal source and instrument spectral response measured with a field-deployable Fourier Transform Spectrometer. As a pair differencing experiment, an important systematic that must be controlled is the differential beam response between the co-located, orthogonally polarized detectors. We generate per-detector far-field beam maps and the corresponding differential beam mismatch that is used to estimate the temperature-to-polarization leakage in our CMB maps and to give feedback on detector and optics fabrication. The differential beam parameters presented here were estimated using improved low-level beam map analysis techniques, including efficient removal of non-Gaussian noise as well as improved spatial masking. These techniques help minimize systematic uncertainty in the beam analysis, with the goal of constraining the bias on $r$ induced by temperature-to-polarization leakage to be subdominant to the statistical uncertainty. This is essential as we progress to higher detector counts in the next generation of CMB experiments.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.01640  [pdf] - 1983835
BICEP2 / Keck Array XI: Beam Characterization and Temperature-to-Polarization Leakage in the BK15 Dataset
Comments: 18 pages, 9 figures, 4 tables. Matches version accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-04-02, last modified: 2019-08-15
Precision measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization require extreme control of instrumental systematics. In a companion paper we have presented cosmological constraints from observations with the BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments up to and including the 2015 observing season (BK15), resulting in the deepest CMB polarization maps to date and a statistical sensitivity to the tensor-to-scalar ratio of $\sigma(r) = 0.020$. In this work we characterize the beams and constrain potential systematic contamination from main beam shape mismatch at the three BK15 frequencies (95, 150, and 220 GHz). Far-field maps of 7,360 distinct beam patterns taken from 2010-2015 are used to measure differential beam parameters and predict the contribution of temperature-to-polarization leakage to the BK15 B-mode maps. In the multifrequency, multicomponent likelihood analysis that uses BK15, Planck, and WMAP maps to separate sky components, we find that adding this predicted leakage to simulations induces a bias of $\Delta r = 0.0027 \pm 0.0019$. Future results using higher-quality beam maps and improved techniques to detect such leakage in CMB data will substantially reduce this uncertainty, enabling the levels of systematics control needed for BICEP Array and other experiments that plan to definitively probe large-field inflation.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.02523  [pdf] - 1903558
BICEP2 / Keck Array IX: New Bounds on Anisotropies of CMB Polarization Rotation and Implications for Axion-Like Particles and Primordial Magnetic Fields
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2017-05-06, last modified: 2019-06-20
We present the strongest constraints to date on anisotropies of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization rotation derived from 150 GHz data taken by the BICEP2/Keck Array CMB experiments up to and including the 2014 observing season (BK14). The definition of the polarization angle in BK14 maps has gone through self-calibration in which the overall angle is adjusted to minimize the observed TB and EB power spectra. After this procedure, the QU maps lose sensitivity to a uniform polarization rotation but are still sensitive to anisotropies of polarization rotation. This analysis places constraints on the anisotropies of polarization rotation, which could be generated by CMB photons interacting with axionlike pseudoscalar fields or Faraday rotation induced by primordial magnetic fields. The sensitivity of BK14 maps ($\sim 3\mu$K-arcmin) makes it possible to reconstruct anisotropies of the polarization rotation angle and measure their angular power spectrum much more precisely than previous attempts. Our data are found to be consistent with no polarization rotation anisotropies, improving the upper bound on the amplitude of the rotation angle spectrum by roughly an order of magnitude compared to the previous best constraints. Our results lead to an order of magnitude better constraint on the coupling constant of the Chern-Simons electromagnetic term $g_{a\gamma}\leq 7.2\times 10^{-2}/H_I$ (95% confidence) than the constraint derived from the B-mode spectrum, where $H_I$ is the inflationary Hubble scale. This constraint leads to a limit on the decay constant of $10^{-6}\lesssim f_a/M_{\rm pl}$ at mass range of $10^{-33}< m_a< 10^{-28}$ eV for $r=0.01$, assuming $g_{a\gamma}\sim\alpha/(2\pi f_a)$ with $\alpha$ denoting the fine structure constant. The upper bound on the amplitude of the primordial magnetic fields is 30nG (95% confidence) from the polarization rotation anisotropies.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.02199  [pdf] - 1774656
Measurements of Degree-Scale B-mode Polarization with the BICEP/Keck Experiments at South Pole
Comments: 9 pages, 8 figures: conference proceedings, 53rd Rencontres de Moriond, Cosmology 2018
Submitted: 2018-07-05, last modified: 2018-10-27
The BICEP and Keck Array experiments are a suite of small-aperture refracting telescopes observing the microwave sky from the South Pole. They target the degree-scale B-mode polarization signal imprinted in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) by primordial gravitational waves. Such a measurement would shed light on the physics of the very early universe. While BICEP2 observed for the first time a B-mode signal at 150 GHz, higher frequencies from the Planck satellite showed that it could be entirely due to the polarized emission from Galactic dust, though uncertainty remained high. Keck Array has been observing the same region of the sky for several years, with an increased detector count, producing the deepest polarized CMB maps to date. New detectors at 95 GHz were installed in 2014, and at 220 GHz in 2015. These observations enable a better constraint of galactic foreground emissions, as presented here. In 2015, BICEP2 was replaced by BICEP3, a 10 times higher throughput telescope observing at 95 GHz, while Keck Array is now focusing on higher frequencies. In the near future, BICEP Array will replace Keck Array, and will allow unprecedented sensitivity to the gravitational wave signal. High resolution observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) will also be used to remove the lensing contribution to B-modes.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.05216  [pdf] - 1798292
BICEP2 / Keck Array x: Constraints on Primordial Gravitational Waves using Planck, WMAP, and New BICEP2/Keck Observations through the 2015 Season
Comments: 23 pages, 23 figures, as accepted by PRL, data and figures available for download at http://bicepkeck.org/
Submitted: 2018-10-11
We present results from an analysis of all data taken by the BICEP2/Keck CMB polarization experiments up to and including the 2015 observing season. This includes the first Keck Array observations at 220 GHz and additional observations at 95 & 150 GHz. The $Q/U$ maps reach depths of 5.2, 2.9 and 26 $\mu$K$_{cmb}$ arcmin at 95, 150 and 220 GHz respectively over an effective area of $\approx 400$ square degrees. The 220 GHz maps achieve a signal-to-noise on polarized dust emission approximately equal to that of Planck at 353 GHz. We take auto- and cross-spectra between these maps and publicly available WMAP and Planck maps at frequencies from 23 to 353 GHz. We evaluate the joint likelihood of the spectra versus a multicomponent model of lensed-$\Lambda$CDM+$r$+dust+synchrotron+noise. The foreground model has seven parameters, and we impose priors on some of these using external information from Planck and WMAP derived from larger regions of sky. The model is shown to be an adequate description of the data at the current noise levels. The likelihood analysis yields the constraint $r_{0.05}<0.07$ at 95% confidence, which tightens to $r_{0.05}<0.06$ in conjunction with Planck temperature measurements and other data. The lensing signal is detected at $8.8 \sigma$ significance. Running maximum likelihood search on simulations we obtain unbiased results and find that $\sigma(r)=0.020$. These are the strongest constraints to date on primordial gravitational waves.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.00568  [pdf] - 1726814
BICEP Array: a multi-frequency degree-scale CMB polarimeter
Comments: 15 pages, 13 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-01
BICEP Array is the newest multi-frequency instrument in the BICEP/Keck Array program. It is comprised of four 550 mm aperture refractive telescopes observing the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 30/40, 95, 150 and 220/270 GHz with over 30,000 detectors. We present an overview of the receiver, detailing the optics, thermal, mechanical, and magnetic shielding design. BICEP Array follows BICEP3's modular focal plane concept, and upgrades to 6" wafer to reduce fabrication with higher detector count per module. The first receiver at 30/40 GHz is expected to start observing at the South Pole during the 2019-20 season. By the end of the planned BICEP Array program, we project $\sigma(r) \sim 0.003$, assuming current modeling of polarized Galactic foreground and depending on the level of delensing that can be achieved with higher resolution maps from the South Pole Telescope.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.00571  [pdf] - 1726817
Design and performance of wide-band corrugated walls for the BICEP Array detector modules at 30/40 GHz
Comments: 12 pages and 14 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-01
BICEP Array is a degree-scale Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment that will search for primordial B-mode polarization while constraining Galactic foregrounds. BICEP Array will be comprised of four receivers to cover a broad frequency range with channels at 30/40, 95, 150 and 220/270 GHz. The first low-frequency receiver will map synchrotron emission at 30 and 40 GHz and will deploy to the South Pole at the end of 2019. In this paper, we give an overview of the BICEP Array science and instrument, with a focus on the detector module. We designed corrugations in the metal frame of the module to suppress unwanted interactions with the antenna-coupled detectors that would otherwise deform the beams of edge pixels. This design reduces the residual beam systematics and temperature-to-polarization leakage due to beam steering and shape mismatch between polarized beam pairs. We report on the simulated performance of single- and wide-band corrugations designed to minimize these effects. Our optimized design alleviates beam differential ellipticity caused by the metal frame to about 7% over 57% bandwidth (25 to 45 GHz), which is close to the level due the bare antenna itself without a metal frame. Initial laboratory measurements are also presented.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.00570  [pdf] - 1726816
Ultra-Thin Large-Aperture Vacuum Windows for Millimeter Wavelengths Receivers
Comments: Published in Proc. SPIE. Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation Conference 10708: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy XI, June 2018. 14 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-01
Targeting faint polarization patterns arising from Primordial Gravitational Waves in the Cosmic Microwave Background requires excellent observational sensitivity. Optical elements in small aperture experiments such as Bicep3 and Keck Array are designed to optimize throughput and minimize losses from transmission, reflection and scattering at millimeter wavelengths. As aperture size increases, cryostat vacuum windows must withstand larger forces from atmospheric pressure and the solution has often led to a thicker window at the expense of larger transmission loss. We have identified a new candidate material for the fabrication of vacuum windows: with a tensile strength two orders of magnitude larger than previously used materials, woven high-modulus polyethylene could allow for dramatically thinner windows, and therefore significantly reduced losses and higher sensitivity. In these proceedings we investigate the suitability of high-modulus polyethylene windows for ground-based CMB experiments, such as current and future receivers in the Bicep/Keck Array program. This includes characterizing their optical transmission as well as their mechanical behavior under atmospheric pressure. We find that such ultra-thin materials are promising candidates to improve the performance of large-aperture instruments at millimeter wavelengths, and outline a plan for further tests ahead of a possible upcoming field deployment of such a science-grade window.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.00569  [pdf] - 1726815
BICEP Array cryostat and mount design
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures. Published in Proc. SPIE. Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation Conference 10708: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy XI, June 2018
Submitted: 2018-08-01
Bicep Array is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment that will begin observing at the South Pole in early 2019. This experiment replaces the five Bicep2 style receivers that compose the Keck Array with four larger Bicep3 style receivers observing at six frequencies from 30 to 270GHz. The 95GHz and 150GHz receivers will continue to push the already deep Bicep/Keck CMB maps while the 30/40GHz and 220/270GHz receivers will constrain the synchrotron and galactic dust foregrounds respectively. Here we report on the design and performance of the Bicep Array instruments focusing on the mount and cryostat systems.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.00567  [pdf] - 1726813
2017 upgrade and performance of BICEP3: a 95GHz refracting telescope for degree-scale CMB polarization
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures, Published in Proc. SPIE. Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation Conference 10708: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy XI, June 2018
Submitted: 2018-08-01
BICEP3 is a 520mm aperture on-axis refracting telescope observing the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 95GHz in search of the B-mode signal originating from inflationary gravitational waves. BICEP3's focal plane is populated with modularized tiles of antenna-coupled transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. BICEP3 was deployed to the South Pole during 2014-15 austral summer and has been operational since. During the 2016-17 austral summer, we implemented changes to optical elements that lead to better noise performance. We discuss this upgrade and show the performance of BICEP3 at its full mapping speed from the 2017 and 2018 observing seasons. BICEP3 achieves an order-of-magnitude improvement in mapping speed compared to a Keck 95GHz receiver. We demonstrate $6.6\mu K\sqrt{s}$ noise performance of the BICEP3 receiver.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.06861  [pdf] - 1531101
BICEP3 focal plane design and detector performance
Comments: 11 pages, 10 figures. To be published in Proc. SPIE. Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation Conference 9914: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VIII, June 2016
Submitted: 2016-07-22
BICEP3, the latest telescope in the BICEP/Keck program, started science observations in March 2016. It is a 550mm aperture refractive telescope observing the polarization of the cosmic microwave background at 95 GHz. We show the focal plane design and detector performance, including spectral response, optical efficiency and preliminary sensitivity of the upgraded BICEP3. We demonstrate 9.72$\mu$K$\sqrt{\textrm{s}}$ noise performance of the BICEP3 receiver.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.04668  [pdf] - 1531046
BICEP3 performance overview and planned Keck Array upgrade
Comments: 17 pages, 6 figures. To be published in Proc. SPIE. Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation Conference 9914: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VIII, June 2016
Submitted: 2016-07-15
BICEP3 is a 520 mm aperture, compact two-lens refractor designed to observe the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 95 GHz. Its focal plane consists of modularized tiles of antenna-coupled transition edge sensors (TESs), similar to those used in BICEP2 and the Keck Array. The increased per-receiver optical throughput compared to BICEP2/Keck Array, due to both its faster f/1.7 optics and the larger aperture, more than doubles the combined mapping speed of the BICEP/Keck program. The BICEP3 receiver was recently upgraded to a full complement of 20 tiles of detectors (2560 TESs) and is now beginning its second year of observation (and first science season) at the South Pole. We report on its current performance and observing plans. Given its high per-receiver throughput while maintaining the advantages of a compact design, BICEP3-class receivers are ideally suited as building blocks for a 3rd-generation CMB experiment, consisting of multiple receivers spanning 35 GHz to 270 GHz with total detector count in the tens of thousands. We present plans for such an array, the new "BICEP Array" that will replace the Keck Array at the South Pole, including design optimization, frequency coverage, and deployment/observing strategies.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.04567  [pdf] - 1531043
Optical Characterization of the BICEP3 CMB Polarimeter at the South Pole
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures. Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation Conference 9914: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VIII, June 2016
Submitted: 2016-07-15
BICEP3 is a small-aperture refracting cosmic microwave background (CMB) telescope designed to make sensitive polarization maps in pursuit of a potential B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. It is the latest in the BICEP/Keck Array series of CMB experiments at the South Pole, which has provided the most stringent constraints on inflation to date. For the 2016 observing season, BICEP3 was outfitted with a full suite of 2400 optically coupled detectors operating at 95 GHz. In these proceedings we report on the far field beam performance using calibration data taken during the 2015-2016 summer deployment season in situ with a thermal chopped source. We generate high-fidelity per-detector beam maps, show the array-averaged beam profile, and characterize the differential beam response between co-located, orthogonally polarized detectors which contributes to the leading instrumental systematic in pair differencing experiments. We find that the levels of differential pointing, beamwidth, and ellipticity are similar to or lower than those measured for BICEP2 and Keck Array. The magnitude and distribution of BICEP3's differential beam mismatch - and the level to which temperature-to-polarization leakage may be marginalized over or subtracted in analysis - will inform the design of next-generation CMB experiments with many thousands of detectors.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.05976  [pdf] - 1439772
BICEP2 / Keck Array VII: Matrix based E/B Separation applied to BICEP2 and the Keck Array
Comments: 21 pages, 23 figures, minor updates to reflect accepted version
Submitted: 2016-03-18, last modified: 2016-07-01
A linear polarization field on the sphere can be uniquely decomposed into an E-mode and a B-mode component. These two components are analytically defined in terms of spin-2 spherical harmonics. Maps that contain filtered modes on a partial sky can also be decomposed into E-mode and B-mode components. However, the lack of full sky information prevents orthogonally separating these components using spherical harmonics. In this paper, we present a technique for decomposing an incomplete map into E and B-mode components using E and B eigenmodes of the pixel covariance in the observed map. This method is found to orthogonally define E and B in the presence of both partial sky coverage and spatial filtering. This method has been applied to the BICEP2 and the Keck Array maps and results in reducing E to B leakage from LCDM E-modes to a level corresponding to a tensor-to-scalar ratio of $r<1\times10^{-4}$.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.01968  [pdf] - 1530800
BICEP2 / Keck Array VIII: Measurement of gravitational lensing from large-scale B-mode polarization
Comments: 12 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2016-06-06, last modified: 2016-06-11
We present measurements of polarization lensing using the 150 GHz maps which include all data taken by the BICEP2 & Keck Array CMB polarization experiments up to and including the 2014 observing season (BK14). Despite their modest angular resolution ($\sim 0.5^\circ$), the excellent sensitivity ($\sim 3\mu$K-arcmin) of these maps makes it possible to directly reconstruct the lensing potential using only information at larger angular scales ($\ell\leq 700$). From the auto-spectrum of the reconstructed potential we measure an amplitude of the spectrum to be $A^{\phi\phi}_{\rm L}=1.15\pm 0.36$ (Planck $\Lambda$CDM prediction corresponds to $A^{\phi\phi}_{\rm L}=1$), and reject the no-lensing hypothesis at 5.8$\sigma$, which is the highest significance achieved to date using an EB lensing estimator. Taking the cross-spectrum of the reconstructed potential with the Planck 2015 lensing map yields $A^{\phi\phi}_{\rm L}=1.13\pm 0.20$. These direct measurements of $A^{\phi\phi}_{\rm L}$ are consistent with the $\Lambda$CDM cosmology, and with that derived from the previously reported BK14 B-mode auto-spectrum ($A^{\rm BB}_{\rm L}=1.20\pm 0.17$). We perform a series of null tests and consistency checks to show that these results are robust against systematics and are insensitive to analysis choices. These results unambiguously demonstrate that the B-modes previously reported by BICEP / Keck at intermediate angular scales ($150\lesssim\ell\lesssim 350$) are dominated by gravitational lensing. The good agreement between the lensing amplitudes obtained from the lensing reconstruction and B-mode spectrum starts to place constraints on any alternative cosmological sources of B-modes at these angular scales.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.09217  [pdf] - 1373111
BICEP2 / Keck Array VI: Improved Constraints On Cosmology and Foregrounds When Adding 95 GHz Data From Keck Array
Comments: 17 pages, 18 figures, minor updates to reflect accepted version, data and figures available for download at http://bicepkeck.org/
Submitted: 2015-10-30, last modified: 2016-03-14
We present results from an analysis of all data taken by the BICEP2 & Keck Array CMB polarization experiments up to and including the 2014 observing season. This includes the first Keck Array observations at 95 GHz. The maps reach a depth of 50 nK deg in Stokes $Q$ and $U$ in the 150 GHz band and 127 nK deg in the 95 GHz band. We take auto- and cross-spectra between these maps and publicly available maps from WMAP and Planck at frequencies from 23 GHz to 353 GHz. An excess over lensed-LCDM is detected at modest significance in the 95x150 $BB$ spectrum, and is consistent with the dust contribution expected from our previous work. No significant evidence for synchrotron emission is found in spectra such as 23x95, or for correlation between the dust and synchrotron sky patterns in spectra such as 23x353. We take the likelihood of all the spectra for a multi-component model including lensed-LCDM, dust, synchrotron and a possible contribution from inflationary gravitational waves (as parametrized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$), using priors on the frequency spectral behaviors of dust and synchrotron emission from previous analyses of WMAP and Planck data in other regions of the sky. This analysis yields an upper limit $r_{0.05}<0.09$ at 95% confidence, which is robust to variations explored in analysis and priors. Combining these $B$-mode results with the (more model-dependent) constraints from Planck analysis of CMB temperature plus BAO and other data, yields a combined limit $r_{0.05}<0.07$ at 95% confidence. These are the strongest constraints to date on inflationary gravitational waves.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.00125  [pdf] - 1335082
Initial Performance of BICEP3: A Degree Angular Scale 95 GHz Band Polarimeter
Comments: 7 pages, LTD-16 proceedings
Submitted: 2016-01-01
BICEP3 is a $550~mm$ aperture telescope with cold, on-axis, refractive optics designed to observe at the $95~GHz$ band from the South Pole. It is the newest member of the BICEP/Keck family of inflationary probes specifically designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree-angular scales. BICEP3 is designed to house 1280 dual-polarization pixels, which, when fully-populated, totals to $\sim$9$\times$ the number of pixels in a single Keck $95~GHz$ receiver, thus further advancing the BICEP/Keck program's $95~GHz$ mapping speed. BICEP3 was deployed during the austral summer of 2014-2015 with 9 detector tiles, to be increased to its full capacity of 20 in the second season. After instrument characterization measurements were taken, CMB observation commenced in April 2015. Together with multi-frequency observation data from Planck, BICEP2, and the Keck Array, BICEP3 is projected to set upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio to $r$ $\lesssim 0.03$ at $95\%$ C.L..
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.00608  [pdf] - 1337357
BICEP2 III: Instrumental Systematics
Comments: 26 pages, 16 figures, higher quality figures available at http://bicepkeck.org
Submitted: 2015-02-02, last modified: 2015-12-14
In a companion paper we have reported a $>5\sigma$ detection of degree scale $B $-mode polarization at 150 GHz by the BICEP2 experiment. Here we provide a detailed study of potential instrumental systematic contamination to that measurement. We focus extensively on spurious polarization that can potentially arise from beam imperfections. We present a heuristic classification of beam imperfections according to their symmetries and uniformities, and discuss how resulting contamination adds or cancels in maps that combine observations made at multiple orientations of the telescope about its boresight axis. We introduce a technique, which we call "deprojection", for filtering the leading order beam-induced contamination from time ordered data, and show that it removes power from BICEP2's $BB$ spectrum consistent with predictions using high signal-to-noise beam shape measurements. We detail the simulation pipeline that we use to directly simulate instrumental systematics and the calibration data used as input to that pipeline. Finally, we present the constraints on $BB$ contamination from individual sources of potential systematics. We find that systematics contribute $BB$ power that is a factor $\sim10\times$ below BICEP2's 3-year statistical uncertainty, and negligible compared to the observed $BB$ signal. The contribution to the best-fit tensor/scalar ratio is at a level equivalent to $r=(3-6)\times10^{-3}$.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.00643  [pdf] - 1287468
BICEP2 / Keck Array V: Measurements of B-mode Polarization at Degree Angular Scales and 150 GHz by the Keck Array
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2015-02-02, last modified: 2015-08-31
The Keck Array is a system of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeters, each similar to the BICEP2 experiment. In this paper we report results from the 2012 and 2013 observing seasons, during which the Keck Array consisted of five receivers all operating in the same (150 GHz) frequency band and observing field as BICEP2. We again find an excess of B-mode power over the lensed-$\Lambda$CDM expectation of $> 5 \sigma$ in the range $30 < \ell < 150$ and confirm that this is not due to systematics using jackknife tests and simulations based on detailed calibration measurements. In map difference and spectral difference tests these new data are shown to be consistent with BICEP2. Finally, we combine the maps from the two experiments to produce final Q and U maps which have a depth of 57 nK deg (3.4 $\mu$K arcmin) over an effective area of 400 deg$^2$ for an equivalent survey weight of 250,000 $\mu$K$^{-2}$. The final BB band powers have noise uncertainty a factor of 2.3 times better than the previous results, and a significance of detection of excess power of $> 6\sigma$.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.00596  [pdf] - 1296107
BICEP2/Keck Array IV: Optical Characterization and Performance of the BICEP2 and Keck Array Experiments
Comments: 21 pages, 27 figures
Submitted: 2015-02-02, last modified: 2015-07-21
BICEP2 and the Keck Array are polarization-sensitive microwave telescopes that observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the South Pole at degree angular scales in search of a signature of inflation imprinted as B-mode polarization in the CMB. BICEP2 was deployed in late 2009, observed for three years until the end of 2012 at 150 GHz with 512 antenna-coupled transition edge sensor bolometers, and has reported a detection of B-mode polarization on degree angular scales. The Keck Array was first deployed in late 2010 and will observe through 2016 with five receivers at several frequencies (95, 150, and 220 GHz). BICEP2 and the Keck Array share a common optical design and employ the field-proven BICEP1 strategy of using small-aperture, cold, on-axis refractive optics, providing excellent control of systematics while maintaining a large field of view. This design allows for full characterization of far-field optical performance using microwave sources on the ground. Here we describe the optical design of both instruments and report a full characterization of the optical performance and beams of BICEP2 and the Keck Array at 150 GHz.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.1422  [pdf] - 983904
Degree-Scale CMB Polarization Measurements from Three Years of BICEP1 Data
Comments: 19 pages, 13 figures. Data release for this publication: http://bicep.rc.fas.harvard.edu/bicep1_3yr/
Submitted: 2013-10-04, last modified: 2015-04-22
BICEP1 is a millimeter-wavelength telescope designed specifically to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at degree angular scales. We present results from an analysis of the data acquired during three seasons of observations at the South Pole (2006 to 2008). This work extends the two-year result published in Chiang et al. (2010), with additional data from the third season and relaxed detector-selection criteria. This analysis also introduces a more comprehensive estimation of band-power window functions, improved likelihood estimation methods and a new technique for deprojecting monopole temperature-to-polarization leakage which reduces this class of systematic uncertainty to a negligible level. We present maps of temperature, E- and B-mode polarization, and their associated angular power spectra. The improvement in the map noise level and polarization spectra error bars are consistent with the 52% increase in integration time relative to Chiang et al. (2010). We confirm both self-consistency of the polarization data and consistency with the two-year results. We measure the angular power spectra at 21 <= l <= 335 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) cosmology, with the first acoustic peak of the EE spectrum now detected at 15sigma. The BB spectrum remains consistent with zero. From B-modes only, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 0.03+0.27-0.23, or r < 0.70 at 95% confidence level.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.00612  [pdf] - 980227
A Joint Analysis of BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck Data
BICEP2/Keck; Collaborations, Planck; :; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barkats, D.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Benton, S. J.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Brevik, J. A.; Bucher, M.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Buza, V.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Connors, J.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Dvorkin, C.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Filippini, J. P.; Finelli, F.; Fliescher, S.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; Golwala, S. R.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hasselfield, M.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hilton, G. C.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hui, H.; Hurier, G.; Irwin, K. D.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Karkare, K. S.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Kefeli, S.; Keihänen, E.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kovac, J. M.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kuo, C. L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leitch, E. M.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Lueker, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Mason, P.; Matarrese, S.; Megerian, K. G.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Orlando, A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Pryke, C.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Richter, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schwarz, R.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Sheehy, C. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Teply, G. P.; Terenzi, L.; Thompson, K. L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tolan, J. E.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Turner, A. D.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Vieregg, A. G.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Weber, A. C.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Willmert, J.; Wong, C. L.; Yoon, K. W.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Version updated to match published. Data and figures available for download at http://bicepkeck.org and http://pla.esac.esa.int/pla
Submitted: 2015-02-02, last modified: 2015-04-14
We report the results of a joint analysis of data from BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck. BICEP2 and Keck Array have observed the same approximately 400 deg$^2$ patch of sky centered on RA 0h, Dec. $-57.5\deg$. The combined maps reach a depth of 57 nK deg in Stokes $Q$ and $U$ in a band centered at 150 GHz. Planck has observed the full sky in polarization at seven frequencies from 30 to 353 GHz, but much less deeply in any given region (1.2 $\mu$K deg in $Q$ and $U$ at 143 GHz). We detect 150$\times$353 cross-correlation in $B$-modes at high significance. We fit the single- and cross-frequency power spectra at frequencies $\geq 150$ GHz to a lensed-$\Lambda$CDM model that includes dust and a possible contribution from inflationary gravitational waves (as parameterized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$), using a prior on the frequency spectral behavior of polarized dust emission from previous \planck\ analysis of other regions of the sky. We find strong evidence for dust and no statistically significant evidence for tensor modes. We probe various model variations and extensions, including adding a synchrotron component in combination with lower frequency data, and find that these make little difference to the $r$ constraint. Finally we present an alternative analysis which is similar to a map-based cleaning of the dust contribution, and show that this gives similar constraints. The final result is expressed as a likelihood curve for $r$, and yields an upper limit $r_{0.05}<0.12$ at 95% confidence. Marginalizing over dust and $r$, lensing $B$-modes are detected at $7.0\,\sigma$ significance.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.00619  [pdf] - 1300145
Antenna-coupled TES bolometers used in BICEP2, Keck array, and SPIDER
Comments: 16 pgs, 20 figs
Submitted: 2015-02-02
We have developed antenna-coupled transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers for a wide range of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimetry experiments, including BICEP2, Keck Array, and the balloon borne SPIDER. These detectors have reached maturity and this paper reports on their design principles, overall performance, and key challenges associated with design and production. Our detector arrays repeatedly produce spectral bands with 20%-30% bandwidth at 95, 150, or 220~GHz. The integrated antenna arrays synthesize symmetric co-aligned beams with controlled side-lobe levels. Cross-polarized response on boresight is typically ~0.5%, consistent with cross-talk in our multiplexed readout system. End-to-end optical efficiencies in our cameras are routinely 35% or higher, with per detector sensitivities of NET~300 uKrts. Thanks to the scalability of this design, we have deployed 2560 detectors as 1280 matched pairs in Keck Array with a combined instantaneous sensitivity of ~9 uKrts, as measured directly from CMB maps in the 2013 season. Similar arrays have recently flown in the SPIDER instrument, and development of this technology is ongoing.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.4302  [pdf] - 862577
BICEP2 II: Experiment and Three-Year Data Set
Comments: 30 pages, 24 figures
Submitted: 2014-03-17, last modified: 2014-07-31
We report on the design and performance of the BICEP2 instrument and on its three-year data set. BICEP2 was designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on angular scales of 1 to 5 degrees ($\ell$=40-200), near the expected peak of the B-mode polarization signature of primordial gravitational waves from cosmic inflation. Measuring B-modes requires dramatic improvements in sensitivity combined with exquisite control of systematics. The BICEP2 telescope observed from the South Pole with a 26~cm aperture and cold, on-axis, refractive optics. BICEP2 also adopted a new detector design in which beam-defining slot antenna arrays couple to transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers, all fabricated on a common substrate. The antenna-coupled TES detectors supported scalable fabrication and multiplexed readout that allowed BICEP2 to achieve a high detector count of 500 bolometers at 150 GHz, giving unprecedented sensitivity to B-modes at degree angular scales. After optimization of detector and readout parameters, BICEP2 achieved an instrument noise-equivalent temperature of 15.8 $\mu$K sqrt(s). The full data set reached Stokes Q and U map depths of 87.2 nK in square-degree pixels (5.2 $\mu$K arcmin) over an effective area of 384 square degrees within a 1000 square degree field. These are the deepest CMB polarization maps at degree angular scales to date. The power spectrum analysis presented in a companion paper has resulted in a significant detection of B-mode polarization at degree scales.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.3985  [pdf] - 841049
BICEP2 I: Detection Of B-mode Polarization at Degree Angular Scales
Comments: 26 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2014-03-16, last modified: 2014-06-23
(abridged for arXiv) We report results from the BICEP2 experiment, a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeter specifically designed to search for the signal of inflationary gravitational waves in the B-mode power spectrum around $\ell\sim80$. The telescope comprised a 26 cm aperture all-cold refracting optical system equipped with a focal plane of 512 antenna coupled transition edge sensor 150 GHz bolometers each with temperature sensitivity of $\approx300\mu\mathrm{K}_\mathrm{CMB}\sqrt{s}$. BICEP2 observed from the South Pole for three seasons from 2010 to 2012. A low-foreground region of sky with an effective area of 380 square deg was observed to a depth of 87 nK deg in Stokes $Q$ and $U$. We find an excess of $B$-mode power over the base lensed-LCDM expectation in the range $30< \ell< 150$, inconsistent with the null hypothesis at a significance of $> 5\sigma$. Through jackknife tests and simulations we show that systematic contamination is much smaller than the observed excess. We also examine a number of available models of polarized dust emission and find that at their default parameter values they predict power $\sim(5-10)\times$ smaller than the observed excess signal. However, these models are not sufficiently constrained to exclude the possibility of dust emission bright enough to explain the entire excess signal. Cross correlating BICEP2 against 100 GHz maps from the BICEP1 experiment, the excess signal is confirmed and its spectral index is found to be consistent with that of the CMB, disfavoring dust at $1.7\sigma$. The observed $B$-mode power spectrum is well fit by a lensed-LCDM + tensor theoretical model with tensor-to-scalar ratio $r=0.20^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$, with $r=0$ disfavored at $7.0\sigma$. Accounting for the contribution of foreground dust will shift this value downward by an amount which will be better constrained with upcoming data sets.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.7877  [pdf] - 804500
Self-Calibration of BICEP1 Three-Year Data and Constraints on Astrophysical Polarization Rotation
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2013-12-30
Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarimeters aspire to measure the faint $B$-mode signature predicted to arise from inflationary gravitational waves. They also have the potential to constrain cosmic birefringence which would produce non-zero expectation values for the CMB's $TB$ and $EB$ spectra. However, instrumental systematic effects can also cause these $TB$ and $EB$ correlations to be non-zero. In particular, an overall miscalibration of the polarization orientation of the detectors produces $TB$ and $EB$ spectra which are degenerate with isotropic cosmological birefringence, while also introducing a small but predictable bias on the $BB$ spectrum. The \bicep three-year spectra, which use our standard calibration of detector polarization angles from a dielectric sheet, are consistent with a polarization rotation of $\alpha = -2.77^\circ \pm 0.86^\circ \text{(statistical)} \pm 1.3^\circ \text{(systematic)}$. We revise the estimate of systematic error on the polarization rotation angle from the two-year analysis by comparing multiple calibration methods. We investigate the polarization rotation for the \bicep 100 GHz and 150 GHz bands separately to investigate theoretical models that produce frequency-dependent cosmic birefringence. We find no evidence in the data supporting either these models or Faraday rotation of the CMB polarization by the Milky Way galaxy's magnetic field. If we assume that there is no cosmic birefringence, we can use the $TB$ and $EB$ spectra to calibrate detector polarization orientations, thus reducing bias of the cosmological $B$-mode spectrum from leaked $E$-modes due to possible polarization orientation miscalibration. After applying this "self-calibration" process, we find that the upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio decreases slightly, from $r<0.70$ to $r<0.65$ at $95\%$ confidence.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1212.0133  [pdf] - 1158200
Scientific verification of Faraday Rotation Modulators: Detection of diffuse polarized Galactic emission
Comments: 13 pages, 15 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2012-12-01, last modified: 2013-02-17
The design and performance of a wide bandwidth linear polarization modulator based on the Faraday effect is described. Faraday Rotation Modulators (FRMs) are solid-state polarization switches that are capable of modulation up to ~10 kHz. Six FRMs were utilized during the 2006 observing season in the Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP) experiment; three FRMs were used at each of BICEP's 100 and 150 GHz frequency bands. The technology was verified through high signal-to-noise detection of Galactic polarization using two of the six FRMs during four observing runs in 2006. The features exhibit strong agreement with BICEP's measurements of the Galaxy using non-FRM pixels and with the Galactic polarization models. This marks the first detection of high signal-to-noise mm-wave celestial polarization using fast, active optical modulation. The performance of the FRMs during periods when they were not modulated was also analyzed and compared to results from BICEP's 43 pixels without FRMs.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.1247  [pdf] - 1150545
Antenna-coupled TES bolometers for the Keck Array, Spider, and Polar-1
Comments: Presented at SPIE Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VI, July 6, 2012. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 8452
Submitted: 2012-08-06
Between the BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments, we have deployed over 1500 dual polarized antenna coupled bolometers to map the Cosmic Microwave Background's polarization. We have been able to rapidly deploy these detectors because they are completely planar with an integrated phased-array antenna. Through our experience in these experiments, we have learned of several challenges with this technology- specifically the beam synthesis in the antenna- and in this paper we report on how we have modified our designs to mitigate these challenges. In particular, we discus differential steering errors between the polarization pairs' beam centroids due to microstrip cross talk and gradients of penetration depth in the niobium thin films of our millimeter wave circuits. We also discuss how we have suppressed side lobe response with a Gaussian taper of our antenna illumination pattern. These improvements will be used in Spider, Polar-1, and this season's retrofit of Keck Array.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.0844  [pdf] - 1150511
Optical Characterization of the Keck Array Polarimeter at the South Pole
Comments: 13 pages, 11 figures, Proceedings of the SPIE, Vol 8452: Millimeter, Submillimeter and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VI, July 2012
Submitted: 2012-08-03
The Keck Array (SPUD) is a set of microwave polarimeters that observes from the South Pole at degree angular scales in search of a signature of Inflation imprinted as B-mode polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The first three Keck Array receivers were deployed during the 2010-2011 Austral summer, followed by two new receivers in the 2011-2012 summer season, completing the full five-receiver array. All five receivers are currently observing at 150 GHz. The Keck Array employs the field-proven BICEP/BICEP2 strategy of using small, cold, on-axis refractive optics, providing excellent control of systematics while maintaining a large field of view. This design allows for full characterization of far-field optical performance using microwave sources on the ground. We describe our efforts to characterize the main beam shape and beam shape mismatch between co-located orthogonally-polarized detector pairs, and discuss the implications of measured differential beam parameters on temperature to polarization leakage in CMB analysis.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.0857  [pdf] - 1150513
Optimization and sensitivity of the Keck Array
Comments: Presented at SPIE 2012 Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation Conference. Will be published in the proceedings
Submitted: 2012-08-03
The Keck Array (SPUD) began observing the cosmic microwave background's polarization in the winter of 2011 at the South Pole. The Keck Array follows the success of the predecessor experiments Bicep and Bicep2, using five on-axis refracting telescopes. These have a combined imaging array of 2500 antenna-coupled TES bolometers read with a SQUID-based time domain multiplexing system. We will discuss the detector noise and the optimization of the readout. The achieved sensitivity of the Keck Array is 11.5 {\mu}K_(CMB)*sqrt{s} in the 2012 configuration.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.0638  [pdf] - 1150486
BICEP2 and Keck Array operational overview and status of observations
Comments: Presented at SPIE Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VI, July 6, 2012. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 8452
Submitted: 2012-08-02
The BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments are designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on angular scales of 2-4 degrees (l=50-100). This is the region in which the B-mode signal, a signature prediction of cosmic inflation, is expected to peak. BICEP2 was deployed to the South Pole at the end of 2009 and is in the middle of its third year of observing with 500 polarization-sensitive detectors at 150 GHz. The Keck Array was deployed to the South Pole at the end of 2010, initially with three receivers--each similar to BICEP2. An additional two receivers have been added during the 2011-12 summer. We give an overview of the two experiments, report on substantial gains in the sensitivity of the two experiments after post-deployment optimization, and show preliminary maps of CMB polarization from BICEP2.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.5516  [pdf] - 350687
The Keck Array: a pulse tube cooled CMB polarimeter
Comments: 8 pages, 6 figures; SPIE proceedings for Millimeter, Submillimeter and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy V (Conference 7741, June 2010, San Diego, CA, USA)
Submitted: 2011-04-28
The Keck Array is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeter that will begin observing from the South Pole in late 2010. The initial deployment will consist of three telescopes similar to BICEP2 housed in ultra-compact, pulse tube cooled cryostats. Two more receivers will be added the following year. In these proceedings we report on the design and performance of the Keck cryostat. We also report some initial results on the performance of antenna-coupled TES detectors operating in the presence of a pulse tube. We find that the performance of the detectors is not seriously impacted by the replacement of BICEP2's liquid helium cryostat with a pulse tube cooled cryostat.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:0906.1181  [pdf] - 124537
Measurement of Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Power Spectra from Two Years of BICEP Data
Comments: Updated to reflect published version
Submitted: 2009-06-05, last modified: 2010-02-23
Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP) is a bolometric polarimeter designed to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree angular scales. During three seasons of observing at the South Pole (2006 through 2008), BICEP mapped ~2% of the sky chosen to be uniquely clean of polarized foreground emission. Here we present initial results derived from a subset of the data acquired during the first two years. We present maps of temperature, Stokes Q and U, E and B modes, and associated angular power spectra. We demonstrate that the polarization data are self-consistent by performing a series of jackknife tests. We study potential systematic errors in detail and show that they are sub-dominant to the statistical errors. We measure the E-mode angular power spectrum with high precision at 21 < ell < 335, detecting for the first time the peak expected at ell ~ 140. The measured E-mode spectrum is consistent with expectations from a LCDM model, and the B-mode spectrum is consistent with zero. The tensor-to-scalar ratio derived from the B-mode spectrum is r = 0.03+0.31-0.26, or r < 0.72 at 95% confidence, the first meaningful constraint on the inflationary gravitational wave background to come directly from CMB B-mode polarization.