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Tissera, P.

Normalized to: Tissera, P.

121 article(s) in total. 641 co-authors, from 1 to 34 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 2,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.11549  [pdf] - 2070560
Age-chemical abundance structure of the Galaxy I: Evidence for a late accretion event in the outer disc at z ~ 0.6
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-03-25
We investigate the age-chemical abundance structure of the outer Galactic disc at a galactocentric distance of r > 10 kpc as recently revealed by the SDSS/APOGEE survey. Two sequences are present in the [alpha/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane with systematically different stellar ages. Surprisingly, the young sequence is less metal-rich, suggesting a recent dilution process by additional gas accretion. As the stars with the lowest iron abundance in the younger sequence also show an enhancement in alpha-element abundance, the gas accretion event must have involved a burst of star formation. In order to explain these observations, we construct a chemical evolution model. In this model we include a relatively short episode of gas accretion at late times on top of an underlying secular accretion over long timescales. Our model is successful at reproducing the observed distribution of stars in the three dimensional space of [alpha/Fe]-[Fe/H]-Age in the outer disc. We find that a late-time accretion with a delay of 8.2 Gyr and a timescale of 0.7 Gyr best fits the observed data, in particular the presence of the young, metal-poor sequence. Our best-fit model further implies that the amount of accreted gas in the late-time accretion event needs to be about three times the local gas reservoir in the outer disc at the time of accretion in order to sufficiently dilute the metal abundance. Given this large fraction, we interpret the late-time accretion event as a minor merger presumably with a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with a mass M_* < 10^9 M_Sun and a gas fraction of ~ 75 per cent.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.06826  [pdf] - 2001455
Chemo-dynamics of barred galaxies in the Auriga simulations: The in-situ formation of the Milky Way bulge
Comments: Corrected references in v2. Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-11-15, last modified: 2019-11-20
We explore a sample of barred galaxies in the Auriga magneto-hydrodynamical cosmological zoom-in simulations that form boxy/peanut (b/p) bulges. The morphology of bars and b/p's vary for different mono-abundance populations, according to their kinematic properties, which are in turn set by the galaxy's assembly history. We find that the Auriga galaxies which best reproduce the chemo-kinematic properties of the Milky Way bulge have a negligible fraction of ex-situ stars in the b/p region ($<1\%$), with flattened, thick disc-like metal-poor stellar populations, and with their last major merger occurring at $t_{\rm lookback}>12\,\rm Gyrs$. This imposes an upper limit on the stellar mass ratio of subsequent mergers, which we find is broadly consistent with the recently proposed Gaia Sausage/Enceladus merger. The average fraction of ex-situ stars in the central regions of Auriga galaxies that form b/p's is $3\%$ -- significantly lower than in those which do not form bars or b/p's. While these central regions contain the oldest populations, they also have stars younger than 5Gyrs ($>30\%$) and exhibit X-shaped age and abundance distributions. Examining the inner discs of galaxies in our sample, we find that in some cases a metal-rich, star-forming inner ring forms, which surrounds the bar. Further out, bar-induced resonances form ridges in the $V_{\phi}-r$ plane -- the longest of which is due to the Outer Lindblad Resonance -- which are younger and more metal-rich than the surrounding phase-space. Our results suggest an in-situ origin for the Milky Way bulge and highlight the significant effect the bar can have on the surrounding disc.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.04881  [pdf] - 2025457
Evidence for the Third Stellar Population in the Milky Way's Disk
Comments: 25 pages, 10 figures, Accepted for Publication on the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2019-04-09, last modified: 2019-10-29
The Milky Way is a unique laboratory, where stellar properties can be measured and analyzed in detail. In particular, stars in the older populations encode information on the mechanisms that led to the formation of our Galaxy. In this article, we analyze the kinematics, spatial distribution, and chemistry of a large number of stars in the Solar Neighborhood, where all of the main Galactic components are well-represented. We find that the thick disk comprises two distinct and overlapping stellar populations, with different kinematic properties and chemical compositions. The metal-weak thick disk (MWTD) contains two times less metal content than the canonical thick disk, and exhibits enrichment of light elements typical of the oldest stellar populations of the Galaxy. The rotational velocity of the MWTD around the Galactic center is ~ 150 km s^(-1), corresponding to a rotational lag of 30 km s^(-1) relative to the canonical thick disk (~ 180 km s^(-1)), with a velocity dispersion of 60 km s^(-1). This stellar population likely originated from the merger of a dwarf galaxy during the early phases of our Galaxy's assembly, or it is a precursor disk, formed in the inner Galaxy and brought into the Solar Neighborhood by bar instability or spiral-arm formation mechanisms.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.10936  [pdf] - 2025746
Non-parametric Morphologies of Galaxies in the EAGLE Simulation
Comments: 21 pages, 12 Figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-08-28, last modified: 2019-10-23
We study the optical morphology of galaxies in a large-scale hydrodynamic cosmological simulation, the EAGLE simulation. Galaxy morphologies were characterized using non-parametric statistics (Gini, $M_{20}$, Concentration and Asymmetry) derived from mock images computed using a 3D radiative transfer technique and post-processed to approximate observational surveys. The resulting morphologies were contrasted to observational results from a sample of $\log_{10}(M_{*}/M_\odot) > 10$ galaxies at $z \sim 0.05$ in the GAMA survey. We find that the morphologies of EAGLE galaxies reproduce observations, except for asymmetry values which are larger in the simulated galaxies. Additionally, we study the effect of spatial resolution in the computation of non-parametric morphologies, finding that Gini and Asymmetry values are systematically reduced with decreasing spatial resolution. Gini values for lower mass galaxies are especially affected. Comparing against other large scale simulations, the non-parametric statistics of EAGLE galaxies largely agree with those found in IllustrisTNG. Additionally, EAGLE galaxies mostly reproduce observed trends between morphology and star formation rate and galaxy size. Finally, We also find a significant correlation between optical and kinematic estimators of morphologies, although galaxy classification based on an optical or a kinematic criteria results in different galaxy subsets. The correlation between optical and kinematic morphologies is stronger in central galaxies than in satellites, indicating differences in morphological evolution.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.12910  [pdf] - 1985332
Constraints on the Galactic Inner Halo Assembly History from the Age Gradient of Blue Horizontal-branch Stars
Comments: 13 figures
Submitted: 2019-09-27
We present an analysis of the relative age distribution of the Milky Way halo, based on samples of blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars obtained from the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and \textit{Galaxy Evolution Explorer} photometry, as well a Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic sample. A machine-learning approach to the selection of BHB stars is developed, using support vector classification, with which we produce chronographic age maps of the Milky Way halo out to 40\,kpc from the Galactic center. We identify a characteristic break in the relative age profiles of our BHB samples, corresponding to a Galactocentric radius of $R_{\rm{GC}} \sim 14$\,kpc. Within the break radius, we find an age gradient of $-63.4 \pm 8.2$ Myr kpc$^{-1}$, which is significantly steeper than obtained by previous studies that did not discern between the inner- and outer-halo regions. The gradient in the relative age profile and the break radius signatures persist after correcting for the influence of metallicity on our spectroscopic calibration sample. We conclude that neither are due to the previously recognized metallicity gradient in the halo, as one passes from the inner-halo to the outer-halo region. Our results are consistent with a dissipational formation of the inner-halo population, involving a few relatively massive progenitor satellites, such as those proposed to account for the assembly of \textit{Gaia}-Enceladus, which then merged with the inner halo of the Milky Way.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.07080  [pdf] - 1966964
A Gaia-Enceladus Analog in the EAGLE Simulation: Insights into the Early Evolution of the Milky Way
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures. Accepted for publication en ApJL
Submitted: 2019-08-19, last modified: 2019-09-09
We identify a simulated Milky Way analog in the EAGLE suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. This galaxy not only shares similar global properties as the Milky Way, but was specifically selected because its merger history resembles that currently known for the Milky Way. In particular we find that this Milky Way analog has experienced its last significant merger (with a stellar mass ratio $\sim 0.2$) at $z\sim 1.2$. We show that this merger affected both the dynamical properties of the stars present at the time, contributing to the formation of a thick disk, and also leading to a significant increase in the star formation rate of the host. This object is thus particularly suitable for understanding the early evolutionary history of the Milky Way. It is also an ideal candidate for re-simulation with much higher resolution as this would allow addressing a plethora of interesting questions such as, for example, the specific distribution of dark matter near the Sun.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.00416  [pdf] - 1949412
The mass-size plane of EAGLE galaxies
Comments: 10 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-08-01
Current observational results show that both late-and-early-type galaxies follow tight mass-size planes, on which physical properties such as age, velocity dispersion and metallicities correlate with the scatter on the plane. We study the mass-size plane of galaxies in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, as a function of velocity dispersion, age, chemical abundances, ellipticity and spin parameters with the aim at assessing to what extent the current cosmological paradigm can reproduce these observations and provide a physical interpretation of them. We select a sample of well-resolved galaxies from the (100 Mpc)^3 simulation of the EAGLE Project. This sample is composed by 508 spheroid-dominated galaxies and 1213 disc-dominated galaxies. The distributions of velocity dispersion, age, metallicity indicators and gradients and spin parameters across the mass-size plane are analysed. Furthermore, we study the relation between shape and kinematic parameters. The results are compared with observations. The mass-weighted ages of the EAGLE galaxies are found to vary along lines of constant velocity dispersion on the mass-size plane, except for galaxies with velocity dispersion larger than aprox 150 km s^(-1) . Negative age gradients tend to be found in extended disc galaxies in agreement with observations. However, the age distributions of early-type galaxies show a larger fraction with inverted radial profiles. The distribution of metallicity gradients does not show any clear dependence on this plane. Galaxies with similar spin parameters ({\lambda}) display larger sizes as their dynamical masses increase. Stellar-weighted ages are found to be good proxies for {\lambda} in galaxies with low ellipticity ({\epsilon}). Abridged
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.11062  [pdf] - 1953366
The assembly of spheroid-dominated galaxies in the EAGLE simulation
Comments: 16 pages, 28 figures, revised version, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2018-11-27, last modified: 2019-08-01
Despite the insights gained in the last few years, our knowledge about the formation and evolution scenario for the spheroid-dominated galaxies is still incomplete. New and more powerful cosmological simulations have been developed that together with more precise observations open the possibility of more detailed study of the formation of early-type galaxies (ETGs). The aim of this work is to analyse the assembly histories of ETGs in a $\Lambda$-CDM cosmology, focussing on the archeological approach given by the mass-growth histories.We inspected a sample of dispersion-dominated galaxies selected from the largest volume simulation of the EAGLE project. This simulation includes a variety of physical processes such as radiative cooling, star formation (SF), metal enrichment, and stellar and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. The selected sample comprised 508 spheroid-dominated galaxies classified according to their dynamical properties. Their surface brightness profile, the fundamental relations, kinematic properties, and stellar-mass growth histories are estimated and analysed. The findings are confronted with recent observations.The simulated ETGs are found to globally reproduce the fundamental relations of ellipticals. All of them have an inner disc component where residual younger stellar populations (SPs) are detected. A fraction of this inner-disc correlates with bulge-to-total ratio. We find a relation between kinematics and shape that implies that dispersion-dominated galaxies with low $V/\sigma_L$ (where $V$ is the average rotational velocity and $\sigma_L$ the one dimensional velocity dispersion) tend to have ellipticity smaller than $\sim 0.5$ and are dominated by old stars. Abridged
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.04491  [pdf] - 1953640
SDSS-IV MaNGA: Spatial Evolution of Star Formation Triggered by Galaxy Interactions
Comments: 18 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-07-09
Galaxy interaction is considered a key driver of galaxy evolution and star formation (SF) history. In this paper, we present an empirical picture of the radial extent of interaction-triggered SF along the merger sequence. The samples under study are drawn from the integral field spectroscopy (IFS) survey SDSS-IV MaNGA, including 205 star-forming galaxies in pairs/mergers and ~1350 control galaxies. For each galaxy in pairs, the merger stage is identified according to its morphological signatures: incoming phase, at first pericenter passage, at apocenter, in merging phase, and in final coalescence. The effect of interactions is quantified by the global and spatially resolved SF rate relative to the SF rate of a control sample selected for each individual galaxy ($\Delta$logSFR and $\Delta$logsSFR(r), respectively). Analysis of the radial $\Delta$logsSFR(r) distributions shows that galaxy interactions have no significant impact on the $\Delta$logsSFR(r) during the incoming phase. Right after the first pericenter passage, the radial $\Delta$logsSFR(r) profile decreases steeply from enhanced to suppressed activity for increasing galactocentric radius. Later on, SF is enhanced on a broad spatial scale out to the maximum radius we explore (~6.7 kpc) and the enhancement is in general centrally peaked. The extended SF enhancement is also observed for systems at their apocenters and in the coalescence phase, suggesting that interaction-triggered SF is not restricted to the central region of a galaxy. Further explorations of a wide range in parameter space of merger configurations (e.g., mass ratio) are required to constrain the whole picture of interaction-triggered SF.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.02082  [pdf] - 1966836
The prevalence of pseudo-bulges in the Auriga simulations
Comments: 21 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-03
We study the galactic bulges in the Auriga simulations, a suite of thirty cosmological magneto-hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations of late-type galaxies in Milky Way-sized dark matter haloes performed with the moving-mesh code AREPO. We aim to characterize bulge formation mechanisms in this large suite of galaxies simulated at high resolution in a fully cosmological context. The bulges of the Auriga galaxies show a large variety in their shapes,sizes and formation histories. According to observational classification criteria, such as Sersic index and degree of ordered rotation, the majority of the Auriga bulges can be classified as pseudo-bulges, while some of them can be seen as composite bulges with a classical component; however, none can be classified as a classical bulge. Auriga bulges show mostly an in-situ origin, 21 percent of them with a negligible accreted fraction (facc < 0.01). In general,their in-situ component was centrally formed, with 75 percent of the bulges forming most of their stars inside the bulge region at z=0. Part of their in-situ mass growth is rapid and is associated with the effects of mergers, while another part is more secular in origin. In 90 percent of the Auriga bulges, the accreted bulge component originates from less than four satellites.We investigate the relation between the accreted stellar haloes and the bulges of the Auriga simulations. The total bulge mass shows no correlation with the accreted stellar halo mass, as in observations. However, the accreted mass of bulges tends to correlate with their respective accreted stellar halo mass.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.07798  [pdf] - 1842310
The Auriga Stellar Haloes: Connecting stellar population properties with accretion and merging history
Comments: Accepted to MNRAS. 30 pages, 19 figures
Submitted: 2018-04-20, last modified: 2019-02-21
We examine the stellar haloes of the Auriga simulations, a suite of thirty cosmological magneto-hydrodynamical high-resolution simulations of Milky Way-mass galaxies performed with the moving-mesh code AREPO. We study halo global properties and radial profiles out to $\sim 150$ kpc for each individual galaxy. The Auriga haloes are diverse in their masses and density profiles; mean metallicity and metallicity gradients; ages; and shapes, reflecting the stochasticity inherent in their accretion and merger histories. A comparison with observations of nearby late-type galaxies shows very good agreement between most observed and simulated halo properties. However, Auriga haloes are typically too massive. We find a connection between population gradients and mass assembly history: galaxies with few significant progenitors have more massive haloes, possess large negative halo metallicity gradients and steeper density profiles. The number of accreted galaxies, either disrupted or under disruption, that contribute 90% of the accreted halo mass ranges from 1 to 14, with a median of 6.5, and their stellar masses span over three orders of magnitude. The observed halo mass--metallicity relation is well reproduced by Auriga and is set by the stellar mass and metallicity of the dominant satellite contributors. This relationship is found not only for the accreted component but also for the total (accreted + in-situ) stellar halo. Our results highlight the potential of observable halo properties to infer the assembly history of galaxies.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.02368  [pdf] - 1834043
The assembly history of the Galactic inner halo inferred from alpha-patterns
Comments: 13 pages, 8 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-09-07, last modified: 2019-02-12
We explore the origin of the observed decline in [O/Fe] (and [Mg/Fe]) with Galactocentric distance for high-metallicity stars ([Fe/H] > -1.1), based on a sample of halo stars selected within the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) fourteenth data release (DR14). We also analyse the characteristics of the [$\alpha$/Fe] distributions in the inner-halo regions inferred from two zoom-in Milky Way mass-sized galaxies that are taken as case studies. One of them qualitatively reproduces the observed trend to have higher fraction of $\alpha$-rich star for decreasing galactocentric distance; the other exhibits the opposite trend. We find that stars with [Fe/H] > -1.1 located in the range [15 - 30] kpc are consistent with formation in two starbursts, with maxima separated by about ~ 1 Gyr. We explore the contributions of stellar populations with different origin to the [$\alpha$/Fe] gradients detected in stars with [Fe/H] > -1.1. Our analysis reveals that the simulated halo that best matches the observed chemical trends is characterised by an accretion history involving low to intermediate-mass satellite galaxies with a short and intense burst of star formation, and contributions from a more massive satellite with dynamical masses about ~ 10$^{10}$M$_{\odot}$, distributing low-[$\alpha$/Fe] stars at intermediate radius.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.03772  [pdf] - 1811004
The metallicity and star formation activity of long gamma-ray burst hosts for z$<$3: insights from the Illustris simulation
Comments: 13 pages, 11 figures. Published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-06-12, last modified: 2019-01-08
We study the properties of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) using a large scale hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, the Illustris simulation. We determine the LGRB host populations under different thresholds for the LGRB progenitor metallicities, according to the collapsar model. We compare the simulated sample of LGRBs hosts with recent, largely unbiased, host samples: BAT6 and SHOALS. We find that at $z<1$ simulated hosts follow the mass-metallicity relation and the fundamental metallicity relation simultaneously, but with a paucity of high-metallicity hosts, in accordance with observations. We also find a clear increment in the mean stellar mass of LGRB hosts and their SFR with redshift up to $z<3$ on account of the metallicity dependence of progenitors. We explore the possible origin of LGRBs in metal rich galaxies, and find that the intrinsic metallicity dispersion in galaxies could explain their presence. LGRB hosts present a tighter correlation between galaxy metallicity and internal metallicity dispersion compared to normal star forming galaxies. We find that the Illustris simulations favours the existence of a metallicity threshold for LGRB progenitors in the range 0.3 - 0.6 Z$_\odot$
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.02269  [pdf] - 1834215
Dark Matter Response to Galaxy Assembly History
Comments: 17 pages, 14 figures. Accepted for publication in A&A. Comments are welcome
Submitted: 2019-01-08
Aims: It is well known that the presence of baryons affects the dark matter host haloes. Exploring the galaxy assembly history together with the dark matter haloes properties through time can provide a way to measure these effects. Methods: We study the properties of four Milky Way mass dark matter haloes from the Aquarius project during their assembly history, between $z = 0 - 4$. In this work, we use the SPH run from Scannapieco et al. (2009) and the dark matter only counterpart as case studies. To asses the robustness of our findings, we compare them with one of the haloes run using a moving-mesh technique and different sub-grid scheme. Results: Our results show that the cosmic evolution of the dark matter halo profiles depends on the assembly history of the baryons. We find that the dark matter profiles do not significantly change with time, hence they become stable, when the fraction of baryons accumulated in the central regions reaches 80 percent of its present mass within the virial radius. Furthermore, the mass accretion history shows that the haloes that assembled earlier are those that contain a larger amount of baryonic mass aforetime, which in turn allows the dark matter halo profiles to reach a stable configuration earlier. For the SPH haloes, we find that the specific angular momentum of the dark matter particles within the five percent of the virial radius at z = 0, remains approximately constant from the time at which 60 percent of the stellar mass is gathered. We explore different theoretical and empirical models for the contraction of the haloes through redshift. A model to better describe the contraction of the haloes through redshift evolution must depend on the stellar mass content in the inner regions.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.02759  [pdf] - 1830544
The Fifteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys: First Release of MaNGA Derived Quantities, Data Visualization Tools and Stellar Library
Aguado, D. S.; Ahumada, Romina; Almeida, Andres; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Ortiz, Erik Aquino; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Aubert, Marie; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Rembold, Sandro Barboza; Barger, Kat; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bates, Dominic; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael L.; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bernardi, Mariangela; Bershady, Matthew; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Mederic; Borissova, Jura; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William Nielsen; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam; Byler, Nell; Diaz, Mariana Cano; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Sodi, Bernardo Cervantes; Chen, Yanping; Cherinka, Brian; Choi, Peter Doohyun; Chung, Haeun; Coffey, Damien; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; Covey, Kevin; Ilha, Gabriele da Silva; da Costa, Luiz; Dai, Yu Sophia; Damke, Guillermo; Darling, Jeremy; Davies, Roger; Dawson, Kyle; Agathe, Victoria de Sainte; Machado, Alice Deconto; Del Moro, Agnese; De Lee, Nathan; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Sanchez, Helena Dominguez; Donor, John; Drory, Niv; Bourboux, Helion du Mas des; Duckworth, Chris; Dwelly, Tom; Ebelke, Garrett; Emsellem, Eric; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fernandez-Trincado, Jose G.; Feuillet, Diane; Fischer, Johanna-Laina; Fleming, Scott W.; Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fu, Hai; Galbany, Lluis; Garcia-Dias, Rafael; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Oehmichen, Luis Alberto Garma; Maia, Marcio Antonio Geimba; Gil-Marin, Hector; Grabowski, Kathleen; Gu, Meng; Guo, Hong; Ha, Jaewon; Harrington, Emily; Hasselquist, Sten; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Toledo, Hector Hernandez; Hicks, Harry; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Hunt, Jason A. S.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Hector J.; Angel, Camilo Eduardo Jimenez; Johnson, Jennifer; Jones, Amy; Jonsson, Henrik; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kollmeier, Juna; Krawczyk, Coleman; Kreckel, Kathryn; Kruk, Sandor; Lacerna, Ivan; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lane, Richard R.; Law, David R.; Lee, Young-Bae; Li, Cheng; Lian, Jianhui; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Yen-Ting; Lintott, Chris; Long, Dan; Longa-Pena, Penelope; Mackereth, J. Ted; de la Macorra, Axel; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Olena; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Mariappan, Vivek; Marinelli, Mariarosa; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masseron, Thomas; Masters, Karen L.; McDermid, Richard M.; Pena, Nicolas Medina; Meneses-Goytia, Sofia; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Minniti, Dante; Minsley, Rebecca; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nascimento, Janaina Correa do; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nitschelm, Christian; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Minakata, Rene A. Ortega; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palicio, Pedro A.; Pan, Kaike; Pan, Hsi-An; Parikh, Taniya; Parker, James; Peirani, Sebastien; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Peterken, Thomas; Pinsonneault, Marc; Prakash, Abhishek; Raddick, Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogerio; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Rose, Benjamin; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Rowlands, Kate; Rubin, Kate H. R.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Sanchez-Gallego, Jose R.; Sayres, Conor; Schaefer, Adam; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Schlafly, Edward; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald; Schultheis, Mathias; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shamsi, Shoaib J.; Shao, Zhengyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shetty, Shravan; Simonian, Gregory; Smethurst, Rebecca; Sobeck, Jennifer; Souter, Barbara J.; Spindler, Ashley; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suarez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Talbot, Michael S.; Tayar, Jamie; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Unda-Sanzana, Eduardo; Valenzuela, Octavio; na, Mariana Vargas-Maga; Mata, Jose Antonio Vazquez; Wake, David; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Wild, Vivienne; Wilson, John; Woods, Emily; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun; Zinn, Joel C.; Zou, Hu
Comments: Paper to accompany DR15. 25 pages, 6 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJSS. The two papers on the MaNGA Data Analysis Pipeline (DAP, Westfall et al. and Belfiore et al., see Section 4.1.2), and the paper on Marvin (Cherinka et al., see Section 4.2) have been submitted for collaboration review and will be posted to arXiv in due course. v2 fixes some broken URLs in the PDF
Submitted: 2018-12-06, last modified: 2018-12-10
Twenty years have passed since first light for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Here, we release data taken by the fourth phase of SDSS (SDSS-IV) across its first three years of operation (July 2014-July 2017). This is the third data release for SDSS-IV, and the fifteenth from SDSS (Data Release Fifteen; DR15). New data come from MaNGA - we release 4824 datacubes, as well as the first stellar spectra in the MaNGA Stellar Library (MaStar), the first set of survey-supported analysis products (e.g. stellar and gas kinematics, emission line, and other maps) from the MaNGA Data Analysis Pipeline (DAP), and a new data visualisation and access tool we call "Marvin". The next data release, DR16, will include new data from both APOGEE-2 and eBOSS; those surveys release no new data here, but we document updates and corrections to their data processing pipelines. The release is cumulative; it also includes the most recent reductions and calibrations of all data taken by SDSS since first light. In this paper we describe the location and format of the data and tools and cite technical references describing how it was obtained and processed. The SDSS website (www.sdss.org) has also been updated, providing links to data downloads, tutorials and examples of data use. While SDSS-IV will continue to collect astronomical data until 2020, and will be followed by SDSS-V (2020-2025), we end this paper by describing plans to ensure the sustainability of the SDSS data archive for many years beyond the collection of data.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.01479  [pdf] - 1795701
The abundances and properties of Dual AGN and their host galaxies in the EAGLE simulations
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, accepted to MNRAS. It includes a new section of discussion with a new figure
Submitted: 2018-05-03, last modified: 2018-11-27
We look into the abundance of Dual AGN in the largest hydrodynamical simulation from the EAGLE project. We define a Dual AGN as two active black holes (BHs) with a separation below 30 kpc. We find that only 1 per cent of AGN with $\LhX\geq 10^{42}\ergs$ are part of a Dual AGN system at $z=0.8-1$. During the evolution of a typical binary BH system, the rapid variability of the hard X-ray luminosity on Myr time-scales severely limits the detectability of Dual AGN. To quantify this effect, we calculate a probability of detection, $t_{\rm on}/t_{\rm 30}$, where $t_{\rm 30}$ is the time in which the two black holes are separated at distances below 30 kpc and $t_{\rm on}$, the time that both AGN are visible (e.g. when both AGN have $\LhX\geq 10^{42}\ergs$) in this period. We find that the average fraction of visible Dual systems is 3 per cent. The visible Dual AGN distribution as a function of BH separation presents a pronounced peak at $\sim 20$ kpc that can be understood as a result of the rapid orbital decay of the host galaxies after their first encounter. We also find that $75$ per cent of the host galaxies have recently undergone or are undergoing a merger with stellar mass ratio $\geq 0.1$. Finally, we find that the fraction of visible Dual AGN increases with redshift as found in observations.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.00968  [pdf] - 1779596
The origin of accreted stellar halo populations in the Milky Way using APOGEE, $\textit{Gaia}$, and the EAGLE simulations
Comments: 19 Pages, 11 Figures (+4 in abstracts), Accepted for publication in MNRAS. ** Important new additions include an appendix showing numerical convergence tests, and a new figure and accompanying text demonstrating the consistency in element abundances between accreted satellites in EAGLE and the high eccentricity stars from APOGEE **
Submitted: 2018-08-02, last modified: 2018-10-30
Recent work indicates that the nearby Galactic halo is dominated by the debris from a major accretion event. We confirm that result from an analysis of APOGEE-DR14 element abundances and $\textit{Gaia}$-DR2 kinematics of halo stars. We show that $\sim$2/3 of nearby halo stars have high orbital eccentricities ($e \gtrsim 0.8$), and abundance patterns typical of massive Milky Way dwarf galaxy satellites today, characterised by relatively low [Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], [Al/Fe], and [Ni/Fe]. The trend followed by high $e$ stars in the [Mg/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane shows a change of slope at [Fe/H]$\sim-1.3$, which is also typical of stellar populations from relatively massive dwarf galaxies. Low $e$ stars exhibit no such change of slope within the observed [Fe/H] range and show slightly higher abundances of Mg, Al and Ni. Unlike their low $e$ counterparts, high $e$ stars show slightly retrograde motion, make higher vertical excursions and reach larger apocentre radii. By comparing the position in [Mg/Fe]-[Fe/H] space of high $e$ stars with those of accreted galaxies from the EAGLE suite of cosmological simulations we constrain the mass of the accreted satellite to be in the range $10^{8.5}\lesssim M_*\lesssim 10^{9}\mathrm{M_\odot}$. We show that the median orbital eccentricities of debris are largely unchanged since merger time, implying that this accretion event likely happened at $z\lesssim1.5$. The exact nature of the low $e$ population is unclear, but we hypothesise that it is a combination of $\textit{in situ}$ star formation, high $|z|$ disc stars, lower mass accretion events, and contamination by the low $e$ tail of the high $e$ population. Finally, our results imply that the accretion history of the Milky Way was quite unusual.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.04575  [pdf] - 1775569
The oxygen abundance gradients in the gas discs of galaxies in the EAGLE simulation
Comments: 15 pages, 14 figures. Submitted to MNRAS. Comments are welcomed
Submitted: 2018-06-12
We use the EAGLE simulations to study the oxygen abundance gradients of gas discs in galaxies within the stellar mass range [10^9.5, 10^10.8]Mo at z=0. The estimated median oxygen gradient is -0.011 (0.002) dex kpc^-1, which is shallower than observed. No clear trend between simulated disc oxygen gradient and galaxy stellar mass is found when all galaxies are considered. However, the oxygen gradient shows a clear correlation with gas disc size so that shallower abundance slopes are found for increasing gas disc sizes. Positive oxygen gradients are detected for ~40 per cent of the analysed gas discs, with a slight higher frequency in low mass galaxies. Galaxies that have quiet merger histories show a positive correlation between oxygen gradient and stellar mass, so that more massive galaxies tend to have shallower metallicity gradients. At high stellar mass, there is a larger fraction of rotational-dominated galaxies in low density regions. At low stellar mass, non-merger galaxies show a large variety of oxygen gradients and morphologies. The normalization of the disc oxygen gradients in non-merger galaxies by the effective radius removes the trend with stellar mass. Conversely, galaxies that experienced mergers show a weak relation between oxygen gradient and stellar mass. Additionally, the analysed EAGLE discs show no clear dependence of the oxygen gradients on local environment, in agreement with current observational findings.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.00034  [pdf] - 1709366
Field spheroid-dominated galaxies in a {\Lambda}-CDM Universe
Comments: 22 pages, 15 figures, accepted for publication in A&A, revised version, minor changes
Submitted: 2018-02-28, last modified: 2018-06-07
Understanding the formation and evolution of early-type, spheroid-dominated galaxies is an open question within the context of the hierarchical clustering scenario, particularly, in low-density environments. Our goal is to study the main structural, dynamical, and stellar population properties and assembly histories of field spheroid-dominated galaxies formed in a LCDM scenario to assess to what extend they are consistent with observations. We selected spheroid-dominated systems from a LCDM simulation that includes star formation, chemical evolution and Supernova feedback. A sample of 18 field systems with Mstar <= 6x10^10 Msun that are dominated by the spheroid component. For this sample we estimate the fundamental relations of ellipticals and then compared with current observations. The simulated spheroid galaxies have sizes in good agreement with observations. The bulges follow a Sersic law with Sersic indexes that correlate with the bulge-to-total mass ratios. The structural-dynamical properties of the simulated galaxies are consistent with observed Faber-Jackson, Fundamental Plane, and Tully-Fisher relations. However, the simulated galaxies are bluer and with higher star formation rates than observed isolated early-type galaxies. The archaeological mass growth histories show a slightly delayed formation and more prominent inside-out growth mode than observational inferences based on the fossil record method. The main structural and dynamical properties of the simulated spheroid-dominated galaxies are consistent with observations. This is remarkable since none of them has been tuned to be reproduced. However, the simulated galaxies are blue and star-forming, and with later stellar mass growth histories as compared to observational inferences. This is mainly due to the persistence of extended discs in the simulations. Abridged
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.05154  [pdf] - 1694055
The Origin of the Milky Way's Halo Age Distribution
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ Letter
Submitted: 2018-03-14, last modified: 2018-05-07
We present an analysis of the radial age gradients for the stellar halos of five Milky Way mass-sized systems simulated as part of the Aquarius Project. The halos show a diversity of age trends, reflecting their different assembly histories. Four of the simulated halos possess clear negative age gradients, ranging from approximately -7 to -19 Myr/kpc , shallower than those determined by recent observational studies of the Milky Way's stellar halo. However, when restricting the analysis to the accreted component alone, all of the stellar halos exhibit a steeper negative age gradient with values ranging from $-$8 to $-$32~Myr/kpc, closer to those observed in the Galaxy. Two of the accretion-dominated simulated halos show a large concentration of old stars in the center, in agreement with the Ancient Chronographic Sphere reported observationally. The stellar halo that best reproduces the current observed characteristics of the age distributions of the Galaxy is that formed principally by the accretion of small satellite galaxies. Our findings suggest that the hierarchical clustering scenario can reproduce the MW's halo age distribution if the stellar halo was assembled from accretion and disruption of satellite galaxies with dynamical masses less than ~10^9.5M_sun, and a minimal in situ contribution.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.09322  [pdf] - 1677757
The Fourteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and from the second phase of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment
Abolfathi, Bela; Aguado, D. S.; Aguilar, Gabriela; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Ananna, Tonima Tasnim; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Ata, Metin; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Barger, Kathleen A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Bastien, Fabienne; Bates, Dominic; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bender, Chad F.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Bershady, Matthew A.; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Mederic; Borissova, Jura; Bovy, Jo; Diaz, Christian Andres Bradna; Brandt, William Nielsen; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam J.; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolas G.; Canas, Caleb I.; Cano-Diaz, Mariana; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Casey, Andrew R.; Sodi, Bernardo Cervantes; Chen, Yanping; Cherinka, Brian; Chiappini, Cristina; Choi, Peter Doohyun; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; Nascimento, Janaina Correa do; da Costa, Luiz; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Cunha, Katia; Ilha, Gabriele da Silva; Damke, Guillermo J.; Darling, Jeremy; Davidson, James W.; Dawson, Kyle; Lizaola, Miguel Angel C. de Icaza; de la Macorra, Axel; de la Torre, Sylvain; De Lee, Nathan; Agathe, Victoria de Sainte; Machado, Alice Deconto; Dell'Agli, Flavia; Delubac, Timothee; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Donor, John; Downes, Juan Jose; Drory, Niv; Bourboux, Helion du Mas des; Duckworth, Christopher J.; Dwelly, Tom; Dyer, Jamie; Ebelke, Garrett; Eigenbrot, Arthur Davis; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Mike; Erfanianfar, Ghazaleh; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fan, Xiaohui; Alvar, Emma Fernandez; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Feuillet, Diane; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter; Fu, Hai; Chew, Yilen Gomez Maqueo; Galbany, Lluis; Perez, Ana E. Garcia; Garcia-Dias, R.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Oehmichen, Luis Alberto Garma; Gaulme, Patrick; Gelfand, Joseph; Gil-Marin, Hector; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Goddard, Daniel; Hernandez, Jonay I. Gonzalez; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul J.; Grier, Catherine J.; Gueguen, Alain; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Hekker, Saskia; Hernandez, Jesus; Toledo, Hector Hernandez; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon; Hou, Jiamin; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Hunt, Jason A. S.; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Angel, Camilo Eduardo Jimenez; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jonsson, Henrik; Jullo, Eric; Khan, Fahim Sakil; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Charles C.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Law, David R.; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Young-Bae; Li, Hongyu; Li, Cheng; Lian, Jianhui; Liang, Yu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Mackereth, J. Ted; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio Antonio Geimba; Majewski, Steven; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Mariappan, Vivek; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masseron, Thomas; Masters, Karen L.; McDermid, Richard M.; McGreer, Ian D.; Melendez, Matthew; Meneses-Goytia, Sofia; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Minchev, Ivan; Minniti, Dante; Mueller, Eva-Maria; Muller-Sanchez, Francisco; Muna, Demitri; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; O'Connell, Julia; Oelkers, Ryan James; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Ortiz, Erik Aquino; Osorio, Yeisson; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palicio, Pedro Alonso; Pan, Hsi-An; Pan, Kaike; Parikh, Taniya; Paris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Pisani, Alice; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Queiroz, Anna Barbara de Andrade; Raddick, M. Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Rembold, Sandro Barboza; Richstein, Hannah; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogerio; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Torres, Sergio Rodriguez; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Ruiz, Jose; Salvato, Mara; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Almeida, Jorge Sanchez; Sanchez-Gallego, Jose R.; Rojas, Felipe Antonio Santana; Santiago, Basilio Xavier; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Schlafly, Edward; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Schuster, William J.; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serenelli, Aldo; Shen, Shiyin; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Simon, Joshua D.; Skrutskie, Mike; Slosar, Anze; Smethurst, Rebecca; Smith, Verne; Sobeck, Jennifer; Somers, Garrett; Souter, Barbara J.; Souto, Diogo; Spindler, Ashley; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stello, Dennis; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy; Suarez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Szigeti, Laszlo; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Talbot, Michael S.; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Teske, Johanna; Thaker, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas W.; Urry, Meg; Valenzuela, O.; Bosch, Remco van den; Vargas-Gonzalez, Jaime; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wilcots, Eric; Wild, Vivienne; Williams, Rob A.; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yeche, Christophe; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Cheng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun; Zinn, Joel C.; Zou, Hu
Comments: SDSS-IV collaboration alphabetical author data release paper. DR14 happened on 31st July 2017. 19 pages, 5 figures. Accepted by ApJS on 28th Nov 2017 (this is the "post-print" and "post-proofs" version; minor corrections only from v1, and most of errors found in proofs corrected)
Submitted: 2017-07-28, last modified: 2018-05-06
The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) has been in operation since July 2014. This paper describes the second data release from this phase, and the fourteenth from SDSS overall (making this, Data Release Fourteen or DR14). This release makes public data taken by SDSS-IV in its first two years of operation (July 2014-2016). Like all previous SDSS releases, DR14 is cumulative, including the most recent reductions and calibrations of all data taken by SDSS since the first phase began operations in 2000. New in DR14 is the first public release of data from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS); the first data from the second phase of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-2), including stellar parameter estimates from an innovative data driven machine learning algorithm known as "The Cannon"; and almost twice as many data cubes from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) survey as were in the previous release (N = 2812 in total). This paper describes the location and format of the publicly available data from SDSS-IV surveys. We provide references to the important technical papers describing how these data have been taken (both targeting and observation details) and processed for scientific use. The SDSS website (www.sdss.org) has been updated for this release, and provides links to data downloads, as well as tutorials and examples of data use. SDSS-IV is planning to continue to collect astronomical data until 2020, and will be followed by SDSS-V.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.02416  [pdf] - 1656069
Non-parametric Morphologies of Mergers in the Illustris Simulation
Comments: 19 pages, 20 figures. Published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-10-07, last modified: 2018-03-26
We study non-parametric morphologies of mergers events in a cosmological context, using the Illustris project. We produce mock g-band images comparable to observational surveys from the publicly available Illustris simulation idealized mock images at $z=0$. We then measure non parametric indicators: asymmetry, Gini, $M_{20}$, clumpiness and concentration for a set of galaxies with $M_* >10^{10}$ M$_\odot$. We correlate these automatic statistics with the recent merger history of galaxies and with the presence of close companions. Our main contribution is to assess in a cosmological framework, the empirically derived non-parametric demarcation line and average time-scales used to determine the merger rate observationally. We found that 98 per cent of galaxies above the demarcation line have a close companion or have experienced a recent merger event. On average, merger signatures obtained from the $G-M_{20}$ criteria anticorrelate clearly with the elapsing time to the last merger event. We also find that the asymmetry correlates with galaxy pair separation and relative velocity, exhibiting the larger enhancements for those systems with pair separations $d < 50$ h$^{-1}$ kpc and relative velocities $V < 350$ km s$^{-1}$. We find that the $G-M_{20}$ is most sensitive to recent mergers ($\sim0.14$ Gyr) and to ongoing mergers with stellar mass ratios greater than 0.1. For this indicator, we compute a merger average observability time-scale of $\sim0.2$ Gyr, in agreement with previous results and demonstrate that the morphologically derived merger rate recovers the intrinsic total merger rate of the simulation and the merger rate as a function of stellar mass.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.04446  [pdf] - 1641424
SDSS IV MaNGA: Dependence of Global and Spatially-resolved SFR-M* Relations on Galaxy Properties
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-01-13
Galaxy integrated H{\alpha} star formation rate-stellar mass relation, or SFR(global)-M*(global) relation, is crucial for understanding star formation history and evolution of galaxies. However, many studies have dealt with SFR using unresolved measurements, which makes it difficult to separate out the contamination from other ionizing sources, such as active galactic nuclei and evolved stars. Using the integral field spectroscopic observations from SDSS-IV MaNGA, we spatially disentangle the contribution from different H{\alpha} powering sources for ~1000 galaxies. We find that, when including regions dominated by all ionizing sources in galaxies, the spatially-resolved relation between H{\alpha} surface density ({\Sigma}H{\alpha}(all)) and stellar mass surface density ({\Sigma}*(all)) progressively turns over at high {\Sigma}*(all) end for increasing M*(global) and bulge dominance (bulge-to-total light ratio, B/T). This in turn leads to the flattening of the integrated H{\alpha}(global)-M*(global) relation in the literature. By contrast, there is no noticeable flattening in both integrated H{\alpha}(HII)-M*(HII) and spatially-resolved {\Sigma}H{\alpha}(HII)-{\Sigma}*(HII) relations when only regions where star formation dominates the ionization are considered. In other words, the flattening can be attributed to the increasing regions powered by non-star-formation sources, which generally have lower ionizing ability than star formation. Analysis of the fractional contribution of non-star-formation sources to total H{\alpha} luminosity of a galaxy suggests a decreasing role of star formation as an ionizing source toward high-mass, high-B/T galaxies and bulge regions. This result indicates that the appearance of the galaxy integrated SFR-M* relation critically depends on their global properties (M*(global) and B/T) and relative abundances of various ionizing sources within the galaxies.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.06225  [pdf] - 1614900
Disentangling the Galactic Halo with APOGEE: II. Chemical and Star Formation Histories for the Two Distinct Populations
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-11-16
The formation processes that led to the current Galactic stellar halo are still under debate. Previous studies have provided evidence for different stellar populations in terms of elemental abundances and kinematics, pointing to different chemical and star-formation histories. In the present work we explore, over a broader range in metallicity (-2.2 < [Fe/H] < -0.5), the two stellar populations detected in the first paper of this series from metal-poor stars in DR13 of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). We aim to infer signatures of the initial mass function (IMF) and the most APOGEE-reliable alpha-elements (O, Mg, Si and Ca). Using simple chemical-evolution models, for each population. Compared with the low-alpha population, we obtain a more intense and longer-lived SFH, and a top-heavier IMF for the high-alpha population.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.05781  [pdf] - 1614895
Disentangling the Galactic Halo with APOGEE: I. Chemical and Kinematical Investigation of Distinct Metal-Poor Populations
Comments: 21 pages, 13 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publishing in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2017-11-15
We find two chemically distinct populations separated relatively cleanly in the [Fe/H] - [Mg/Fe] plane, but also distinguished in other chemical planes, among metal-poor stars (primarily with metallicities [Fe/H] $< -0.9$) observed by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) and analyzed for Data Release 13 (DR13) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These two stellar populations show the most significant differences in their [X/Fe] ratios for the $\alpha$-elements, C+N, Al, and Ni. In addition to these populations having differing chemistry, the low metallicity high-Mg population (which we denote the HMg population) exhibits a significant net Galactic rotation, whereas the low-Mg population (or LMg population) has halo-like kinematics with little to no net rotation. Based on its properties, the origin of the LMg population is likely as an accreted population of stars. The HMg population shows chemistry (and to an extent kinematics) similar to the thick disk, and is likely associated with $\it in$ $\it situ$ formation. The distinction between the LMg and HMg populations mimics the differences between the populations of low- and high-$\alpha$ halo stars found in previous studies, suggesting that these are samples of the same two populations.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.08726  [pdf] - 1614862
Properties of the circumgalactic medium in simulations compared to observations
Comments: 15 pages, 15 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-10-24
Galaxies are surrounded by extended gaseous halos which store significant fractions of chemical elements. These are syntethized by the stellar populations and later ejected into the circumgalactic medium (CGM) by different mechanism, of which supernova feedback is considered one of the most relevant. We explore the properties of this metal reservoir surrounding star-forming galaxies in a cosmological context aiming to investigate the chemical loop between galaxies and their CGM, and the ability of the subgrid models to reproduce observational results. Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we analyse the gas-phase chemical contents of galaxies with stellar masses in the range $10^{9} - 10^{11}\,{\rm M}_{\odot}$. We estimate the fractions of metals stored in the different CGM phases, and the predicted OVI and SiIII column densities within the virial radius. We find roughly $10^{7}\,{\rm M}_{\odot}$ of oxygen in the CGM of simulated galaxies having $M_{\star}{\sim}10^{10}\,{\rm M}_{\odot}$, in fair agreement with the lower limits imposed by observations. The $M_{\rm oxy}$ is found to correlate with $M_{\star}$, at odds with current observational trends but in agreement with other numerical results. The estimated profiles of OVI column density reveal a substantial shortage of that ion, whereas SiIII, which probes the cool phase, is overpredicted. The analysis of the relative contributions of both ions from the hot, warm and cool phases suggests that the warm gas ($ 10^5~{\rm K} < T < 10^6~{\rm K}$) should be more abundant in order to bridge the mismatch with the observations, or alternatively, that more metals should be stored in this gas-phase. Adittionally, we find that the X-ray coronae around the simulated galaxies have luminosities and temperatures in decent agreement with the available observational estimates. [abridged]
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.06605  [pdf] - 1588585
The central spheroids of Milky Way mass-sized galaxies
Comments: 12 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-09-19
We study the properties of the central spheroids located within 10 kpc of the centre of mass of Milky Way mass-sized galaxies simulated in a cosmological context. The simulated central regions are dominated by stars older than 10 Gyr, mostly formed in situ, with a contribution of ~30 per cent from accreted stars. These stars formed in well-defined starbursts, although accreted stars exhibit sharper and earlier ones. The fraction of accreted stars increases with galactocentric distance, so that at a radius of ~8-10 kpc a fraction of ~40 per cent, on average, are detected. Accreted stars are slightly younger, lower metallicity, and more $\alpha$-enhanced than in situ stars. A significant fraction of old stars in the central regions come from a few ($2-3$) massive satellites ($\sim 10^{10}{\rm M}_\odot$). The bulge components receive larger contributions of accreted stars formed in dwarfs smaller than $\sim 10^{9.5}{\rm M}_\odot$. The difference between the distributions of ages and metallicities of old stars is thus linked to the accretion histories -- those central regions with a larger fraction of accreted stars are those with contributions from more massive satellites. The kinematical properties of in situ and accreted stars are consistent with the latter being supported by their velocity dispersions, while the former exhibit clear signatures of rotational support. Our simulations demonstrate a range of characteristics, with some systems exhibiting a co-existing bar and spheroid in their central regions, resembling in some respect the central region of the Milky Way.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.00438  [pdf] - 1587832
The evolution of the metallicity gradient and the star formation efficiency in disc galaxies
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2017-09-01
We study the oxygen abundance profiles of the gas-phase components in hydrodynamical simulations of pre-prepared disc galaxies including major mergers, close encounters and isolated configurations. We analyse the evolution of the slope of oxygen abundance profiles and the specific star formation rate (sSFR) along their evolution. We find that galaxy-galaxy interactions could generate either positive and negative gas-phase oxygen profiles depending on the state of evolution. Along the interaction, galaxies are found to have metallicity gradients and sSFR consistent with observations, on average. Strong gas inflows produced during galaxy-galaxy interactions or as a result of strong local instabilities in gas-rich discs are able to produce both a quick dilution of the central gas-phase metallicity and a sudden increase of the sSFR. Our simulations show that, during these events, a correlation between the metallicity gradients and the sSFR can be set up if strong gas inflows are triggered in the central regions in short timescales. Simulated galaxies without experiencing strong disturbances evolve smoothly without modifying the metallicity gradients. Gas-rich systems show large dispersion along the correlation. The dispersion in the observed relation could be interpreted as produced by the combination of galaxies with different gas-richness and/or experiencing different types of interactions. Hence, our findings suggest that the observed relation might be the smoking gun of galaxies forming in a hierarchical clustering scenario.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.01617  [pdf] - 1586797
Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Galaxies Science Roadmap
Comments: For more information, see https://galaxies.science.lsst.org
Submitted: 2017-08-04
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will enable revolutionary studies of galaxies, dark matter, and black holes over cosmic time. The LSST Galaxies Science Collaboration has identified a host of preparatory research tasks required to leverage fully the LSST dataset for extragalactic science beyond the study of dark energy. This Galaxies Science Roadmap provides a brief introduction to critical extragalactic science to be conducted ahead of LSST operations, and a detailed list of preparatory science tasks including the motivation, activities, and deliverables associated with each. The Galaxies Science Roadmap will serve as a guiding document for researchers interested in conducting extragalactic science in anticipation of the forthcoming LSST era.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.03456  [pdf] - 1585816
APOGEE Chemical Abundances of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2017-07-11
The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) provides the opportunity to measure elemental abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in vast numbers of stars. We analyze the chemical abundance patterns of these elements for 158 red giant stars belonging to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). This is the largest sample of Sgr stars with detailed chemical abundances and the first time C, N, P, K, V, Cr, Co, and Ni have been studied at high-resolution in this galaxy. We find that the Sgr stars with [Fe/H] $\gtrsim$ -0.8 are deficient in all elemental abundance ratios (expressed as [X/Fe]) relative to the Milky Way, suggesting that Sgr stars observed today were formed from gas that was less enriched by Type II SNe than stars formed in the Milky Way. By examining the relative deficiencies of the hydrostatic (O, Na, Mg, and Al) and explosive (Si, P, K, and Mn) elements, our analysis supports the argument that previous generations of Sgr stars were formed with a top-light IMF, one lacking the most massive stars that would normally pollute the ISM with the hydrostatic elements. We use a simple chemical evolution model, flexCE to further backup our claim and conclude that recent stellar generations of Fornax and the LMC could also have formed according to a top-light IMF.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.00052  [pdf] - 1581688
Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Mapping the Milky Way, Nearby Galaxies, and the Distant Universe
Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Abolfathi, Bela; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Alonso-García, Javier; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett; Aquino-Ortíz, Erik; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barger, Kathleen A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Bates, Dominic; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Médéric; Borissova, Jura; Bosch, Remco van den; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam J.; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cappellari, Michele; Carigi, Maria Leticia Delgado; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Carrera, Ricardo; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Chew, Yilen Gómez Maqueo; Chiappini, Cristina; Choi, Peter Doohyun; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comparat, Johan; da Costa, Luiz; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Cuadra, Daniel Garrido; Cunha, Katia; Damke, Guillermo J.; Darling, Jeremy; Davies, Roger; Dawson, Kyle; de la Macorra, Axel; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Di Mille, Francesco; Diamond-Stanic, Aleks; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Donor, John; Downes, Juan José; Drory, Niv; Bourboux, Hélion du Mas des; Duckworth, Christopher J.; Dwelly, Tom; Dyer, Jamie; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Mike; Escoffier, Stephanie; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Feuillet, Diane K.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Fredrickson, Alexander; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbany, Lluís; Garcia-Dias, R.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Gaulme, Patrick; Geisler, Doug; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Goddard, Daniel; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul J.; Grier, Catherine J.; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hahn, ChangHoon; Hall, Matthew; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Fred; Hernández, Jonay I. Gonzalez; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Holzer, Parker H.; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Héctor J.; Ilha, Gabriele da Silva; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivory, KeShawn; Jackson, Kelly; Jensen, Trey W.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jönsson, Henrik; Jullo, Eric; Kamble, Vikrant; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Klaene, Mark; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Law, David R.; Lazarz, Daniel; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Liang, Fu-Heng; Li, Cheng; LI, Hongyu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Yen-Ting; de Lis, Sara Bertran; Liu, Chao; Lizaola, Miguel Angel C. de Icaza; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; MacDonald, Nicholas K.; Machado, Alice Deconto; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio Antonio Geimba; Maiolino, Roberto; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, Arturo; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McDermid, Richard M.; McGrath, Brianne; McGreer, Ian D.; Peña, Nicolás Medina; Melendez, Matthew; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Minchev, Ivan; Minniti, Dante; Miyaji, Takamitsu; More, Surhud; Mulchaey, John; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Muna, Demitri; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Nascimento, Janaina Correa do; Negrete, Alenka; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Ntelis, Pierros; O'Connell, Julia E.; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palicio, Pedro Alonso; Pan, Kaike; Parikh, Taniya; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patten, Alim Y.; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Pisani, Alice; Poleski, Radosław; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Queiroz, Anna Bárbara de Andrade; Raddick, M. Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Rembold, Sandro Barboza; Richstein, Hannah; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Roman-Lopes, A.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Rosado, Margarita; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Rykoff, Eli S.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Aguado, David Sánchez; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Santana, Felipe A.; Santiago, Basílio Xavier; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schimoia, Jaderson da Silva; Schlafly, Edward F.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schuster, William J.; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shao, Zhengyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Simon, Joshua D.; Skinner, Danielle; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sobreira, Flavia; Somers, Garrett; Souto, Diogo; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan; Stauffer, Fritz; Steinmetz, Matthias; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suárez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Suzuki, Nao; Szigeti, Laszlo; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Teske, Johanna; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Toledo, Hector Hernandez; de la Torre, Sylvain; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas W.; Valenzuela, Octavio; Valpuesta, Inma Martinez; Vargas-González, Jaime; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vivek, M.; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wild, Vivienne; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yèche, Christophe; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zoccali, Manuela; Zou, Hu
Comments: Published in Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2017-02-28, last modified: 2017-06-29
We describe the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV), a project encompassing three major spectroscopic programs. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2) is observing hundreds of thousands of Milky Way stars at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio in the near-infrared. The Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey is obtaining spatially-resolved spectroscopy for thousands of nearby galaxies (median redshift of z = 0.03). The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) is mapping the galaxy, quasar, and neutral gas distributions between redshifts z = 0.6 and 3.5 to constrain cosmology using baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions, and the shape of the power spectrum. Within eBOSS, we are conducting two major subprograms: the SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources (SPIDERS), investigating X-ray AGN and galaxies in X-ray clusters, and the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), obtaining spectra of variable sources. All programs use the 2.5-meter Sloan Foundation Telescope at Apache Point Observatory; observations there began in Summer 2014. APOGEE-2 also operates a second near-infrared spectrograph at the 2.5-meter du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, with observations beginning in early 2017. Observations at both facilities are scheduled to continue through 2020. In keeping with previous SDSS policy, SDSS-IV provides regularly scheduled public data releases; the first one, Data Release 13, was made available in July 2016.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.00101  [pdf] - 1580194
Baryon effects on void statistics in the EAGLE simulation
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS, 21 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2016-08-31, last modified: 2017-06-29
Cosmic voids are promising tools for cosmological tests due to their sensitivity to dark energy, modified gravity and alternative cosmological scenarios. Most previous studies in the literature of void properties use cosmological N-body simulations of dark matter (DM) particles that ignore the potential effect of baryonic physics. Using a spherical underdensity finder, we analyse voids using the mass field and subhalo tracers in the EAGLE simulations, which follow the evolution of galaxies in a $\rm{\Lambda}$ cold dark matter Universe with state-of-the-art subgrid models for baryonic processes in a $(100 \rm{cMpc})^3$ volume. We study the effect of baryons on void statistics by comparing results with DM-only simulations that use the same initial conditions as EAGLE. When identifying voids in the mass field, we find that a DM-only simulation produces 24 per cent more voids than a hydrodynamical one due to the action of galaxy feedback polluting void regions with hot gas, specially for small voids with $r_{\rm{void}} \le 10\ \rm{Mpc}$. We find that the way in which galaxy tracers are selected has a strong impact on the inferred void properties. Voids identified using galaxies selected by their stellar mass are larger and have cuspier density profiles than those identified by galaxies selected by their total mass. Overall, baryons have minimal effects on void statistics, as void properties are well captured by DM-only simulations, but it is important to account for how galaxies populate DM haloes to estimate the observational effect of different cosmological models on the statistics of voids.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.03739  [pdf] - 1584560
Mild evolution of the stellar metallicity gradients of disc galaxies
Comments: 8 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-06-12
The metallicity gradients of the stellar populations in disc galaxies and their evolution store relevant information on the disc formation history and on those processes which could mix stars a posteriori, such as migration, bars and/or galaxy-galaxy interactions. We aim to investigate the evolution of the metallicity gradients of the whole stellar populations in disc components of simulated galaxies in a cosmological context. We analyse simulated disc galaxies selected from a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation that includes chemical evolution and a physically motivated Supernova feedback capable of driving mass-loaded galactic winds. We detect a mild evolution with redshift in the metallicity slopes of $-0.02 \pm 0.01$ dex~kpc$^{-1}$ from $z\sim 1$. If the metallicity profiles are normalised by the effective radius of the stellar disc, the slopes show no clear evolution for $z < 1$, with a median value of approximately $-0.23$ dex ~$r_{\rm reff}^{-1}$. As a function of stellar mass, we find that metallicity gradients steepen for stellar masses smaller than $\sim 10^{10.3} {\rm M_{\odot}}$ while the trend reverses for higher stellar masses, in the redshift range $z=[0,1]$. Galaxies with small stellar masses have discs with larger $r_{\rm reff}$ and flatter metallicity gradients than expected. We detect migration albeit weaker than in previous works. Our stellar discs show a mild evolution of the stellar metallicity slopes up to $z\sim 1,$ which is well-matched by the evolution calculated archeologically from the abundance distributions of mono-age stellar populations at $z\sim 0$. Overall, Supernova feedback could explain the trends but an impact of migration can not be totally discarded. Galaxy-galaxy interactions or small satellite accretions can also contribute to modify the metallicity profiles in the outer parts. [abridged]
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.01711  [pdf] - 1557917
Characterization of the VVV Survey RR Lyrae Population across the Southern Galactic Plane
Comments: 10 pages, 13 figures. AJ, in press
Submitted: 2017-03-05
Deep near-IR images from the VISTA Variables in the V\'ia L\'actea (VVV) Survey were used to search for RR Lyrae stars in the Southern Galactic plane. A sizable sample of 404 RR Lyrae of type ab stars was identified across a thin slice of the 4$^{\rm th}$ Galactic quadrant ($295\deg < l < 350\deg$, $-2.24\deg < b < -1.05\deg$). The sample's distance distribution exhibits a maximum density that occurs at the bulge tangent point, which implies that this primarily Oosterhoff type I population of RRab stars does not trace the bar delineated by their red clump counterparts. The bulge RR Lyrae population does not extend beyond $l \sim340 \deg$, and the sample's spatial distribution presents evidence of density enhancements and substructure that warrants further investigation. Indeed, the sample may be employed to evaluate Galactic evolution models, and is particularly lucrative since half of the discovered RR Lyrae are within reach of Gaia astrometric observations.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.08628  [pdf] - 1477160
The age structure of the Milky Way's halo
Comments: Main Article: 12 pages, 4 figures; Supplemental Material: 4 pages, 1 figure. Nature Physics version: http://www.nature.com/nphys/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nphys3874.html (Main article: 7 pages, 4 figures)
Submitted: 2016-07-28, last modified: 2016-09-07
We present a new, high-resolution chronographic (age) map of the Milky Way's halo, based on the inferred ages of ~130,000 field blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars with photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our map exhibits a strong central concentration of BHB stars with ages greater than 12 Gyr, extending up to ~15 kpc from the Galactic center (reaching close to the solar vicinity), and a decrease in the mean ages of field stars with distance by 1-1.5 Gyr out to ~45-50 kpc, along with an apparent increase of the dispersion of stellar ages, and numerous known (and previously unknown) resolved over-densities and debris streams, including the Sagittarius Stream. These results agree with expectations from modern LambdaCDM cosmological simulations, and support the existence of a dual (inner/outer) halo system, punctuated by the presence of over-densities and debris streams that have not yet completely phase-space mixed.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.08116  [pdf] - 1451891
The stellar metallicity gradients in galaxy discs in a cosmological scenario
Comments: 9 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2016-04-27
The stellar metallicity gradients of disc galaxies provide information on the disc assembly, star formation processes and chemical evolution. They also might store information on dynamical processes which could affect the distribution of chemical elements in the gas-phase and the stellar components. We studied the stellar metallicity gradients of stellar discs in a cosmological simulation. We explored the dependence of the stellar metallicity gradients on stellar age and the size and mass of the stellar discs. We used galaxies selected from a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation performed including a physically-motivated Supernova feedback and chemical evolution. The metallicity profiles were estimated for stars with different ages. We confront our numerical findings with results from the CALIFA Survey. The simulated stellar discs are found to have metallicity profiles with slopes in global agreement with observations. Low stellar-mass galaxies tend to have a larger variety of metallicity slopes. When normalized by the half-mass radius, the stellar metallicity gradients do not show any dependence and the dispersion increases significantly, regardless of galaxy mass. Galaxies with stellar masses around $10^{10}$M$_{\odot}$ show steeper negative metallicity gradients. The stellar metallicity gradients correlate with the half-mass radius. However, the correlation signal is not present when they are normalized by the half-mass radius. Stellar discs with positive age gradients are detected to have negative and positive metallicity gradients, depending on the relative importance of the recent star formation activity in the central regions. The large dispersions in the metallicity gradients as a function of stellar mass could be ascribed to the effects of dynamical processes such as mergers/interactions and/or migration as well as those regulating the conversion of gas into stars. [abridged]
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.08227  [pdf] - 1347693
The gas metallicity gradient and the star formation activity of disc galaxies
Comments: 12 pages, 8 figures, accepted MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-11-25
We study oxygen abundance profiles of the gaseous disc components in simulated galaxies in a hierarchical universe. We analyse the disc metallicity gradients in relation to the stellar masses and star formation rates of the simulated galaxies. We find a trend for galaxies with low stellar masses to have steeper metallicity gradients than galaxies with high stellar masses at z ~0. We also detect that the gas-phase metallicity slopes and the specific star formation rate (sSFR) of our simulated disc galaxies are consistent with recently reported observations at z ~0. Simulated galaxies with high stellar masses reproduce the observed relationship at all analysed redshifts and have an increasing contribution of discs with positive metallicity slopes with increasing redshift. Simulated galaxies with low stellar masses a have larger fraction of negative metallicity gradients with increasing redshift. Simulated galaxies with positive or very negative metallicity slopes exhibit disturbed morphologies and/or have a close neighbour. We analyse the evolution of the slope of the oxygen profile and sSFR for a gas-rich galaxy-galaxy encounter, finding that this kind of events could generate either positive and negative gas-phase oxygen profiles depending on their state of evolution. Our results support claims that the determination of reliable metallicity gradients as a function of redshift is a key piece of information to understand galaxy formation and set constrains on the subgrid physics.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.08147  [pdf] - 1317565
Chronography of the Milky Way's Halo System with Field Blue Horizontal-Branch Stars
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, ApJ letters
Submitted: 2015-10-27
In a pioneering effort, Preston et al. reported that the colors of blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars in the halo of the Galaxy shift with distance, from regions near the Galactic center to about 12 kpc away, and interpreted this as a correlated variation in the ages of halo stars, from older to younger, spanning a range of a few Gyrs. We have applied this approach to a sample of some 4700 spectroscopically confirmed BHB stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to produce the first "chronographic map" of the halo of the Galaxy. We demonstrate that the mean de-reddened g$-$r color, <(g$-$r)o>, increases outward in the Galaxy from $-$0.22 to $-$0.08 (over a color window spanning [$-$0.3:0.0]) from regions close to the Galactic center to ~40 kpc, independent of the metallicity of the stars. Models of the expected shift in the color of the field BHB stars based on modern stellar evolutionary codes confirm that this color gradient can be associated with an age difference of roughly 2-2.5 Gyrs, with the oldest stars concentrated in the central ~15 kpc of the Galaxy. Within this central region, the age difference spans a mean color range of about 0.05 mag (~0.8 Gyrs). Furthermore, we show that chronographic maps can be used to identify individual substructures, such as the Sagittarius Stream, and overdensities in the direction of Virgo and Monoceros, based on the observed contrast in their mean BHB colors with respect to the foreground/background field population.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.07220  [pdf] - 1268013
Angular momentum evolution for galaxies in a Lambda-CDM scenario
Comments: 9 pages, 8 figures, A&A accepted
Submitted: 2015-08-28
Galaxy formation in the current cosmological paradigm is a very complex process in which inflows, outflows, interactions and mergers are common events. These processes can redistribute the angular momentum content of baryons. Recent observational results suggest that disc formed conserving angular momentum while elliptical galaxies, albeit losing angular momentum, determine a correlation between the specific angular momentum of the galaxy and the stellar mass. These observations provide stringent constraints for galaxy formation models in a hierarchical clustering scenario. We aim to analyse the specific angular momentum content of the disc and bulge components as a function of virial mass, stellar mass and redshift. We also estimate the size of the simulated galaxies and confront them with observations. We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that include an effective, physically-motivated Supernova feedback which is able to regulate the star formation in haloes of different masses. We analyse the morphology and formation history of a sample of galaxies in a cosmological simulation by performing a bulge-disc decomposition of the analysed systems and their progenitors. We estimate the angular momentum content of the stellar and gaseous discs, stellar bulges and total baryons. In agreement with recent observational findings, our simulated galaxies have disc and spheroid components whose specific angular momentum contents determine correlations with the stellar and dark matter masses with the same slope, although the spheroidal components are off-set by a fixed fraction. Abridged.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.4137  [pdf] - 1296056
Progenitors of Supernovae Type Ia and Chemical Enrichment in Hydrodynamical Simulations -I. The Single Degenerate Scenario
Comments: 19 pages, 6 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-02-17, last modified: 2015-06-19
The nature of the Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) progenitors remains still uncertain. This is a major issue for galaxy evolution models since both chemical and energetic feedback play a major role in the gas dynamics, star formation and therefore in the overall stellar evolution. The progenitor models for the SNIa available in the literature propose different distributions for regulating the explosion times of these events. These functions are known as the Delay Time Distributions (DTDs). This work is the first one in a series of papers aiming at studying five different DTDs for SNIa. Here, we implement and analyse the Single Degenerate scenario (SD) in galaxies dominated by a rapid quenching of the star formation, displaying the majority of the stars concentrated in the bulge component. We find a good fit to both the present observed SNIa rates in spheroidal dominated galaxies, and to the [O/Fe] ratios shown by the bulge of the Milky Way. Additionally, the SD scenario is found to reproduce a correlation between the specific SNIa rate and the specific star formation rate, which closely resembles the observational trend, at variance with previous works. Our results suggest that SNIa observations in galaxies with very low and very high specific star formation rates can help to impose more stringent constraints on the DTDs and therefore on SNIa progenitors.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.01798  [pdf] - 944881
Angular momentum evolution for galaxies
Comments: 1 page, BAAA proceedings (accepted with minor changes), AAA Meeeting, september 2014
Submitted: 2015-03-05
Using cosmological hydrodynamics simulations we study the angular momentum content of the simulated galaxies in relation with their morphological type. We found that not only the angular momentum of the disk component follow the expected theoretical relation, Mo, Mao & Whiye (1998), but also the spheroidal one, with a gap due to its lost of angular momentum, in agreement with Fall & Romanowsky (2013),. We also found that the galaxy size can plot in one general relation, despite the morphological type, as found by Kravtsov (2013).
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.00017  [pdf] - 1224264
Stellar feedback from HMXBs in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations
Comments: 11 pages, 8 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-01-30
We explored the role of X-ray binaries composed by a black hole and a massive stellar companion (BHXs) as sources of kinetic feedback by using hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. Following previous results, our BHX model selects low metal-poor stars ($Z = [0,10^{-4}]$) as possible progenitors. The model that better reproduces observations assumes that a $\sim 20\%$ fraction of low-metallicity black holes are in binary systems which produce BHXs. These sources are estimated to deposit $\sim 10^{52}$ erg of kinetic energy per event. With these parameters and in the simulated volume, we find that the energy injected by BHXs represents $\sim 30\%$ of the total energy released by SNII and BHX events at redshift $z\sim7$ and then decreases rapidly as baryons get chemically enriched. Haloes with virial masses smaller than $\sim 10^{10} \,M_{\odot}$ (or $T_{\rm vir} \lesssim 10^5 $ K) are the most directly affected ones by BHX feedback. These haloes host galaxies with stellar masses in the range $10^7 - 10^8$ M$_\odot$. Our results show that BHX feedback is able to keep the interstellar medium warm, without removing a significant gas fraction, in agreement with previous analytical calculations. Consequently, the stellar-to-dark matter mass ratio is better reproduced at high redshift. Our model also predicts a stronger evolution of the number of galaxies as a function of the stellar mass with redshift when BHX feedback is considered. These findings support previous claims that the BHXs could be an effective source of feedback in early stages of galaxy evolution.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.5800  [pdf] - 1215823
Low-metallicity stellar halo populations as tracers of dark matter haloes
Comments: 5 pages,3 figures, MNRAS Letters accepted
Submitted: 2014-07-22
We analyse the density profiles of the stellar halo populations in eight Milky-Way mass galaxies, simulated within the $\Lambda$-Cold Dark Matter scenario. We find that accreted stars can be well-fitted by an Einasto profile, as well as any subsample defined according to metallicity. We detect a clear correlation between the Einasto fitting parameters of the low-metallicity stellar populations and those of the dark matter haloes. The correlations for stars with [Fe/H]$<-3$ allow us to predict the shape of the dark matter profiles within residuals of $\sim 10 $ per cent, in case the contribution from in situ stars remains small. Using Einasto parameters estimated for the stellar halo of the Milky Way and assuming the later formed with significant contributions from accreted low-mass satellite, our simulations predict $\alpha \sim 0.15 $ and $r_2 \sim 15$ kpc for its dark matter profile. These values, combined with observed estimations of the local dark matter density, yield an enclosed dark matter mass at $\sim 8$ kpc in the range $3.9 - 6.7 \times 10^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$, in agreement with recent observational results. These findings suggest that low-metallicity stellar haloes could store relevant information on the DM haloes. Forthcoming observations would help us to further constrain our models and predictions.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.0260  [pdf] - 986589
Properties of Long Gamma Ray Burst Progenitors in Cosmological Simulations
Comments: To appear in the 56th Bulletin of the Argentine Astronomical Society (BAAA 56, 2013). 4 pages
Submitted: 2014-07-01
We study the nature of long gamma ray burst (LGRB) progenitors using cosmological simulations of structure formation and galactic evolution. LGRBs are potentially excellent tracers of stellar evolution in the early universe. We developed a Monte Carlo numerical code which generates LGRBs coupled to cosmological simulations. The simulations allows us to follow the ormation of galaxies self-consistently. We model the detectability of LGRBs and their host galaxies in order to compare results with observational data obtained by high-energy satellites. Our code also includes stochastic effects in the observed rate of LGRBs.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.7022  [pdf] - 843633
The baryonic mass assembly of low-mass halos in a Lambda-CDM Universe
Comments: Accepted for publication in BAAA, Vol. 56, 2013. 4 pages, 1 figure. More detailed results about this project can be found in the accompanying paper: arXiv 1308.2727
Submitted: 2014-06-26
We analyse the dark, gas, and stellar mass assembly histories of low-mass halos (Mvir ~ 10^10.3 - 10^12.3 M_sun) identified at redshift z = 0 in cosmological numerical simulations. Our results indicate that for halos in a given present-day mass bin, the gas-to-baryon fraction inside the virial radius does not evolve significantly with time, ranging from ~0.8 for smaller halos to ~0.5 for the largest ones. Most of the baryons are located actually not in the galaxies but in the intrahalo gas; for the more massive halos, the intrahalo gas-to-galaxy mass ratio is approximately the same at all redshifts, z, but for the least massive halos, it strongly increases with z. The intrahalo gas in the former halos gets hotter with time, being dominant at z = 0, while in the latter halos, it is mostly cold at all epochs. The multiphase ISM and thermal feedback models in our simulations work in the direction of delaying the stellar mass growth of low-mass galaxies.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.2329  [pdf] - 833364
The role of metallicity in high mass X-ray binaries in galaxy formation models
Comments: Comments have been included to clarify aspects of the models
Submitted: 2014-03-10, last modified: 2014-06-09
Recent theoretical works claim that high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) could have been important sources of energy feedback into the interstellar and intergalactic media, playing a major role in the reionization epoch. A metallicity dependence of the production rate or luminosity of the sources is a key ingredient generally assumed but not yet probed. Aims: Our goal is to explore the relation between the X-ray luminosity (Lx) and star formation rate of galaxies as a possible tracer of a metallicity dependence of the production rates and/or X-ray luminosities of HMXBs. Methods: We developed a model to estimate the Lx of star forming galaxies based on stellar evolution models which include metallicity dependences. We applied our X-ray binary models to galaxies selected from hydrodynamical cosmological simulations which include chemical evolution of the stellar populations in a self-consistent way. Results: Our models successfully reproduce the dispersion in the observed relations as an outcome of the combined effects of the mixture of stellar populations with heterogeneous chemical abundances and the metallicity dependence of the X-ray sources. We find that the evolution of the Lx as a function of SFR of galaxies could store information on possible metallicity dependences of the HMXB sources. A non-metallicity dependent model predicts a non-evolving relation while any metallicity dependence should affect the slope and the dispersion as a function of redshift. Our results suggest the characteristics of the Lx evolution can be linked to the nature of the metallicity dependence of the production rate or the Lx of the stellar sources. By confronting our models with current available observations of strong star-forming galaxies, we find that only chemistry-dependent models reproduce the observed trend for z < 4.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.5836  [pdf] - 862820
Morphology of galaxies with quiescent recent assembly history in a Lambda-CDM universe
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures, A&A in press
Submitted: 2014-05-22, last modified: 2014-06-04
The standard disc formation scenario postulates that disc forms as the gas cools and flows into the centre of the dark matter halo, conserving the specific angular momentum. Major mergers have been shown to be able to destroy or highly perturb the disc components. More recently, the alignment of the material that is accreted to form the galaxy has been pointed out as a key ingredient to determine galaxy morphology. However, in a hierarchical scenario galaxy formation is a complex process that combines these processes and others in a non-linear way so that the origin of galaxy morphology remains to be fully understood. We aim at exploring the differences in the formation histories of galaxies with a variety of morphology, but quite recent merger histories, to identify which mechanisms are playing a major role. We analyse when minor mergers can be considered relevant to determine galaxy morphology. We also study the specific angular momentum content of the disc and central spheroidal components separately. We used cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that include an effective, physically motivated supernova feedback that is able to regulate the star formation in haloes of different masses. We analysed the morphology and formation history of a sample of 15 galaxies of a cosmological simulation. We performed a spheroid-disc decomposition of the selected galaxies and their progenitor systems. The angular momentum orientation of the merging systems as well as their relative masses were estimated to analyse the role played by orientation and by minor mergers in the determination of the morphology. We found the discs to be formed by conserving the specific angular momentum in accordance with the classical disc formation model. The specific angular momentum of the stellar central spheroid correlates with the dark matter halo angular momentum and determines a power law. Abridged
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.3609  [pdf] - 791715
Stellar haloes in Milky-Way mass galaxies: From the inner to the outer haloes
Comments: 11 pages, 6 figures. Accepted MNRAS. Revised version after referee's comments
Submitted: 2013-09-13, last modified: 2014-01-23
We present a comprehensive study of the chemical properties of the stellar haloes of Milky-Way mass galaxies, analysing the transition between the inner to the outer haloes. We find the transition radius between the relative dominance of the inner-halo and outer-halo stellar populations to be ~15-20 kpc for most of our haloes, similar to that inferred for the Milky Way from recent observations. While the number density of stars in the simulated inner-halo populations decreases rapidly with distance, the outer-halo populations contribute about 20-40 per cent in the fiducial solar neighborhood, in particular at the lowest metallicities. We have determined [Fe/H] profiles for our simulated haloes; they exhibit flat or mild gradients, in the range [-0.002, -0.01 ] dex/kpc. The metallicity distribution functions exhibit different features, reflecting the different assembly history of the individual stellar haloes. We find that stellar haloes formed with larger contributions from massive subgalactic systems have steeper metallicity gradients. Very metal-poor stars are mainly contributed to the halo systems by lower-mass satellites. There is a clear trend among the predicted metallicity distribution functions that a higher fraction of low-metallicity stars are found with increasing radius. These properties are consistent with the range of behaviours observed for stellar haloes of nearby galaxies.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.4396  [pdf] - 1173515
Clumpy Disc and Bulge Formation
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS - Aug. 20, 2013
Submitted: 2013-08-20
We present a set of hydrodynamical/Nbody controlled simulations of isolated gas rich galaxies that self-consistently include SN feedback and a detailed chemical evolution model, both tested in cosmological simulations. The initial conditions are motivated by the observed star forming galaxies at z ~ 2-3. We find that the presence of a multiphase interstellar media in our models promotes the growth of disc instability favouring the formation of clumps which in general, are not easily disrupted on timescales compared to the migration time. We show that stellar clumps migrate towards the central region and contribute to form a classical-like bulge with a Sersic index, n > 2. Our physically-motivated Supernova feedback has a mild influence on clump survival and evolution, partially limiting the mass growth of clumps as the energy released per Supernova event is increased, with the consequent flattening of the bulge profile. This regulation does not prevent the building of a classical-like bulge even for the most energetic feedback tested. Our Supernova feedback model is able to establish a self-regulated star formation, producing mass-loaded outflows and stellar age spreads comparable to observations. We find that the bulge formation by clumps may coexit with other channels of bulge assembly such as bar and mergers. Our results suggest that galactic bulges could be interpreted as composite systems with structural components and stellar populations storing archaeological information of the dynamical history of their galaxy.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.2727  [pdf] - 1173353
On the mass assembly of low-mass galaxies in hydrodynamical simulations of structure formation
Comments: 19 pages, 12 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS: 6th August 2013. First submitted: 7th July 2012
Submitted: 2013-08-12
Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations are studied in order to analyse generic trends for the stellar, baryonic and halo mass assembly of low-mass galaxies (M_* < 3 x 10^10 M_sun) as a function of their present halo mass, in the context of the Lambda-CDM scenario and common subgrid physics schemes. We obtain that smaller galaxies exhibit higher specific star formation rates and higher gas fractions. Although these trends are in rough agreement with observations, the absolute values of these quantities tend to be lower than observed ones since z~2. The simulated galaxy stellar mass fraction increases with halo mass, consistently with semi-empirical inferences. However, the predicted correlation between them shows negligible variations up to high z, while these inferences seem to indicate some evolution. The hot gas mass in z=0 halos is higher than the central galaxy mass by a factor of ~1-1.5 and this factor increases up to ~5-7 at z~2 for the smallest galaxies. The stellar, baryonic and halo evolutionary tracks of simulated galaxies show that smaller galaxies tend to delay their baryonic and stellar mass assembly with respect to the halo one. The Supernova feedback treatment included in this model plays a key role on this behaviour albeit the trend is still weaker than the one inferred from observations. At z>2, the overall properties of simulated galaxies are not in large disagreement with those derived from observations.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.1301  [pdf] - 1158864
Stellar haloes of simulated Milky Way-like galaxies: Chemical and kinematic properties
Comments: 12 pages, 6 figures. Accepted version. To appear in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-01-07, last modified: 2013-04-19
We investigate the chemical and kinematic properties of the diffuse stellar haloes of six simulated Milky Way-like galaxies from the Aquarius Project. Binding energy criteria are adopted to defined two dynamically distinct stellar populations: the diffuse inner and outer haloes, which comprise different stellar sub-populations with particular chemical and kinematic characteristics. Our simulated inner- and outer-halo stellar populations have received contributions from debris stars (formed in sub-galactic systems while they were outside the virial radius of the main progenitor galaxies) and endo-debris stars (those formed in gas-rich sub-galactic systems inside the dark matter haloes). The inner haloes possess an additional contribution from disc-heated stars in the range $\sim 3 - 30 %$, with a mean of $\sim 20% $. Disc-heated stars might exhibit signatures of kinematical support, in particular among the youngest ones. Endo-debris plus disc-heated stars define the so-called \insitu stellar populations. In both the inner- and outer-halo stellar populations, we detect contributions from stars with moderate to low [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios, mainly associated with the endo-debris or disc-heated sub-populations. The observed abundance gradients in the inner-halo regions are influenced by both the level of chemical enrichment and the relative contributions from each stellar sub-population. Steeper abundance gradients in the inner-halo regions are related to contributions from the disc-heated and endo-debris stars, which tend to be found at lower binding energies than debris stars. (Abridged).
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1209.0512  [pdf] - 1151084
Fingerprints of the hierarchical building up of the structure on the gas kinematics of galaxies
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2012-09-03
Recent observational and theoretical works have suggested that the Tully-Fisher Relation might be generalised to include dispersion-dominated systems by combining the rotation and dispersion velocity in the definition of the kinematical indicator. Mergers and interactions have been pointed out as responsible of driving turbulent and disordered gas kinematics, which could generate Tully-Fisher Relation outliers. We intend to investigate the gas kinematics of galaxies by using a simulated sample which includes both, gas disc-dominated and spheroid-dominated systems. Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations which include a multiphase model and physically-motivated Supernova feedback were performed in order to follow the evolution of galaxies as they are assembled. Both the baryonic and stellar Tully-Fisher relations for gas disc-dominated systems are tight while, as more dispersion-dominated systems are included, the scatter increases. We found a clear correlation between $\sigma / V_{\rm rot}$ and morphology, with dispersion-dominated systems exhibiting the larger values ($> 0.7$). Mergers and interactions can affect the rotation curves directly or indirectly inducing a scatter in the Tully-Fisher Relation larger than the simulated evolution since $z \sim 3$. Kinematical indicators which combine rotation velocity and dispersion velocity can reduce the scatter in the baryonic and the stellar mass-velocity relations. Our findings also show that the lowest scatter in both relations is obtained if the velocity indicators are measured at the maximum of the rotation curve. Moreover, the rotation velocity estimated at the maximum of the gas rotation curve is found to be the best proxy for the potential well regardless of morphology.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.5570  [pdf] - 1124350
The Halo Shape and Evolution of Polar Disc Galaxies
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS; 14 pages; 14 figures
Submitted: 2012-06-25
We examine the properties and evolution of a simulated polar disc galaxy. This galaxy is comprised of two orthogonal discs, one of which contains old stars (old stellar disc), and the other, containing both younger stars and the cold gas (polar disc) of the galaxy. By exploring the shape of the inner region of the dark matter halo, we are able to confirm that the halo shape is a oblate ellipsoid flattened in the direction of the polar disc. We also note that there is a twist in the shape profile, where the innermost 3 kpc of the halo flattens in the direction perpendicular to the old disc, and then aligns with the polar disc out until the virial radius. This result is then compared to the halo shape inferred from the circular velocities of the two discs. We also use the temporal information of the simulation to track the system's evolution, and identify the processes which give rise to this unusual galaxy type. We confirm the proposal that the polar disc galaxy is the result of the last major merger, where the angular moment of the interaction is orthogonal to the angle of the infalling gas. This merger is followed by the resumption of coherent gas infall. We emphasise that the disc is rapidly restored after the major merger and that after this event the galaxy begins to tilt. A significant proportion of the infalling gas comes from filaments. This infalling gas from the filament gives the gas its angular momentum, and, in the case of the polar disc galaxy, the direction of the gas filament does not change before or after the last major merger.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.5864  [pdf] - 1085158
Chemical signatures of formation processes in the stellar populations of simulated galaxies
Comments: 17 pages, 13 figures, accepted MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-10-26
We study the chemical properties of the stellar populations in eight simulations of the formation of Milky-Way mass galaxies in a LCDM Universe. Our simulations include metal-dependent cooling and an explicitly multiphase treatment of the effects on the gas of cooling, enrichment and supernova feedback. We search for correlations between formation history and chemical abundance patterns. Differing contributions to spheroids and discs from in situ star formation and from accreted populations are reflected in differing chemical properties. Discs have younger stellar populations, with most stars forming in situ and with low alpha-enhancement from gas which never participated in a galactic outflow. Up to 15 per cent of disc stars can come from accreted satellites. These tend to be alpha-enhanced, older and to have larger velocity dispersions than the in situ population. Inner spheroids have old, metal-rich and alpha-enhanced stars which formed primarily in situ, more than 40 per cent from material recycled through earlier galactic winds. Few accreted stars are found in the inner spheroid unless a major merger occurred recently. Such stars are older, more metal-poor and more alpha-enhanced than the in situ population. Stellar haloes tend to have low metallicity and high alpha-enhancement. The outer haloes are made primarily of accreted stars. Their mean metallicity and alpha-enhancement reflect the masses of the disrupted satellites where they formed: more massive satellites typically have higher [Fe/H] and lower [alpha/Fe]. Surviving satellites have distinctive chemical patterns which reflect their extended, bursty star formation histories. These produce lower alpha-enhancement at given metallicity than in the main galaxy, in agreement with observed trends in the Milky Way.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.4556  [pdf] - 1077482
Chemical evolution during gas-rich galaxy interactions
Comments: 13 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-06-22
We analyse a set of galaxy interactions performed by using a self-consistent chemo-hydrodynamical model which includes star formation, Supernova feedback and chemical evolution. In agreement with previous works, we find that tidally-induced low-metallicity gas inflows dilute the central oxygen abundance and contribute to the flattening of the metallicity gradients. The tidally-induced inflows trigger starbursts which increase the impact of SN II feedback injecting new chemical elements and driving galactic winds which modulate the metallicity distribution. Although $\alpha$-enhancement in the central regions is detected as a result of the induced starbursts in agreement with previous works, our simulations suggest that this parameter can only provide a timing of the first pericentre mainly for non-retrograde encounters. In order to reproduce wet major mergers at low and high redshifts, we have run simulations with respectively 20 and 50 percent of the disc in form of gas. We find that the more gas-rich encounters behave similarly to the less rich ones, between the first and second pericentre where low-metallicity gas inflows are triggered. However, the higher strength of the inflows triggered in the more gas-rich interactions produces larger metal dilutions factors which are afterward modulated by the new chemical production by Supernova. We find that the more gas-rich interaction develops violent and clumpy star formation triggered by local instabilities all over the disc before the first pericentre, so that if these galaxies were observed at these early stages where no important tidally-induced inflows have been able to develop yet, they would tend to show an excess of oxygen. We find a global mean correlation of both the central abundances and the gradients with the strength of the star formation activity. [abridged]
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.3081  [pdf] - 1077321
Ram pressure profiles in galaxy groups and clusters
Comments: 7 pages, 6 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-06-15
Using a hybrid method which combines non-radiative hydrodynamical simulations with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, we determine the ram pressure as a function of halocentric distance experienced by galaxies in haloes with virial masses 12.5 <= log (M_200 h/M_Sun) < 15.35, for redshifts 0 <= z <= 3. The ram pressure is calculated with a self-consistent method which uses the simulation gas particles to obtain the properties of the intergalactic medium. The ram pressure profiles obtained can be well described by beta profile models, with parameters that depend on redshift and halo virial mass in a simple fashion. The fitting formulae provided here will prove useful to include ram pressure effects into semi-analytic models based on methods which lack gas physics, such as dark matter-only simulations or the Press-Schechter formalism.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.0680  [pdf] - 1076390
Formation history, structure and dynamics of discs and spheroids in simulated Milky Way mass galaxies
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS. 20 pages, 18 figures
Submitted: 2011-05-03
We study the stellar discs and spheroids in eight simulations of galaxy formation within Milky Way-mass haloes in a Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmology. A first paper in this series concentrated on disc properties. Here, we extend this analysis to study how the formation history, structure and dynamics of discs and spheroids relate to the assembly history and structure of their haloes. We find that discs are generally young, with stars spanning a wide range in stellar age: the youngest stars define thin discs and have near-circular orbits, while the oldest stars form thicker discs which rotate ~2 times slower than the thin components, and have 2-3 times larger velocity dispersions. Unlike the discs, spheroids form early and on short time-scales, and are dominated by velocity dispersion. We find great variety in their structure. The inner regions are bar- or bulge-like, while the extended outer haloes are rich in complex non-equilibrium structures such as stellar streams, shells and clumps. Our discs have very high in-situ fractions, i.e. most of their stars formed in the disc itself. Nevertheless, there is a non-negligible contribution (~15 percent) from satellites that are accreted on nearly coplanar orbits. The inner regions of spheroids also have relatively high in-situ fractions, but 65-85 percent of their outer stellar population is accreted. We analyse the circular velocities, rotation velocities and velocity dispersions of our discs and spheroids, both for gas and stars, showing that the dynamical structure is complex as a result of the non-trivial interplay between cooling and SN heating.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.5201  [pdf] - 1076266
Chemical abundances and spatial distribution of Long Gamma-Ray Bursts
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-04-27
We analyse the spatial distribution within host galaxies and chemical properties of the progenitors of Long Gamma Ray Bursts as a function of redshift. By using hydrodynamical cosmological simulations which include star formation, Supernova feedback and chemical enrichment and based on the hypothesis of the collapsar model with low metallicity, we investigate the progenitors in the range 0 < z < 3. Our results suggest that the sites of these phenomena tend to be located in the central regions of the hosts at high redshifts but move outwards for lower ones. We find that scenarios with low metallicity cut-offs best fit current observations. For these scenarios Long Gamma Ray Bursts tend to be [Fe/H] poor and show a strong alpha-enhancement evolution towards lower values as redshift decreases. The variation of typical burst sites with redshift would imply that they might be tracing different part of galaxies at different redshifts.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.2103  [pdf] - 342936
The role of supernova feedback on the origin of the stellar and baryonic Tully-Fisher relations
Comments: Accepted for publication in BAAA, Vol. 53, 2010. 4 pages, baaa2010.sty
Submitted: 2011-04-11
In this work, we studied the stellar and baryonic Tully-Fisher relations by using hydrodynamical simulations in a cosmological framework. We found that supernova feedback plays an important role on shaping the stellar Tully-Fisher relation causing a steepening of its slope at the low-mass end, consistently with observations. The bend of the relation occurs at a characteristic velocity of approximately 100 km/s, in concordance with previous observational and theoretical findings. With respect to the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, the model predicts a linear trend at z~0 with a weaker tendency for a bend at higher redshifts. In our simulations, this behaviour is a consequence of the more efficient action of supernova feedback at regulating the star formation process in smaller galaxies.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.2367  [pdf] - 290281
Supernova Feedback and the Bend of the Tully-Fisher Relation
Comments: 2 pages, to appear in the proceedings of the XIII Latin American Regional IAU Meeting, Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico, November 8-12, 2010
Submitted: 2011-01-12
We have studied the origin of the Tully-Fisher relation by analysing hydrodynamical simulations in a Lambda-CDM universe. We found that smaller galaxies exhibit lower stellar masses than those predicted by the linear fit to high mass galaxies (fast rotators), consistently with observations. In this model, these trends are generated by the more efficient action of Supernova feedback in the regulation of the star formation in smaller galaxies. Without introducing scale-dependent parameters, the model predicts that the Tully-Fisher relation bends at a characteristic velocity of around 100 km/s, in agreement with previous observational and theoretical findings.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.5446  [pdf] - 251313
Ram pressure stripping in a galaxy formation model. I. A novel numerical approach
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS. Minor changes to match published version
Submitted: 2010-06-28, last modified: 2010-10-13
We develop a new numerical approach to describe the action of ram pressure stripping (RPS) within a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation and evolution which works in combination with non-radiative hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters. The new feature in our method is the use of the gas particles to obtain the kinematical and thermodynamical properties of the intragroup and intracluster medium (ICM). This allows a self-consistent estimation of the RPS experienced by satellite galaxies. We find that the ram pressure (RP) in the central regions of clusters increases approximately one order of magnitude between z = 1 and 0, consistent with the increase in the density of the ICM. The mean RP experienced by galaxies within the virial radius increases with decreasing redshift. In clusters with virial masses M_vir ~10^15 h^-1 M_Sun, over 50 per cent of satellite galaxies have experienced RP ~10^(-11) h^2 dyn cm^-2 or higher for z <= 0.5. In smaller clusters (M_vir ~10^14 h^-1 M_Sun) the mean RP are approximately one order of magnitude lower at all redshifts. RPS has a strong effect on the cold gas content of galaxies for all cluster masses. At z = 0, over 70 per cent of satellite galaxies within the virial radius are completely depleted of cold gas. For the more massive clusters the fraction of depleted galaxies is already established at z ~ 1, whereas for the smaller clusters this fraction increases appreciably between z = 1 and 0. This indicates that the rate at which the cold gas is stripped depends on the virial mass of the host cluster. Compared to our new approach, the use of an analytic profile to describe the ICM results in an overestimation of the RP larger than 50 per cent for z >= 0.5.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.4036  [pdf] - 1032675
Host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts in the Millennium Simulation
Comments: 11 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-05-21, last modified: 2010-06-28
(abridged) In this work, we investigate the nature of the host galaxies of long Gamma-Ray bursts (LGRBs) using a galaxy catalogue constructed from the Millennium Simulation. We developed an LGRB synthetic model based on the hypothesis that these events originate at the end of the life of massive stars following the collapsar model, with the possibility of including a constraint on the metallicity of the progenitor star. A complete observability pipeline was designed to calculate a probability estimation for a galaxy to be observationally identified as a host for LGRBs detected by present observational facilities. This new tool allows us to build an observable host galaxy catalogue which is required to reproduce the current stellar mass distribution of observed hosts. This observability pipeline predicts that the minimum mass for the progenitor stars should be ~75 solar masses in order to be able to reproduce BATSE observations. Systems in our observable catalogue are able to reproduce the observed properties of host galaxies, namely stellar masses, colours, luminosity, star formation activity and metallicities as a function of redshift. At z>2, our model predicts that the observable host galaxies would be very similar to the global galaxy population. We found that ~88 per cent of the observable host galaxies with mean gas metallicity lower than 0.6 solar have stellar masses in the range 10^8.5-10^10.3 solar masses in excellent agreement with observations. Interestingly, in our model observable host galaxies remain mainly within this mass range regardless of redshift, since lower stellar mass systems would have a low probability of being observed while more massive ones would be too metal-rich. Observable host galaxies are predicted to preferentially inhabit dark matter haloes in the range 10^11-10^11.5 solar masses, with a weak dependence on redshift.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.4960  [pdf] - 1032771
Impact of Supernova feedback on the Tully-Fisher relation
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2010-05-26, last modified: 2010-05-31
Recent observational results found a bend in the Tully-Fisher Relation in such a way that low mass systems lay below the linear relation described by more massive galaxies. We intend to investigate the origin of the observed features in the stellar and baryonic Tully-Fisher relations and analyse the role played by galactic outflows on their determination. Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations which include Supernova feedback were performed in order to follow the dynamical evolution of galaxies. We found that Supernova feedback is a fundamental process in order to reproduce the observed trends in the stellar Tully-Fisher relation. Simulated slow rotating systems tend to have lower stellar masses than those predicted by the linear fit to the massive end of the relation, consistently with observations. This feature is not present if Supernova feedback is turned off. In the case of the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, we also detect a weaker tendency for smaller systems to lie below the linear relation described by larger ones. This behaviour arises as a result of the more efficient action of Supernovae in the regulation of the star formation process and in the triggering of powerful galactic outflows in shallower potential wells which may heat up and/or expel part of the gas reservoir.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.2316  [pdf] - 1018333
Dark matter response to galaxy formation
Comments: 14 pages, 9 figures. Accepted MNRAS. Revised version includes discussion on resolution effects and minor changes.
Submitted: 2009-11-12, last modified: 2010-04-02
We have resimulated the six galaxy-sized haloes of the Aquarius Project including metal-dependent cooling, star formation and supernova feedback. This allows us to study not only how dark matter haloes respond to galaxy formation, but also how this response is affected by details of halo assembly history. In agreement with previous work, we find baryon condensation to lead to increased dark matter concentration. Dark matter density profiles differ substantially in shape from halo to halo when baryons are included, but in all cases the velocity dispersion decreases monotonically with radius. Some haloes show an approximately constant dark matter velocity anisotropy with $ \beta \approx 0.1-02$, while others retain the anisotropy structure of their baryon-free versions. Most of our haloes become approximately oblate in their inner regions, although a few retain the shape of their dissipationless counterparts. Pseudo-phase-space densities are described by a power law in radius of altered slope when baryons are included. The shape and concentration of the dark matter density profiles are not well reproduced by published adiabatic contraction models. The significant spread we find in the density and kinematic structure of our haloes appears related to differences in their formation histories. Such differences already affect the final structure in baryon-free simulations, but they are reinforced by the inclusion of baryons, and new features are produced. The details of galaxy formation need to be better understood before the inner dark matter structure of galaxies can be used to constrain cosmological models or the nature of dark matter.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.4380  [pdf] - 1018054
The joint evolution of baryons and dark matter haloes
Comments: 16 pages, 16 figures, accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-10-22, last modified: 2009-11-30
We have studied the dark matter (DM) distribution in a approx 10^12 h^-1 M_sun mass halo extracted from a simulation consistent with the concordance cosmology, where the physics regulating the transformation of gas into stars was allowed to change producing galaxies with different morphologies. The presence of baryons produces the concentration of the DM halo with respect to its corresponding dissipationless run, but we found that this response does not only depend on the amount of baryons gathered in the central region but also on the way they have been assembled. DM and baryons affect each other in a complex way so the formation history of a galaxy plays an important role on its final total mass distribution. Supernova (SN) feedback regulates the star formation and triggers galactic outflows not only in the central galaxy but also in its satellites. Our results suggest that, as the effects of SN feedback get stronger, satellites get less massive and can even be more easily disrupted by dynamical friction, transferring less angular momentum. We found indications that this angular momentum could be acquired not only by the outer part of the DM halo but also by the inner ones and by the stellar component in the central galaxy. The latter effect produces stellar migration which contributes to change the inner potential well, probably working against further DM contraction. As a consequence of the action of these processes, when the halo hosts a galaxy with an important disc structure formed by smooth gas accretion, it is more concentrated than when it hosts a spheroidal system which experienced more massive mergers and interactions. (abridged)
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.2845  [pdf] - 1001958
Building a control sample for galaxy pairs
Comments: Accepted for publicacion in MNRAS; 9 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2009-04-18, last modified: 2009-06-18
Several observational works have attempted to isolate the effects of galaxy interactions by comparing galaxies in pairs with isolated galaxies. However, different authors have proposed different ways to build these so-called control samples (CS). By using mock galaxy catalogues of the SDSS-DR4 built up from the Millennium Simulation, we explore how the way of building a CS might introduce biases which could affect the interpretation of results. We make use of the fact that the physics of interactions is not included in the semianalytic model, to infer that any difference between the mock control and pair samples can be ascribed to selection biases. Thus, we find that galaxies in pairs artificially tend to be older and more bulge-dominated, and to have less cold gas and different metallicities than their isolated counterparts. Also because of a biased selection, galaxies in pairs tend to live in higher density environments, and in haloes of larger masses. We find that imposing constraints on redshift, stellar masses and local densities diminishes the selection biases by ~70%. Based on these findings, we suggest observers how to build an unique and unbiased CS in order to reveal the effect of galaxy interactions.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.2851  [pdf] - 1001959
Global environmental effects versus galaxy interactions
Comments: submitted to MNRAS, 12 pages, 9 figures (For people who have tried to download this paper, I've already changed the wrong version)
Submitted: 2009-04-18, last modified: 2009-04-21
We explore properties of close galaxy pairs and merging systems selected from the SDSS-DR4 in different environments with the aim to assess the relative importance of the role of interactions over global environmental processes. For this purpose, we perform a comparative study of galaxies with and without close companions as a function of local density and host-halo mass, carefully removing sources of possible biases. We find that at low and high local density environments, colours and morphologies of close galaxy pairs are very similar to those of isolated galaxies. At intermediate densities, we detect significant differences, indicating that close pairs could have experienced a more rapid transition onto the red sequence than isolated galaxies. The presence of a correlation between colours and morphologies indicates that the physical mechanism responsible for the colour transformation also operates changing galaxy morphologies. Regardless of dark matter halo mass, we show that the percentage of red galaxies in close pairs and in the control sample are comparable at low and high local density environments. However, at intermediate local densities, the gap in the red fraction between close pairs and the control galaxies increases from ~10% in low mass haloes up to ~50% in the most massive ones. Our findings suggest that in intermediate density environments galaxies are efficiently pre-processed by close encounters and mergers before entering higher local density regions. (Abridge)
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:0812.0976  [pdf] - 1001155
The Formation and Survival of Discs in a Lambda-CDM Universe
Comments: 14 pages, 10 figures, mn2e.cls. MNRAS in press, updated to match published version
Submitted: 2008-12-04, last modified: 2009-04-03
We study the formation of galaxies in a Lambda-CDM Universe using high resolution hydrodynamical simulations with a multiphase treatment of gas, cooling and feedback, focusing on the formation of discs. Our simulations follow eight haloes similar in mass to the Milky Way and extracted from a large cosmological simulation without restriction on spin parameter or merger history. This allows us to investigate how the final properties of the simulated galaxies correlate with the formation histories of their haloes. We find that, at z = 0, none of our galaxies contain a disc with more than 20 per cent of its total stellar mass. Four of the eight galaxies nevertheless have well-formed disc components, three have dominant spheroids and very small discs, and one is a spheroidal galaxy with no disc at all. The z = 0 spheroids are made of old stars, while discs are younger and formed from the inside-out. Neither the existence of a disc at z = 0 nor the final disc-to-total mass ratio seems to depend on the spin parameter of the halo. Discs are formed in haloes with spin parameters as low as 0.01 and as high as 0.05; galaxies with little or no disc component span the same range in spin parameter. Except for one of the simulated galaxies, all have significant discs at z > ~2, regardless of their z = 0 morphologies. Major mergers and instabilities which arise when accreting cold gas is misaligned with the stellar disc trigger a transfer of mass from the discs to the spheroids. In some cases, discs are destroyed, while in others, they survive or reform. This suggests that the survival probability of discs depends on the particular formation history of each galaxy. A realistic Lambda-CDM model will clearly require weaker star formation at high redshift and later disc assembly than occurs in our models.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.2100  [pdf] - 21296
The impact of baryons on dark matter haloes
Comments: 5 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-02-12
We analyse the dark matter (DM) distribution in a approx 10^12 M_sun halo extracted from a simulation consistent with the concordance cosmology, where the physics regulating the transformation of gas into stars was allowed to change producing galaxies with different morphologies. Although the DM profiles get more concentrated as baryons are collected at the centre of the haloes compared to a pure dynamical run, the total baryonic mass alone is not enough to fully predict the reaction of the DM profile. We also note that baryons affect the DM distribution even outside the central regions. Those systems where the transformation of gas into stars is regulated by Supernova (SN) feedback, so that significant disc structures are able to form, are found to have more concentrated dark matter profiles than a galaxy which has efficiently transformed most of its baryons into stars at early times. The accretion of satellites is found to be associated with an expansion of the dark matter profiles, triggered by angular momentum transfer from the incoming satellites. As the impact of SN feedback increases, the satellites get less massive and are even strongly disrupted before getting close to the main structure causing less angular momentum transfer. Our findings suggest that the response of the DM halo is driven by the history of assembly of baryons into a galaxy along their merger tree.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:0806.2872  [pdf] - 13651
Milky Way type galaxies in a LCDM cosmology
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, mne2.cls, MNRAS, replaced with accepted version
Submitted: 2008-06-17, last modified: 2009-01-29
We analyse a sample of 52,000 Milky Way (MW) type galaxies drawn from the publicly available galaxy catalogue of the Millennium Simulation with the aim of studying statistically the differences and similarities of their properties in comparison to our Galaxy. Model galaxies are chosen to lie in haloes with maximum circular velocities in the range 200-250 km/seg and to have bulge-to-disk ratios similar to that of the Milky Way. We find that model MW galaxies formed quietly through the accretion of cold gas and small satellite systems. Only 12 per cent of our model galaxies experienced a major merger during their lifetime. Most of the stars formed in situ, with only about 15 per cent of the final mass gathered through accretion. Supernovae and AGN feedback play an important role in the evolution of these systems. At high redshifts, when the potential wells of the MW progenitors are shallower, winds driven by supernovae explosions blow out a large fraction of the gas and metals. As the systems grow in mass, SN feedback effects decrease and AGN feedback takes over, playing a more important role in the regulation of the star formation activity at lower redshifts. Although model Milky Way galaxies have been selected to lie in a narrow range of maximum circular velocities, they nevertheless exhibit a significant dispersion in the final stellar masses and metallicities. Our analysis suggests that this dispersion results from the different accretion histories of the parent dark matter haloes. Statically, we also find evidences to support the Milky Way as a typical Sb/Sc galaxy in the same mass range, providing a suitable benchmark to constrain numerical models of galaxy formation
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.4478  [pdf] - 12152
The influence of halo assembly on galaxies and galaxy groups
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS. Send comments to taz@astro.iag.usp.br
Submitted: 2008-04-28, last modified: 2009-01-12
In this paper, we study the variations of group galaxy properties according to the assembly history in SDSS-DR6 selected groups. Using mock SDSS group catalogues, we find two suitable indicators of group formation time: i) the isolation of the group, defined as the distance to the nearest neighbor in terms of its virial radius, and ii) the concentration, measured as the group inner density calculated using the fifth nearest bright galaxy to the group centre. Groups within narrow ranges of mass in the mock catalogue show increasing group age with isolation and concentration. However, in the observational data the stellar age, as indicated by the spectral type, only shows a correlation with concentration. We study groups of similar mass and different assembly history, finding important differences in their galaxy population. Particularly, in high mass SDSS groups, the number of members, mass-to-light ratios, red galaxy fractions and the magnitude difference between the brightest and second brightest group galaxies, show different trends as a function of isolation and concentration, even when it is expected that the latter two quantities correlate with group age. Conversely, low mass SDSS groups appear to be less sensitive to their assembly history. The correlations detected in the SDSS are not consistent with the trends measured in the mock catalogues. However, discrepancies can be explained in terms of the disagreement found in the age-isolation trends, suggesting that the model might be overestimating the effects of environment.We discuss how the modeling of the cold gas in satellite galaxies could be responsible for this problem. These results can be used to improve our understanding of the evolution of galaxies in high-density environments.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.2718  [pdf] - 1000877
Effects of Supernova Feedback on the Formation of Galaxies
Comments: To appear in "The Galaxy Disk in Cosmological Context"; Proceedings of IAU254; 9-13 June 2008; Copenhagen; v2: typo corrected; uses iaus.cls
Submitted: 2008-08-20, last modified: 2008-08-21
We study the effects of Supernova (SN) feedback on the formation of galaxies using hydrodynamical simulations in a Lambda-CDM cosmology. We use an extended version of the code GADGET-2 which includes chemical enrichment and energy feedback by Type II and Type Ia SN, metal-dependent cooling and a multiphase model for the gas component. We focus on the effects of SN feedback on the star formation process, galaxy morphology, evolution of the specific angular momentum and chemical properties. We find that SN feedback plays a fundamental role in galaxy evolution, producing a self-regulated cycle for star formation, preventing the early consumption of gas and allowing disks to form at late times. The SN feedback model is able to reproduce the expected dependence on virial mass, with less massive systems being more strongly affected.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.3795  [pdf] - 12030
Effects of Supernova Feedback on the Formation of Galaxy Disks
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures, mne2.cls, MNRAS, replaced with accepted version
Submitted: 2008-04-23, last modified: 2008-07-24
We use cosmological simulations in order to study the effects of supernova (SN) feedback on the formation of a Milky Way-type galaxy of virial mass ~10^12 M_sun/h. We analyse a set of simulations run with the code described by Scannapieco et al. (2005, 2006), where we have tested our star formation and feedback prescription using isolated galaxy models. Here we extend this work by simulating the formation of a galaxy in its proper cosmological framework, focusing on the ability of the model to form a disk-like structure in rotational support. We find that SN feedback plays a fundamental role in the evolution of the simulated galaxy, efficiently regulating the star formation activity, pressurizing the gas and generating mass-loaded galactic winds. These processes affect several galactic properties such as final stellar mass, morphology, angular momentum, chemical properties, and final gas and baryon fractions. In particular, we find that our model is able to reproduce extended disk components with high specific angular momentum and a significant fraction of young stars. The galaxies are also found to have significant spheroids composed almost entirely of stars formed at early times. We find that most combinations of the input parameters yield disk-like components, although with different sizes and thicknesses, indicating that the code can form disks without fine-tuning the implemented physics. We also show how our model scales to smaller systems. By analysing simulations of virial masses 10^9 M_sun/h and 10^10 M_sun/h, we find that the smaller the galaxy, the stronger the SN feedback effects.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.2548  [pdf] - 14565
Effects of SN Feedback on the Dark Matter Distribution
Comments: 6 pages, 5 figures, Proceedings of IAU Symposium 254 "The Galaxy disk in a cosmological context", Copenhagen, June 2008
Submitted: 2008-07-16
We use cosmological simulations to study the effects of supernova (SN) feedback on the dark matter distribution in galaxies. We simulate the formation of a Milky-Way type galaxy using a version of the SPH code GADGET2 which includes chemical enrichment and energy feedback by SN, a multiphase model for the gas component and metal-dependent cooling. We analyse the impact of the main three input SN feedback parameters on the amplitude and shape of the dark matter density profiles, focusing on the inner regions of the halo. In order to test the dependence of the results on the halo mass, we simulated a scale-down version of this system. First results of this ongoing work show that the dark matter distribution is affected by the feedback, through the redistribution of the baryons. Our findings suggest that the response of the dark matter halo could be the result of a combination of several physical parameters such as the amount of stellar mass formed at the centre, its shape, and probably the bursty characteristics of the star formation rate. As expected, we find that the dark matter haloes of small galaxies are more sensitive to SN feedback. Higher resolution simulations are being performed to test for numerical effects.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.0533  [pdf] - 11466
Rotation curve bifurcations as indicators of close recent galaxy encounters
Comments: 4 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2008-04-03
Rotation curves of interacting galaxies often show that velocities are either rising or falling in the direction of the companion galaxy. We seek to reproduce and analyse these features in the rotation curves of simulated equal-mass galaxies suffering a one-to-one encounter, as possible indicators of close encounters. Using simulations of major mergers in 3D, we study the time evolution of these asymmetries in a pair of galaxies, during the first passage. Our main results are: (a) the rotation curve asymmetries appear right at pericentre of the first passage, (b) the significant disturbed rotation velocities occur within a small time interval, of ~ 0.5 Gyr h^-1, and therefore the presence of bifurcation in the velocity curve could be used as an indicator of the pericentre occurrence. These results are in qualitative agreement with previous findings for minor mergers and fly-byes.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.3904  [pdf] - 10457
The mass-metallicity relation of interacting galaxies
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2008-02-26
We study the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies in pairs and in isolation taken from the SDSS-DR4 using the stellar masses and oxygen abundances derived by Tremonti et al. (2004). Close galaxy pairs, defined by projected separation r_p < 25kpc/h and radial velocity Delta_V < 350 km/s, are morphologically classified according to the strength of the interaction signs. We find that only for pairs showing signs of strong interactions, the mass-metallicity relation differs significantly from that of galaxies in isolation. In such pairs, the mean gas-phase oxygen abundances of galaxies with low stellar masses (Mstar ~< 10^9 Msun/h) exhibit an excess of 0.2 dex. Conversely, at larger masses (Mstar >~ 10^10 Msun/h) galaxies have a systematically lower metallicity, although with a smaller difference (-0.05 dex). Similar trends are obtained if g-band magnitudes are used instead of stellar masses. In minor interactions, we find that the less massive member is systematically enriched, while a galaxy in interaction with a comparable stellar mass companion shows a metallicity decrement with respect to galaxies in isolation. We argue that metal-rich starbursts triggered by a more massive component, and inflows of low metallicity gas induced by comparable or less massive companion galaxies, provide a natural scenario to explain our findings.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0611122  [pdf] - 86508
The host galaxies of long-duration GRBs in a cosmological hierarchical scenario
Comments: Final revised version with minor changes. 9 pages, 9 figures, mn2e.cls. To appear in MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-11-03, last modified: 2007-02-05
We developed a Monte Carlo code to generate long-duration gamma ray burst (LGRB) events within cosmological hydrodynamical simulations consistent with the concordance model. As structure is assembled, LGRBs are generated in the substructure that formed galaxies today. We adopted the collapsar model so that LGRBs are produced by single, massive stars at the final stage of their evolution. We found that the observed properties of the LGRB host galaxies (HGs) are reproduced if LGRBs are also required to be generated by low metallicity stars. The low metallicity condition imposed on the progenitor stars of LGRBs selects a sample of HGs with mean gas abundances of 12 + log O/H \~ 8.6. For z<1 the simulated HGs of low metallicity LGRB progenitors tend to be faint, slow rotators with high star formation efficiency, compared with the general galaxy population, in agreement with observations. At higher redshift, our results suggest that larger systems with high star formation activity could also contribute to the generation of LGRBs from low metallicity progenitors since the fraction of low metallicity gas available for star formation increases for all systems with look-back time. Under the hypothesis of our LGRB model, our results support the claim that LGRBs could be unbiased tracers of star formation at high redshifts.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0701192  [pdf] - 88321
AGNs and galaxy interactions
Comments: 9 pages, 9 figures, accepted MNRAS
Submitted: 2007-01-08
We perform a statistical analysis of AGN host characteristics and nuclear activity for AGNs in pairs and without companions. Our study concerns a sample of AGNs derived from the SDSS-DR4 data by Kauffmann et al (2003) and pair galaxies obtained from the same data set by Alonso et al. (2006). An eye-ball classification of images of 1607 close pairs ($r_p<25$ kpc $h^{-1}$, $\Delta V<350$ km $s^{-1}$) according to the evidence of interaction through distorted morphologies and tidal features provides us with a more confident assessment of galaxy interactions from this sample. We notice that, at a given luminosity or stellar mass content, the fraction of AGNs is larger for pair galaxies exhibiting evidence for strong interaction and tidal features which also show sings of strong star formation activity. Nevertheless, this process accounts only for a $\sim 10%$ increase of the fraction of AGNs. As in previous works, we find AGN hosts to be redder and with a larger concentration morphological index than non-AGN galaxies. This effect does not depend whether AGN hosts are in pairs or in isolation. The OIII luminosity of AGNs with strong interaction features is found to be significantly larger than that of other AGNs, either in pairs or in isolation. Estimations of the accretion rate, $L[OIII]/M_{BH}$, show that AGNs in merging pairs are actively feeding their black holes, regardless of their stellar masses. We also find that the luminosity of the companion galaxy seems to be a key parameter in the determination of the black hole activity. At a given host luminosity, both the OIII luminosity and the $L[OIII]/M_{BH}$ are significantly larger in AGNs with a bright companion ($M_r < -20$) than otherwise.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0609243  [pdf] - 84835
Clues for the origin of the fundamental metallicity relations. I: The hierarchical building up of the structure
Comments: 17 pages, 13 figures. Minor changes to match accepted version. Accepted October 3 MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-09-08, last modified: 2006-10-05
We analyse the evolutionary history of galaxies formed in a hierarchical scenario consistent with the concordance $\Lambda$-CDM model focusing on the study of the relation between their chemical and dynamical properties. Our simulations consistently describe the formation of the structure and its chemical enrichment within a cosmological context. Our results indicate that the luminosity-metallicity (LZR) and the stellar mass-metallicity (MZR) relations are naturally generated in a hierarchical scenario. Both relations are found to evolve with redshift. In the case of the MZR, the estimated evolution is weaker than that deduced from observational works by approximately 0.10 dex. We also determine a characteristic stellar mass, $M_c \approx 3 \times 10^{10} M_{\odot}$, which segregates the simulated galaxy population into two distinctive groups and which remains unchanged since $z\sim 3$, with a very weak evolution of its metallicity content. The value and role played by $M_c$ is consistent with the characteristic mass estimated from the SDSS galaxy survey by Kauffmann et al. (2004). Our findings suggest that systems with stellar masses smaller than $M_c$ are responsible for the evolution of this relation at least from $ z\approx 3$. Larger systems are stellar dominated and have formed more than 50 per cent of their stars at $z \ge 2$, showing very weak evolution since this epoch. We also found bimodal metallicity and age distributions from $z\sim3$, which reflects the existence of two different galaxy populations. Although SN feedback may affect the properties of galaxies and help to shape the MZR, it is unlikely that it will significantly modify $M_c$ since, from $z=3$ this stellar mass is found in systems with circular velocities larger than $100 \kms$.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0604524  [pdf] - 81593
Feedback and metal enrichment in cosmological SPH simulations - II. A multiphase model with supernova energy feedback
Comments: 18 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-04-25, last modified: 2006-08-23
We have developed a new scheme to treat a multiphase interstellar medium in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of galaxy formation. This scheme can represent a co-spatial mixture of cold and hot ISM components, and is formulated without scale-dependent parameters. It is thus particularly suited to studies of cosmological structure formation where galaxies with a wide range of masses form simultaneously. We also present new algorithms for energy and heavy element injection by supernovae, and show that together these schemes can reproduce several important observed effects in galaxy evolution. Both in collapsing systems and in quiescent galaxies our codes can reproduce the Kennicutt relation between the surface densities of gas and of star formation. Strongly metal-enhanced winds are generated in both cases with ratios of mass-loss to star formation which are similar to those observed. This leads to a self-regulated cycle for star formation activity. The overall impact of feedback depends on galaxy mass. Star formation is suppressed at most by a factor of a few in massive galaxies, but in low-mass systems the effects can be much larger, giving star formation an episodic, bursty character. The larger the energy fraction assumed available in feedback, the more massive the outflows and the lower the final stellar masses. Winds from forming disks are collimated perpendicular to the disk plane, reach velocities up to 1000 km/s, and efficiently transport metals out of the galaxies. The asymptotically unbound baryon fraction drops from >95 per cent to ~30 per cent from the least to the most massive of our idealised galaxies, but the fraction of all metals ejected with this component exceeds 60 per cent regardless of mass. Such winds could plausibly enrich the intergalactic medium to observed levels.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0505440  [pdf] - 73210
Feedback and metal enrichment in cosmological SPH simulations I. A model for chemical enrichment
Comments: 15 pages, 15 figures, MNRAS, modified to match published version
Submitted: 2005-05-20, last modified: 2006-07-10
We discuss a model for treating chemical enrichment by SNII and SNIa explosions in simulations of cosmological structure formation. Our model includes metal-dependent radiative cooling and star formation in dense collapsed gas clumps. Metals are returned into the diffuse interstellar medium by star particles using a local SPH smoothing kernel. A variety of chemical abundance patterns in enriched gas arise in our treatment owing to the different yields and lifetimes of SNII and SNIa progenitor stars. In the case of SNII chemical production, we adopt metal-dependent yields. Because of the sensitive dependence of cooling rates on metallicity, enrichment of galactic haloes with metals can in principle significantly alter subsequent gas infall and the build up of the stellar components. Indeed, in simulations of isolated galaxies we find that a consistent treatment of metal-dependent cooling produces 25% more stars outside the central region than simulations with a primordial cooling function. In the highly-enriched central regions, the evolution of baryons is however not affected by metal cooling, because here the gas is always dense enough to cool. A similar situation is found in cosmological simulations because we include no strong feedback processes which could spread metals over large distances and mix them into unenriched diffuse gas. We demonstrate this explicitly with test simulations which adopt super-solar cooling functions leading to large changes both in the stellar mass and in the metal distributions. We also find that the impact of metallicity on the star formation histories of galaxies may depend on their particular evolutionary history. Our results hence emphasise the importance of feedback processes for interpreting the cosmic metal enrichment.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0511450  [pdf] - 77808
Study of the relationship between the gamma ray bursts and their host galaxies
Comments: Minor changes after referee report. To appear in the 48th Bulletin of the Argentine Astronomical Society (BAAA 48, 2005). 4 pages, baaa-eng.sty
Submitted: 2005-11-15, last modified: 2006-05-05
Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) belong to the most energetic events in the Universe. Recently, the extragalactic nature of these sources has been confirmed with the discovery of several host galaxies (HGs) and the measurement of their redshifts. To explain the origin of GRBs various models have been proposed, among which the coalescence of compact objects and the "collapsar" scenarios are the most representative, being the collapsar model one of the most accepted to explain the long duration GRBs. A natural consequence of this model is that the GRBs would trace the star formation rate (SFR) of their HGs. In this contributed paper we present preliminary results of the development of a Montecarlo-based code for collapsar event formation which is coupled to chemical-cosmological simulations aiming at studying the properties of HGs in a hierarchical scenario.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605131  [pdf] - 81819
Galaxy pairs in cosmological simulations: effects of interactions on colours and chemical abundances
Comments: Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2006-05-04
We perform an statistical analysis of galaxies in pairs in a Lambda-CDM scenario by using the chemical GADGET-2 of Scannapieco et al. (2005) in order to study the effects of galaxy interactions on colours and metallicities. We find that galaxy-galaxy interactions can produce a bimodal colour distribution with galaxies with significant recent star formation activity contributing mainly to blue colours. In the simulations, the colours and the fractions of recently formed stars of galaxies in pairs depend on environment more strongly than those of galaxies without a close companion, suggesting that interactions play an important role in galaxy evolution. If the metallicity of the stellar populations is used as the chemical indicator, we find that the simulated galaxies determine luminosity-metallicity and stellar mass-metallicity relations which do not depend on the presence of a close companion. However, in the case of the luminosity-metallicity relation, at a given level of enrichment, we detect a systematic displacement of the relation to brighter magnitudes for active star forming systems. Regardless of relative distance and current level of star formation activity, galaxies in pairs have stellar populations with higher level of enrichment than galaxies without a close companion. In the case of the gas component, this is no longer valid for galaxies in pairs with passive star formation which only show an excess of metals for very close pair members, consequence of an important recent past star formation activity. (Abridged).
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603707  [pdf] - 80916
Interactions, Mergers and the Fundamental Mass Relations of Galaxies
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in A&A. Replaced by edited version
Submitted: 2006-03-26, last modified: 2006-05-02
We present a study of the effects of mergers and interactions on the mass distribution of galactic systems in hierarchical clustering scenarios using the disc-bulge structural parameters and their dynamical properties to quantify them. We focus on the analysis of the Fundamental Mass Plane relation, finding that secular evolution phases contribute significantly to the determination of a plane with a slope in agreement to that of the observed luminosity relation. In these simulations, secular phases are responsible for the formation of compact stellar bulges with the correct structural parameter combination. We also test that the relations among these parameters agree with observations. Taking into account these results, the hierarchical growth of the structure predicts a bulge formation scenario for typical field spiral galaxies where secular evolution during dissipate mergers plays a fundamental role. Conversely, subsequent mergers can help to enlarge the bulges but do not seem to strongly modify their fundamental mass relations. Systems get to the local mass relations at different stages of evolution (i.e. different redshifts) so that their formation histories introduce a natural scatter in the relations. Our results suggest that the formation mechanisms of the bulge and disc components, satisfying their corresponding fundamental mass relations, might be coupled and that secular evolution could be the possible connecting process.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0511482  [pdf] - 77840
Study of the Origin of the Luminosity-Metallicity and the Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relations in Hierarchical Universes
Comments: Presented at the 48th Annual Meeting of the Argentine Astronomical Society. Accepted for publication in BAAA. 4 pages, baaa-eng.sty
Submitted: 2005-11-16, last modified: 2006-05-02
In this work, we study the Luminosity-Metallicity relation (LMR) and the Stellar Mass -Metallicity relation (MMR) of galactic systems in a hierarhical clustering scenario. We performed numerical hydrodynamical simulations with the chemical GADGET-2 of Scannapieco et al.(2005) in a LCDM universe. We found that our simulated galactic systems reproduce the observed local LMR and its evolution in zero point and slope. The simulated MMR is also in agreement with recent observational results. From the analysis of the evolution of the MMR, we found a characteristic mass at ~10^(10.2) M_sun / h which separates two galactic populations with different astrophysical properties. More massive systems tend to have their stars formed at z > 2 and show less evolution than smaller systems. Hence, this characteristic mass is determined by the formation of the structure in a hierarchical scenario. Our results also suggest the need for important supernova feedback.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603726  [pdf] - 80935
Analysis of the Luminosity-Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relation in cosmological simulations
Comments: To appear in the proceedings of the 11th Latin-American Regional IAU Meeting, (Dec 2005) Pucon, Chile
Submitted: 2006-03-27, last modified: 2006-03-30
We study the Luminosity-Metallicity Relation and the Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relation by performing chemo-dynamical simulations in a cosmological scenario. Our results predict a tight linear correlation between oxygen chemical abundance and luminosity for galactic systems up to z=3. The Luminosity-Metallicity Relation evolves with redshift in such a way that systems at a given oxygen abundance were ~3 dex brighter at z=3 compared to local ones, in good agreement with observations. We determin also a characteristic stellar mass M_c~10^(10.2) M_sun/h above which the Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relation starts to flatten. We encounter that this mass arises as a consequence of the hierarchical aggregation of structure in a LCDM universe and segregates two galactic populations with different astophysical properties.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603633  [pdf] - 1469029
Galaxy Formation and SN Feedback
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure. Presented at LARIM05; to appear in RevMexAst Conf Series
Submitted: 2006-03-23
We present a Supernova (SN) feedback model that succeeds at describing the chemical and energetic effects of SN explosions in galaxy formation simulations. This new SN model has been coupled to GADGET-2 and works within a new multiphase scheme which allows the description of a co-spatial mixture of cold and hot interstellar medium phases. No ad hoc scale-dependent parameters are associated to these SN and multiphase models making them particularly suited to studies of galaxy formation in a cosmological framework. Our SN model succeeds not only in setting a self-regulated star formation activity in galaxies but in triggering collimated chemical-enriched galactic winds. The effects of winds vary with the virial mass of the systems so that the smaller the galaxy, the larger the fraction of swept away gas and the stronger the decrease in its star formation activity. The fact that the fraction of ejected metals exceeds 60 per cent regardless of mass, suggests that SN feedback can be the responsible mechanism of the enrichment of the intergalactic medium to the observed levels.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603174  [pdf] - 80383
Impact of Supernova Explosions on Galaxy Formation
Comments: Proceedings of the 2005 Anual Meeting of the Argentinian Astronomical Society, baaa-eng.sty
Submitted: 2006-03-07
We study the effects of Supernova (SN) feedback on the formation of disc galaxies. For that purpose we run simulations using the extended version of the code GADGET-2 which includes a treatment of chemical and energy feedback by SN explosions. We found that our model succeeds in setting a self-regulated star formation process since an important fraction of the cold gas from the center of the haloes is efficiently heated up and transported outwards. The impact of SN feedback on galactic systems is also found to depend on virial mass: smaller systems are more strongly affected with star formation histories in which several starbursts can develop. Our implementation of SN feedback is also successful in producing violent outflows of chemical enriched material.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603059  [pdf] - 80268
Evolution of the Luminosity-Metallicity-Stellar Mass correlation in a hierarchical scenario
Comments: To appear in "Groups of galaxies in the nearby Universe" ESO Workshop, (Dec 2005) Santiago, Chile
Submitted: 2006-03-02
We study the evolution of the Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relation and the Luminosity-Metallicity Relation by performing numerical simulations in a cosmological framework. We find that the slope and the zero point of the Luminosity-Metallicity Relation evolve in such a way that, at a given metallicity, systems were ~3 mag brighter at z=3 compared to galaxies in the local universe, which is consistent with the observational trend. The local Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relation shows also a good agreement with recent observations. We identify a characteristic stellar mass M_c ~ 10^(10.2) M_sun/h at which the slope of the Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relation decreases for larger stellar masses. Our results indicate that M_c arises naturally as a consequence of the hierarchical building up of the structure.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0602624  [pdf] - 1233741
The role of tidal interactions in driving galaxy evolution
Comments: to appear in "Groups of galaxies in the nearby Universe" ESO Workshop, (Dec 2005) Santiago, Chile
Submitted: 2006-02-28
We carry out a statistical analysis of galaxy pairs selected from chemical hydrodynamical simulations with the aim at assessing the capability of hierarchical scenarios to reproduce recent observational results for galaxies in pairs. Particularly, we analyse the effects of mergers and interactions on the star formation (SF) activity, the global mean chemical properties and the colour distribution of interacting galaxies. We also assess the effects of spurious pairs.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0511362  [pdf] - 77720
Effects of galaxy interactions in different environments
Comments: accepted MNRAS
Submitted: 2005-11-11, last modified: 2006-01-04
We analyse star formation rates derived from photometric and spectroscopic data of galaxies in pairs in different environments using the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The two samples comprise several thousand pairs, suitable to explore into detail the dependence of star formation activity in pairs on orbital parameters and global environment. We use the projected galaxy density derived from the fifth nearest neighbour of each galaxy, with convenient luminosity thresholds to characterise environment in both surveys in a consistent way. Star formation activity is derived through the $\eta$ parameter in 2dFGRS and through the star formation rate normalised to the total mass in stars, $SFR/M^*$, given by Brinchmann et al. (2004) in the second data release SDSS-DR2. For both galaxy pair catalogs, the star formation birth rate parameter is a strong function of the global environment and orbital parameters. Our analysis on SDSS pairs confirms previous results found with the 2dFGRS where suitable thresholds for the star formation activity induced by interactions are estimated at a projected distance $r_{\rm p} = 100 \kpc$ and a relative velocity $\Delta V = 350$ km $s^{-1}$. We observe that galaxy interactions are more effective at triggering important star formation activity in low and moderate density environments with respect to the control sample of galaxies without a close companion. Although close pairs have a larger fraction of actively star-forming galaxies, they also exhibit a greater fraction of red galaxies with respect to those systems without a close companion, an effect that may indicate that dust stirred up during encounters could be affecting colours and, partially, obscuring tidally-induced star formation.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510327  [pdf] - 1469003
Galaxy Pairs in cosmological simulations: Effects of interactions on star formation
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2005-10-11, last modified: 2005-11-18
We carried out a statistical analysis of galaxy pairs in hydrodynamical Lambda-CDM simulations. We focused on the triggering of star formation by interactions and analysed the enhancement of star formation activity in terms of orbital parameters. By comparing to a suitable sample of simulated galaxies without a nearby companion, we find that close encounters (r<30 kpc/h) may effectively induce star formation. However, our results suggest that the stability properties of systems and the spatial proximity are both relevant factors in the process of triggering star formation by tidal interactions. In order to assess the effects of projection and spurious pairs in observational samples, we also constructed and analysed samples of pairs of galaxies in the simulations obtained in projection. We found a good agreement with observational results with a threshold at rp ~ 25 kpc/h for interactions to effectively enhance star formation activity. For pairs within rp < 100 kpc/h, we estimated a ~27% contamination by spurious pairs, reduced to ~19% for close systems. We also found that spurious pairs affect more strongly high density regions with 17% of spurious pairs detected for low density regions compared to 33% found in high density ones. Also, we analysed the dependence of star formation on environment by defining the usual projected density parameter for both pairs and isolated galaxies in the simulations. We find the expected star formation-local density relation for both galaxies in pairs and without a close companion, with a stronger density dependence for close pairs which suggests a relevant role for interactions in driving this relation.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0511574  [pdf] - 77932
Metallicity and colours in galaxy pairs in chemical hydrodynamical simulations
Comments: Presented at the Argentinian Astronomical Society. To appear in BBAA
Submitted: 2005-11-18
Using chemical hydrodynamical simulations consistent with a Lambda-CDM model, we study the role played by mergers and interactions in the regulation of the star formation activity, colours and the chemical properties of galaxies in pairs. A statistical analysis of the orbital parameters in galaxy pairs (r <100 kpc/h) shows that the star formation (SF) activity correlates strongly with the relative separation and weakly with the relative velocity, indicating that close encounters (r <30 kpc/h) can increase the SF activity to levels higher than that exhibit in galaxies without a close companion. Analysing the internal properties of interacting systems, we find that their stability properties also play a role in the regulation the SF activity (Perez et al 2005a). Particularly, we find that the passive star forming galaxies in pairs are statistically more stable with deeper potential wells and less leftover gas than active star forming pairs. In order to compare our results with observations, we also build a projected catalog of galaxy pairs (2D-GP: rp <100 kpc/h and Vr <350 km/s), constructed by projecting the 3D sample in different random directions. In good agreement with observations (Lambas et al 2003), our results indicate that galaxies with rp < 25 kpc/h (close pairs) show an enhancement of the SF activity with respect to galaxies without a close companion. (Abridged.)
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0509440  [pdf] - 76022
Supernova outflows in galaxy formation
Comments: Proceedings for the Vth Marseille International Cosmology Conference: The Fabulous Destiny of Galaxies (5 pages)
Submitted: 2005-09-15
We investigate the generation of galactic outflows by supernova feedback in the context of SPH cosmological simulations. We use a modified version of the code GADGET-2 which includes chemical enrichment and energy feedback by Supernova. We find that energy feedback plays a fundamental role in the evolution of galaxies, heating up the cold material in the centre of the haloes and triggering outflows which efficiently transport gas from the centre to the outskirts of galaxies. The impact of feedback is found to depend on the virial mass of the system with smaller systems, such as dwarf galaxies, being more strongly affected. The outflows help to establish a self-regulated star formation process, and to transport a significant amount of metals into the haloes and even out of the systems. According to our results, energy feedback by supernovae could be the mechanism responsible for the chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0509334  [pdf] - 75916
Confronting Hierarchical Clustering Models with Observations of Galaxy Pairs
Comments: Proceedings for the Vth Marseille International Cosmology Conference: The Fabulous Destiny of Galaxies. (2 pages)
Submitted: 2005-09-13
We investigate the star formation activity in galaxy pairs in chemical hydrodynamical simulations consistent with a Lambda-CDM scenario. A statistical analysis of the effects of galaxy interactions on the star formation activity as a function of orbital parameters shows that close encounters (r < 30 kpc/h) can be effectively correlated with an enhancement of star formation activity with respect to galaxies without a close companion. Our results suggest that the stability properties of systems are also relevant in this process. We found that the passive star forming galaxies pairs tend to have deeper potential wells, older stellar populations, and less leftover gas than active star forming ones. In order to assess the effects that projection and interlopers could introduce in observational samples, we have also constructed and analysed projected simulated catalogs of galaxy pairs. In good agreement with observations, our results show a threshold (rp < 25 kpc/h) for interactions to enhance the star formation activity with respect to galaxies without a close companion. Finally, analysing the environmental effect, we detect the expected SFR-local density relation for both pairs and isolated galaxy samples, although the density dependence is stronger for galaxies in pairs suggesting a relevant role for interactions in driving this relation.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0508680  [pdf] - 75569
Fingerprints of the Hierarchical Building up of the Structure on the Mass-Metallicity Relation
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures. Accepted MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2005-08-31
We study the mass-metallicity relation of galactic systems with stellar masses larger than 10^9 Mo in Lambda-CDM scenarios by using chemical hydrodynamical simulations. We find that this relation arises naturally as a consequence of the formation of the structure in a hierarchical scenario. The hierarchical building up of the structure determines a characteristic stellar mass at M_c ~10^10.2 Moh^-1 which exhibits approximately solar metallicities from z ~ 3 to z=0. This characteristic mass separates galactic systems in two groups with massive ones forming most of their stars and metals at high redshift. We find evolution in the zero point and slope of the mass-metallicity relation driven mainly by the low mass systems which exhibit the larger variations in the chemical properties. Although stellar mass and circular velocity are directly related, the correlation between circular velocity and metallicity shows a larger evolution with redshift making this relation more appropriate to confront models and observations. The dispersion found in both relations is a function of the stellar mass and reflects the different dynamical history of evolution of the systems.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0504366  [pdf] - 1468767
Effects of collisions and interactions on star formation in galaxy pairs in the field
Comments: Presented at the Argentinian Astronomical Society. To appear in BBAA. 4 pages, baaa-eng.sty,baaa-cas.sty
Submitted: 2005-04-17
By using cosmological simulations, we studied the effects of galaxy interactionson the star formation activity in the local Universe. We selected galaxy pairs from the 3D galaxy distribution according to a proximity criterion. The 2D galaxy catalog was constructed by projecting the 3D total galaxy distribution and then selecting projected galaxy pairs. The analysis of the 3D galaxy pair catalog showed that an enhancement of the star formation activity can be statistically correlated with proximity. The projected galaxy pairs exhibited a similar trend with projected distances and relative radial velocities. However, the star formation enhancement signal is diminished with respect to that of the 3D galaxy pair catalog owing to projection effects and spurious galaxy pairs. Overall, we found that hierarchical scenarios reproduced the observational dependence of star formation activity in pairs on orbital parameters and environment. We also found that geometrical effects due to projection modify the trends more severely than those introduced by spurious pairs.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0503701  [pdf] - 72083
Are violent events responsible of a Galaxy Morphological loop?
Comments: 2 pages. To appear in the proceedings of the IAUC198 "Near-Field Cosmology with Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies", 14 - 18 March 2005, Les Diablerets, Switzerland
Submitted: 2005-03-31
We use cosmological SPH simulations to investigate the effects of mergers and interactions on the formation of the bulge and disc components of galactic systems. We find that secular evolution during mergers seems to be a key process in the formation of stable disc-bulge systems with observational counterparts and contributes to establish the fundamental relations observed in galaxies. Our findings suggest that the secular evolution phase couples the formation mechanisms of the bulge and disc components. According to our results, depending on the particular stability properties and merger parameters, violents events could drive a morphological loop in which the outcome could be a disc or a spheroid.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0401455  [pdf] - 62325
Galaxy Pairs in the 2dFGRS II. Effects of interactions on star formation in groups and clusters
Comments: 9 pages, 14 figures. Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2004-01-22
We analyse the effects of galaxy interactions on star formation in groups and clusters of galaxies with virial masses in the range $10^{13} - 10 ^{15} M_{\odot}$. We find a trend for galaxy-galaxy interactions to be less efficient in triggering star formation in high density regions in comparison with galaxies with no close companion. However, we obtain the same relative projected distance and relative radial velocity thresholds for the triggering of significant star formation activity ($r_p \sim 25 h^{-1} $ kpc and $\Delta V \sim 100 {\rm km s^{-1}}$) as found in the field. Thus, the nature of star formation driven by galaxy interactions is nearly independent of environment, although there is a general lower level of star formation activity in massive systems. The above results reflect, on one hand, the local nature of star formation induced by tidal interactions and, on the other, the role played by the internal properties of galaxies. By using a 2dFGRS mock catalog we estimate the contamination by spurious pairs finding that the statistics are cleary dominated by real pairs. We also found the behaviour of the trends to be robust against the use of more restrictive relative velocity thresholds.(Abridged)
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0310560  [pdf] - 60223
Triggering star formation by galaxy-galaxy interactions
Comments: to appear in Recycling intergalactic and intersetellar matter, IAUSS Vol 217, 2004
Submitted: 2003-10-20
We analyzed the effects of having a close companion on the star formation activity of galaxies in 8K galaxy pair catalog selected from the 2dFGRS. We found that, statistically, galaxies with $r_{\rm p} < 25 {\rm h^{-1}}$ kpc and $\Delta V < 100 {\rm km/s}$ have enhanced star formation with respect to isolated galaxies with the same luminosity and redshift distribution. Our results suggest that the physical processes at work during tidal interactions can overcome the effects of environment, expect in dense regions.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0310559  [pdf] - 60222
Chemical Abundances and the Hierarchical Clustering
Comments: to appear in Recycling intergalactic and intersetellar matter, IAUSS Vol 217, 2004
Submitted: 2003-10-20
We studied the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium and stellar population of the building blocks of current typical galaxies in the field, in cosmological hydrodynamics simulations. The simulations include detail modeling of chemical enrichment by SNIa and SNII. In our simulations the metal missing problem is caused by chemical elements being locked upon in the central regions (or bulges) mainly, in stars. Supernova energy feedback could help to reduce this concentration by expelling metals to the intergalactic medium.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0310558  [pdf] - 60221
Chemical Evolution in Hierarchical Clustering Scenarios
Comments: to appear in Recycling intergalactic and intersetellar matter, IAUSS Vol 217, 2004
Submitted: 2003-10-20
We present first results of an implementation of chemical evolution in a cosmological hydrodynamical code, focusing the analysis on the effects of cooling baryons according to their metallicity. We found that simulations with primordial cooling can underestimate the star formation rate from $z < 3$ and by up to $\approx 20 %$. We constructed simulated spectra by combining the star formation and chemical history of galactic systems with spectra synthesis models and assess the impact of chemical evolution on the energy distribution.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0212222  [pdf] - 53612
Galaxy Pairs in the 2dF Survey I. Effects of Interactions in the Field
Comments: 9 pages, 11 Postscript figures. Submitted to MNRAS. Revised version
Submitted: 2002-12-10, last modified: 2003-08-04
We study galaxy pairs in the field selected from the 100 K public release of the 2dF galaxy redshift survey. Our analysis provides a well defined sample of 1258 galaxy pairs, a large database suitable for statistical studies of galaxy interactions in the local universe, $z \le 0.1$. Galaxy pairs where selected by radial velocity ($\Delta V$) and projected separation ($r_{\rm p}$) criteria determined by analyzing the star formation activity within neighbours (abridged). The ratio between the fractions of star forming galaxies in pairs and in isolation is a useful tools to unveil the effects of having a close companion. We found that about fifty percent of galaxy pairs do not show signs of important star formation activity (independently of their luminosities) supporting the hypothesis that the internal properties of the galaxies play a crucial role in the triggering of star formation by interactions.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0304303  [pdf] - 56211
Building Blocks in Hierarchical Clustering Scenarios and their Connection with Damped Ly$\alpha$ Systems
Comments: 15 pages, 11 Postscript figures. Accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2003-04-16, last modified: 2003-04-25
We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the chemical properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) and the stellar population (SP) of current normal galaxies and their progenitors in a hierarchical clustering scenario. We compared the results with observations of Damped Lyman-$\alpha$ systems (DLAs) under the hypothesis that, at least, part of the observed DLAs could originate in the building blocks of today normal galaxies. We used a hydrodynamical cosmological code which includes star formation and chemical enrichment. Galaxy-like objects are identified at $z=0$ and then followed back in time. Random line-of-sights (LOS) are drawn through these structures in order to mimic Damped Lyman $\alpha$ systems. We then analysed the chemical properties of the ISM and SP along the LOS. We found that the progenitors of current galaxies in the field with mean $L <0.5 L^* $ and virial circular velocity of $100-250 {\rm km/sec}$ could be the associated DLA galaxies. For these systems we detected a trend for $<L/L^*>$ to increase with redshift.(Abridged)
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0210240  [pdf] - 52278
Nitrogen Abundances in DLA Systems: The Combined Effects of SNII and SNIa in a Hierarchical Clustering Scenario
Comments: 4 pages, 2 Postscript figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS (pink pages)
Submitted: 2002-10-10, last modified: 2002-10-22
The combined enrichment of Supernovae II and I in a hierarchical clustering scenario could produce regions with low N content respect to $\alpha$-elements consistent with observed values measured in Damped Ly-$\alpha$ (DLAs). We have studied the formation of DLAs in a hierarchical clustering scenario under the hypothesis that the building blocks of current field galaxies could be part of the structures mapped by DLAs. In our models the effects of the non-linear evolution of the structure (which produces bursty star formation histories, gas infall, etc.) and the contributions of SNIa and SNII are found to be responsible of producing these N regions with respect to the $\alpha$-elements. Although SNIa are not main production sites for Si or O, because of the particular timing Consistently, we found the simulated low nitrogen DLAs to have sub-solar [Fe/H]. We show that low nitrogen DLAs have experienced important star formation activity in the past with higher efficiency than normal DLAs. Our chemical model suggests that SNIa play a relevant role in the determination of the abundance pattern of DLA and, that the observed low nitrogen DLA frequency could be explained taking into account the time-delay of $\approx $ 0.5 Gyr introduced by these supernova to release metals.
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0208538  [pdf] - 51354
The Effects of Mergers on the Formation of Disc-Bulge Systems in Hierarchical Clustering Scenarios
Comments: 13 pages, 12 postscript figures, uses mne2.cls, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2002-08-29, last modified: 2002-10-09
We study the effects of mergers on the structural properties of disc-like systems by using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamical (SPH) numerical simulations in hierarchical clustering scenarios. In order to assess the effects of mergers on the mass distributions we performed a bulge-disc decomposition of the projected surface density of the systems at different stages of the merger process. We assumed an exponential law for the disc component and the S\'ersic law for the bulges. We found that simulated objects at $z=0$ have bulge profiles with shape parameters $n\approx 1$, consistent with observational results of spiral galaxies. The complete sample of simulated objects at $z=0$ and $z>0$ shows that $n$ takes values in the range $n\approx 0.4 - 4$. We found that secular evolution tends to produce exponential bulge profiles, while the fusion of baryonic cores tends to increase the $n$ value and helps to generate the correlation between $B/D$ and $n$. We found no dependence on the relative mass of the colliding objects. Our results suggest that mergers, through secular evolution and fusions, could produce the transformation of galactic objects along the Hubble sequence by driving a morphological loop that might also depend on the properties of the central galactic potential wells, which are also affected by mergers.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0202160  [pdf] - 47654
Double Starbursts Triggered by Mergers in Hierarchical Clustering Scenarios
Comments: 17 pages, 6 postscript figures. Accepted MNRAS
Submitted: 2002-02-07
We use cosmological SPH simulations to study the effects of mergers in the star formation history of galactic objects in hierarchical clustering scenarios. We find that during some merger events, gaseous discs can experience two starbursts: the first one during the orbital decay phase, due to gas inflows driven as the satellite approaches, and the second one, when the two baryonic clumps collide. A trend for these first induced starbursts to be more efficient at transforming the gas into stars is also found. We detect that systems which do not experience early gas inflows have well-formed stellar bulges and more concentrated potential wells, which seem to be responsible for preventing further gas inward transport triggered by tidal forces. Our results constitute the first proof that bulges can form as the product of collapse, collisions and secular evolution in a cosmological framework, and they are consistent with a rejuvenation of the stellar population in bulges at intermediate z with, at least, 50% of the stars (in SCDM) being formed at high z. (Abridged)
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0007074  [pdf] - 36912
Chemical evolution using SPH cosmological simulations. I: implementation, tests and first results
Comments: 36 pages, 9 Postscript figures. Final version (few changes),Acepted MNRAS
Submitted: 2000-07-06, last modified: 2001-04-18
We develop a model to implement metal enrichment in a cosmological context based on the hydrodynamical AP3MSPH code described by Tissera, Lambas and Abadi (1997).The star formation model is based on the Schmidt law and has been modified in order to describe the transformation of gas into stars in more detail. The enrichment of the interstellar medium due to supernovae I and II explosions is taken into account by assuming a Salpeter Initial Mass Function and different nucleosynthesis models.The different chemical elements are mixed within the gaseous medium according to the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics technique. We present tests of the code that assess the effects of resolution and model parameters on the results. scenario and we present results of the analysis of the star formation and chemical properties of the interstellar medium and stellar population of the simulated galactic objects. We show that these systems reproduce abundance ratios for primary and secondary elements of the interstellar medium, and the correlation between the (O/H) abundance and the gas fraction of galaxies. The numerical simulations performed provide a detailed description of the chemical properties of galactic objects formed in hierarchical clustering scenarios and proved to be useful tools to deepen our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0104308  [pdf] - 42047
Chemical Enrichment at High Redshifts: Understanding the Nature of Damped Ly$\alpha$ Systems in Hierarchical Models
Comments: 2 Postscript figures.Acepted ApJ
Submitted: 2001-04-18
We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations including star formation and metal enrichment to study the evolution of the chemical properties of galaxy-like objects at high redshift in the range $0.25<z< 2.35$ in a hierarchical clustering scenario. As the galactic objects are assembled we find that their gaseous components exhibit neutral Hydrogen column densities with abundances and scatter comparable to those observed in damped Lyman-$\alpha$ systems (DLAs).The unweighted mean of abundance ratios and least square linear regressions through the simulated DLAs yield intrinsic metallicity evolution for the [Zn/H] and [Fe/H], consistent with results obtained from similar analysis of available observations. Our model statistically reproduces the mild evolution detected in the metallicity of the neutral hydrogen content of the Universe, given by mass-weighted means,if observational constraints are considered (as suggested by Boiss\'ee et al. 1998). For the $\alpha$-elements in the simulated DLAs, we find neither enhancement nor dependence on metallicity. Our results support the hypotheses that DLAs trace a variety of galactic objects with different formation histories and that both SNI and SNII are contributing to the chemical enrichment of the gas component at least since $z \approx 2$. This study indicates that DLAs could be understood as the building blocks that merged to form today normal galaxies within a hierarchical clustering scenario.
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0102011  [pdf] - 40722
Disc-like Objects in Hierarchical Hydrodynamical Simulations: Comparison with Observations
Comments: 22 pages, LaTeX; 14 figures; references updated. MNRAS, in press
Submitted: 2001-02-01, last modified: 2001-02-15
We present results from a careful and detailed analysis of the structural and dynamical properties of a sample of 29 disc-like objects identified at z=0 in three AP3M-SPH fully consistent cosmological simulations. These simulations are realizations of a CDM hierarchical model, where an inefficient Schmidt law-like algorithm to model the stellar formation process has been implemented. We focus on properties that can be constrained with available data from observations of spiral galaxies, namely, the bulge and disc structural parameters and the rotation curves. Comparisons with data from Broeils (1992), de Jong (1996) and Courteau (1996, 1997) give satisfactory agreement, in contrast with previous findings using other codes. This suggests that the stellar formation implementation we have used has succeded in forming compact bulges that stabilize disc-like structures in the violent phases of their assembly, while in the quiescent phases the gas has cooled and collapsed according with the Fall & Efstathiou standard model of disc formation.
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0101490  [pdf] - 40628
Comparison between Disk-like Objects Formed in Hierarchical Hydrodynamical Simulations and Observations of Spiral Galaxies
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures. To appear in the Proceedings of the IVth S.E.A. Scientific Meeting, Santiago de Compostela 11-14 September 2000
Submitted: 2001-01-26
We analyze the structural and dynamical properties of disk-like objects formed in fully consistent cosmological simulations which include inefficient star formation. Comparison with data of similar observable properties of spiral galaxies gives satisfactory agreement, in contrast with previous findings using other codes. This suggests that the stellar formation implementation used has allowed the formation of disks as well as guaranteed their stability.
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0101489  [pdf] - 40627
Properties of Galaxy Disks in Hierarchical Hydrodynamical Simulations: Comparison with Observational Data
Comments: 2 pages, 2 figures. To appear in the Proceedings of the Conference "Galaxy Disks and Disk Galaxies", Rome, 12-16 June 2000
Submitted: 2001-01-26
We analyze the structural and dynamical properties of disk-like objects formed in fully consistent cosmological simulations with an inefficient star formation algorithm. Comparison with data of similar observable properties of spiral galaxies gives satisfactory agreement.
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0010462  [pdf] - 38809
Chemical Evolution of the Stellar and Gaseous Components of Galaxies in Hydrodynamical Cosmological Simulations
Comments: 2 pages, 1 Postscript figures. Proceeding of Galaxy Disks and Disk Galaxies, Rome, 2000
Submitted: 2000-10-23
We present preliminary results on the effects of mergers on the chemical properties of galactic objects in hierarchical clustering scenarios. We adopt a hydrodynamical chemical code that allows to describe the coupled evolution of dark matter and baryons within a cosmological context. We found that disk-like and spheroid-like objects have distinctive metallicity patterns that may be the result of different evolution.
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0007072  [pdf] - 36910
Galaxy Formation and Chemical Evolution in Hierarchical Hydrodynamical Simulations
Comments: 4 pages, 1 Postscript figure, 1jpg figure. To appear in ASP, Conference Series. Proceeding of 'Stars, Gas and Dust in Galaxies: Exploring the Links'
Submitted: 2000-07-06
We report first results of an implementation of a chemical model in a cosmological code, based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique. We show that chemical SPH simulations are a promising tool to provide clues for the understanding of the chemical properties of galaxies in relation to their formation and evolution in a cosmological framework.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9912431  [pdf] - 1469874
Analysis of Star Formation in Galaxy-like Objects
Comments: 11 postscript figures. 2000, ApJ, accepted
Submitted: 1999-12-20
Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we investigate the effects of hierarchical aggregation on the triggering of star formation in galactic-like objects. We include a simple star formation model to transform the cold gas in dense regions into stars. Simulations with different parameters have been performed in order to quantify the dependence of the results on the parameters. We then resort to stellar population synthesis models to trace the color evolution of each object with red-shift and in relation to their merger histories. We find that, in a hierarchical clustering scenario, the process of assembling of the structure is one natural mechanism that may trigger star formation. The resulting star formation rate history for each individual galactic object is composed of a continuous one ($\leq 3 \rm{M_{\odot}/yr}$) and a series of star bursts. We find that even the accretion of a small satellite can be correlated with a stellar burst. Massive mergers are found to be more efficient at transforming gas into stars
[116]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9911127  [pdf] - 109255
Analysis of metallicity effects in SPH cosmological simulations
Comments: 2 pages, 1 PS figures. To be published as an ASP Conference Series: Proceedings of Clustering at High Redshift, Les Rencontres Internationales de l'IGRAP
Submitted: 1999-11-08
We report preliminar results on a chemical model implemented in a hydrodynamical cosmological code. We compute the metallicity of the gaseous component in galactic halos at different redshifts. The results compare reasonably well to observations. In particular, we show the predicted metallicity content of today-galaxy progenitors as a function of redshift and confront them with those observed in DLA systems.
[117]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9911009  [pdf] - 109137
Mergers and star formation in SPH cosmological simulations
Comments: 5 pages, 2 PS figures
Submitted: 1999-11-02
The star formation rate history of galactic objects in hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are analyzed in relation to their merger histories. The findings suggest that massive mergers produce more efficient starbursts and that, depending on the internal structure of the objects, double starbursts could also occur.
[118]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809312  [pdf] - 103016
Disk Formation In Hierarchical Hydrodynamical Simulations: A Way Out Of The Angular Momentum Catastrophe
Comments: 11 pages, 2 figures. Accepted by The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 1998-09-24
We report results on the formation of disk-like structures in two cosmological hydrodynamical simulations in a hierarchical clustering scenario, sharing the same initial conditions. In the first one, a simple and generic implementation of star formation has allowed galaxy-like objects with stellar bulges and extended, populated disks to form. Gas in the disk comes from both, particles that survive mergers keeping in part their angular momentum content, and new gas supply by infall, once the merger process is over, with global specific angular momentum conservation. The stellar bulge forms from gas that has lost most of its angular momentum. In the second simulation, no star formation has been included. In this case, objects consist of an overpopulated central gas concentration, and an extended, underpopulated disk. The central concentration forms from particles that suffer an important angular momentum loss in violent events, and it often contains more than 70% of the object's baryonic mass. The external disk forms by late infall of gas, that roughly conserves its specific angular momentum. The difference between these two simulations is likely to be due to the stabilizing character of the stellar bulge-like cores that form in the first simulation, which diminishes the inflow of gas triggered by mergers and interactions.
[119]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809172  [pdf] - 102876
A Way Out of the Disc Angular Momentum Catastrophe in Hirarchical Hydrodynamical Simulations
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure. To appear in the Proceedings of ' XI Recontre of Blois: The Birth of Galaxies'
Submitted: 1998-09-14
We present results that suggest that disc angular momentum catastrophes (DAMCs) plaguing hierarchical hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation, not including star formation processes, are due to the inward gas transport that follows bar disk instabilities triggered by interactions and mergers. They also show that DAMCs can be easily avoided by including star-forming processes, as they lead unavoidably to the formation of compact stellar bulges that stabilize disks against bars. The formation of disks similar to those observed demands, in addition, that not all the gas is depleted into stars at high z, so that they can be formed at lower z.
[120]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9801116  [pdf] - 99965
Dark Matter Halo Structure in CDM Hydrodynamical Simulations
Comments: 28 pages, 15 figures (figures 3ab sent by request), 2 tables. Accepted for publication MNRAS
Submitted: 1998-01-13
We have carried out a comparative analysis of the properties of dark matter halos in N-body and hydrodynamical simulations. We analyze their density profiles, shapes and kinematical properties with the aim of assessing the effects that hydrodynamical processes might produce on the evolution of the dark matter component. The simulations performed allow us to reproduce dark matter halos with high resolution, although the range of circular velocities is limited. We find that for halos with circular velocities of $[150-200] km s^{-1}$ at the virial radius, the presence of baryons affects the evolution of the dark matter component in the central region modifying the density profiles, shapes and velocity dispersions. We also analyze the rotation velocity curves of disk-like structures and compare them with observational results.
[121]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9603153  [pdf] - 1943584
Analysis of Galaxy Formation with Hydrodynamics
Comments: 21 pages, 2 postscript tables. Submitted MNRAS 04.03.96
Submitted: 1996-03-28
We present a hydrodynamical code based on the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics technique implemented in an AP3M code aimed at solving the hydrodynamical and gravitational equations in a cosmological frame. We analyze the ability of the code to reproduce standard tests and perform numerical simulations to study the formation of galaxies in a typical region of a CDM model. These numerical simulations include gas and dark matter particles and take into account physical processes such as shock waves, radiative cooling, and a simplified model of star formation. Several observed properties of normal galaxies such as $M_{gas}/M_{total}$ ratios, the luminosity function and the Tully-Fisher relation are analyzed within the limits imposed by numerical resolution.