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Thévenin, F.

Normalized to: Thévenin, F.

50 article(s) in total. 882 co-authors, from 1 to 15 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 5,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.13883  [pdf] - 2104071
Sun-like Oscillations in the Population II giant HD 122563
Comments: Proceedings of the French Astronomy Society Meeting, SF2A, June 2019; v2: typo in reported numax in Table, authors corrected
Submitted: 2020-05-28, last modified: 2020-05-29
We have been monitoring the metal-poor Population II giant, HD 122563, for radial velocity variations since 2016 using the SONG telescope on Tenerife. We have detected the global seismic quantity, numax, which provides information related to the stellar parameters. By combining these data with complementary data, we derive a new precise surface gravity, radius and distance to the star. Our results are corroborated by using the parallax from Gaia DR2. We present these results and some of their implications.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.11566  [pdf] - 2115353
On the Metamorphosis of the Bailey diagram for RR Lyrae stars
Comments: 14 pages, 4 figures, 1 table, Accepted on ApJ Letter
Submitted: 2020-05-23
We collected over 6000 high-resolution spectra of four dozen field RR Lyrae (RRL) variables pulsating either in the fundamental (39 RRab) or in the first overtone (9 RRc) mode. We measured radial velocities (RVs) of four strong metallic and four Balmer lines along the entire pulsational cycle and derived RV amplitudes with accuracies better than 1$-$2~\kmsec. The new amplitudes were combined with literature data for 23~RRab and 3~RRc stars (total sample 74 RRLs) which allowed us to investigate the variation of the Bailey diagram (photometric amplitude versus period) when moving from optical to mid-infrared bands and to re-cast the Bailey diagram in terms of RV amplitudes. We found that RV amplitudes for RRab are minimally affected by nonlinear phenomena (shocks) and multi-periodicity (Blazhko effect). The RV slope ($\log P$--A(V$_r$)) when compared with the visual slope ($\log P$--A($V$)) is shallower and the dispersion, at fixed period, decreases by a factor of two. We constructed homogeneous sets of Horizontal Branch evolutionary models and nonlinear, convective pulsation models of RRLs to constrain the impact of evolutionary effects on their pulsation properties. Evolution causes, on the Bailey diagram based on RV amplitudes, a modest variation in pulsation period and a large dispersion in amplitude. The broad dispersion in period of the Bailey diagram is mainly caused by variation in RRL intrinsic parameters (stellar mass, chemical composition). Empirical evidence indicates that RV amplitudes are an optimal diagnostic for tracing the mean effective temperature across the RRab instability strip.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.02064  [pdf] - 1966933
On the use of field RR Lyrae as Galactic probes: I. The Oosterhoff dichotomy based on fundamental variables
Comments: 23 pages, 16 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-08-06, last modified: 2019-08-07
We collected a large data set of field RR Lyrae stars (RRLs) by using catalogues already available in the literature and Gaia DR2. We estimated the iron abundances for a sub-sample of 2,382 fundamental RRLs ($\Delta$S method: CaIIK, H$\beta$, H$\gamma$ and H$\delta$ lines) for which are publicly available medium-resolution SDSS-SEGUE spectra. We also included similar estimates available in the literature ending up with the largest and most homogeneous spectroscopic data set ever collected for RRLs (2,903). The metallicity scale was validated by using iron abundances based on high resolution spectra for a fundamental field RRL (V~Ind), for which we collected X-shooter spectra covering the entire pulsation cycle. The peak ([Fe/H]=-1.59$\pm$0.01) and the standard deviation ($\sigma$=0.43 dex) of the metallicity distribution agree quite well with similar estimates available in the literature. The current measurements disclose a well defined metal-rich tail approaching Solar iron abundance. The spectroscopic sample plotted in the Bailey diagram (period vs luminosity amplitude) shows a steady variation when moving from the metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-3.0/-2.5) to the metal-rich ([Fe/H]=-0.5/0.0) regime. The smooth transition in the peak of the period distribution as a function of the metallicity strongly indicates that the long-standing problem of the Oosterhoff dichotomy among Galactic globulars is the consequence of the lack of metal-intermediate clusters hosting RRLs. We also found that the luminosity amplitude, in contrast with period, does not show a solid correlation with metallicity. This suggests that period-amplitude-metallicity relations should be cautiously treated.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.02657  [pdf] - 1878736
First detection of oscillations in the Halo giant HD 122563: validation of seismic scaling relations and new fundamental parameters
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-02-07
The nearby metal-poor giant HD122563 is an important astrophysical laboratory for which to test stellar atmospheric and interior physics. It is also a benchmark star for which to calibrate methods to apply to large scale surveys. Recently it has been remeasured using various methodologies given the new high precision instruments at our disposal. However, inconsistencies in the observations and models have been found. In order to better characterise this star we have been measuring its radial velocities since 2016 using the Hertzsprung telescope (SONG network node). In this work we report the first detections of sun-like oscillations in this star, and to our knowledge, a detection in the most metal-poor giant to date. We apply the classical seismic scaling relation to derive a new surface gravity of $\log g_{\nu} = 1.39 \pm 0.01$ dex. Constraints on the mass imposed by its PopII giant classification then yield a radius of $30.8 \pm 1.0$ R$_{\odot}$. By coupling this with recent interferometric measurements we infer a distance to the star of 306 $\pm$ 9 pc. Data from the Gaia mission corroborates the distance hypothesis ($d_{\rm GDR2}$ = 290 $\pm$ 5 pc), and thus the updated fundamental parameters. We confirm the validity of the seismic scaling relation without corrections for surface gravity in metal-poor and evolved star regimes. The small discrepancy of 0.04 dex reduces to 0.02 dex by applying corrections to the scaling relations. The new constraints on the HR diagram ($L_{\odot} = 381 \pm 26$) reduce the disagreement between the stellar parameters and evolution models, however, a discrepancy still exists. Fine-tuned stellar evolution calculations show that this can be reconciled by changing the mixing-length parameter by an amount (--0.35) that is in agreement with predictions from recent 3D simulations and empirical results.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.08902  [pdf] - 1842421
Stellar and substellar companions of nearby stars from Gaia DR2 - Binarity from proper motion anomaly
Comments: 23 pages, 31 figures. Revised mass limits on companions with very long orbital periods, and computations extended to the full Hipparcos catalog. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2018-11-21, last modified: 2019-02-07
The census of stellar and substellar companions of nearby stars is largely incomplete. It is, however, fundamentally important in the understanding of the stellar and planetary formation and evolution mechanisms. We aim to characterize the presence of physical companions in orbit around nearby stars. Orbiting secondary bodies influence the proper motion (PM) of their parent star through their gravitational reflex motion. Using the Hipparcos catalog and Gaia's second data release (GDR2), we determined the long-term PM of the stars common to these two catalogs. We then searched for a PM anomaly (PMa) between the long-term PM vector and the GDR2 (or Hipparcos) measurements, indicative of the presence of a perturbing secondary object. We focussed our analysis on the 6741 nearby stars located within 50 pc, and we also present a catalog of the PMa for >99% of the Hipparcos catalog (>117000 stars). 30% of the stars studied present a PMa greater than 3 sigmas. The PMa allows us to detect orbiting companions, or set stringent limits on their presence. We present a few applications to interesting targets. We set upper limits of 0.1-0.3 M_Jup to potential planets orbiting Proxima between 1 and 10 au (P_orb=3 to 100 years). We confirm that Proxima is gravitationally bound to alpha Cen. We recover the masses of the known companions of epsilon Eri, epsilon Ind, Ross 614 and beta Pic. We also detect a possible planet of a few Jovian masses orbiting tau Ceti. The combination of the GDR2 with Hipparcos results in very high accuracy PMa vectors. The detection of tangential velocity anomalies at a median accuracy of sigma(Delta v_tan)=1.0 m/s per parsec of distance opens the possibility to identify long period orbital companions otherwise inaccessible. Gaia's complementarity to radial velocity and transit techniques already appears to be remarkably powerful.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.08995  [pdf] - 1834268
The puzzling high velocity G5 supergiant star HD 179821 : new insight from Gaia DR2 data
Comments: 6 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2019-01-25
HD 179821 is classified as G5 Ia star. From the IRAS colors and spectral energy distributions it was classified as a post-AGB star. But some studies classify it as a massive (30 to 19 Msun ) post-red supergiant evolving to become a Type II supernova. Its mass and evolutionary status remained a hotly debated question even after several detailed spectroscopic studies as the distance was not known. We use the parallax of HD 179821 from the second Gaia data release, and deduce its distance 2959 +/- 409 pc and its absolute magnitude MV = -5.7 +/- 0.3. Using the absolute magnitude determined in this paper, we show that HD 179821 fits very well with post-AGB tracks in the H-R diagram. Our results clearly confirm that HD 179821 is a post-AGB star of mass in the range of 0.8 Msun. It is not a 30 Msun red supergiant. The progenitor mass of this post-AGB star may be in the range of 4 Msun but may be a bit more.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.09302  [pdf] - 1771454
An empirical recipe for inelastic hydrogen-atom collisions in non-LTE calculations
Comments: 15 pages, published in A&A at https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201630352
Submitted: 2016-12-29, last modified: 2018-10-22
We investigate the role of hydrogen collisions in NLTE spectral line synthesis, and introduce a new general empirical recipe to determine inelastic charge transfer (CT) and bound-bound hydrogen collisional rates. This recipe is based on fitting the energy functional dependence of published quantum collisional rate coefficients of several neutral elements (BeI, NaI, MgI, AlI, SiI and CaI) using simple polynomial equations. We perform thorough NLTE abundance calculation tests using our method for four different atoms, Na, Mg, Al and Si, for a broad range of stellar parameters. We then compare the results to calculations computed using the published quantum rates for all the corresponding elements. We also compare to results computed using excitation collisional rates via the commonly used Drawin equation for different fudge factors, SH, applied. We demonstrate that our proposed method is able to reproduce the NLTE abundance corrections performed with the quantum rates for different spectral types and metallicities for representative NaI and AlI lines to within $\le$0.05 dex and %\le%0.03 dex, respectively. For MgI and SiI lines, the method performs better for the cool giants and dwarfs, while larger discrepancies up to 0.2 dex could be obtained for some lines for the subgiants and warm dwarfs. We obtained larger NLTE correction differences between models incorporating Drawin rates relative to the quantum models by up to 0.4 dex. These discrepancies are potentially due to ignoring either or both CT and ionization collisional processes by hydrogen in our Drawin models. Our empirical fitting method performs well in its ability to reproduce, within narrow uncertainties, the abundance corrections computed with models incorporating quantum collisional rates. It could possibly be extended to other transitions or in the absence of published quantum calculations, to other elements as well.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09378  [pdf] - 1732652
Gaia Data Release 2: Observational Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams
Gaia Collaboration; Babusiaux, C.; van Leeuwen, F.; Barstow, M. A.; Jordi, C.; Vallenari, A.; Bossini, D.; Bressan, A.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; van Leeuwen, M.; Brown, A. G. A.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Walton, N. A.; Arenou, F.; Bastian, U.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Bakker, J.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; DeAngeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Holl, B.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Teyssier, D.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Audard, M.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Burgess, P.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Clotet, M.; Creevey, O.; Davidson, M.; DeRidder, J.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fouesneau, M.; Frémat, Y.; Galluccio, L.; García-Torres, M.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Gosset, E.; Guy, L. P.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández, J.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Jordan, S.; Korn, A. J.; Krone-Martins, A.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Lebzelter, T.; Löffler, W.; Manteiga, M.; Marrese, P. M.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Moitinho, A.; Mora, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Richards, P. J.; Rimoldini, L.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Sozzetti, A.; Süveges, M.; Torra, J.; vanReeven, W.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aerts, C.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alvarez, R.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Arcay, B.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Balm, P.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbato, D.; Barblan, F.; Barklem, P. S.; Barrado, D.; Barros, M.; Muñoz, S. Bartholomé; Bassilana, J. -L.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; Berihuete, A.; Bertone, S.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Boeche, C.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Bramante, L.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Brugaletta, E.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Butkevich, A. G.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cancelliere, R.; Cannizzaro, G.; Carballo, R.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Casamiquela, L.; Castellani, M.; Castro-Ginard, A.; Charlot, P.; Chemin, L.; Chiavassa, A.; Cocozza, G.; Costigan, G.; Cowell, S.; Crifo, F.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Cuypers, J.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; deLaverny, P.; DeLuise, F.; DeMarch, R.; deMartino, D.; deSouza, R.; deTorres, A.; Debosscher, J.; delPozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Diakite, S.; Diener, C.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Eriksson, K.; Esquej, P.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernique, P.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Frézouls, B.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavel, A.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Giacobbe, P.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Glass, F.; Gomes, M.; Granvik, M.; Gueguen, A.; Guerrier, A.; Guiraud, J.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Hauser, M.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Heu, J.; Hilger, T.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holland, G.; Huckle, H. E.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Janßen, K.; JevardatdeFombelle, G.; Jonker, P. G.; Juhász, Á. L.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kewley, A.; Klar, J.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, M.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Koubsky, P.; Lambert, S.; Lanza, A. F.; Lasne, Y.; Lavigne, J. -B.; LeFustec, Y.; LePoncin-Lafitte, C.; Lebreton, Y.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; López, M.; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martino, M.; Marton, G.; Mary, N.; Massari, D.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molnár, L.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; O'Mullane, W.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Panahi, A.; Pawlak, M.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poggio, E.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Racero, E.; Ragaini, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Riclet, F.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rivard, A.; Rixon, G.; Roegiers, T.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sanna, N.; Santana-Ros, T.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Ségransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Siltala, L.; Silva, A. F.; Smart, R. L.; Smith, K. W.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; SoriaNieto, S.; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Teyssandier, P.; Thuillot, W.; Titarenko, A.; TorraClotet, F.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Uzzi, S.; Vaillant, M.; Valentini, G.; Valette, V.; vanElteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; Vaschetto, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Viala, Y.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; vonEssen, C.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Wertz, O.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zorec, J.; Zschocke, S.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.
Comments: Published in the A&A Gaia Data Release 2 special issue. Tables 2 and A.4 corrected. Tables available at http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/616/A10
Submitted: 2018-04-25, last modified: 2018-08-13
We highlight the power of the Gaia DR2 in studying many fine structures of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD). Gaia allows us to present many different HRDs, depending in particular on stellar population selections. We do not aim here for completeness in terms of types of stars or stellar evolutionary aspects. Instead, we have chosen several illustrative examples. We describe some of the selections that can be made in Gaia DR2 to highlight the main structures of the Gaia HRDs. We select both field and cluster (open and globular) stars, compare the observations with previous classifications and with stellar evolutionary tracks, and we present variations of the Gaia HRD with age, metallicity, and kinematics. Late stages of stellar evolution such as hot subdwarfs, post-AGB stars, planetary nebulae, and white dwarfs are also analysed, as well as low-mass brown dwarf objects. The Gaia HRDs are unprecedented in both precision and coverage of the various Milky Way stellar populations and stellar evolutionary phases. Many fine structures of the HRDs are presented. The clear split of the white dwarf sequence into hydrogen and helium white dwarfs is presented for the first time in an HRD. The relation between kinematics and the HRD is nicely illustrated. Two different populations in a classical kinematic selection of the halo are unambiguously identified in the HRD. Membership and mean parameters for a selected list of open clusters are provided. They allow drawing very detailed cluster sequences, highlighting fine structures, and providing extremely precise empirical isochrones that will lead to more insight in stellar physics. Gaia DR2 demonstrates the potential of combining precise astrometry and photometry for large samples for studies in stellar evolution and stellar population and opens an entire new area for HRD-based studies.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09372  [pdf] - 1838132
Gaia Data Release 2: Properties and validation of the radial velocities
Comments: Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2018-04-25
For Gaia DR2 (GDR2), 280 million spectra, collected by the RVS instrument on-board Gaia, were processed and median radial velocities were derived for 9.8 million sources brighter than Grvs = 12 mag. This paper describes the validation and properties of the median radial velocities published in GDR2. Quality tests and filters are applied to select, from the 9.8 million radial velocities, those with the quality to be published in GDR2. The accuracy of the selected sample is assessed with respect to ground-based catalogues. Its precision is estimated using both ground-based catalogues and the distribution of the Gaia radial velocity uncertainties. GDR2 contains median radial velocities for 7 224 631 stars, with Teff in the range [3550, 6900] K, which passed succesfully the quality tests. The published median radial velocities provide a full sky-coverage and have a completness with respect to the astrometric data of 77.2\% (for $G \leq 12.5$ mag). The median radial velocity residuals with respect to the ground-based surveys vary from one catalogue to another, but do not exceed a few 100s m/s. In addition, the Gaia radial velocities show a positive trend as a function of magnitude, which starts around Grvs $\sim 9$ mag and reaches about $+500$ m/s at Grvs $= 11.75$ mag. The overall precision, estimated from the median of the Gaia radial velocity uncertainties, is 1.05 km/s. The radial velocity precision is function of many parameters, in particular the magnitude and effective temperature. For bright stars, Grvs in [4, 8] mag, the precision is in the range 200-350 m/s, which is about 3 to 5 times more precise than the pre-launch specification of 1 km/s. At the faint end, Grvs = 11.75 mag, the precisions for Teff = 5000 K and 6500 K are respectively 1.4 km/s and 3.7 km/s.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09370  [pdf] - 1736358
Gaia Data Release 2: The catalogue of radial velocity standard stars
Comments: to be published in A&A special issue on Gaia DR2
Submitted: 2018-04-25
Aims. The Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) on board the ESA satellite mission Gaia has no calibration device. Therefore, the radial velocity zero point needs to be calibrated with stars that are proved to be stable at a level of 300 m/s during the Gaia observations. Methods. We compiled a dataset of ~71000 radial velocity measurements from five high-resolution spectrographs. A catalogue of 4813 stars was built by combining these individual measurements. The zero point was established using asteroids. Results. The resulting catalogue has seven observations per star on average on a typical time baseline of six years, with a median standard deviation of 15 m/s. A subset of the most stable stars fulfilling the RVS requirements was used to establish the radial velocity zero point provided in Gaia Data Release 2. The stars that were not used for calibration are used to validate the RVS data.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09369  [pdf] - 2097142
Gaia Radial Velocity Spectrometer
Comments: 19 pages, 20 figures. Associated with the Gaia Data Release 2
Submitted: 2018-04-25
This paper presents the specification, design, and development of the Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) on the European Space Agency's Gaia mission. Starting with the rationale for the full six dimensions of phase space in the dynamical modelling of the Galaxy, the scientific goals and derived top-level instrument requirements are discussed, leading to a brief description of the initial concepts for the instrument. The main part of the paper is a description of the flight RVS, considering the optical design, the focal plane, the detection and acquisition chain, and the as-built performance drivers and critical technical areas. After presenting the pre-launch performance predictions, the paper concludes with the post-launch developments and mitigation strategies, together with a summary of the in-flight performance at the end of commissioning.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.03274  [pdf] - 1622440
Accurate effective temperatures of the metal-poor benchmark stars HD 140283, HD 122563 and HD 103095 from CHARA interferometry
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2018-01-10
Large stellar surveys of the Milky Way require validation with reference to a set of "benchmark" stars whose fundamental properties are well-determined. For metal-poor benchmark stars, disagreement between spectroscopic and interferometric effective temperatures has called the reliability of the temperature scale into question. We present new interferometric measurements of three metal-poor benchmark stars, HD 140283, HD 122563, and HD 103095, from which we determine their effective temperatures. The angular sizes of all the stars were determined from observations with the PAVO beam combiner at visible wavelengths at the CHARA array, with additional observations of HD 103095 made with the VEGA instrument, also at the CHARA array. Together with photometrically derived bolometric fluxes, the angular diameters give a direct measurement of the effective temperature. For HD 140283 we find {\theta}_LD = 0.324+/-0.005 mas, Teff = 5787+/-48 K; for HD 122563, {\theta}_LD = 0.926+/-0.011 mas, Teff = 4636+/-37 K; and for HD 103095 {\theta}_LD = 0.595+/-0.007 mas, Teff = 5140+/-49 K. Our temperatures for HD 140283 and HD 103095 are hotter than the previous interferometric measurements by 253 K and 322 K, respectively. We find good agreement between our temperatures and recent spectroscopic and photometric estimates. We conclude some previous interferometric measurements have been affected by systematic uncertainties larger than their quoted errors.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00688  [pdf] - 1583007
Gaia Data Release 1. Testing the parallaxes with local Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars
Gaia Collaboration; Clementini, G.; Eyer, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Muraveva, T.; Garofalo, A.; Sarro, L. M.; Palmer, M.; Luri, X.; Molinaro, R.; Rimoldini, L.; Szabados, L.; Musella, I.; Anderson, R. I.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Azntoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernánde, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: 29 pages, 25 figures. Accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2017-05-01
Parallaxes for 331 classical Cepheids, 31 Type II Cepheids and 364 RR Lyrae stars in common between Gaia and the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1) as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). In order to test these first parallax measurements of the primary standard candles of the cosmological distance ladder, that involve astrometry collected by Gaia during the initial 14 months of science operation, we compared them with literature estimates and derived new period-luminosity ($PL$), period-Wesenheit ($PW$) relations for classical and Type II Cepheids and infrared $PL$, $PL$-metallicity ($PLZ$) and optical luminosity-metallicity ($M_V$-[Fe/H]) relations for the RR Lyrae stars, with zero points based on TGAS. The new relations were computed using multi-band ($V,I,J,K_{\mathrm{s}},W_{1}$) photometry and spectroscopic metal abundances available in the literature, and applying three alternative approaches: (i) by linear least squares fitting the absolute magnitudes inferred from direct transformation of the TGAS parallaxes, (ii) by adopting astrometric-based luminosities, and (iii) using a Bayesian fitting approach. TGAS parallaxes bring a significant added value to the previous Hipparcos estimates. The relations presented in this paper represent first Gaia-calibrated relations and form a "work-in-progress" milestone report in the wait for Gaia-only parallaxes of which a first solution will become available with Gaia's Data Release 2 (DR2) in 2018.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.02395  [pdf] - 1550532
Science cases for a visible interferometer
Comments: White Paper prospective. This book is dedicated to the memory of our colleague Olivier Chesneau who passed away at the age of 41. v2 includes some corrections to text
Submitted: 2017-03-07, last modified: 2017-03-21
High spatial resolution is the key for the understanding various astrophysical phenomena. But even with the future E-ELT, single dish instruments are limited to a spatial resolution of about 4 mas in the visible. For the closest objects within our Galaxy most of the stellar photosphere remains smaller than 1 mas. With the success of long baseline interferometry these limitations were soom overcome. Today low and high resolution interferometric instruments on the VLTI and CHARA offer an immense range of astrophysical studies. Combining more telescopes and moving to visible wavelengths broadens the science cases even more. With the idea of developing strong science cases for a future visible interferometer, we organized a science group around the following topics: pre-main sequence and main sequence stars, fundamental parameters, asteroseismology and classical pulsating stars, evolved stars, massive stars, active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and imaging techniques. A meeting was organized on the 15th and 16th of January, 2015 in Nice with the support of the Action Specific in Haute Resolution Angulaire (ASHRA), the Programme National en Physique Stellaire (PNPS), the Lagrange Laboratory and the Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, in order to present these cases and to discuss them further for future visible interferometers. This White Paper presents the outcome of the exchanges. This book is dedicated to the memory of our colleague Olivier Chesneau who passed away at the age of 41.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.01084  [pdf] - 1581739
Seismic inference of 57 stars using full-length Kepler data sets
Comments: 4-page proceedings from Seismology of the Sun and the Distant Stars 2016, TASC/KASC, Azores, Portugal, corrected references in v2
Submitted: 2017-03-03, last modified: 2017-03-06
We present stellar properties (mass, age, radius, distances) of 57 stars from a seismic inference using full-length data sets from Kepler. These stars comprise active stars, planet-hosts, solar-analogs, and binary systems. We validate the distances derived from the astrometric Gaia-Tycho solution. Ensemble analysis of the stellar properties reveals a trend of mixing-length parameter with the surface gravity and effective temperature. We derive a linear relationship with the seismic quantity $\langle r_{02} \rangle$ to estimate the stellar age. Finally, we define the stellar regimes where the Kjeldsen et al (2008) empirical surface correction for 1D model frequencies is valid.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.01131  [pdf] - 1567701
Gaia Data Release 1. Open cluster astrometry: performance, limitations, and future prospects
Gaia Collaboration; van Leeuwen, F.; Vallenari, A.; Jordi, C.; Lindegren, L.; Bastian, U.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Martino, D.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffer, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegrio, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Rimoldini, L.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingril, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernsteiny, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclarky, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardio, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Palmer, M.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poelsy, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: Accepted for publication by A&A. 21 pages main text plus 46 pages appendices. 34 figures main text, 38 figures appendices. 8 table in main text, 19 tables in appendices
Submitted: 2017-03-03
Context. The first Gaia Data Release contains the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). This is a subset of about 2 million stars for which, besides the position and photometry, the proper motion and parallax are calculated using Hipparcos and Tycho-2 positions in 1991.25 as prior information. Aims. We investigate the scientific potential and limitations of the TGAS component by means of the astrometric data for open clusters. Methods. Mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are derived taking into account the error correlations within the astrometric solutions for individual stars, an estimate of the internal velocity dispersion in the cluster, and, where relevant, the effects of the depth of the cluster along the line of sight. Internal consistency of the TGAS data is assessed. Results. Values given for standard uncertainties are still inaccurate and may lead to unrealistic unit-weight standard deviations of least squares solutions for cluster parameters. Reconstructed mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are generally in very good agreement with earlier Hipparcos-based determination, although the Gaia mean parallax for the Pleiades is a significant exception. We have no current explanation for that discrepancy. Most clusters are observed to extend to nearly 15 pc from the cluster centre, and it will be up to future Gaia releases to establish whether those potential cluster-member stars are still dynamically bound to the clusters. Conclusions. The Gaia DR1 provides the means to examine open clusters far beyond their more easily visible cores, and can provide membership assessments based on proper motions and parallaxes. A combined HR diagram shows the same features as observed before using the Hipparcos data, with clearly increased luminosities for older A and F dwarfs.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.03495  [pdf] - 1532553
Proxima's orbit around Alpha Centauri
Comments: 7 pages, 2 figures, Astronomy & Astrophysics, in press
Submitted: 2016-11-10, last modified: 2017-01-18
Proxima and Alpha Centauri AB have almost identical distances and proper motions with respect to the Sun. Although the probability of such similar parameters is in principle very low, the question as to whether they actually form a single gravitationally bound triple system has been open since the discovery of Proxima one century ago. Owing to HARPS high precision absolute radial velocity measurements and the recent revision of the parameters of the Alpha Cen pair, we show that Proxima and Alpha Cen are gravitationally bound with a high degree of confidence. The orbital period of Proxima is approximately 550 000 years. With an excentricity of 0.50 (+0.08 -0.09), Proxima comes within 4.3 (+1.1 -0.9) kau of Alpha Cen at periastron. Its orbital phase is currently close to apastron (13.0 +0.3 -0.1 kau). This orbital motion may have influenced the formation or evolution of the recently discovered planet orbiting Proxima as well as circumbinary planet formation around Alpha Cen.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.06185  [pdf] - 1532159
The radii and limb darkenings of Alpha Centauri A and B - Interferometric measurements with VLTI/PIONIER
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures, in press for Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-10-19
The photospheric radius is one of the fundamental parameters governing the radiative equilibrium of a star. We report new observations of the nearest solar-type stars Alpha Centauri A (G2V) and B (K1V) with the VLTI/PIONIER optical interferometer. The combination of four configurations of the VLTI enable us to measure simultaneously the limb darkened angular diameter thetaLD and the limb darkening parameters of the two solar-type stars in the near-infrared H band (lambda = 1.65 microns). We obtain photospheric angular diameters of thetaLD(A) = 8.502 +/- 0.038 mas (0.43%) and thetaLD(B) = 5.999 +/- 0.025 mas (0.42%), through the adjustment of a power law limb darkening model. We find H band power law exponents of alpha(A) = 0.1404 +/- 0.0050 (3.6%) and alpha(B) = 0.1545 +/- 0.0044 (2.8%), which closely bracket the observed solar value (alpha_sun = 0.15027). Combined with the parallax pi = 747.17 +/- 0.61 mas recently determined, we derive linear radii of RA = 1.2234 +/- 0.0053 Rsun (0.43%) and RB = 0.8632 +/- 0.0037 Rsun (0.43%). The power law exponents that we derive for the two stars indicate a significantly weaker limb darkening than predicted by both 1D and 3D stellar atmosphere models. As this discrepancy is also observed on near-infrared limb darkening profile of the Sun, an improvement of the calibration of stellar atmosphere models is clearly needed. The reported PIONIER visibility measurements of Alpha Cen A and B provide a robust basis to validate the future evolutions of these models.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.06079  [pdf] - 1499606
Close stellar conjunctions of alpha Centauri A and B until 2050 - An mK = 7.8 star may enter the Einstein ring of alpha Cen A in 2028
Comments: 15 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2016-10-19
The rapid proper motion of the alpha Cen pair (3.7 arcsec/yr) and its location close to the galactic plane on a rich stellar background combine to make them excellent candidates for stellar conjunctions with distant stars. Adding new astrometry to archival data, we have refined the orbital parameters, barycentric proper motion and parallax of alpha Cen and compute its apparent trajectory on sky over the coming decades. We present a catalog of the expected close conjunctions until 2050. An exceptional event will take place in early May 2028, when alpha Cen A will come within 0.015 +/- 0.135 arcseconds of the mK = 7.8 star 2MASS 14392160-6049528 (hereafter S5). In terms of impact parameter and contrast, this is the most favorable stellar conjunction of alpha Cen within at least the next three decades. With an angular diameter of LD = 0.47 +/- 0.05 mas, it is likely that S5 is a red giant or supergiant located at several kiloparsecs. The approached stars will act as moving light probes in transmission through the environment of alpha Cen. The observation of these close conjunctions holds great promises to search for planets and other low mass objects in the alpha Cen system using photometry and astrometry. The relativistic deflection of the approached star images will be in the milliarcsecond range. The small impact parameter of the conjunction with S5 means that this star has a probability of 45% of entering the Einstein ring of alpha Cen A. The gravitational amplification of the flux of S5 could reach a factor five for the combination of the two lensed images. The proper motion, orbital parameters and parallax of alpha Cen will be measurable with an extreme accuracy from differential astrometry with the S stars. This will be valuable, for example to prepare the Breakthrough Starshot initiative to send interstellar nanocrafts to alpha Centauri.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.08044  [pdf] - 1531735
A test field for Gaia. Radial velocity catalogue of stars in the South Ecliptic Pole
Comments: 15 pages, 19 figures, 6 tables at CDS
Submitted: 2016-09-26
Gaia is a space mission currently measuring the five astrometric parameters as well as spectrophotometry of at least 1 billion stars to G = 20.7 mag with unprecedented precision. The sixth parameter in phase space (radial velocity) is also measured thanks to medium-resolution spectroscopy being obtained for the 150 million brightest stars. During the commissioning phase, two fields, one around each ecliptic pole, have been repeatedly observed to assess and to improve the overall satellite performances as well as the associated reduction and analysis software. A ground-based photometric and spectroscopic survey was therefore initiated in 2007, and is still running in order to gather as much information as possible about the stars in these fields. This work is of particular interest to the validation of the Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) outputs. The paper presents the radial velocity measurements performed for the Southern targets in the 12 - 17 R magnitude range on high- to mid-resolution spectra obtained with the GIRAFFE and UVES spectrographs.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.03181  [pdf] - 1501988
The Carina Project. X. On the kinematics of old and intermediate-age stellar populations
Comments: 21 pages, 16 figures, 4 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-07-11
We present new radial velocity (RV) measurements of old (horizontal branch) and intermediate-age (red clump) stellar tracers in the Carina dwarf spheroidal. They are based on more than 2,200 low-resolution spectra collected with VIMOS at VLT. The targets are faint (20<V<21.5 mag), but the accuracy at the faintest limit is <9 kms-1. These data were complemented with RV measurements either based on spectra collected with FORS2 and FLAMES/GIRAFFE at VLT or available in the literature. We ended up with a sample of 2748 stars and among them 1389 are candidate Carina stars. We found that the intermediate-age stellar component shows a well defined rotational pattern around the minor axis. The western and the eastern side of the galaxy differ by +5 and -4 km s-1 when compared with the main RV peak. The old stellar component is characterized by a larger RV dispersion and does not show evidence of RV pattern. We compared the observed RV distribution with N-body simulations for a former disky dwarf galaxy orbiting a giant MilkyWay-like galaxy (Lokas et al. 2015). We rotated the simulated galaxy by 60 degrees with respect to the major axis, we kept the observer on orbital plane of the dwarf and extracted a sample of stars similar to the observed one. Observed and predicted Vrot/{\sigma} ratios across the central regions are in remarkable agreement. This evidence indicates that Carina was a disky dwarf galaxy that experienced several strong tidal interactions with the Milky Way. Owing to these interactions, Carina transformed from a disky to a prolate spheroid and the rotational velocity transformed into random motions.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.02393  [pdf] - 1530988
Grown-up stars physics with MATISSE
Comments: SPIE, Jun 2016, Edimbourgh, France
Submitted: 2016-07-08
MATISSE represents a great opportunity to image the environment around massive and evolved stars. This will allow one to put constraints on the circumstellar structure, on the mass ejection of dust and its reorganization , and on the dust-nature and formation processes. MATISSE measurements will often be pivotal for the understanding of large multiwavelength datasets on the same targets collected through many high-angular resolution facilities at ESO like sub-millimeter interferometry (ALMA), near-infrared adaptive optics (NACO, SPHERE), interferometry (PIONIER, GRAVITY), spectroscopy (CRIRES), and mid-infrared imaging (VISIR). Among main sequence and evolved stars, several cases of interest have been identified that we describe in this paper.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.04417  [pdf] - 1359062
New determination of abundances and stellar parameters for a set of weak G-band stars
Comments: 19 pages , 14 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2015-12-14
Weak G-band (wGb) stars are very peculiar red giants almost devoided of carbon and often mildly enriched in lithium. Despite their very puzzling abundance patterns, very few detailed spectroscopic studies existed up to a few years ago, preventing any clear understanding of the wGb phenomenon. We recently proposed the first consistent analysis of published data for 28 wGb stars and identified them as descendants of early A-type to late B-type stars, without being able to conclude on their evolutionary status or the origin of their peculiar abundance pattern. We used newly obtained high-resolution and high SNR spectra for 19 wGb stars in the southern and northern hemisphere to homogeneously derive their fundamental parameters, metallicities, as well as the spectroscopic abundances for Li, C, N, O, Na, Sr, and Ba. We also computed dedicated stellar evolution models that we used to determine the masses and to investigate the evolutionary status and chemical history of the stars in our sample. We confirm that the wGb stars are stars in the mass range 3.2 to 4.2 M$_\odot$. We suggest that a large fraction could be mildly evolved stars on the SGB currently undergoing the 1st DUP, while a smaller number of stars are more probably in the core He burning phase at the clump. After analysing their abundance pattern, we confirm their strong N enrichment anti-correlated with large C depletion, characteristic of material fully processed through the CNO cycle to an extent not known in other evolved intermediate-mass stars. However, we demonstrate here that such a pattern is very unlikely due to self-enrichment. In the light of the current observational constraints, no solid self-consistent pollution scenario can be presented either, leaving the wGb puzzle largely unsolved.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.02687  [pdf] - 1275011
The Carina Project IX: on Hydrogen and helium burning variables
Comments: 44 pages, 13 tables, 13 figures, Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-09-09
We present new multi-band (UBVI) time-series data of helium burning variables in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The current sample includes 92 RR Lyrae-six of them are new identifications-and 20 Anomalous Cepheids, one of which is new identification. The analysis of the Bailey diagram shows that the luminosity amplitude of the first overtone component in double-mode variables is located along the long-period tail of regular first overtone variables, while the fundamental component is located along the short-period tale of regular fundamental variables. This evidence further supports the transitional nature of these objects. Moreover, the distribution of Carina double-mode variables in the Petersen diagram (P_1/P_0 vs P_0) is similar to metal-poor globulars (M15, M68), to the dwarf spheroidal Draco and to the Galactic Halo. This suggests that the Carina old stellar population is metal-poor and affected by a small spread in metallicity. We use trigonometric parallaxes for five field RR Lyrae stars to provide an independent estimate of the Carina distance using the observed reddening free Period--Wesenheit [PW, (BV)] relation. Theory and observations indicate that this diagnostic is independent of metallicity. We found a true distance modulus of \mu=20.01\pm0.02 (standard error of the mean) \pm0.05 (standard deviation) mag. We also provided independent estimates of the Carina true distance modulus using four predicted PW relations (BV, BI, VI, BVI) and we found: \mu=(20.08\pm0.007\pm0.07) mag, \mu=(20.06\pm0.006\pm0.06) mag, \mu=(20.07\pm0.008\pm0.08) mag and \mu=(20.06\pm0.006\pm0.06) mag. Finally, we identified more than 100 new SX Phoenicis stars that together with those already known in the literature (340) make Carina a fundamental laboratory to constrain the evolutionary and pulsation properties of these transitional variables.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.06095  [pdf] - 1288401
Gaia FGK Benchmark Stars: Effective temperatures and surface gravities
Comments: Accepted by A&A; 34 pages (printer format), 14 tables, 13 figures; language corrected
Submitted: 2015-06-19, last modified: 2015-08-20
Large Galactic stellar surveys and new generations of stellar atmosphere models and spectral line formation computations need to be subjected to careful calibration and validation and to benchmark tests. We focus on cool stars and aim at establishing a sample of 34 Gaia FGK Benchmark Stars with a range of different metallicities. The goal was to determine the effective temperature and the surface gravity independently from spectroscopy and atmospheric models as far as possible. Fundamental determinations of Teff and logg were obtained in a systematic way from a compilation of angular diameter measurements and bolometric fluxes, and from a homogeneous mass determination based on stellar evolution models. The derived parameters were compared to recent spectroscopic and photometric determinations and to gravity estimates based on seismic data. Most of the adopted diameter measurements have formal uncertainties around 1%, which translate into uncertainties in effective temperature of 0.5%. The measurements of bolometric flux seem to be accurate to 5% or better, which contributes about 1% or less to the uncertainties in effective temperature. The comparisons of parameter determinations with the literature show in general good agreements with a few exceptions, most notably for the coolest stars and for metal-poor stars. The sample consists of 29 FGK-type stars and 5 M giants. Among the FGK stars, 21 have reliable parameters suitable for testing, validation, or calibration purposes. For four stars, future adjustments of the fundamental Teff are required, and for five stars the logg determination needs to be improved. Future extensions of the sample of Gaia FGK Benchmark Stars are required to fill gaps in parameter space, and we include a list of suggested candidates.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.06597  [pdf] - 1249118
The Carina Project. VIII. The {\alpha}-element abundances
Comments: 21 pages, 19 figures, 11 tables, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2015-05-25, last modified: 2015-06-05
We have performed a new abundance analysis of Carina Red Giant (RG) stars from spectroscopic data collected with UVES (high resolution) and FLAMES/GIRAFFE (high and medium resolution) at ESO/VLT. The former sample includes 44 RGs, while the latter consists of 65 (high) and ~800 (medium resolution) RGs, covering a significant fraction of the galaxy's RG branch (RGB), and red clump stars. To improve the abundance analysis at the faint magnitude limit, the FLAMES/GIRAFFE data were divided into ten surface gravity and effective temperature bins. The spectra of the stars belonging to the same gravity/temperature bin were stacked. This approach allowed us to increase by at least a factor of five the signal-to-noise ratio in the faint limit (V>20.5mag). We took advantage of the new photometry index cU,B,I introduced by Monelli et al. (2014), as an age and probably a metallicity indicator, to split stars along the RGB. These two stellar populations display distinct [Fe/H] and [Mg/H] distributions: their mean Fe abundances are -2.15$\pm$0.06dex (sig=0.28), and -1.75$\pm$0.03dex (sig=0.21), respectively. The two iron distributions differ at the 75% level. This supports preliminary results by Lemasle et al. (2012) and by Monelli et al. (2014). Moreover, we found that the old and intermediate-age stellar populations have mean [Mg/H] abundances of -1.91$\pm$0.05dex (sig=0.22) and -1.35$\pm$0.03dex (sig=0.22); these differ at the 83% level. Carina's {\alpha}-element abundances agree, within 1sigma, with similar abundances for field Halo stars and for cluster (Galactic, Magellanic) stars. The same outcome applies to nearby dwarf spheroidals and ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, in the iron range covered by Carina stars. Finally, we found evidence of a clear correlation between Na and O abundances, thus suggesting that Carina's chemical enrichment history is quite different than in the globular clusters.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.09162  [pdf] - 1055901
Effective collision strengths between Mg I and electrons
Comments: 9 pages, 1 figure, 2 tables, research note accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2015-03-31
The treatment of the inelastic collisions with electrons and hydrogen atoms are the main source of uncertainties in non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) spectral line computations. We report, in this research note, quantum mechanical data for 369 collisional transitions of \ion{Mg}{I} with electrons for temperatures comprised between 500 and 20000~K. We give the quantum mechanical data in terms of effective collision strengths, more practical for non-LTE studies.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.03758  [pdf] - 1249080
On the alpha-element gradients of the Galactic thin disk using Cepheids
Comments: 25 pages, 11 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2015-03-12
We present new homogeneous measurements of Na, Al and three alpha-elements (Mg, Si, Ca) for 75 Galactic Cepheids. The abundances are based on high spectral resolution (R ~ 38,000) and high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ~ 50-300) spectra collected with UVES at ESO VLT. The current measurements were complemented with Cepheid abundances either provided by our group (75) or available in the literature, for a total of 439 Galactic Cepheids. Special attention was given in providing a homogeneous abundance scale for these five elements plus iron (Genovali et al. 2013, 2014). In addition, accurate Galactocentric distances (RG) based on near-infrared photometry are also available for all the Cepheids in the sample (Genovali et al. 2014). They cover a large fraction of the Galactic thin disk (4.1 <= RG <= 18.4 kpc). We found that the above five elements display well defined linear radial gradients and modest standard deviations over the entire range of RG. Moreover, the [element/Fe] abundance ratios are constant across the entire thin disk; only the Ca radial distribution shows marginal evidence of a positive slope. These results indicate that the chemical enrichment history of iron and of the quoted five elements has been quite similar across the four quadrants of the Galactic thin disk. The [element/Fe] ratios are also constant over the entire period range. This empirical evidence indicates that the chemical enrichment of Galactic Cepheids has also been very homogenous during the range in age that they cover (~10-300 Myr). Once again, [Ca/Fe] vs. log(P) shows a (negative) gradient, being underabundant among youngest Cepheids. Finally, we also found that Cepheid abundances agree quite well with similar abundances for thin and thick disk dwarf stars and they follow the typical Mg-Al and Na-O correlations.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.4780  [pdf] - 936228
Benchmark stars for Gaia: fundamental properties of the Population II star HD140283 from interferometric, spectroscopic and photometric data
Comments: final accepted version paper (2 column format)
Submitted: 2014-10-17, last modified: 2014-12-15
We determined the fundamental properties of HD 140283 by obtaining new interferometric and spectroscopic measurements and combining them with photometry from the literature. The interferometric measurements were obtained using the visible interferometer VEGA on the CHARA array and we determined a 1D limb-darkened angular diameter of 0.353 +/- 0.013 milliarcseconds. Using photometry from the literature we derived the bolometric flux with two solutions: a zero-reddening one of Fbol = 3.890 +/- 0.066 1E-8 erg/s/cm2 and a solution with a maximum of Av = 0.1 mag, Fbol= 4.220 +/- 0.067 1E-8 erg/s/cm2. The interferometric Teff is thus 5534 +/- 103 K or 5647 +/- 105 K and its radius is R = 2.21 +/- 0.08 Rsol. Spectroscopic measurements of HD140283 were obtained using HARPS, NARVAL, and UVES and a 1D LTE analysis of H-alpha line wings yields Teff(Halpha) = 5626 +/- 75 K. Using fine-tuned stellar models including diffusion of elements we then determined the mass M and age t of HD140283. Once the metallicity has been fixed, the age of the star depends on M, initial helium abundance Yi and mixing-length parameter alpha, only two of which are independent. We need to adjust alpha to much lower values than the solar one (~2) in order to fit the observations, and if Av = 0.0 mag then 0.5 < alpha < 1. We give an equation to estimate t from M, Yi (alpha) and Av. Establishing a reference alpha = 1.00 and adopting Yi = 0.245 we derive a mass and age of HD140283: M = 0.780 +/- 0.010 Msol and t = 13.7 +/- 0.7 Gyr (Av = 0.0) or M = 0.805 +/- 0.010 Msol and t = 12.2 +/- 0.6 Gyr (Av=0.1 mag). Our stellar models yield an initial metallicity of [Z/X]i = -1.70 and logg = 3.65 +/- 0.03. Asteroseismic observations are critical for overcoming limitations in our results.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.2124  [pdf] - 1222464
The Carina Project VII: Towards the breaking of the age-metallicity degeneracy of red giant branch stars using the c_UBI index
Comments: 11 pages, 11 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-10-08
We present an analysis of photometric and spectroscopic data of the Carina dSph galaxy, testing a new approach similar to that used to disentangle multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We show that a proper colour combination is able to separate a significant fraction of the red giant branch (RGB) of the two main Carina populations (the old one, \sim 12 Gyr, and the intermediate-age one, 4-8 Gyr). In particular, the c_UBI=(U-B)-(B-I) pseudo-colour allows us to follow the RGB of both populations along a relevant portion of the RGB. We find that the oldest stars have more negative c_UBI pseudo-colour than intermediate-age ones. We correlate the pseudo-colour of RGB stars with their chemical properties, finding a significant trend between the iron content and the c_UBI. Stars belonging to the old population are systematically more metal poor ([Fe/H]=-2.32\pm0.08 dex) than the intermediate-age ones ([Fe/H]=-1.82\pm0.03 dex). This gives solid evidence on the chemical evolution history of this galaxy, and we have a new diagnostic that can allow us to break the age-metallicity degeneracy of H-burning advanced evolutionary phases. We compared the distribution of stars in the c_UBI plane with theoretical isochrones, finding that no satisfactory agreement can be reached with models developed in a theoretical framework based on standard heavy element distributions. Finally, we discuss possible systematic differences when compared with multiple populations in GCs.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.2157  [pdf] - 1179097
The Gaia astrophysical parameters inference system (Apsis). Pre-launch description
Comments: 21 pages, accepted to A&A
Submitted: 2013-09-09
The Gaia satellite will survey the entire celestial sphere down to 20th magnitude, obtaining astrometry, photometry, and low resolution spectrophotometry on one billion astronomical sources, plus radial velocities for over one hundred million stars. Its main objective is to take a census of the stellar content of our Galaxy, with the goal of revealing its formation and evolution. Gaia's unique feature is the measurement of parallaxes and proper motions with hitherto unparalleled accuracy for many objects. As a survey, the physical properties of most of these objects are unknown. Here we describe the data analysis system put together by the Gaia consortium to classify these objects and to infer their astrophysical properties using the satellite's data. This system covers single stars, (unresolved) binary stars, quasars, and galaxies, all covering a wide parameter space. Multiple methods are used for many types of stars, producing multiple results for the end user according to different models and assumptions. Prior to its application to real Gaia data the accuracy of these methods cannot be assessed definitively. But as an example of the current performance, we can attain internal accuracies (RMS residuals) on F,G,K,M dwarfs and giants at G=15 (V=15-17) for a wide range of metallicites and interstellar extinctions of around 100K in effective temperature (Teff), 0.1mag in extinction (A0), 0.2dex in metallicity ([Fe/H]), and 0.25dex in surface gravity (logg). The accuracy is a strong function of the parameters themselves, varying by a factor of more than two up or down over this parameter range. After its launch in November 2013, Gaia will nominally observe for five years, during which the system we describe will continue to evolve in light of experience with the real data.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.3858  [pdf] - 1172723
The Carina Project. VI. The helium burning variable stars
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ, publication date September 20, 2013. 31 pages, 7 figure, 3 tables. Figs. 3 and 4 corrected, references added, minor corrections
Submitted: 2013-07-15, last modified: 2013-08-29
We present new optical (BVI) time-series data for the evolved variable stars in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The quality of the data and the observing strategy allowed us to identify 14 new variable stars. Eight out of the 14 are RR Lyrae (RRL) stars, four are Anomalous Cepheids (ACs) and two are geometrical variables. Comparison of the period distribution for the entire sample of RRLs with similar distributions in nearby dSphs and in the Large Magellanic Cloud indicates that the old stellar populations in these systems share similar properties. This finding is also supported by the RRL distribution in the Bailey diagram. On the other hand, the period distribution and the Bailey diagram of ACs display significant differences among the above stellar systems. This evidence suggests that the properties of intermediate-age stellar populations might be affected both by environmental effects and structural parameters. We use the BV Period--Wesenheit (PW) relation of RRLs together with evolutionary prescriptions and find a true distance modulus of 20.09+/-0.07(intrinsic)+/-0.1(statistical) mag that agrees quite well with similar estimates available in the literature. We identified four peculiar variables. Taking into account their position in the Bailey diagram and in the BV PW relation, two of them (V14, V149) appear to be candidate ACs, while two (V158, V182) might be peculiar RRLs. In particular, the variable V158 has a period and a V-band amplitude very similar to the low-mass RRL ---RRLR-02792---recently identified by Pietrzynski at al. (2012) in the Galactic bulge.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.2742  [pdf] - 1166586
On the metallicity distribution of classical Cepheids in the Galactic inner disk
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures; Corrected typos, corrected Table 2
Submitted: 2013-05-13, last modified: 2013-06-24
We present homogeneous and accurate iron abundances for almost four dozen (47) of Galactic Cepheids using high-spectral resolution (R$\sim$40,000) high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N $\ge$ 100) optical spectra collected with UVES at VLT. A significant fraction of the sample (32) is located in the inner disk (RG $le$ 6.9 kpc) and for half of them we provide new iron abundances. Current findings indicate a steady increase in iron abundance when approaching the innermost regions of the thin disk. The metallicity is super-solar and ranges from 0.2 dex for RG $\sim$ 6.5 kpc to 0.4 dex for RG $\sim$ 5.5 kpc. Moreover, we do not find evidence of correlation between iron abundance and distance from the Galactic plane. We collected similar data available in the literature and ended up with a sample of 420 Cepheids. Current data suggest that the mean metallicity and the metallicity dispersion in the four quadrants of the Galactic disk attain similar values. The first-second quadrants show a more extended metal-poor tail, while the third-fourth quadrants show a more extended metal-rich tail, but the bulk of the sample is at solar iron abundance. Finally, we found a significant difference between the iron abundance of Cepheids located close to the edge of the inner disk ([Fe/H]$\sim$0.4) and young stars located either along the Galactic bar or in the nuclear bulge ([Fe/H]$\sim$0). Thus suggesting that the above regions have had different chemical enrichment histories. The same outcome applies to the metallicity gradient of the Galactic bulge, since mounting empirical evidence indicates that the mean metallicity increases when moving from the outer to the inner bulge regions.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.7158  [pdf] - 654284
A large sample of calibration stars for Gaia: log g from Kepler and CoRoT
Comments: Accepted MNRAS, 15 pages (10 figures and 3 tables), v2=some rewording of two sentences
Submitted: 2013-02-28, last modified: 2013-04-19
Asteroseismic data can be used to determine surface gravities with precisions of < 0.05 dex by using the global seismic quantities Deltanu and nu_max along with Teff and [Fe/H]. Surface gravity is also one of the four stellar properties to be derived by automatic analyses for 1 billion stars from Gaia data (workpackage GSP_Phot). We explore seismic data from MS F, G, K stars (solar-like stars) observed by Kepler as a potential calibration source for methods that Gaia will use for object characterisation (log g). We calculate log g for bright nearby stars for which radii and masses are known, and using their global seismic quantities in a grid-based method, we determine an asteroseismic log g to within 0.01 dex of the direct calculation, thus validating the accuracy of our method. We find that errors in Teff and mainly [Fe/H] can cause systematic errors of 0.02 dex. We then apply our method to a list of 40 stars to deliver precise values of surface gravity, i.e. sigma < 0.02 dex, and we find agreement with recent literature values. Finally, we explore the precision we expect in a sample of 400+ Kepler stars which have their global seismic quantities measured. We find a mean uncertainty (precision) on the order of <0.02 dex in log g over the full explored range 3.8 < log g < 4.6, with the mean value varying only with stellar magnitude (0.01 - 0.02 dex). We study sources of systematic errors in log g and find possible biases on the order of 0.04 dex, independent of log g and magnitude, which accounts for errors in the Teff and [Fe/H] measurements, as well as from using a different grid-based method. We conclude that Kepler stars provide a wealth of reliable information that can help to calibrate methods that Gaia will use, in particular, for source characterisation with GSP_Phot where excellent precision (small uncertainties) and accuracy in log g is obtained from seismic data.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.5807  [pdf] - 1164811
The nearby eclipsing stellar system delta Velorum - IV. Differential astrometry with VLT/NACO at the 100 microarcsecond level
Comments: 8 pages, accepted for publication in A\&A
Submitted: 2013-02-23
Context. delta Vel contains the brightest eclipsing binary in the southern sky (delta Vel A), and a nearby third star located ~0.6" away (delta Vel B). The proximity of delta Vel B (usable as a reference) makes it a particularly well-suited target to detect the astrometric displacement of the center of light of the eclipsing pair. Aims. We obtained NACO astrometric observations with two goals: (1) to confirm the orientation of the orbital plane of the eclipsing pair on the sky determined by interferometry (Paper III) and (2) demonstrate the capabilities of narrow-angle adaptive optics astrometry on a simple system with predictable astrometric properties. Methods. We measured the angular separation vector between the eclipsing binary delta Vel A and the visual companion delta Vel B from narrow-band images at 2.17 microns obtained with the VLT/NACO adaptive optics system. Based on these observations and our previous determination of the orbital parameters of the wide binary delta Vel A-B, we derive the apparent displacement of the center-of-light of the eclipsing pair at 11 epochs over its orbital cycle. Results. We detect the astrometric wobble of the center of light of the delta Vel A pair relatively to B with a typical measurement precision of ~50 microarcseconds per epoch, for a total amplitude of the measured displacement of ~2 milliarcseconds. Conclusions. The detected wobble is in agreement with our model presented in Paper III and confirms the orientation of the Aab orbital plane on the sky. The residual dispersion compared to our model is 110 microarcseconds rms, that we tentatively attribute to photometric variability of the fast rotating A-type components Aa and/or Ab in the BrGamma line. Based on these results, we conclude that in favorable conditions (bright source with only two resolved components, small angular separation), narrow-angle astrometry with adaptive optics on an 8-meter class telescope can reach an accuracy of 50 to 100 microarcseconds.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1212.1297  [pdf] - 599836
Asteroseismic constraints for Gaia
Comments: 5 pages, single column
Submitted: 2012-12-06
Distances from the Gaia mission will no doubt improve our understanding of stellar physics by providing an excellent constraint on the luminosity of the star. However, it is also clear that high precision stellar properties from, for example, asteroseismology, will also provide a needed input constraint in order to calibrate the methods that Gaia will use, e.g. stellar models or GSP_phot. For solar-like stars (F, G, K IV/V), asteroseismic data delivers at the least two very important quantities: (1) the average large frequency separation <Delta_nu> and (2) the frequency corresponding to the maximum of the modulated-amplitude spectrum nu_max. Both of these quantities are related directly to stellar parameters (radius and mass) and in particular their combination (gravity and density). We show how the precision in <Delta_nu>, nu_max, and atmospheric parameters T_eff and [Fe/H] affect the determination of gravity (log g) for a sample of well-known stars. We find that log g can be determined within less than 0.02 dex accuracy for our sample while considering precisions in the data expected for V<12 stars from Kepler data. We also derive masses and radii which are accurate to within 1sigma of the accepted values. This study validates the subsequent use of all of the available asteroseismic data on main sequence solar-like stars from the Kepler field (>500 IV/V stars) in order to provide a very important constraint for Gaia calibration of GSP_phot through the use of log g. We note that while we concentrate on IV/V stars, both the CoRoT and Kepler fields contain asteroseismic data on thousands of giant stars which will also provide useful calibration measures.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.5954  [pdf] - 541890
Fundamental properties of the Population II fiducial stars HD 122563 and Gmb 1830 from CHARA interferometric observations
Comments: accepted A&A, 8 dbl-column pages, incl. 7 tables and 4 figures
Submitted: 2012-07-25
We have determined the angular diameters of two metal-poor stars, HD 122563 and Gmb 1830, using CHARA and Palomar Testbed Interferometer observations. For the giant star HD 122563, we derive an angular diameter theta_3D = 0.940 +- 0.011 milliarcseconds (mas) using limb-darkening from 3D convection simulations and for the dwarf star Gmb 1830 (HD 103095) we obtain a 1D limb-darkened angular diameter theta_1D = 0.679 +- 0.007 mas. Coupling the angular diameters with photometry yields effective temperatures with precisions better than 55 K (Teff = 4598 +- 41 K and 4818 +- 54 K --- for the giant and the dwarf star, respectively). Including their distances results in very well-determined luminosities and radii (L = 230 +- 6 L_sun, R = 23.9 +- 1.9 R_sun and L = 0.213 +- 0.002 L_sun, R = 0.664 +- 0.015 R_sun, respectively). We used the CESAM2k stellar structure and evolution code in order to produce models that fit the observational data. We found values of the mixing-length parameter alpha (which describes 1D convection) that depend on the mass of the star. The masses were determined from the models with precisions of <3% and with the well-measured radii excellent constraints on the surface gravity are obtained (log g = 1.60 +- 0.04, 4.59 +- 0.02, respectively). The very small errors on both log g and Teff provide stringent constraints for spectroscopic analyses given the sensitivity of abundances to both of these values. The precise determination of Teff for the two stars brings into question the photometric scales for metal-poor stars.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.4612  [pdf] - 1118152
The Carina Project. V. The impact of NLTE effects on the iron content
Comments: Accepted for publication in PASP, 16 pages, 7 figures, 3 tables, 1 MR table Note: the electronic version of Table1 is included, but commented, in the tex file
Submitted: 2012-04-20, last modified: 2012-04-23
We have performed accurate iron abundance measurements for 44 red giants (RGs) in the Carina dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy. We used archival, high-resolution spectra (R~38,000) collected with UVES at ESO/VLT either in slit mode (5) or in fiber mode (39, FLAMES/GIRAFFE-UVES). The sample is more than a factor of four larger than any previous spectroscopic investigation of stars in dSphs based on high-resolution (R>38,000) spectra. We did not impose the ionization equilibrium between neutral and singly-ionized iron lines. The effective temperatures and the surface gravities were estimated by fitting stellar isochrones in the V, B-V color-magnitude diagram. To measure the iron abundance of individual lines we applied the LTE spectrum synthesis fitting method using MARCS model atmospheres of appropriate metallicity. We found evidence of NLTE effects between neutral and singly-ionized iron abundances. Assuming that the FeII abundances are minimally affected by NLTE effects, we corrected the FeI stellar abundances using a linear fit between FeI and FeII stellar abundance determinations. We found that the Carina metallicity distribution based on the corrected FeI abundances (44 RGs) has a weighted mean metallicity of [Fe/H]=-1.80 and a weighted standard deviation of sigma=0.24 dex. The Carina metallicity distribution based on the FeII abundances (27 RGs) gives similar estimates ([Fe/H]=-1.72, sigma=0.24 dex). The current weighted mean metallicities are slightly more metal poor when compared with similar estimates available in the literature. Furthermore, if we restrict our analysis to stars with the most accurate iron abundances, ~20 FeI and at least three FeII measurements (15 stars), we found that the range in iron abundances covered by Carina RGs (~1 dex) agrees quite well with similar estimates based on high-resolution spectra.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.0985  [pdf] - 421811
The diameter of the CoRoT target HD 49933. Combining the 3D limb darkening, asteroseismology, and interferometry
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2011-10-05
Context. The interpretation of stellar pulsations in terms of internal structure depends on the knowledge of the fundamental stellar parameters. Long-base interferometers permit us to determine very accurate stellar radii, which are independent constraints for stellar models that help us to locate the star in the HR diagram. Aims: Using a direct interferometric determination of the angular diameter and advanced three-dimensional (3D) modeling, we derive the radius of the CoRoT target HD 49933 and reduce the global stellar parameter space compatible with seismic data. Methods: The VEGA/CHARA spectro-interferometer is used to measure the angular diameter of the star. A 3D radiative hydrodynamical simulation of the surface is performed to compute the limb darkening and derive a reliable diameter from visibility curves. The other fundamental stellar parameters (mass, age, and Teff) are found by fitting the large and small p-mode frequency separations using a stellar evolution model that includes microscopic diffusion. Results: We obtain a limb-darkened angular diameter of {\theta}LD = 0.445 \pm 0.012 mas. With the Hipparcos parallax, we obtain a radius of R = 1.42 \pm 0.04 Rsun. The corresponding stellar evolution model that fits both large and small frequency separations has a mass of 1.20 \pm 0.08 Msun and an age of 2.7 Gy. The atmospheric parameters are Teff = 6640 \pm 100 K, log g = 4.21 \pm 0.14, and [Fe/H] = -0.38.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1107.6015  [pdf] - 1083083
A grid of NLTE corrections for magnesium and calcium in late-type giant and supergiant stars: application to Gaia
Comments: 27 pages, 19 figures and 11 tables. Also on-line data; MNRAS (2011) 0000
Submitted: 2011-07-29
We investigate NLTE effects for magnesium and calcium in the atmospheres of late-type giant and supergiant stars. The aim of this paper is to provide a grid of NLTE/LTE equivalent width ratios W/W* of Mg and Ca lines for the following range of stellar parameters: Teff in [3500, 5250] K, log g in [0.5, 2.0] dex and [Fe/H] in [-4.0, 0.5] dex. We use realistic model atoms with the best physics available and taking into account the fine structure. The Mg and Ca lines of interest are in optical and near IR ranges. A special interest concerns the lines in the Gaia spectrograph (RVS) wavelength domain [8470, 8740] A. The NLTE corrections are provided as function of stellar parameters in an electronic table as well as in a polynomial form for the Gaia/RVS lines.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.3038  [pdf] - 1052112
The Carina Project. IV. radial velocity distribution
Comments: Accepted on PASP, 9 pages, 13 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2011-02-15
We present new and accurate radial velocity (RV) measurements of luminous stars of all ages (old horizontal branch, intermediate--age red clump, and young blue plume, as well as red giants of a range of ages; 20.6<V<22) in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy, based on low-resolution spectra collected with the FORS2 multi-object slit spectrograph at the VLT. This data set was complemented by RV measurements based on medium and high-resolution archive spectra of brighter (V<20.6) Carina targets collected with the GIRAFFE multi-object fiber spectrograph at the VLT. The combined sample includes more than 21,340 individual spectra of ~2,000 stars covering the entire body of the galaxy. To further improve the statistics, the accurate RV measurements recently provided by Walker et al.(2007) were also added to the current data set. We ended up with a sample of ~1,370 RV measurements of candidate Carina stars that is ~75% larger than any previous Carina RV sample. The mean RV across the body of the galaxy varies from ~220 km/s at a distance of 7arcmin (~200 pc) from the center to ~223 km/s at 13arcmin, (~400 pc, 6sigma level) and flattens out to a constant value of ~221 km/s at larger distances (600 pc, 4sigma level). Moreover and even more importantly, we found that in the Carina regions where the mean RV is smaller the dispersion is also smaller, and the RV distribution is more centrally peaked (i.e. the kurtosis attains larger values). There is evidence of a secondary maximum in RV across the Carina center (|D|<200 pc). The occurrence of a secondary feature across the Carina center is also supported by the flat-topped radial distribution based on the photometric catalog.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.1682  [pdf] - 18410
The nearby eclipsing stellar system delta Velorum - I. Origin of the infrared excess from VISIR and NACO imaging
Comments: 8 pages, 9 figures, A&A, in press
Submitted: 2008-11-11
- Context: The triple stellar system delta Vel system presents a significant infrared excess, whose origin is still being debated. A large infrared bow shock has been discovered using Spitzer/MIPS observations. Although it appears as a significant contributor to the measured IR excess, the possibility exists that a circumstellar IR excess is present around the stars of the system. - Aims: The objective of the present VISIR and NACO observations is to identify whether one of the stars of the delta Vel system presents a circumstellar photometric excess in the thermal IR domain and to quantify it. - Methods: We observed delta Vel using the imaging modes of the ESO/VLT instruments VISIR (in BURST mode) and NACO to resolve the A-B system (0.6" separation) and obtain the photometry of each star. We also obtained one NACO photometry epoch precisely at the primary (annular) eclipse of delta Vel Aa by Ab. - Results: Our photometric measurements with NACO (2.17 mic), complemented by the existing visible photometry allowed us to reconstruct the spectral energy distribution of the three stars. We then compared the VISIR photometry (8.6-12.8 mic) to the expected photospheric emission from the three stars at the corresponding wavelengths. - Conclusions: We can exclude the presence of a circumstellar thermal infrared excess around delta Vel A or B down to a few percent level. This supports the conclusions of Gaspar et al. (2008) that the IR excess of delta Vel has an interstellar origin, although a cold circumstellar disk could still be present. In addition, we derive the spectral types of the three stars Aa, Ab, and B (respectively A2IV, A4V and F8V), and we estimate the age of the system around 400-500 Myr.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:0806.4049  [pdf] - 13869
The radii of the nearby K5V and K7V stars 61 Cyg A & B - CHARA/FLUOR interferometry and CESAM2k modeling
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A, 8 pages
Submitted: 2008-06-25
Context: The main sequence binary star 61 Cyg (K5V+K7V) is our nearest stellar neighbour in the northern hemisphere. This proximity makes it a particularly well suited system for very high accuracy interferometric radius measurements. Aims: Our goal is to constrain the poorly known evolutionary status and age of this bright binary star. Methods: We obtained high accuracy interferometric observations in the infrared K' band, using the CHARA/FLUOR instrument. We then computed evolutionary models of 61 Cyg A & B with the CESAM2k code. As model constraints, we used a combination of observational parameters from classical observation methods (photometry, spectroscopy) as well as our new interferometric radii. Results: The measured limb darkened disk angular diameters are theta_LD(A) = 1.775 +/- 0.013 mas and theta_LD(B) = 1.581 +/- 0.022 mas, respectively for 61 Cyg A and B. Considering the high accuracy parallaxes available, these values translate into photospheric radii of R(A) = 0.665 +/- 0.005 Rsun and R(B) = 0.595 +/- 0.008 Rsun. The new radii constrain efficiently the physical parameters adopted for the modeling of both stars, allowing us to predict asteroseismic frequencies based on our best-fit models. Conclusions: The CESAM2k evolutionary models indicate an age around 6 Gyrs and are compatible with small values of the mixing length parameter. The measurement of asteroseismic oscillation frequencies in 61 Cyg A & B would be of great value to improve the modeling of this important fiducial stellar system, in particular to better constrain the masses.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:0710.1731  [pdf] - 5829
A near-infrared interferometric survey of debris disk stars. I. Probing the hot dust content around epsilon Eridani and tau Ceti with CHARA/FLUOR
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, to appear in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2007-10-09
We probed the first 3AU around tau Ceti and epsilon Eridani with the CHARA array (Mt Wilson, USA) in order to gauge the 2micron excess flux emanating from possible hot dust grains in the debris disks and to also resolve the stellar photospheres. High precision visibility amplitude measurements were performed with the FLUOR single mode fiber instrument and telescope pairs on baselines ranging from 22 to 241m of projected length. The short baseline observations allow us to disentangle the contribution of an extended structure from the photospheric emission, while the long baselines constrain the stellar diameter. We have detected a resolved emission around tau Cet, corresponding to a spatially integrated, fractional excess flux of 0.98 +/- 0.21 x 10^{-2} with respect to the photospheric flux in the K'-band. Around eps Eri, our measurements can exclude a fractional excess of greater than 0.6x10^{-2} (3sigma). We interpret the photometric excess around tau Cet as a possible signature of hot grains in the inner debris disk and demonstrate that a faint, physical or background, companion can be safely excluded. In addition, we measured both stellar angular diameters with an unprecedented accuracy: Theta_LD(tau Cet)= 2.015 +/- 0.011 mas and Theta_LD(eps Eri)=2.126 +/- 0.014 mas.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0612223  [pdf] - 1455163
Deep imaging survey of the environment of Alpha Centauri - II. CCD imaging with the NTT-SUSI2 camera
Comments: Accepted for publication as a Research Note in A&A
Submitted: 2006-12-08
Context: The nearby pair of solar-type stars Alpha Centauri is a favorable target for an imaging search for extrasolar planets. Indications exist that the gravitational mass of Alpha Cen B could be higher than its modeled mass, the difference being consistent with a substellar companion of a few tens of Jupiter masses. However, Alpha Centauri usually appears in star catalogues surrounded by a large void area, due to the strong diffused light. Aims: We searched for faint comoving companions to Alpha Cen located at angular distances of the order of a few tens of arcseconds, up to 2-3 arcmin. As a secondary objective, we built a catalogue of the detected background sources. Methods: In order to complement our adaptive optics search at small angular distances (Paper I), we used atmosphere limited CCD imaging from the NTT-SUSI2 instrument in the Bessel V, R, I, and Z bands. Results: We present the results of our search in the form of a catalogue of the detected objects inside a 5.5 arcmin box around this star. A total of 4313 sources down to mV~24 and mI~22 were detected from this wide-field survey. We extracted the infrared photometry of part of the detected sources from archive images of the 2MASS survey (JHK bands). We investigate briefly the nature of the detected sources, many of them presenting extremely red color indices (V-K > 14). Conclusions: We did not detect any companion to Alpha Centauri between 100 and 300 AU, down to a maximum mass of ~15 times Jupiter. We also mostly exclude the presence of a companion more massive than 30 MJup between 50 and 100 AU.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0608510  [pdf] - 1455142
Deep imaging survey of the environment of Alpha Centauri - I. Adaptive optics imaging of Alpha Cen B with VLT-NACO
Comments: 15 pages, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2006-08-24
Context: Alpha Centauri is our closest stellar neighbor, at a distance of only 1.3 pc, and its two main components have spectral types comparable to the Sun. This is therefore a favorable target for an imaging search for extrasolar planets. Moreover, indications exist that the gravitational mass of Alpha Cen B is higher than its modeled mass, the difference being consistent with a substellar companion of a few tens of Jupiter masses. Aims: We searched for faint comoving companions to Alpha Cen B. As a secondary objective, we built a catalogue of the detected background sources. Methods: We used the NACO adaptive optics system of the VLT in the J, H, and Ks bands to search for companions to Alpha Cen B. This instrument allowed us to achieve a very high sensitivity to point-like sources, with a limiting magnitude of m\_Ks ~ 18 at 7" from the star. We complemented this data set with archival coronagraphic images from the HST-ACS instrument to obtain an accurate astrometric calibration. Results: Over the observed area, we did not detect any comoving companion to Alpha Cen B down to an absolute magnitude of 19-20 in the H and Ks bands. However, we present a catalogue of 252 background objects within about 15" of the star. This catalogue fills part of the large void area that surrounds Alpha Cen in sky surveys due to the strong diffused light. We also present a model of the diffused light as a function of angular distance for the NACO instrument, that can be used to predict the background level for bright star observations. Conclusions: According to recent numerical models, the limiting magnitude of our search sets the maximum mass of possible companions to 20-30 times Jupiter, between 7 and 20 AU from Alpha Cen B.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0502235  [pdf] - 1456407
A Search for Very Active Stars in the Galaxy
Comments: to appear in A&A, 7 figures
Submitted: 2005-02-11, last modified: 2005-02-18
We report the first results of a systematic search near the plane of the Galaxy for the so called very active stars (VAS), which are characterized by a hard X-ray spectrum and activity in the radio domain. Candidates with hard X-ray binary-like spectra have been selected from the Bright ROSAT Source Catalogue in the Zone of Avoidance ($| b | < 20{^o}$) and were tentatively identified in GB6/PMM/NVSS radio surveys. Most of them were observed with the ATCA and VLA. Precise radio coordinates have led to unambiguous optical identification for 60 candidates, and a sub-sample of five of themhas been observed with the VLT. Also some discovery and confirmatory spectra were obtained with the AAT (4-m) and BTA (6-m). Spectroscopy with moderate dispersion, made with the FORS1 spectrograph of the VLT has revealed two stellar objects (one of them, VASC J1628-41, is definitivelya binary VAS), one new AGN and two featureless spectrum sources. One of these objects, VASC J1353-66, shows a marginal evidence of proper motion, which, if confirmed, would imply the discovery of a new type of galactic source.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0501459  [pdf] - 1456404
Seismology and activity of the F type star HD 49933
Comments: accepted in A&A Letters
Submitted: 2005-01-21
A 10-night asteroseismic observation programme has been conducted in January 2004 with the spectrometer Harps at the ES0 3.6-m telescope. The selected target, the 6th magnitude F5V star HD 49933, was chosen among the prime candidates of Corot, the European space mission dedicated to characterize stellar oscillations mode with high precision photometry measurements. This star shows important line profiles variations, indicating a surprisingly high activity with respect to its low rotation rate. However, with the help of tools developed for disentangling the signatures of activity and oscillations, we are able to observe its oscillation spectrum in the frequency range [1.2, 2.2 mHz]. We measure the large separation (88.7+-0.4 microHz) and the maximum amplitude (around 0.4+-0.1 m/s rms), respectively in agreement and marginal agreement with the predicted values.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0501420  [pdf] - 1456403
VLTI/VINCI diameter constraints on the evolutionary status of delta Eri, xi Hya, eta Boo
Comments: other location: http://www.obs-nice.fr/pichon/science.html ; Accepted for publication in Astron. Astrophys
Submitted: 2005-01-19
Using VLTI/VINCI angular diameter measurements, we constrain the evolutionary status of three asteroseismic targets: the stars $\delta$ Eri, $\xi$ Hya, $\eta$ Boo. Our predictions of the mean large frequency spacing of these stars are in agreement with published observational estimations. Looking without success for a companion of $\delta$ Eri we doubt on its classification as an RS CVn star.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0105166  [pdf] - 42395
VLT Observations of Turnoff stars in the Globular Cluster NGC 6397
Comments: to appear in A&A
Submitted: 2001-05-10
VLT-UVES high resolution spectra of seven turnoff stars in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 6397 have been obtained. Atmospheric parameters and abundances of several elements (Li, Na, Mg, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn and Ba) were derived for program stars. The mean iron abundance is [Fe/H] = -2.02, with no star-to-star variation. The mean abundances of the alpha-elements (Ca, Ti) and of the iron-peak elements (Sc, Cr, Ni) are consistent with abundances derived for field stars of similar metallicity. Magnesium is also almost solar, consistent with the values found by Idiart & Th\'evenin (2000) when non-LTE effects (NLTE hereafter) are taken into account. The sodium abundance derived for five stars is essentially solar, but one object (A447) is clearly Na deficient. These results are compatible with the expected abundance range estimated from the stochastic evolutionary halo model by Argast et al. (2000) when at the epoch of [Fe/H] $\sim$ -2 the interstellar medium is supposed to become well-mixed.