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Tarle, G.

Normalized to: Tarle, G.

273 article(s) in total. 3427 co-authors, from 1 to 241 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 70,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2007.00050  [pdf] - 2125672
A DESGW Search for the Electromagnetic Counterpart to the LIGO/Virgo Gravitational Wave Binary Neutron Star Merger Candidate S190510g
Comments: Paper submitted to ApJL
Submitted: 2020-06-30
We present the results from a search for the electromagnetic counterpart of the LIGO/Virgo event S190510g using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). S190510g is a binary neutron star (BNS) merger candidate of moderate significance detected at a distance of 227$\pm$92 Mpc and localized within an area of 31 (1166) square degrees at 50\% (90\%) confidence. While this event was later classified as likely non-astrophysical in nature within 30 hours of the event, our short latency search and discovery pipeline identified 11 counterpart candidates, all of which appear consistent with supernovae following offline analysis and spectroscopy by other instruments. Later reprocessing of the images enabled the recovery of 6 more candidates. Additionally, we implement our candidate selection procedure on simulated kilonovae and supernovae under DECam observing conditions (e.g., seeing, exposure time) with the intent of quantifying our search efficiency and making informed decisions on observing strategy for future similar events. This is the first BNS counterpart search to employ a comprehensive simulation-based efficiency study. We find that using the current follow-up strategy, there would need to be 19 events similar to S190510g for us to have a 99\% chance of detecting an optical counterpart, assuming a GW170817-like kilonova. We further conclude that optimization of observing plans, which should include preference for deeper images over multiple color information, could result in up to a factor of 1.5 reduction in the total number of followups needed for discovery.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.14961  [pdf] - 2122762
A statistical standard siren measurement of the Hubble constant from the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave compact object merger GW190814 and Dark Energy Survey galaxies
Comments: 12 pages, 3 figures, submitted to ApJL. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1901.01540
Submitted: 2020-06-25
We present a measurement of the Hubble constant $H_0$ using the gravitational wave (GW) event GW190814, which resulted from the coalescence of a 23 $M_\odot$ black hole with a 2.6 $M_\odot$ compact object, as a standard siren. No compelling electromagnetic counterpart with associated host galaxy has been identified for this event, thus our analysis accounts for $\sim$ 2,700 potential host galaxies within a statistical framework. The redshift information is obtained from the photometric redshift (photo-$z$) catalog from the Dark Energy Survey. The luminosity distance is provided by the gravitational wave sky map published by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration. Since this GW event has the second-smallest sky localization area after GW170817, GW190814 is likely to provide the best constraint on cosmology from a single standard siren without identifying an electromagnetic counterpart. Our analysis uses photo-$z$ probability distribution functions and corrects for photo-$z$ biases. We also reanalyze the binary-black hole GW170814 within this updated framework. We explore how our findings impact the $H_0$ constraints from GW170817, the only GW merger associated with a unique host galaxy, and therefore the most powerful standard siren to date. From a combination of GW190814, GW170814 and GW170817, our analysis yields $H_0 = 69.0^{+ 14}_{- 7.5 }~{\rm km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$ (68% Highest Density Interval, HDI) for a prior in $H_0$ uniform between $[20,140]~{\rm km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$. The addition of GW190814 and GW170814 to GW170817 improves the 68% HDI from GW170817 alone by $\sim 12\%$, showing how well-localized mergers without counterparts can provide a marginal contribution to standard siren measurements, provided that a complete galaxy catalog is available at the location of the event.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.10162  [pdf] - 2117715
$\mu_{\star}$ Masses: Weak Lensing Calibration of the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 redMaPPer Clusters using Stellar Masses
Comments: 20 pages, 10 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-06-17
We present the weak lensing mass calibration of the stellar mass based $\mu_{\star}$ mass proxy for redMaPPer galaxy clusters in the Dark Energy Survey Year 1. For the first time we are able to perform a calibration of $\mu_{\star}$ at high redshifts, $z>0.33$. In a blinded analysis, we use $\sim 6,000$ clusters split into 12 subsets spanning the ranges $0.1 \leqslant z<0.65$ and $\mu_{\star}$ up to $\sim 5.5 \times 10^{13} M_{\odot}$, and infer the average masses of these subsets through modelling of their stacked weak lensing signal. In our model we account for the following sources of systematic uncertainty: shear measurement and photometric redshift errors, miscentring, cluster-member contamination of the source sample, deviations from the NFW halo profile, halo triaxiality and projection effects. We use the inferred masses to estimate the joint mass--$\mu_{\star}$--$z$ scaling relation given by $\langle M_{200c} | \mu_{\star},z \rangle = M_0 (\mu_{\star}/5.16\times 10^{12} \mathrm{M_{\odot}})^{F_{\mu_{\star}}} ((1+z)/1.35)^{G_z}$. We find $M_0= (1.14 \pm 0.07) \times 10^{14} \mathrm{M_{\odot}}$ with $F_{\mu_{\star}}= 0.76 \pm 0.06$ and $G_z= -1.14 \pm 0.37$. We discuss the use of $\mu_{\star}$ as a complementary mass proxy to the well-studied richness $\lambda$ for: $i)$ exploring the regimes of low $z$, $\lambda<20$ and high $\lambda$, $z \sim 1$; $ii)$ testing systematics such as projection effects for applications in cluster cosmology.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.10457  [pdf] - 2124684
Dark Energy Survey Identification of A Low-Mass Active Galactic Nucleus at Redshift 0.823 from Optical Variability
Comments: 13 pages, 8 figures, 1 table, accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-03-23, last modified: 2020-06-15
We report the identification of a low-mass AGN, DES J0218$-$0430, in a redshift $z = 0.823$ galaxy in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Supernova field. We select DES J0218$-$0430 as an AGN candidate by characterizing its long-term optical variability alone based on DES optical broad-band light curves spanning over 6 years. An archival optical spectrum from the fourth phase of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey shows both broad Mg II and broad H$\beta$ lines, confirming its nature as a broad-line AGN. Archival XMM-Newton X-ray observations suggest an intrinsic hard X-ray luminosity of $L_{{\rm 2-12\,keV}}\sim7.6\pm0.4\times10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$, which exceeds those of the most X-ray luminous starburst galaxies, in support of an AGN driving the optical variability. Based on the broad H$\beta$ from SDSS spectrum, we estimate a virial BH mass of $M_{\bullet}\approx10^{6.43}$-$10^{6.72}M_{\odot}$ (with the error denoting 1$\sigma$ statistical uncertainties only), consistent with the estimation from OzDES, making it the lowest mass AGN with redshift $>$ 0.4 detected in optical. We estimate the host galaxy stellar mass to be $M_{\ast}\sim10^{10.5\pm0.3}M_{\odot}$ based on modeling the multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution. DES J0218$-$0430 extends the $M_{\bullet}$-$M_{\ast}$ relation observed in luminous AGNs at $z\sim1$ to masses lower than being probed by previous work. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of using optical variability to identify low-mass AGNs at higher redshift in deeper synoptic surveys with direct implications for the upcoming Legacy Survey of Space and Time at Vera C. Rubin Observatory.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.07385  [pdf] - 2114306
Constraints on the Physical Properties of S190814bv through Simulations based on DECam Follow-up Observations by the Dark Energy Survey
Comments: Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2020-06-12
On 14 August 2019, the LIGO and Virgo Collaborations alerted the astronomical community of a high significance detection of gravitational waves and classified the source as a neutron star - black hole (NSBH) merger, the first event of its kind. In search of an optical counterpart, the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Gravitational Wave Search and Discovery Team performed the most thorough and accurate analysis to date, targeting the entire 90 percent confidence level localization area with Blanco/DECam 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, and 16 nights after the merger was detected. Objects with varying brightness were detected by the DES Search and Discovery Pipeline and we systematically reduced the list of candidate counterparts through catalog matching, light curve properties, host-galaxy photometric redshifts, SOAR spectroscopic follow-up observations, and machine-learning-based photometric classification. All candidates were rejected as counterparts to the merger. To quantify the sensitivity of our search, we applied our selection criteria to simulations of supernovae and kilonovae as they would appear in the DECam observations. Since there are no explicit light curve models for NSBH mergers, we characterize our sensitivity with binary NS models that are expected to have similar optical signatures as NSBH mergers. We find that if a kilonova occurred during this merger, configurations where the ejected matter is greater than 0.07 solar masses, has lanthanide abundance less than $10^{-8.56}$, and has a velocity between $0.18c$ and $0.21c$ are disfavored at the $2\sigma$ level. Furthermore, we estimate that our background reduction methods are capable of associating gravitational wave signals with a detected electromagnetic counterpart at the $4\sigma$ level in $95\%$ of future follow-up observations.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.04294  [pdf] - 2109338
Shadows in the Dark: Low-Surface-Brightness Galaxies Discovered in the Dark Energy Survey
Comments: 29 pages, 18 figures. Data products related to this work can be found in: https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/other/y3-lsbg
Submitted: 2020-06-07
We present a catalog of 20,977 extended low-surface-brightness galaxies (LSBGs) identified in ~ 5000 deg$^2$ from the first three years of imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Based on a single-component S\'ersic model fit, we define extended LSBGs as galaxies with $g$-band effective radii $R_{\scriptsize{eff}} > 2.5"$ and mean surface brightness $\bar{\mu}_{\scriptsize{eff}}(g) > 24.3$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$. We find that the distribution of LSBGs is strongly bimodal in $(g-r)$ vs. $(g-i$) color space. We divide our sample into red ($g-i \geq 0.59$) and blue ($g-i<0.59$) galaxies and study the properties of the two populations. Redder LSBGs are more clustered than their blue counterparts, and are correlated with the distribution of nearby ($z < 0.10$) bright galaxies. Red LSBGs constitute $\sim 35\%$ of our LSBG sample, and $\sim 30\%$ of these are located within 1 deg of low-redshift galaxy groups and clusters (compared to $\sim 8\%$ of the blue LSBGs). For nine of the most prominent galaxy groups and clusters, we calculate the physical properties of associated LSBGs assuming a redshift derived from the host system. In these systems, we identify 108 objects that can be classified as ultra-diffuse galaxies, defined as LSBGs with projected physical effective radii $R_{\scriptsize{eff}} > 1.5$ kpc. The wide-area sample of LSBGs in DES can be used to test the role of environment on models of LSBG formation and evolution.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.00449  [pdf] - 2110125
OzDES multi-object fibre spectroscopy for the Dark Energy Survey: Results and second data release
Comments: 20 pages, 16 figures. Accepted for publication by MNRAS. Data release available at https://datacentral.org.au
Submitted: 2020-05-31
We present a description of the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES) and summarise the results from its six years of operations. Using the 2dF fibre positioner and AAOmega spectrograph on the 3.9-metre Anglo-Australian Telescope, OzDES has monitored 771 AGN, classified hundreds of supernovae, and obtained redshifts for thousands of galaxies that hosted a transient within the 10 deep fields of the Dark Energy Survey. We also present the second OzDES data release, containing the redshifts of almost 30,000 sources, some as faint as $r_{\mathrm AB}=24$ mag, and 375,000 individual spectra. These data, in combination with the time-series photometry from the Dark Energy Survey, will be used to measure the expansion history of the Universe out to $z\sim1.2$ and the masses of hundreds of black holes out to $z\sim4$. OzDES is a template for future surveys that combine simultaneous monitoring of targets with wide-field imaging cameras and wide-field multi-object spectrographs.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.11559  [pdf] - 2105611
DES16C3cje: A low-luminosity, long-lived supernova
Comments: Accepted in MNRAS. 17 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2020-01-30, last modified: 2020-05-29
We present DES16C3cje, a low-luminosity, long-lived type II supernova (SN II) at redshift 0.0618, detected by the Dark Energy Survey (DES). DES16C3cje is a unique SN. The spectra are characterized by extremely narrow photospheric lines corresponding to very low expansion velocities of $\lesssim1500$ km s$^{-1}$, and the light curve shows an initial peak that fades after 50 days before slowly rebrightening over a further 100 days to reach an absolute brightness of M$_r\sim -15.5$ mag. The decline rate of the late-time light curve is then slower than that expected from the powering by radioactive decay of $^{56}$Co but is comparable to that expected from accretion power. Comparing the bolometric light curve with hydrodynamical models, we find that DES16C3cje can be explained by either i) a low explosion energy (0.11 foe) and relatively large $^{56}$Ni production of 0.075 M$_{\odot}$ from a $\sim15$ M$_{\odot}$ red supergiant progenitor typical of other SNe II, or ii) a relatively compact $\sim40$ M$_{\odot}$ star, explosion energy of 1 foe, and 0.08 M$_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni. Both scenarios require additional energy input to explain the late-time light curve, which is consistent with fallback accretion at a rate of $\sim0.5\times{10^{-8}}$ M$_{\odot}$ s$^{-1}$.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.12275  [pdf] - 2101588
Is diffuse intracluster light a good tracer of the galaxy cluster matter distribution?
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-05-25
We explore the relation between diffuse intracluster light (central galaxy included) and the galaxy cluster (baryonic and dark) matter distribution using a sample of 528 clusters at $0.2\leq z \leq 0.35$ found in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 data. The surface brightness of the diffuse light shows an increasing dependence on cluster total mass at larger radius, and appears to be self-similar with a universal radial dependence after scaling by cluster radius.We also compare the diffuse light radial profiles to the cluster (baryonic and dark) matter distribution measured through weak lensing and find them to be comparable. The IllustrisTNG galaxy formation simulation offers further insight into the connection between diffuse stellar mass and cluster matter distributions -- the simulation radial profile of the diffuse stellar component does not have a similar slope with the total cluster matter content, although that of the cluster satellite galaxies does. Regardless of the radial trends, the amount of diffuse stellar mass has a low-scatter scaling relation with cluster's total mass in the simulation, out-performing the total stellar mass of cluster satellite galaxies. We conclude that there is no consistent evidence on whether or not diffuse light is a faithful radial tracer of the cluster matter distribution. Nevertheless, both observational and simulation results reveal that diffuse light is an excellent indicator of the cluster's total mass.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.10767  [pdf] - 2099364
Chemical Analysis of the Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxy Grus~II. Signature of high-mass stellar nucleosynthesis
Comments: 17 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2020-05-21
We present a detailed abundance analysis of the three brightest member stars at the top of the giant branch of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Grus~II. All stars exhibit a higher than expected $\mathrm{[Mg/Ca]}$ ratio compared to metal-poor stars in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies and in the Milky Way halo. Nucleosynthesis in high mass ($\geqslant 20$M$_\odot$) core-collapse supernovae has been shown to create this signature. The abundances of this small sample (3) stars suggest the chemical enrichment of Grus~II could have occurred through substantial high-mass stellar evolution and is consistent with the framework of a top-heavy initial mass function. However, with only three stars it can not be ruled out that the abundance pattern is the result of a stochastic chemical enrichment at early times in the galaxy. The most metal-rich of the three stars also possesses a small enhancement in rapid neutron-capture ($r$-process) elements. The abundance pattern of the $r$-process elements in this star matches the scaled $r$-process pattern of the solar system and $r$-process enhanced stars in other dwarf galaxies and in the Milky Way halo, hinting at a common origin for these elements across a range of environments. All current proposed astrophysical sites of $r$-process element production are associated with high-mass stars, thus the possible top-heavy initial mass function of Grus~II would increase the likelihood of any of these events occurring. The time delay between the $\alpha$ and $r$-process element enrichment of the galaxy favors a neutron star merger as the origin of the $r$-process elements in Grus~II.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.09757  [pdf] - 2101566
Studying Type II supernovae as cosmological standard candles using the Dark Energy Survey
Comments: 39 pages, 22 figures, 10 tables, Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-05-19
Despite vast improvements in the measurement of the cosmological parameters, the nature of dark energy and an accurate value of the Hubble constant (H$_0$) in the Hubble-Lema\^itre law remain unknown. To break the current impasse, it is necessary to develop as many independent techniques as possible, such as the use of Type II supernovae (SNe II). The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the utility of SNe II for deriving accurate extragalactic distances, which will be an asset for the next generation of telescopes where more-distant SNe II will be discovered. More specifically, we present a sample from the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program (DES-SN) consisting of 15 SNe II with photometric and spectroscopic information spanning a redshift range up to 0.35. Combining our DES SNe with publicly available samples, and using the standard candle method (SCM), we construct the largest available Hubble diagram with SNe II in the Hubble flow (70 SNe II) and find an observed dispersion of 0.27 mag. We demonstrate that adding a colour term to the SN II standardisation does not reduce the scatter in the Hubble diagram. Although SNe II are viable as distance indicators, this work points out important issues for improving their utility as independent extragalactic beacons: find new correlations, define a more standard subclass of SNe II, construct new SN II templates, and dedicate more observing time to high-redshift SNe II. Finally, for the first time, we perform simulations to estimate the redshift-dependent distance-modulus bias due to selection effects.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.08653  [pdf] - 2096538
The Host Galaxies of Rapidly Evolving Transients in the Dark Energy Survey
Comments: 16 pages, 15 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-05-18
Rapidly evolving transients (RETs), also termed fast blue optical transients (FBOTs), are a distinct class of astrophysical event. They are characterised by lightcurves that decline much faster than common classes supernovae (SNe), span vast ranges in peak luminosity and can be seen to redshifts greater than 1. Their evolution on fast timescales has hindered high quality follow-up observations, and thus their origin and explosion/emission mechanism remains unexplained. In this paper we define the largest sample of RETs to date, comprising 106 objects from the Dark Energy Survey, and perform the most comprehensive analysis of RET host galaxies. Using deep-stacked photometry and emission-lines from OzDES spectroscopy, we derive stellar masses and star-formation rates (SFRs) for 49 host galaxies, and metallicities for 37. We find that RETs explode exclusively in star-forming galaxies and are thus likely associated with massive stars. Comparing RET hosts to samples of host galaxies of other explosive transients as well as field galaxies, we find that RETs prefer galaxies with high specific SFRs, indicating a link to young stellar populations, similar to stripped-envelope SNe. RET hosts appear to show a lack of chemical enrichment, their metallicities akin to long duration gamma-ray bursts and superluminous SN host galaxies. There are no clear relationships between properties of the host galaxies and the peak magnitudes or decline rates of the transients themselves.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.05929  [pdf] - 2089021
Blinding multi-probe cosmological experiments
Comments: 18 pages, 13 figures, data available upon request. Updated to match published version
Submitted: 2019-11-13, last modified: 2020-05-04
The goal of blinding is to hide an experiment's critical results -- here the inferred cosmological parameters -- until all decisions affecting its analysis have been finalised. This is especially important in the current era of precision cosmology, when the results of any new experiment are closely scrutinised for consistency or tension with previous results. In analyses that combine multiple observational probes, like the combination of galaxy clustering and weak lensing in the Dark Energy Survey (DES), it is challenging to blind the results while retaining the ability to check for (in)consistency between different parts of the data. We propose a simple new blinding transformation that works by modifying the summary statistics that are input to parameter estimation, such as two-point correlation functions. The transformation shifts the measured statistics to new values that are consistent with (blindly) shifted cosmological parameters, while preserving internal (in)consistency. We apply the blinding transformation to simulated data for the projected DES Year 3 galaxy clustering and weak lensing analysis, demonstrating that practical blinding is achieved without significant perturbation of internal-consistency checks, as measured here by degradation of the $\chi^2$ between data and best-fitting model. Our blinding method conserves $\chi^2$ more precisely as experiments evolve to higher precision.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.01721  [pdf] - 2093277
A joint SZ-Xray-optical analysis of the dynamical state of 288 massive galaxy clusters
Comments: 21 pages, 12 Figures, 4 Tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-04-03, last modified: 2020-04-28
We use imaging from the first three years of the Dark Energy Survey to characterize the dynamical state of 288 galaxy clusters at $0.1 \lesssim z \lesssim 0.9$ detected in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect survey (SPT-SZ). We examine spatial offsets between the position of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and the center of the gas distribution as traced by the SPT-SZ centroid and by the X-ray centroid/peak position from Chandra and XMM data. We show that the radial distribution of offsets provides no evidence that SPT SZ-selected cluster samples include a higher fraction of mergers than X-ray-selected cluster samples. We use the offsets to classify the dynamical state of the clusters, selecting the 43 most disturbed clusters, with half of those at $z \gtrsim 0.5$, a region seldom explored previously. We find that Schechter function fits to the galaxy population in disturbed clusters and relaxed clusters differ at $z>0.55$ but not at lower redshifts. Disturbed clusters at $z>0.55$ have steeper faint-end slopes and brighter characteristic magnitudes. Within the same redshift range, we find that the BCGs in relaxed clusters tend to be brighter than the BCGs in disturbed samples, while in agreement in the lower redshift bin. Possible explanations includes a higher merger rate, and a more efficient dynamical friction at high redshift. The red-sequence population is less affected by the cluster dynamical state than the general galaxy population.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.12369  [pdf] - 2109030
The Curious Case of PHL 293B: A Long-Lived Transient in a Metal-Poor Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy
Comments: 15 pages, 6 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publication in ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2020-02-27, last modified: 2020-04-27
We report on small-amplitude optical variability and recent dissipation of the unusually persistent broad emission lines in the blue compact dwarf galaxy PHL 293B. The galaxy's unusual spectral features (P Cygni-like profiles with $\sim$800 km s$^{-1}$ blueshifted absorption lines) have resulted in conflicting interpretations of the nature of this source in the literature. However, analysis of new Gemini spectroscopy reveals the broad emission has begun to fade after being persistent for over a decade prior. Precise difference imaging light curves constructed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Dark Energy Survey reveal small-amplitude optical variability of $\sim$0.1 mag in the g band offset by $100\pm21$ pc from the brightest pixel of the host. The light curve is well-described by an active galactic nuclei (AGN)-like damped random walk process. However, we conclude that the origin of the optical variability and spectral features of PHL 293B is due to a long-lived stellar transient, likely a Type IIn supernova or non-terminal outburst, mimicking long-term AGN-like variability. This work highlights the challenges of discriminating between scenarios in such extreme environments, relevant to searches for AGNs in dwarf galaxies. This is the second long-lived transient discovered in a blue compact dwarf, after SDSS1133. Our result implies such long-lived stellar transients may be more common in metal-deficient galaxies. Systematic searches for low-level variability in dwarf galaxies will be possible with the upcoming Legacy Survey of Space and Time at Vera C. Rubin Observatory.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.12218  [pdf] - 2084339
First Hubble diagram and cosmological constraints using superluminous supernova
Comments: 14 oages, 7 figures. Comments are welcome
Submitted: 2020-04-25
We present the first Hubble diagram of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) out to a redshift of two, together with constraints on the matter density, $\Omega_{\rm M}$, and the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, $w(\equiv p/\rho)$. We build a sample of 20 cosmologically useful SLSNe~I based on light curve and spectroscopy quality cuts. We confirm the robustness of the peak decline SLSN~I standardization relation with a larger dataset and improved fitting techniques than previous works. We then solve the SLSN model based on the above standardisation via minimisation of the $\chi^2$ computed from a covariance matrix which includes statistical and systematic uncertainties. For a spatially flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model, we find $\Omega_{\rm M}=0.44^{+0.21}_{-0.21}$, with a rms of 0.28 mag for the residuals of the distance moduli. For an $w_0w_a$CDM cosmological model, the addition of SLSNe~I to a `baseline' measurement consisting of Planck temperature and WMAP polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuation together with type Ia supernovae, results in a small improvement in the constraints of $w_0$ and $w_a$ of 4\%. We present simulations of future surveys with 847 SLSNe I and show that such a sample can deliver cosmological constraints in a flat $\Lambda$CDM model with the same precision (considering only statistical uncertainties) as current surveys that use type Ia supernovae, while providing an improvement of 15\% in the constraints on the time variation of dark energy, $w_0$ and $w_a$. This paper represents the proof-of-concept for superluminous supernova cosmology, and demonstrates they can provide an independent test of cosmology in the high-redshift ($z>1$) universe.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.03302  [pdf] - 2079284
Milky Way Satellite Census. I. The Observational Selection Function for Milky Way Satellites in DES Y3 and Pan-STARRS DR1
Comments: 34 pages, 11 figures, 6 tables; updated to match published version. Selection functions available at: https://github.com/des-science/mw-sats
Submitted: 2019-12-06, last modified: 2020-04-16
We report the results of a systematic search for ultra-faint Milky Way satellite galaxies using data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and Pan-STARRS1 (PS1). Together, DES and PS1 provide multi-band photometry in optical/near-infrared wavelengths over ~80% of the sky. Our search for satellite galaxies targets ~25,000 deg$^2$ of the high-Galactic-latitude sky reaching a 10$\sigma$ point-source depth of $\gtrsim$ 22.5 mag in the $g$ and $r$ bands. While satellite galaxy searches have been performed independently on DES and PS1 before, this is the first time that a self-consistent search is performed across both data sets. We do not detect any new high-significance satellite galaxy candidates, while recovering the majority of satellites previously detected in surveys of comparable depth. We characterize the sensitivity of our search using a large set of simulated satellites injected into the survey data. We use these simulations to derive both analytic and machine-learning models that accurately predict the detectability of Milky Way satellites as a function of their distance, size, luminosity, and location on the sky. To demonstrate the utility of this observational selection function, we calculate the luminosity function of Milky Way satellite galaxies, assuming that the known population of satellite galaxies is representative of the underlying distribution. We provide access to our observational selection function to facilitate comparisons with cosmological models of galaxy formation and evolution.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.03303  [pdf] - 2083408
Milky Way Satellite Census. II. Galaxy--Halo Connection Constraints Including the Impact of the Large Magellanic Cloud
Comments: 26 pages, 10 figures, 3 tables. Updated to published version
Submitted: 2019-12-06, last modified: 2020-04-16
The population of Milky Way (MW) satellites contains the faintest known galaxies and thus provides essential insight into galaxy formation and dark matter microphysics. Here we combine a model of the galaxy--halo connection with newly derived observational selection functions based on searches for satellites in photometric surveys over nearly the entire high Galactic latitude sky. In particular, we use cosmological zoom-in simulations of MW-like halos that include realistic Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) analogs to fit the position-dependent MW satellite luminosity function. We report decisive evidence for the statistical impact of the LMC on the MW satellite population due to an estimated $6\pm 2$ observed LMC-associated satellites, consistent with the number of LMC satellites inferred from Gaia proper-motion measurements, confirming the predictions of cold dark matter models for the existence of satellites within satellite halos. Moreover, we infer that the LMC fell into the MW within the last $2\ \rm{Gyr}$ at high confidence. Based on our detailed full-sky modeling, we find that the faintest observed satellites inhabit halos with peak virial masses below $3.2\times 10^{8}\ M_{\rm{\odot}}$ at $95\%$ confidence, and we place the first robust constraints on the fraction of halos that host galaxies in this regime. We predict that the faintest detectable satellites occupy halos with peak virial masses above $10^{6}\ M_{\rm{\odot}}$, highlighting the potential for powerful galaxy formation and dark matter constraints from future dwarf galaxy searches.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.05714  [pdf] - 2115131
Imaging Systematics and Clustering of DESI Main Targets
Comments: 30 pages, 28 figures, 11 tables; v2: minor revisions to incorporate referee comments
Submitted: 2019-11-13, last modified: 2020-04-14
We evaluate the impact of imaging systematics on the clustering of luminous red galaxies (LRG), emission-line galaxies (ELG) and quasars (QSO) targeted for the upcoming Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) survey. Using Data Release 7 of the DECam Legacy Survey, we study the effects of astrophysical foregrounds, stellar contamination, differences between north galactic cap and south galactic cap measurements, and variations in imaging depth, stellar density, galactic extinction, seeing, airmass, sky brightness, and exposure time before presenting survey masks and weights to mitigate these effects. With our sanitized samples in hand, we conduct a preliminary analysis of the clustering amplitude and evolution of the DESI main targets. From measurements of the angular correlation functions, we determine power law fits $r_0 = 7.78 \pm 0.26$ $h^{-1}$Mpc, $\gamma = 1.98 \pm 0.02$ for LRGs and $r_0 = 5.45 \pm 0.1$ $h^{-1}$Mpc, $\gamma = 1.54 \pm 0.01$ for ELGs. Additionally, from the angular power spectra, we measure the linear biases and model the scale dependent biases in the weakly nonlinear regime. Both sets of clustering measurements show good agreement with survey requirements for LRGs and ELGs, attesting that these samples will enable DESI to achieve precise cosmological constraints. We also present clustering as a function of magnitude, use cross-correlations with external spectroscopy to infer $dN/dz$ and measure clustering as a function of luminosity, and probe higher order clustering statistics through counts-in-cells moments.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.06306  [pdf] - 2078211
STRIDES: a 3.9 per cent measurement of the Hubble constant from the strong lens system DES J0408-5354
Comments: 32 pages, 17 figures, 10 tables. Accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-10-14, last modified: 2020-04-14
We present a blind time-delay cosmographic analysis for the lens system DES J0408$-$5354. This system is extraordinary for the presence of two sets of multiple images at different redshifts, which provide the opportunity to obtain more information at the cost of increased modelling complexity with respect to previously analyzed systems. We perform detailed modelling of the mass distribution for this lens system using three band Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We combine the measured time delays, line-of-sight central velocity dispersion of the deflector, and statistically constrained external convergence with our lens models to estimate two cosmological distances. We measure the "effective" time-delay distance corresponding to the redshifts of the deflector and the lensed quasar $D_{\Delta t}^{\rm eff}=3382^{+146}_{-115}$ Mpc and the angular diameter distance to the deflector $D_{\rm d}=1711^{+376}_{-280}$ Mpc, with covariance between the two distances. From these constraints on the cosmological distances, we infer the Hubble constant $H_0 = 74.2^{+2.7}_{-3.0}$ km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$ assuming a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmology and a uniform prior for $\Omega_{\rm m}$ as $\Omega_{\rm m} \sim \mathcal{U}(0.05, 0.5)$. This measurement gives the most precise constraint on $H_0$ to date from a single lens. Our measurement is consistent with that obtained from the previous sample of six lenses analyzed by the $H_0$ Lenses in COSMOGRAIL's Wellspring (H0LiCOW) collaboration. It is also consistent with measurements of $H_0$ based on the local distance ladder, reinforcing the tension with the inference from early Universe probes, for example, with 2.2$\sigma$ discrepancy from the cosmic microwave background measurement.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.05618  [pdf] - 2077442
Noise from Undetected Sources in Dark Energy Survey Images
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2020-04-12
For ground-based optical imaging with current CCD technology, the Poisson fluctuations in source and sky background photon arrivals dominate the noise budget and are readily estimated. Another component of noise, however, is the signal from the undetected population of stars and galaxies. Using injection of artificial galaxies into images, we demonstrate that the measured variance of galaxy moments (used for weak gravitational lensing measurements) in Dark Energy Survey (DES) images is significantly in excess of the Poisson predictions, by up to 30\%, and that the background sky levels are overestimated by current software. By cross-correlating distinct images of "empty" sky regions, we establish that there is a significant image noise contribution from undetected static sources (US), which on average are mildly resolved at DES resolution. Treating these US as a stationary noise source, we compute a correction to the moment covariance matrix expected from Poisson noise. The corrected covariance matrix matches the moment variances measured on the injected DES images to within 5\%. Thus we have an empirical method to statistically account for US in weak lensing measurements, rather than requiring extremely deep sky simulations. We also find that local sky determinations can remove the bias in flux measurements, at a small penalty in additional, but quantifiable, noise.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.12083  [pdf] - 2080937
The Mystery of Photometric Twins DES17X1boj and DES16E2bjy
Comments: Accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-11-27, last modified: 2020-04-07
We present an analysis of DES17X1boj and DES16E2bjy, two peculiar transients discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (DES). They exhibit nearly identical double-peaked light curves which reach very different maximum luminosities (M$_\mathrm{r}$ = -15.4 and M$_\mathrm{r}$ = -17.9, respectively). The light curve evolution of these events is highly atypical and has not been reported before. The transients are found in different host environments: DES17X1boj was found near the nucleus of a spiral galaxy, while DES16E2bjy is located in the outskirts of a passive red galaxy. Early photometric data is well fitted with a blackbody and the resulting moderate photospheric expansion velocities (1800 km/s for DES17X1boj and 4800 km/s for DES16E2bjy) suggest an explosive or eruptive origin. Additionally, a feature identified as high-velocity CaII absorption (v $\approx$ 9400km/s) in the near-peak spectrum of DES17X1boj may imply that it is a supernova. While similar light curve evolution suggests a similar physical origin for these two transients, we are not able to identify or characterise the progenitors.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.04350  [pdf] - 2073948
Modelling the Milky Way. I -- Method and first results fitting the thick disk and halo with DES-Y3 data
Comments: 18 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2019-04-08, last modified: 2020-04-01
We present MWFitting, a method to fit the stellar components of the Galaxy by comparing Hess Diagrams (HDs) from TRILEGAL models to real data. We apply MWFitting to photometric data from the first three years of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). After removing regions containing known resolved stellar systems such as globular clusters, dwarf galaxies, nearby galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Sagittarius Stream, our main sample spans a total area of $\sim$2,300 deg$^2$ distributed across the DES footprint. We further explore a smaller subset ($\sim$ 1,300 deg$^2$) that excludes all regions with known stellar streams and stellar overdensities. Validation tests on synthetic data possessing similar properties to the DES data show that the method is able to recover input parameters with a precision better than 3\%. Based on the best-fit models, we create simulated stellar catalogues covering the whole DES footprint down to $g = 24$ magnitude. Comparisons of data and simulations provide evidence for a break in the power law index describing the stellar density of the Milky Way (MW) halo. Several previously discovered stellar over-densities are recovered in the residual stellar density map, showing the reliability of MWFitting in determining the Galactic components. Simulations made with the best-fitting parameters are a promising way to predict MW star counts for surveys such as LSST and Euclid.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.12117  [pdf] - 2072774
STRIDES: Spectroscopic and photometric characterization of the environment and effects of mass along the line of sight to the gravitational lenses DES J0408-5354 and WGD 2038-4008
Comments: 40 pages, 18 figures Added missing author to the author list
Submitted: 2020-03-26, last modified: 2020-03-30
In time-delay cosmography, three of the key ingredients are 1) determining the velocity dispersion of the lensing galaxy, 2) identifying galaxies and groups along the line of sight with sufficient proximity and mass to be included in the mass model, and 3) estimating the external convergence $\kappa_\mathrm{ext}$ from less massive structures that are not included in the mass model. We present results on all three of these ingredients for two time-delay lensed quasar systems, DES J0408-5354 and WGD 2038-4008. We use the Gemini, Magellan and VLT telescopes to obtain spectra to both measure the stellar velocity dispersions of the main lensing galaxies and to identify the line-of-sight galaxies in these systems. Next, we identify 10 groups in DES J0408-5354 and 2 groups in WGD 2038-4008using a group-finding algorithm. We then identify the most significant galaxy and galaxy-group perturbers using the "flexion shift" criterion. We determine the probability distribution function of the external convergence $\kappa_\mathrm{ext}$ for both of these systems based on our spectroscopy and on the DES-only multiband wide-field observations. Using weighted galaxy counts, calibrated based on the Millennium Simulation, we find that DES J0408-5354 is located in a significantly underdense environment, leading to a tight (width $\sim3\%$), negative-value $\kappa_\mathrm{ext}$ distribution. On the other hand, WGD 2038-4008 is located in an environment of close to unit density, and its low source redshift results in a much tighter $\kappa_\mathrm{ext}$ of $\sim1\%$, as long as no external shear constraints are imposed.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.10454  [pdf] - 2069160
The impact of spectroscopic incompleteness in direct calibration of redshift distributions for weak lensing surveys
Comments: 19 pages, 12 figures. Our main result is shown in Fig. 6. Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-03-23
Obtaining accurate distributions of galaxy redshifts is a critical aspect of weak lensing cosmology experiments. One of the methods used to estimate and validate redshift distributions is apply weights to a spectroscopic sample so that their weighted photometry distribution matches the target sample. In this work we estimate the \textit{selection bias} in redshift that is introduced in this procedure. We do so by simulating the process of assembling a spectroscopic sample (including observer-assigned confidence flags) and highlight the impacts of spectroscopic target selection and redshift failures. We use the first year (Y1) weak lensing analysis in DES as an example data set but the implications generalise to all similar weak lensing surveys. We find that using colour cuts that are not available to the weak lensing galaxies can introduce biases of $\Delta~z\sim0.015$ in the weighted mean redshift of different redshift intervals. To assess the impact of incompleteness in spectroscopic samples, we select only objects with high observer-defined confidence flags and compare the weighted mean redshift with the true mean. We find that the mean redshift of the DES Y1 weak lensing sample is typically biased at the $\Delta~z=0.005-0.05$ level after the weighting is applied. The bias we uncover can have either sign, depending on the samples and redshift interval considered. For the highest redshift bin, the bias is larger than the uncertainties in the other DES Y1 redshift calibration methods, justifying the decision of not using this method for the redshift estimations. We discuss several methods to mitigate this bias.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.10834  [pdf] - 2055410
Validation of Selection Function, Sample Contamination and Mass Calibration in Galaxy Cluster Samples
Comments: 28 pages, 23 figure
Submitted: 2020-02-25, last modified: 2020-02-26
We construct and validate the selection function of the MARD-Y3 sample. This sample was selected through optical follow-up of the 2nd ROSAT faint source catalog (2RXS) with Dark Energy Survey year 3 (DES-Y3) data. The selection function is modeled by combining an empirically constructed X-ray selection function with an incompleteness model for the optical follow-up. We validate the joint selection function by testing the consistency of the constraints on the X-ray flux--mass and richness--mass scaling relation parameters derived from different sources of mass information: (1) cross-calibration using SPT-SZ clusters, (2) calibration using number counts in X-ray, in optical and in both X-ray and optical while marginalizing over cosmological parameters, and (3) other published analyses. We find that the constraints on the scaling relation from the number counts and SPT-SZ cross-calibration agree, indicating that our modeling of the selection function is adequate. Furthermore, we apply a largely cosmology independent method to validate selection functions via the computation of the probability of finding each cluster in the SPT-SZ sample in the MARD-Y3 sample and vice-versa. This test reveals no clear evidence for MARD-Y3 contamination, SPT-SZ incompleteness or outlier fraction. Finally, we discuss the prospects of the techniques presented here to limit systematic selection effects in future cluster cosmological studies.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.11124  [pdf] - 2055421
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Cosmological Constraints from Cluster Abundances and Weak Lensing
DES Collaboration; Abbott, Tim; Aguena, Michel; Alarcon, Alex; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steve; Annis, James; Avila, Santiago; Bacon, David; Bermeo, Alberto; Bernstein, Gary; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bhargava, Sunayana; Bocquet, Sebastian; Brooks, David; Brout, Dillon; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Burke, David; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco Javier; Cawthon, Ross; Chang, Chihway; Chen, Xinyi; Choi, Ami; Costanzi, Matteo; Crocce, Martin; da Costa, Luiz; Davis, Tamara; De Vicente, Juan; DeRose, Joseph; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, H. Thomas; Dietrich, Jörg; Dodelson, Scott; Doel, Peter; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Eckert, Kathleen; Eifler, Tim; Elvin-Poole, Jack; Estrada, Juan; Everett, Spencer; Evrard, August; Farahi, Arya; Ferrero, Ismael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Frieman, Josh; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gatti, Marco; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Gerdes, David; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Giles, Paul; Grandis, Sebastian; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; Gschwend, Julia; Gutierrez, Gaston; Hartley, Will; Hinton, Samuel; Hollowood, Devon L.; Honscheid, Klaus; Hoyle, Ben; Huterer, Dragan; James, David; Jarvis, Mike; Jeltema, Tesla; Johnson, Margaret; Kent, Stephen; Krause, Elisabeth; Kron, Richard; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Lahav, Ofer; Li, Ting; Lidman, Christopher; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Huan; MacCrann, Niall; Maia, Marcio; Mantz, Adam; Marshall, Jennifer; Martini, Paul; Mayers, Julian; Melchior, Peter; Mena, Juan; Menanteau, Felipe; Miquel, Ramon; Mohr, Joe; Nichol, Robert; Nord, Brian; Ogando, Ricardo; Palmese, Antonella; Paz-Chinchon, Francisco; Malagón, Andrés Plazas; Prat, Judit; Rau, Markus Michael; Romer, Kathy; Roodman, Aaron; Rooney, Philip; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli; Sako, Masao; Samuroff, Simon; Sanchez, Carles; Saro, Alexandro; Scarpine, Vic; Schubnell, Michael; Scolnic, Daniel; Serrano, Santiago; Sevilla, Ignacio; Sheldon, Erin; Smith, J. Allyn; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly; Tarle, Gregory; Thomas, Daniel; To, Chun-Hao; Troxel, Michael A.; Tucker, Douglas; Varga, Tamas Norbert; von der Linden, Anja; Walker, Alistair; Wechsler, Risa; Weller, Jochen; Wilkinson, Reese; Wu, Hao-Yi; Yanny, Brian; Zhang, Zhuowen; Zuntz, Joe
Comments: 35 pages, 20 figures, submitted to Physical Review D
Submitted: 2020-02-25
We perform a joint analysis of the counts and weak lensing signal of redMaPPer clusters selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 dataset. Our analysis uses the same shear and source photometric redshifts estimates as were used in the DES combined probes analysis. Our analysis results in surprisingly low values for $S_8 =\sigma_8(\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3)^{0.5}= 0.65\pm 0.04$, driven by a low matter density parameter, $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.179^{+0.031}_{-0.038}$, with $\sigma_8-\Omega_{\rm m}$ posteriors in $2.4\sigma$ tension with the DES Y1 3x2pt results, and in $5.6\sigma$ with the Planck CMB analysis. These results include the impact of post-unblinding changes to the analysis, which did not improve the level of consistency with other data sets compared to the results obtained at the unblinding. The fact that multiple cosmological probes (supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, cosmic shear, galaxy clustering and CMB anisotropies), and other galaxy cluster analyses all favor significantly higher matter densities suggests the presence of systematic errors in the data or an incomplete modeling of the relevant physics. Cross checks with X-ray and microwave data, as well as independent constraints on the observable--mass relation from SZ selected clusters, suggest that the discrepancy resides in our modeling of the weak lensing signal rather than the cluster abundance. Repeating our analysis using a higher richness threshold ($\lambda \ge 30$) significantly reduces the tension with other probes, and points to one or more richness-dependent effects not captured by our model.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.08493  [pdf] - 2076734
Birds of a Feather? Magellan/IMACS Spectroscopy of the Ultra-Faint Satellites Grus II, Tucana IV, and Tucana V
Comments: 16 pages, 9 figures, 6 tables. Minor edits in the abstract and Section 5. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-11-19, last modified: 2020-02-20
We present Magellan/IMACS spectroscopy of three recently discovered ultra-faint Milky Way satellites, Grus II, Tucana IV, and Tucana V. We measure systemic velocities of V_hel = -110.0 +/- 0.5 km/s, V_hel = 15.9 +/- 1.8 km/s, and V_hel = -36.2 +/-2.5 km/s for the three objects, respectively. Their large relative velocity differences demonstrate that the satellites are unrelated despite their close physical proximity. We determine a velocity dispersion for Tuc IV of sigma = 4.3^+1.7_-1.0 km/s, but we cannot resolve the velocity dispersions of the other two systems. For Gru II we place an upper limit (90% confidence) on the dispersion of sigma < 1.9 km/s, and for Tuc V we do not obtain any useful limits. All three satellites have metallicities below [Fe/H] = -2.1, but none has a detectable metallicity spread. We determine proper motions for each satellite based on Gaia astrometry and compute their orbits around the Milky Way. Gru II is on a tightly bound orbit with a pericenter of 25 kpc and orbital eccentricity of 0.45. Tuc V likely has an apocenter beyond 100 kpc, and could be approaching the Milky Way for the first time. The current orbit of Tuc IV is similar to that of Gru II, with a pericenter of 25 kpc and an eccentricity of 0.36. However, a backward integration of the position of Tuc IV demonstrates that it collided with the Large Magellanic Cloud at an impact parameter of 4 kpc ~120 Myr ago, deflecting its trajectory and possibly altering its internal kinematics. Based on their sizes, masses, and metallicities, we classify Gru II and Tuc IV as likely dwarf galaxies, but the nature of Tuc V remains uncertain.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.03610  [pdf] - 2052053
Optimising Automatic Morphological Classification of Galaxies with Machine Learning and Deep Learning using Dark Energy Survey Imaging
Comments: 20 pages, 19 figures. Accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-08-09, last modified: 2020-02-20
There are several supervised machine learning methods used for the application of automated morphological classification of galaxies; however, there has not yet been a clear comparison of these different methods using imaging data, or a investigation for maximising their effectiveness. We carry out a comparison between several common machine learning methods for galaxy classification (Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), K-nearest neighbour, Logistic Regression, Support Vector Machine, Random Forest, and Neural Networks) by using Dark Energy Survey (DES) data combined with visual classifications from the Galaxy Zoo 1 project (GZ1). Our goal is to determine the optimal machine learning methods when using imaging data for galaxy classification. We show that CNN is the most successful method of these ten methods in our study. Using a sample of $\sim$2,800 galaxies with visual classification from GZ1, we reach an accuracy of $\sim$0.99 for the morphological classification of Ellipticals and Spirals. The further investigation of the galaxies that have a different ML and visual classification but with high predicted probabilities in our CNN usually reveals an the incorrect classification provided by GZ1. We further find the galaxies having a low probability of being either spirals or ellipticals are visually Lenticulars (S0), demonstrating that supervised learning is able to rediscover that this class of galaxy is distinct from both Es and Spirals. We confirm that $\sim$2.5\% galaxies are misclassified by GZ1 in our study. After correcting these galaxies' labels, we improve our CNN performance to an average accuracy of over 0.99 (accuracy of 0.994 is our best result).
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.03638  [pdf] - 2047971
Quasar Accretion Disk Sizes from Continuum Reverberation Mapping in the DES Standard Star Fields
Comments: 33 pages, 24 figures
Submitted: 2018-11-08, last modified: 2020-02-12
Measurements of the physical properties of accretion disks in active galactic nuclei are important for better understanding the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. We present the accretion disk sizes of 22 quasars from continuum reverberation mapping with data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) standard star fields and the supernova C fields. We construct continuum lightcurves with the \textit{griz} photometry that span five seasons of DES observations. These data sample the time variability of the quasars with a cadence as short as one day, which corresponds to a rest frame cadence that is a factor of a few higher than most previous work. We derive time lags between bands with both JAVELIN and the interpolated cross-correlation function method, and fit for accretion disk sizes using the JAVELIN Thin Disk model. These new measurements include disks around black holes with masses as small as $\sim10^7$ $M_{\odot}$, which have equivalent sizes at 2500\AA \, as small as $\sim 0.1$ light days in the rest frame. We find that most objects have accretion disk sizes consistent with the prediction of the standard thin disk model when we take disk variability into account. We have also simulated the expected yield of accretion disk measurements under various observational scenarios for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Deep Drilling Fields. We find that the number of disk measurements would increase significantly if the default cadence is changed from three days to two days or one day.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.01478  [pdf] - 2065243
Trans-Neptunian objects found in the first four years of the Dark Energy Survey
Comments: 33 pages, accepted to ApJS, table of objects found in the ancillary files
Submitted: 2019-09-03, last modified: 2020-02-11
We present a catalog of 316 trans-Neptunian bodies detected by the Dark Energy Survey (DES). These objects include 245 discoveries by DES (139 not previously published) detected in $\approx 60,000$ exposures from the first four seasons of the survey ("Y4" data). The survey covers a contiguous 5000 deg$^2$ of the southern sky in the $grizY$ optical/NIR filter set, with a typical TNO in this part of the sky being targeted by $25-30$ Y4 exposures. We describe the processes for detection of transient sources and the linkage into TNO orbits, which are made challenging by the absence of the few-hour repeat observations employed by TNO-optimized surveys. We also describe the procedures for determining detection efficiencies vs. magnitude and estimating rates of false-positive linkages. This work presents all TNOs which were detected on $\ge 6$ unique nights in the Y4 data and pass a "sub-threshold confirmation" test wherein we demand the the object be detectable in a stack of the individual images in which the orbit indicates an object should be present, but was not detected. This eliminates false positives and yields TNO detections complete to $r\lesssim 23.3$ mag with virtually no dependence on orbital properties for bound TNOs at distance $30\,{\rm AU}<d<2500\,{\rm AU}.$ The final DES TNO catalog is expected to yield $>0.3$ mag more depth, and arcs of $>4$ years for nearly all detections.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.00974  [pdf] - 2115184
Supernova Siblings: Assessing the Consistency of Properties of Type Ia Supernovae that Share the Same Parent Galaxies
Comments: Submitted to ApJL. Comments welcome. Fermilab id included
Submitted: 2020-02-03, last modified: 2020-02-05
While many studies have shown a correlation between properties of the light curves of Type Ia SN (SNe Ia) and properties of their host galaxies, it remains unclear what is driving these correlations. We introduce a new direct method to study these correlations by analyzing `parent' galaxies that host multiple SNe Ia 'siblings'. Here, we search the Dark Energy Survey SN sample, one of the largest samples of discovered SNe, and find 8 galaxies that hosted two likely Type Ia SNe. Comparing the light-curve properties of these SNe and recovered distances from the light curves, we find no better agreement between properties of SNe in the same galaxy as any random pair of galaxies, with the exception of the SN light-curve stretch. We show at $2.8\sigma$ significance that at least 1/2 of the intrinsic scatter of SNe Ia distance modulus residuals is not from common host properties. We also discuss the robustness with which we could make this evaluation with LSST, which will find $100\times$ more pairs of galaxies, and pave a new line of study on the consistency of Type Ia supernovae in the same parent galaxies. Finally, we argue that it is unlikely some of these SNe are actually single, lensed SN with multiple images.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.11294  [pdf] - 2080983
First Cosmology Results using Type Ia Supernovae from the Dark Energy Survey: The Effect of Host Galaxy Properties on Supernova Luminosity
Comments: 27 pages, 13 figures; Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-01-30
We present improved photometric measurements for the host galaxies of 206 spectroscopically confirmed type Ia supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program (DES-SN) and used in the first DES-SN cosmological analysis. Fitting spectral energy distributions to the $griz$ photometric measurements of the DES-SN host galaxies, we derive stellar masses and star-formation rates. For the DES-SN sample, when considering a 5D ($z$, $x_1$, $c$, $\alpha$, $\beta$) bias correction, we find evidence of a Hubble residual `mass step', where SNe Ia in high mass galaxies ($>10^{10} \textrm{M}_{\odot}$) are intrinsically more luminous (after correction) than their low mass counterparts by $\gamma=0.040\pm0.019$mag. This value is larger by $0.031$mag than the value found in the first DES-SN cosmological analysis. This difference is due to a combination of updated photometric measurements and improved star formation histories and is not from host-galaxy misidentification. When using a 1D (redshift-only) bias correction the inferred mass step is larger, with $\gamma=0.066\pm0.020$mag. The 1D-5D $\gamma$ difference for DES-SN is $0.026\pm0.009$mag. We show that this difference is due to a strong correlation between host galaxy stellar mass and the $x_1$ component of the 5D distance-bias correction. To better understand this effect, we include an intrinsic correlation between light-curve width and stellar mass in simulated SN Ia samples. We show that a 5D fit recovers $\gamma$ with $-9$mmag bias compared to a $+2$mmag bias for a 1D fit. This difference can explain part of the discrepancy seen in the data. Improvements in modeling correlations between galaxy properties and SN is necessary to determine the implications for $\gamma$ and ensure unbiased precision estimates of the dark energy equation-of-state as we enter the era of LSST.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.11015  [pdf] - 2039862
Increasing the census of L and T dwarfs in wide binary and multiple systems using Dark Energy Survey DR1 and Gaia DR2 data
Comments: 16 pages, 8 figures. Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-01-29
We present the discovery of 255 binary and six multiple system candidates with wide (> 5") separation composed by L or T dwarfs companions to stars, plus nine double brown dwarf systems. The sample of brown dwarf candidates was found in the Dark Energy Survey and the possible stellar companions are from Gaia DR2 and DES data. Our search is based in a common distance criterion with no proper motion information. For the Gaia DR2 stars we estimate distances based on their parallaxes and photometry, using the StarHorse code, while for DES stars, the StarHorse distances were purely photometric for the majority of cases, with a fraction having parallax measurement from Gaia DR2. L and T dwarfs distances are based on empirical templates ranging from L0 to T9. We also compute chance alignment probabilities in order to assess the physical nature of each pair. We find 174 possible pairs with Gaia DR2 primaries with chance alignment probabilities < 5%. We also find 85 binary pair candidates with a DES star as a primary, 81 of them with chance alignment probabilities < 5%. Only nine candidate systems composed of two brown dwarfs were identified. The sample of multiple systems is made up of five triple systems and one quadruple system. We determine that the typical wide binary fraction over the L and T spectral types is 2-4%. The significant leap provided by this sample will enable constraints on the formation and evolution of L and T dwarfs.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.13484  [pdf] - 2065205
Detection of cross-correlation between gravitational lensing and gamma rays
Comments: 24 pages, 10 figures, v2: text re-arranged, typos corrected, slight improvement in the detection significance, matching version accepted for publication in PRL
Submitted: 2019-07-31, last modified: 2020-01-22
In recent years, many gamma-ray sources have been identified, yet the unresolved component hosts valuable information on the faintest emission. In order to extract it, a cross-correlation with gravitational tracers of matter in the Universe has been shown to be a promising tool. We report here the first identification of a cross-correlation signal between gamma rays and the distribution of mass in the Universe probed by weak gravitational lensing. We use the Dark Energy Survey Y1 weak lensing catalogue and the Fermi Large Area Telescope 9-year gamma-ray data, obtaining a signal-to-noise ratio of 5.3. The signal is mostly localised at small angular scales and high gamma-ray energies, with a hint of correlation at extended separation. Blazar emission is likely the origin of the small-scale effect. We investigate implications of the large-scale component in terms of astrophysical sources and particle dark matter emission.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.06551  [pdf] - 2036338
Optical follow-up of gravitational wave triggers with DECam during the first two LIGO/VIRGO observing runs
Comments: 15 pages, 7 figures, submitted to Astronomy and Computing
Submitted: 2020-01-17, last modified: 2020-01-22
Gravitational wave (GW) events detectable by LIGO and Virgo have several possible progenitors, including black hole mergers, neutron star mergers, black hole--neutron star mergers, supernovae, and cosmic string cusps. A subset of GW events are expected to produce electromagnetic (EM) emission that, once detected, will provide complementary information about their astrophysical context. To that end, the LIGO--Virgo Collaboration (LVC) sends GW candidate alerts to the astronomical community so that searches for their EM counterparts can be pursued. The DESGW group, consisting of members of the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the LVC, and other members of the astronomical community, uses the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to perform a search and discovery program for optical signatures of LVC GW events. DESGW aims to use a sample of GW events as standard sirens for cosmology. Due to the short decay timescale of the expected EM counterparts and the need to quickly eliminate survey areas with no counterpart candidates, it is critical to complete the initial analysis of each night's images as quickly as possible. We discuss our search area determination, imaging pipeline, and candidate selection processes. We review results from the DESGW program during the first two LIGO--Virgo observing campaigns and introduce other science applications that our pipeline enables.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.06060  [pdf] - 2061666
Dynamical Classification of Trans-Neptunian Objects Detected by the Dark Energy Survey
Comments: accepted to AJ
Submitted: 2020-01-16
The outer Solar System contains a large number of small bodies (known as trans-Neptunian objects or TNOs) that exhibit diverse types of dynamical behavior. The classification of bodies in this distant region into dynamical classes -- sub-populations that experience similar orbital evolution -- aids in our understanding of the structure and formation of the Solar System. In this work, we propose an updated dynamical classification scheme for the outer Solar System. This approach includes the construction of a new (automated) method for identifying mean-motion resonances. We apply this algorithm to the current dataset of TNOs observed by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and present a working classification for all of the DES TNOs detected to date. Our classification scheme yields 1 inner centaur, 19 outer centaurs, 21 scattering disk objects, 47 detached TNOs, 48 securely resonant objects, 7 resonant candidates, and 97 classical belt objects. Among the scattering and detached objects, we detect 8 TNOs with semi-major axes greater than 150 AU.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.06018  [pdf] - 2032985
The Clustering of DESI-like Luminous Red Galaxies Using Photometric Redshifts
Comments: 25 pages, 24 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-01-16
We present measurements of the redshift-dependent clustering of a DESI-like luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample selected from the Legacy Survey imaging dataset, and use the halo occupation distribution (HOD) framework to fit the clustering signal. The LRG sample contains 2.7 million objects over the redshift range of $0.4 < z < 0.9$ over 5655 sq. degrees. We have developed new photometric redshift (photo-$z$) estimates using the Legacy Survey DECam and WISE photometry, with $\sigma_{\mathrm{NMAD}} = 0.02$ precision for LRGs. We compute the projected correlation function using new methods that maximize signal-to-noise while incorporating redshift uncertainties. We present a novel algorithm for dividing irregular survey geometries into equal-area patches for jackknife resampling. For a 5-parameter HOD model fit using the MultiDark halo catalog, we find that there is little evolution in HOD parameters except at the highest-redshifts. The inferred large-scale structure bias is largely consistent with constant clustering amplitude over time. In an appendix, we explore limitations of MCMC fitting using stochastic likelihood estimates resulting from applying HOD methods to N-body catalogs, and present a new technique for finding best-fit parameters in this situation. Accompanying this paper we have released the PRLS (Photometric Redshifts for the Legacy Surveys) catalog of photo-$z$'s obtained by applying the methods used in this work to the full Legacy Survey Data Release 8 dataset. This catalog provides accurate photometric redshifts for objects with $z < 21$ over more than 16,000 square degrees of sky.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.02640  [pdf] - 2101350
Supernova Host Galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey: I. Deep Coadds, Photometry, and Stellar Masses
Comments: 18 pages, 17 figures. Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-01-08
The five-year Dark Energy Survey supernova programme (DES-SN) is one of the largest and deepest transient surveys to date in terms of volume and number of supernovae. Identifying and characterising the host galaxies of transients plays a key role in their classification, the study of their formation mechanisms, and the cosmological analyses. To derive accurate host galaxy properties, we create depth-optimised coadds using single-epoch DES-SN images that are selected based on sky and atmospheric conditions. For each of the five DES-SN seasons, a separate coadd is made from the other 4 seasons such that each SN has a corresponding deep coadd with no contaminating SN emission. The coadds reach limiting magnitudes of order $\sim 27$ in $g$-band, and have a much smaller magnitude uncertainty than the previous DES-SN host templates, particularly for faint objects. We present the resulting multi-band photometry of host galaxies for samples of spectroscopically confirmed type Ia (SNe Ia), core-collapse (CCSNe), and superluminous (SLSNe) as well as rapidly evolving transients (RETs) discovered by DES-SN. We derive host galaxy stellar masses and probabilistically compare stellar-mass distributions to samples from other surveys. We find that the DES spectroscopically confirmed sample of SNe Ia selects preferentially fewer high mass hosts at high redshift compared to other surveys, while at low redshift the distributions are consistent. DES CCSNe and SLSNe hosts are similar to other samples, while RET hosts are unlike the hosts of any other transients, although these differences have not been disentangled from selection effects.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.09133  [pdf] - 2065348
The STRong lensing Insights into the Dark Energy Survey (STRIDES) 2017/2018 follow-up campaign: Discovery of 10 lensed quasars and 10 quasar pairs
Comments: 22 pages, 16 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-12-19
We report the results of the STRong lensing Insights from the Dark Energy Survey (STRIDES) follow-up campaign of the late 2017/early 2018 season. We obtained spectra of 65 lensed quasar candidates either with EFOSC2 on the NTT or ESI on Keck, which confirm 10 new gravitationally lensed quasars and 10 quasar pairs with similar spectra, but which do not show a lensing galaxy in DES images. Eight lensed quasars are doubly imaged with source redshifts between 0.99 and 2.90, one is triply imaged by a group (DESJ0345-2545, $z=1.68$), and one is quadruply imaged (quad: DESJ0053-2012, $z=3.8$). Singular isothermal ellipsoid models for the doubles, based on high-resolution imaging from SAMI on SOAR or NIRC2 on Keck, give total magnifications between 3.2 and 5.6, and Einstein radii between 0.49 and 1.97 arcseconds. After spectroscopic follow-up, we extract multi-epoch $grizY$ photometry of confirmed lensed quasars and contaminant quasar+star pairs from the first 4 years of DES data using parametric multi-band modelling, and compare variability in each system's components. By measuring the reduced ${\chi}^2$ associated with fitting all epochs to the same magnitude, we find a simple cut on the less variable component that retains all confirmed lensed quasars, while removing 94 per cent of contaminant systems with stellar components. Based on our spectroscopic follow-up, this variability information can improve selection of lensed quasars and quasar pairs from 34-45 per cent to 51-70 per cent, with the majority of remaining contaminants being compact star-forming galaxies. Using mock lensed quasar lightcurves we demonstrate that selection based only on variability will over-represent the quad fraction by 10 per cent over a complete DES magnitude-limited sample (excluding microlensing differences), explained by the magnification bias and hence lower luminosity (more variable) sources in quads.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.04121  [pdf] - 2061583
The SPTpol Extended Cluster Survey
Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Stalder, B.; Gladders, M. D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Allen, S. W.; Anderson, A. J.; Annis, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Austermann, J. E.; Avila, S.; Avva, J. S.; Bayliss, M.; Beall, J. A.; Bechtol, K.; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bianchini, F.; Blake, C.; Brodwin, M.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Citron, R.; Moran, C. Corbett; Costanzi, M.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; da Costa, L. N.; de Haan, T.; De Vicente, J.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Eifler, T. F.; Everett, W.; Flaugher, B.; Floyd, B.; Frieman, J.; Gallicchio, J.; García-Bellido, J.; George, E. M.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gilbert, A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N.; Henning, J. W.; Heymans, C.; Holder, G. P.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Joudaki, S.; Khullar, G.; Klein, M.; Knox, L.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lee, A. T.; Li, D.; Lidman, C.; Lowitz, A.; MacCrann, N.; Mahler, G.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Montgomery, J.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Noble, G.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Palmese, A.; Parkinson, D.; Patil, S.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Ramachandra, N. S.; Reichardt, C. L.; González, J. D. Remolina; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sanchez, E.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schrabback, T.; Serrano, S.; Sharon, K.; Sievers, C.; Smecher, G.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Veach, T.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Weller, J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yefremenko, V.; Zhang, Y.
Comments: 49 pages, 14 figures, 10 tables. Minor changes to match accepted version in ApJS
Submitted: 2019-10-09, last modified: 2019-12-13
We describe the observations and resultant galaxy cluster catalog from the 2770 deg$^2$ SPTpol Extended Cluster Survey (SPT-ECS). Clusters are identified via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, and confirmed with a combination of archival and targeted follow-up data, making particular use of data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). With incomplete followup we have confirmed as clusters 244 of 266 candidates at a detection significance $\xi \ge 5$ and an additional 204 systems at $4<\xi<5$. The confirmed sample has a median mass of $M_{500c} \sim {4.4 \times 10^{14} M_\odot h_{70}^{-1}}$, a median redshift of $z=0.49$, and we have identified 44 strong gravitational lenses in the sample thus far. Radio data are used to characterize contamination to the SZ signal; the median contamination for confirmed clusters is predicted to be $\sim$1% of the SZ signal at the $\xi>4$ threshold, and $<4\%$ of clusters have a predicted contamination $>10\% $ of their measured SZ flux. We associate SZ-selected clusters, from both SPT-ECS and the SPT-SZ survey, with clusters from the DES redMaPPer sample, and find an offset distribution between the SZ center and central galaxy in general agreement with previous work, though with a larger fraction of clusters with significant offsets. Adopting a fixed Planck-like cosmology, we measure the optical richness-to-SZ-mass ($\lambda-M$) relation and find it to be 28% shallower than that from a weak-lensing analysis of the DES data---a difference significant at the 4 $\sigma$ level---with the relations intersecting at $\lambda=60$ . The SPT-ECS cluster sample will be particularly useful for studying the evolution of massive clusters and, in combination with DES lensing observations and the SPT-SZ cluster sample, will be an important component of future cosmological analyses.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.02763  [pdf] - 2076764
LyaCoLoRe: Synthetic Datasets for Current and Future Lyman-${\alpha}$ Forest BAO Surveys
Comments: 29 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2019-12-05
The statistical power of Lyman-${\alpha}$ forest Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) measurements is set to increase significantly in the coming years as new instruments such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument deliver progressively more constraining data. Generating mock datasets for such measurements will be important for validating analysis pipelines and evaluating the effects of systematics. With such studies in mind, we present LyaCoLoRe: a package for producing synthetic Lyman-${\alpha}$ forest survey datasets for BAO analyses. LyaCoLoRe transforms initial Gaussian random field skewers into skewers of transmitted flux fraction via a number of fast approximations. In this work we explain the methods of producing mock datasets used in LyaCoLoRe, and then measure correlation functions on a suite of realisations of such data. We demonstrate that we are able to recover the correct BAO signal, as well as large-scale bias parameters similar to literature values. Finally, we briefly describe methods to add further astrophysical effects to our skewers - high column density systems and metal absorbers - which act as potential complications for BAO analyses.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.08813  [pdf] - 2057676
Stellar mass as a galaxy cluster mass proxy: application to the Dark Energy Survey redMaPPer clusters
Comments: 14 pages, 7 figures, addressing MNRAS referee comments
Submitted: 2019-03-20, last modified: 2019-11-18
We introduce a galaxy cluster mass observable, $\mu_\star$, based on the stellar masses of cluster members, and we present results for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 observations. Stellar masses are computed using a Bayesian Model Averaging method, and are validated for DES data using simulations and COSMOS data. We show that $\mu_\star$ works as a promising mass proxy by comparing our predictions to X-ray measurements. We measure the X-ray temperature-$\mu_\star$ relation for a total of 150 clusters matched between the wide-field DES Year 1 redMaPPer catalogue, and Chandra and XMM archival observations, spanning the redshift range $0.1<z<0.7$. For a scaling relation which is linear in logarithmic space, we find a slope of $\alpha = 0.488\pm0.043$ and a scatter in the X-ray temperature at fixed $\mu_\star$ of $\sigma_{{\rm ln} T_X|\mu_\star}=0.266^{+0.019}_{-0.020}$ for the joint sample. By using the halo mass scaling relations of the X-ray temperature from the Weighing the Giants program, we further derive the $\mu_\star$-conditioned scatter in mass, finding $\sigma_{{\rm ln} M|\mu_\star}=0.26^{+ 0.15}_{- 0.10}$. These results are competitive with well-established cluster mass proxies used for cosmological analyses, showing that $\mu_\star$ can be used as a reliable and physically motivated mass proxy to derive cosmological constraints.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.05568  [pdf] - 1998159
Dark Energy Survey Year 3 results: cosmology with moments of weak lensing mass maps -- validation on simulations
Comments: submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-11-13
We present a simulated cosmology analysis using the second and third moments of the weak lensing mass (convergence) maps. The analysis is geared towards the third year (Y3) data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), but the methodology can be applied to other weak lensing data sets. The second moment, or variances, of the convergence as a function of smoothing scale contains information similar to standard shear 2-point statistics. The third moment, or the skewness, contains additional non-Gaussian information. We present the formalism for obtaining the convergence maps from the measured shear and for obtaining the second and third moments of these maps given partial sky coverage. We estimate the covariance matrix from a large suite of numerical simulations. We test our pipeline through a simulated likelihood analyses varying 5 cosmological parameters and 10 nuisance parameters. Our forecast shows that the combination of second and third moments provides a 1.5 percent constraint on $S_8 \equiv \sigma_8 (\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3)^{0.5}$ for DES Y3 data. This is 20 percent better than an analysis using a simulated DES Y3 shear 2-point statistics, owing to the non-Gaussian information captured by the inclusion of higher-order statistics. The methodology developed here can be applied to current and future weak lensing datasets to make use of information from non-Gaussianity in the cosmic density field and to improve constraints on cosmological parameters.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.01386  [pdf] - 1996113
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 results: The relationship between mass and light around cosmic voids
Comments: 16 pages, 14 figures, 1 table. Reflects MNRAS published version
Submitted: 2019-09-03, last modified: 2019-11-11
What are the mass and galaxy profiles of cosmic voids? In this paper we use two methods to extract voids in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 redMaGiC galaxy sample to address this question. We use either 2D slices in projection, or the 3D distribution of galaxies based on photometric redshifts to identify voids. For the mass profile, we measure the tangential shear profiles of background galaxies to infer the excess surface mass density. The signal-to-noise ratio for our lensing measurement ranges between 10.7 and 14.0 for the two void samples. We infer their 3D density profiles by fitting models based on N-body simulations and find good agreement for void radii in the range 15-85 Mpc. Comparison with their galaxy profiles then allows us to test the relation between mass and light at the 10%-level, the most stringent test to date. We find very similar shapes for the two profiles, consistent with a linear relationship between mass and light both within and outside the void radius. We validate our analysis with the help of simulated mock catalogues and estimate the impact of photometric redshift uncertainties on the measurement. Our methodology can be used for cosmological applications, including tests of gravity with voids. This is especially promising when the lensing profiles are combined with spectroscopic measurements of void dynamics via redshift-space distortions.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02499  [pdf] - 1995367
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Constraints on Extended Cosmological Models from Galaxy Clustering and Weak Lensing
DES Collaboration; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Avila, S.; Banerji, M.; Baxter, E.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M. R.; Bertin, E.; Blazek, J.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Brout, D.; Burke, D. L.; Campos, A.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Chen, A.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; DeRose, J.; Desai, S.; Di Valentino, E.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Ferté, A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Hollowood, D. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kim, A. G.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lee, S.; Lemos, P.; Leonard, C. D.; Li, T. S.; Liddle, A. R.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Miranda, V.; Mohr, J. J.; Muir, J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Raveri, M.; Rollins, R. P.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosenfeld, R.; Samuroff, S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Secco, L. F.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weaverdyck, N.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: 22 pages, 7 figures, matches the published version
Submitted: 2018-10-04, last modified: 2019-11-08
We present constraints on extensions of the minimal cosmological models dominated by dark matter and dark energy, $\Lambda$CDM and $w$CDM, by using a combined analysis of galaxy clustering and weak gravitational lensing from the first-year data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES Y1) in combination with external data. We consider four extensions of the minimal dark energy-dominated scenarios: 1) nonzero curvature $\Omega_k$, 2) number of relativistic species $N_{\rm eff}$ different from the standard value of 3.046, 3) time-varying equation-of-state of dark energy described by the parameters $w_0$ and $w_a$ (alternatively quoted by the values at the pivot redshift, $w_p$, and $w_a$), and 4) modified gravity described by the parameters $\mu_0$ and $\Sigma_0$ that modify the metric potentials. We also consider external information from Planck CMB measurements; BAO measurements from SDSS, 6dF, and BOSS; RSD measurements from BOSS; and SNIa information from the Pantheon compilation. Constraints on curvature and the number of relativistic species are dominated by the external data; when these are combined with DES Y1, we find $\Omega_k=0.0020^{+0.0037}_{-0.0032}$ at the 68% confidence level, and $N_{\rm eff}<3.28\, (3.55)$ at 68% (95%) confidence. For the time-varying equation-of-state, we find the pivot value $(w_p, w_a)=(-0.91^{+0.19}_{-0.23}, -0.57^{+0.93}_{-1.11})$ at pivot redshift $z_p=0.27$ from DES alone, and $(w_p, w_a)=(-1.01^{+0.04}_{-0.04}, -0.28^{+0.37}_{-0.48})$ at $z_p=0.20$ from DES Y1 combined with external data; in either case we find no evidence for the temporal variation of the equation of state. For modified gravity, we find the present-day value of the relevant parameters to be $\Sigma_0= 0.43^{+0.28}_{-0.29}$ from DES Y1 alone, and $(\Sigma_0, \mu_0)=(0.06^{+0.08}_{-0.07}, -0.11^{+0.42}_{-0.46})$ from DES Y1 combined with external data, consistent with predictions from GR.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.02951  [pdf] - 1995564
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: the lensing imprint of cosmic voids on the Cosmic Microwave Background
Comments: 16 pages, 13 figures
Submitted: 2019-11-06
Cosmic voids gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, resulting in a distinct imprint on degree scales. We use the simulated CMB lensing convergence map from the MICE N-body simulation to calibrate our detection strategy for a given void definition and galaxy tracer density. We then identify cosmic voids in DES Year 1 data and stack the Planck 2015 lensing convergence map on their locations, probing the consistency of simulated and observed void lensing signals. When fixing the shape of the stacked convergence profile to that calibrated from simulations, we find imprints at the $3{\sigma}$ significance level for various analysis choices. The best measurement strategies based on the MICE calibration process yield $S/N \sim 4$ for DES Y1, and the best-fit amplitude recovered from the data is consistent with expectations from MICE ($A \sim 1$). Given these results as well as the agreement between them and N-body simulations, we conclude that the previously reported excess integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) signal associated with cosmic voids in DES Y1 has no counterpart in the Planck CMB lensing map.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.02162  [pdf] - 2042245
Observation and Confirmation of Nine Strong Lensing Systems in Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Data
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-11-05
We describe the observation and confirmation of \nbconfirmtext\ new strong gravitational lenses discovered in Year 1 data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We created candidate lists based on a) galaxy group and cluster samples and b) photometrically selected galaxy samples. We selected 46 candidates through visual inspection and then used the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) at the Gemini South telescope to acquire spectroscopic follow-up of 21 of these candidates. Through analysis of this spectroscopic follow-up data, we confirmed nine new lensing systems and rejected 2 candidates, but the analysis was inconclusive on 10 candidates. For each of the confirmed systems, we report measured spectroscopic properties, estimated \einsteinradiussub, and estimated enclosed masses. The sources that we targeted have an i-band surface brightness range of iSB ~ 22 - 24 mag arcsec^2 and a spectroscopic redshift range of zspec ~0.8 - 2.6. The lens galaxies have a photometric redshift range of zlens ~ 0.3 - 0.7. The lensing systems range in image-lens separation 2 - 9 arcsec and in enclosed mass 10^12 - 10^13 Msol.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.08605  [pdf] - 1994098
A Detection of CMB-Cluster Lensing using Polarization Data from SPTpol
Raghunathan, S.; Patil, S.; Baxter, E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Crawford, T. M.; Holder, G. P.; McClintock, T.; Reichardt, C. L.; Varga, T. N.; Whitehorn, N.; Ade, P. A. R.; Allam, S.; Anderson, A. J.; Austermann, J. E.; Avila, S.; Avva, J. S.; Bacon, D.; Beall, J. A.; Bender, A. N.; Bianchini, F.; Bocquet, S.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Citron, R.; Costanzi, M.; Crites, A. T.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Doel, P.; Everett, S.; Evrard, A. E.; Feng, C.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gallicchio, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; George, E. M.; Giannantonio, T.; Gilbert, A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, G.; de Haan, T.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeltema, T.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Knox, L.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lee, A. T.; Li, D.; Lima, M.; Lowitz, A.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Montgomery, J.; Moran, C. Corbett; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Noble, G.; Novosad, V.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Rapetti, D.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Rozo, E.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sievers, C.; Smecher, G.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Veach, T.; De Vicente, J.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Wang, G.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yefremenko, V.; Zhang, Y.
Comments: 10 pages, 3 figures, 1 table; typos fixed; accepted for publication in PRL
Submitted: 2019-07-19, last modified: 2019-09-24
We report the first detection of gravitational lensing due to galaxy clusters using only the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The lensing signal is obtained using a new estimator that extracts the lensing dipole signature from stacked images formed by rotating the cluster-centered Stokes $Q/U$ map cutouts along the direction of the locally measured background CMB polarization gradient. Using data from the SPTpol 500 deg$^{2}$ survey at the locations of roughly 18,000 clusters with richness $\lambda \ge 10$ from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year-3 full galaxy cluster catalog, we detect lensing at $4.8\sigma$. The mean stacked mass of the selected sample is found to be $(1.43 \pm 0.4)\ \times 10^{14}\ {\rm M_{\odot}}$ which is in good agreement with optical weak lensing based estimates using DES data and CMB-lensing based estimates using SPTpol temperature data. This measurement is a key first step for cluster cosmology with future low-noise CMB surveys, like CMB-S4, for which CMB polarization will be the primary channel for cluster lensing measurements.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.06308  [pdf] - 1961079
Search for RR Lyrae stars in DES ultra-faint systems: Grus I, Kim 2, Phoenix II, and Grus II
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures, 7 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-09-13
This work presents the first search for RR Lyrae stars (RRLs) in four of the ultra-faint systems imaged by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using SOAR/Goodman and Blanco/DECam imagers. We have detected two RRLs in the field of Grus I, none in Kim 2, one in Phoenix II, and four in Grus II. With the detection of these stars, we accurately determine the distance moduli for these ultra-faint dwarf satellite galaxies; $\mu_0$=20.51$\pm$0.10 mag (D$_{\odot}$=127$\pm$6 kpc) for Grus I and $\mu_0$=20.01$\pm$0.10 mag (D$_{\odot}$=100$\pm$5 kpc) for Phoenix II. These measurements are larger than previous estimations by Koposov et al. 2015 and Bechtol et al. 2015, implying larger physical sizes; 5\% for Grus I and 33\% for Phoenix II. For Grus II, out of the four RRLs detected, one is consistent with being a member of the galactic halo (D$_\odot$=24$\pm$1 kpc, $\mu_0$=16.86$\pm$0.10 mag), another is at D$_\odot$=55$\pm$2 kpc ($\mu_0$=18.71$\pm$0.10 mag), which we associate with Grus II, and the two remaining at D$_\odot$=43$\pm$2 kpc ($\mu_0$=18.17$\pm$0.10 mag). Moreover, the appearance of a subtle red horizontal branch in the color-magnitude diagram of Grus II at the same brightness level of the latter two RRLs, which are at the same distance and in the same region, suggests that a more metal-rich system may be located in front of Grus II. The most plausible scenario is the association of these stars with the Chenab/Orphan Stream. Finally, we performed a comprehensive and updated analysis of the number of RRLs in dwarf galaxies. This allows us to predict that the method of finding new ultra-faint dwarf galaxies by using two or more clumped RRLs will work only for systems brighter than M$_V\sim-6$ mag.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.08800  [pdf] - 1956501
H0LiCOW X: Spectroscopic/imaging survey and galaxy-group identification around the strong gravitational lens system WFI2033-4723
Comments: Matches the version accepted for publication by MNRAS. Note that this paper previously appeared as H0LICOW XI
Submitted: 2019-05-21, last modified: 2019-09-06
Galaxies and galaxy groups located along the line of sight towards gravitationally lensed quasars produce high-order perturbations of the gravitational potential at the lens position. When these perturbation are too large, they can induce a systematic error on $H_0$ of a few-percent if the lens system is used for cosmological inference and the perturbers are not explicitly accounted for in the lens model. In this work, we present a detailed characterization of the environment of the lens system WFI2033-4723 ($z_{\rm src} = 1.662$, $z_{\rm lens}$ = 0.6575), one of the core targets of the H0LICOW project for which we present cosmological inferences in a companion paper (Rusu et al. 2019). We use the Gemini and ESO-Very Large telescopes to measure the spectroscopic redshifts of the brightest galaxies towards the lens, and use the ESO-MUSE integral field spectrograph to measure the velocity-dispersion of the lens ($\sigma_{\rm {los}}= 250^{+15}_{-21}$ km/s) and of several nearby galaxies. In addition, we measure photometric redshifts and stellar masses of all galaxies down to $i < 23$ mag, mainly based on Dark Energy Survey imaging (DR1). Our new catalog, complemented with literature data, more than doubles the number of known galaxy spectroscopic redshifts in the direct vicinity of the lens, expanding to 116 (64) the number of spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies separated by less than 3 arcmin (2 arcmin) from the lens. Using the flexion-shift as a measure of the amplitude of the gravitational perturbation, we identify 2 galaxy groups and 3 galaxies that require specific attention in the lens models. The ESO MUSE data enable us to measure the velocity-dispersions of three of these galaxies. These results are essential for the cosmological inference analysis presented in Rusu et al. (2019).
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.06989  [pdf] - 1953361
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Constraints on Intrinsic Alignments and their Colour Dependence from Galaxy Clustering and Weak Lensing
Comments: 31 pages, 23 figures; accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-11-16, last modified: 2019-08-06
We perform a joint analysis of intrinsic alignments and cosmology using tomographic weak lensing, galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements from Year 1 (Y1) of the Dark Energy Survey. We define early- and late-type subsamples, which are found to pass a series of systematics tests, including for spurious photometric redshift error and point spread function correlations. We analyse these split data alongside the fiducial mixed Y1 sample using a range of intrinsic alignment models. In a fiducial Nonlinear Alignment Model (NLA) analysis, assuming a flat \lcdm~cosmology, we find a significant difference in intrinsic alignment amplitude, with early-type galaxies favouring $A_\mathrm{IA} = 2.38^{+0.32}_{-0.31}$ and late-type galaxies consistent with no intrinsic alignments at $0.05^{+0.10}_{-0.09}$. We find weak evidence of a diminishing alignment amplitude at higher redshifts in the early-type sample. The analysis is repeated using a number of extended model spaces, including a physically motivated model that includes both tidal torquing and tidal alignment mechanisms. In multiprobe likelihood chains in which cosmology, intrinsic alignments in both galaxy samples and all other relevant systematics are varied simultaneously, we find the tidal alignment and tidal torquing parts of the intrinsic alignment signal have amplitudes $A_1 = 2.66 ^{+0.67}_{-0.66}$, $A_2=-2.94^{+1.94}_{-1.83}$, respectively, for early-type galaxies and $A_1 = 0.62 ^{+0.41}_{-0.41}$, $A_2 = -2.26^{+1.30}_{-1.16}$ for late-type galaxies. In the full (mixed) Y1 sample the best constraints are $A_1 = 0.70 ^{+0.41}_{-0.38}$, $A_2 = -1.36 ^{+1.08}_{-1.41}$. For all galaxy splits and IA models considered, we report cosmological parameter constraints that are consistent with the results of Troxel et al. (2017) and Dark Energy Survey Collaboration (2017).
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.05005  [pdf] - 1938344
Phenotypic redshifts with self-organizing maps: A novel method to characterize redshift distributions of source galaxies for weak lensing
Comments: 24 pages, 11 figures; matches version accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-01-15, last modified: 2019-08-05
Wide-field imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) rely on coarse measurements of spectral energy distributions in a few filters to estimate the redshift distribution of source galaxies. In this regime, sample variance, shot noise, and selection effects limit the attainable accuracy of redshift calibration and thus of cosmological constraints. We present a new method to combine wide-field, few-filter measurements with catalogs from deep fields with additional filters and sufficiently low photometric noise to break degeneracies in photometric redshifts. The multi-band deep field is used as an intermediary between wide-field observations and accurate redshifts, greatly reducing sample variance, shot noise, and selection effects. Our implementation of the method uses self-organizing maps to group galaxies into phenotypes based on their observed fluxes, and is tested using a mock DES catalog created from N-body simulations. It yields a typical uncertainty on the mean redshift in each of five tomographic bins for an idealized simulation of the DES Year 3 weak-lensing tomographic analysis of $\sigma_{\Delta z} = 0.007$, which is a 60% improvement compared to the Year 1 analysis. Although the implementation of the method is tailored to DES, its formalism can be applied to other large photometric surveys with a similar observing strategy.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.04599  [pdf] - 1929679
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: The effect of intracluster light on photometric redshifts for weak gravitational lensing
Comments: 11 pages, 4 figures, matches version published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-09-12, last modified: 2019-08-03
We study the effect of diffuse intracluster light on the critical surface mass density estimated from photometric redshifts of lensing source galaxies, and the resulting bias in a weak lensing measurement of galaxy cluster mass. Under conservative assumptions, we find the bias to be negligible for imaging surveys like the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with a recommended scale cut of >=200 kpc distance from cluster centers. For significantly deeper source catalogs from present and future surveys like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) program, more conservative scale and source magnitude cuts or a correction of the effect may be necessary to achieve per-cent level lensing measurement accuracy, especially at the massive end of the cluster population.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02212  [pdf] - 1922933
Cosmological lensing ratios with DES Y1, SPT and Planck
Prat, J.; Baxter, E. J.; Shin, T.; Sánchez, C.; Chang, C.; Jain, B.; Miquel, R.; Alarcon, A.; Bacon, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Cawthon, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; Dodelson, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Friedrich, O.; Gatti, M.; Gruen, D.; Hartley, W. G.; Holder, G. P.; Hoyle, B.; Jarvis, M.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Mawdsley, B.; Nicola, A.; Omori, Y.; Pujol, A.; Rau, M. M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Samuroff, S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vielzeuf, P.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Avila, S.; Aylor, K.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bleem, L. E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Chown, R.; Crites, A. T.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Doel, P.; Everett, W. B.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; George, E. M.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; de Haan, T.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Knox, L.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lima, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Maia, M. A. G.; Manzotti, A.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. J.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Simard, G.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-04, last modified: 2019-07-25
Correlations between tracers of the matter density field and gravitational lensing are sensitive to the evolution of the matter power spectrum and the expansion rate across cosmic time. Appropriately defined ratios of such correlation functions, on the other hand, depend only on the angular diameter distances to the tracer objects and to the gravitational lensing source planes. Because of their simple cosmological dependence, such ratios can exploit available signal-to-noise down to small angular scales, even where directly modeling the correlation functions is difficult. We present a measurement of lensing ratios using galaxy position and lensing data from the Dark Energy Survey, and CMB lensing data from the South Pole Telescope and Planck, obtaining the highest precision lensing ratio measurements to date. Relative to the concordance $\Lambda$CDM model, we find a best fit lensing ratio amplitude of $A = 1.1 \pm 0.1$. We use the ratio measurements to generate cosmological constraints, focusing on the curvature parameter. We demonstrate that photometrically selected galaxies can be used to measure lensing ratios, and argue that future lensing ratio measurements with data from a combination of LSST and Stage-4 CMB experiments can be used to place interesting cosmological constraints, even after considering the systematic uncertainties associated with photometric redshift and galaxy shear estimation.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.11171  [pdf] - 1923113
Astro2020 APC White Paper: The MegaMapper: a z > 2 spectroscopic instrument for the study of Inflation and Dark Energy
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-07-25
MegaMapper is a proposed ground-based experiment to measure Inflation parameters and Dark Energy from galaxy redshifts at 2<z<5. A 6.5-m Magellan telescope will be coupled with DESI spectrographs to achieve multiplexing of 20,000. MegaMapper would be located at Las Campanas Observatory to fully access LSST imaging for target selection.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.10688  [pdf] - 1923067
The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI)
Comments: 9-page APC White Paper submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey. To be published in BAAS. More about the DESI instrument and survey can be found at https://www.desi.lbl.gov
Submitted: 2019-07-24
We present the status of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and its plans and opportunities for the coming decade. DESI construction and its initial five years of operations are an approved experiment of the US Department of Energy and is summarized here as context for the Astro2020 panel. Beyond 2025, DESI will require new funding to continue operations. We expect that DESI will remain one of the world's best facilities for wide-field spectroscopy throughout the decade. More about the DESI instrument and survey can be found at https://www.desi.lbl.gov.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.07193  [pdf] - 2113957
A DECam Search for Explosive Optical Transients Associated with IceCube Neutrinos
Comments: Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2019-07-16
To facilitate multimessenger studies with TeV and PeV astrophysical neutrinos, the IceCube Collaboration has developed a realtime alert system for the highest confidence and best localized neutrino events. In this work we investigate the likelihood of association between realtime high-energy neutrino alerts and explosive optical transients, with a focus on core-collapse supernovae (CC SNe) as candidate neutrino sources. We report results from triggered optical follow-up observations of two IceCube alerts, IC170922A and IC171106A, with Blanco/DECam ($gri$ to 24th magnitude in $\sim6$ epochs). Based on a suite of simulated supernova light curves, we develop and validate selection criteria for CC SNe exploding in coincidence with neutrino alerts. The DECam observations are sensitive to CC SNe at redshifts $z \lesssim 0.3$. At redshifts $z \lesssim 0.1$, our selection criteria reduce background SNe contamination to a level below the predicted signal. For the IC170922A (IC171106A) follow-up observations, we expect that 12.1% (9.5%) of coincident CC SNe at $z \lesssim 0.3$ are recovered, and that on average, 0.23 (0.07) unassociated SNe in the 90% containment regions also pass our selection criteria. We find two total candidate CC SNe that are temporally coincident with the neutrino alerts, but none in the 90% containment regions, which is statistically consistent with expected rates of background CC SNe for these observations. Given the signal efficiencies and background rates derived from this pilot study, we estimate that to determine whether CC SNe are the dominant contribution to the total TeV-PeV energy IceCube neutrino flux at the $3\sigma$ confidence level, DECam observations similar to those of this work would be needed for $\sim200$ neutrino alerts, though this number falls to $\sim60$ neutrino alerts if redshift information is available for all candidates.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.01022  [pdf] - 1966616
Chemical Abundance Analysis of Tucana III, the Second $r$-process Enhanced Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxy
Comments: 18 pages, 10 figures; accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2018-12-03, last modified: 2019-07-16
We present a chemical abundance analysis of four additional confirmed member stars of Tucana III, a Milky Way satellite galaxy candidate in the process of being tidally disrupted as it is accreted by the Galaxy. Two of these stars are centrally located in the core of the galaxy while the other two stars are located in the eastern and western tidal tails. The four stars have chemical abundance patterns consistent with the one previously studied star in Tucana III: they are moderately enhanced in $r$-process elements, i.e. they have $<$[Eu/Fe]$> \approx +$0.4 dex. The non-neutron-capture elements generally follow trends seen in other dwarf galaxies, including a metallicity range of 0.44 dex and the expected trend in $\alpha$-elements, i.e., the lower metallicity stars have higher Ca and Ti abundance. Overall, the chemical abundance patterns of these stars suggest that Tucana III was an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy, and not a globular cluster, before being tidally disturbed. As is the case for the one other galaxy dominated by $r$-process enhanced stars, Reticulum II, Tucana III's stellar chemical abundances are consistent with pollution from ejecta produced by a binary neutron star merger, although a different $r$-process element or dilution gas mass is required to explain the abundances in these two galaxies if a neutron star merger is the sole source of $r$-process enhancement.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.05908  [pdf] - 1908558
Galaxies in X-ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data II: Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling of the Red-Sequence Galaxy Luminosity Function
Comments: Updated to match the accepted version
Submitted: 2017-10-16, last modified: 2019-06-29
Using $\sim 100$ X-ray selected clusters in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data, we constrain the luminosity function (LF) of cluster red sequence galaxies as a function of redshift. This is the first homogeneous optical/X-ray sample large enough to constrain the evolution of the luminosity function simultaneously in redshift ($0.1<z<1.05$) and cluster mass ($13.5 \le \rm{log_{10}}(M_{200crit}) \sim< 15.0$). We pay particular attention to completeness issues and the detection limit of the galaxy sample. We then apply a hierarchical Bayesian model to fit the cluster galaxy LFs via a Schecter function, including its characteristic break ($m^*$) to a faint end power-law slope ($\alpha$). Our method enables us to avoid known issues in similar analyses based on stacking or binning the clusters. We find weak and statistically insignificant ($\sim 1.9 \sigma$) evolution in the faint end slope $\alpha$ versus redshift. We also find no dependence in $\alpha$ or $m^*$ with the X-ray inferred cluster masses. However, the amplitude of the LF as a function of cluster mass is constrained to $\sim 20\%$ precision. As a by-product of our algorithm, we utilize the correlation between the LF and cluster mass to provide an improved estimate of the individual cluster masses as well as the scatter in true mass given the X-ray inferred masses. This technique can be applied to a larger sample of X-ray or optically selected clusters from the Dark Energy Survey, significantly improving the sensitivity of the analysis.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.04071  [pdf] - 1904098
Superluminous Supernovae from the Dark Energy Survey
Comments: 28 pages, 16 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-12-10, last modified: 2019-06-21
We present a sample of 21 hydrogen-free superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I), and one hydrogen-rich SLSN (SLSN-II) detected during the five-year Dark Energy Survey (DES). These SNe, located in the redshift range 0.220<z<1.998, represent the largest homogeneously-selected sample of SLSN events at high redshift. We present the observed g,r, i, z light curves for these SNe, which we interpolate using Gaussian Processes. The resulting light curves are analysed to determine the luminosity function of SLSN-I, and their evolutionary timescales. The DES SLSN-I sample significantly broadens the distribution of SLSN-I light curve properties when combined with existing samples from the literature. We fit a magnetar model to our SLSNe, and find that this model alone is unable to replicate the behaviour of many of the bolometric light curves. We search the DES SLSN-I light curves for the presence of initial peaks prior to the main light-curve peak. Using a shock breakout model, our Monte Carlo search finds that 3 of our 14 events with pre-max data display such initial peaks. However, 10 events show no evidence for such peaks, in some cases down to an absolute magnitude of <-16, suggesting that such features are not ubiquitous to all SLSN-I events. We also identify a red pre-peak feature within the light curve of one SLSN, which is comparable to that observed within SN2018bsz.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.01136  [pdf] - 1966790
Producing a BOSS-CMASS sample with DES imaging
Comments: 22 pages, 17 figures
Submitted: 2019-06-03
We present a sample of galaxies with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) photometry that replicates the properties of the BOSS CMASS sample. The CMASS galaxy sample has been well characterized by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) collaboration and was used to obtain the most powerful redshift-space galaxy clustering measurements to date. A joint analysis of redshift-space distortions (such as those probed by CMASS from SDSS) and a galaxy-galaxy lensing measurement for an equivalent sample from DES can provide powerful cosmological constraints. Unfortunately, the DES and SDSS-BOSS footprints have only minimal overlap, primarily on the celestial equator near the SDSS Stripe 82 region. Using this overlap, we build a robust Bayesian model to select CMASS-like galaxies in the remainder of the DES footprint. The newly defined DES-CMASS (DMASS) sample consists of 117,293 effective galaxies covering $1,244 {\rm deg}^2$. Through various validation tests, we show that the DMASS sample selected by this model matches well with the BOSS CMASS sample, specifically in the South Galactic cap (SGC) region that includes Stripe 82. Combining measurements of the angular correlation function and the clustering-z distribution of DMASS, we constrain the difference in mean galaxy bias and mean redshift between the BOSS CMASS and DMASS samples to be $\Delta b = 0.010^{+0.045}_{-0.052}$ and $\Delta z = \left( 3.46^{+5.48}_{-5.55} \right) \times 10^{-3}$ for the SGC portion of CMASS, and $\Delta b = 0.044^{+0.044}_{-0.043} $ and $\Delta z= ( 3.51^{+4.93}_{-5.91}) \times 10^{-3}$ for the full CMASS sample. These values indicate that the mean bias of galaxies and mean redshift in the DMASS sample is consistent with both CMASS samples within $1\sigma$.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.01018  [pdf] - 2088970
Monte Carlo Control Loops for cosmic shear cosmology with DES Year 1
Comments: 31 pages, 15 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2019-06-03
Weak lensing by large-scale structure is a powerful probe of cosmology and of the dark universe. This cosmic shear technique relies on the accurate measurement of the shapes and redshifts of background galaxies and requires precise control of systematic errors. The Monte Carlo Control Loops (MCCL) is a forward modelling method designed to tackle this problem. It relies on the Ultra Fast Image Generator (UFig) to produce simulated images tuned to match the target data statistically, followed by calibrations and tolerance loops. We present the first end-to-end application of this method, on the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 wide field imaging data. We simultaneously measure the shear power spectrum $C_{\ell}$ and the redshift distribution $n(z)$ of the background galaxy sample. The method includes maps of the systematic sources, Point Spread Function (PSF), an Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) inference of the simulation model parameters, a shear calibration scheme, and the fast estimation of the covariance matrix. We find a close statistical agreement between the simulations and the DES Y1 data using an array of diagnostics. In a non-tomographic setting, we derive a set of $C_\ell$ and $n(z)$ curves that encode the cosmic shear measurement, as well as the systematic uncertainty. Following a blinding scheme, we measure the combination of $\Omega_m$, $\sigma_8$, and intrinsic alignment amplitude $A_{\rm{IA}}$, defined as $S_8D_{\rm{IA}} = \sigma_8(\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.5}D_{\rm{IA}}$, where $D_{\rm{IA}}=1-0.11(A_{\rm{IA}}-1)$. We find $S_8D_{\rm{IA}}=0.895^{+0.054}_{-0.039}$, where systematics are at the level of roughly 60\% of the statistical errors. We discuss these results in the context of earlier cosmic shear analyses of the DES Y1 data. Our findings indicate that this method and its fast runtime offer good prospects for cosmic shear measurements with future wide-field surveys.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.07119  [pdf] - 1893322
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Calibration of Cluster Mis-centering in the redMaPPer Catalogs
Comments: Code used in this analysis is available from https://github.com/yyzhang/center_modeling_y1
Submitted: 2019-01-21, last modified: 2019-06-01
The center determination of a galaxy cluster from an optical cluster finding algorithm can be offset from theoretical prescriptions or $N$-body definitions of its host halo center. These offsets impact the recovered cluster statistics, affecting both richness measurements and the weak lensing shear profile around the clusters. This paper models the centering performance of the \RM~cluster finding algorithm using archival X-ray observations of \RM-selected clusters. Assuming the X-ray emission peaks as the fiducial halo centers, and through analyzing their offsets to the \RM~centers, we find that $\sim 75\pm 8 \%$ of the \RM~clusters are well centered and the mis-centered offset follows a Gamma distribution in normalized, projected distance. These mis-centering offsets cause a systematic underestimation of cluster richness relative to the well-centered clusters, for which we propose a descriptive model. Our results enable the DES Y1 cluster cosmology analysis by characterizing the necessary corrections to both the weak lensing and richness abundance functions of the DES Y1 redMaPPer cluster catalog.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02377  [pdf] - 1893288
First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernovae From the Dark Energy Survey: Analysis, Systematic Uncertainties, and Validation
Brout, D.; Scolnic, D.; Kessler, R.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Davis, T. M.; Gupta, R. R.; Hinton, S. R.; Kim, A. G.; Lasker, J.; Lidman, C.; Macaulay, E.; Möller, A.; Nichol, R. C.; Sako, M.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Zhang, B.; Andersen, P.; Asorey, J.; Avelino, A.; Bassett, B. A.; Brown, P.; Calcino, J.; Carollo, D.; Challis, P.; Childress, M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.; Galbany, L.; Glazebrook, K.; Hoormann, J. K.; Kasai, E.; Kirshner, R. P.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Lewis, G. F.; Mandel, K. S.; March, M.; Miranda, V.; Morganson, E.; Muthukrishna, D.; Nugent, P.; Palmese, A.; Pan, Y. -C.; Sharp, R.; Sommer, N. E.; Swann, E.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, B. E.; Uddin, S. A.; Wester, W.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Avila, S.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Hollowood, D. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jeltema, T.; Krause, E.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.
Comments: 30 Pages, 18 Figures, 12 Tables. Submitted to ApJ. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2018-11-06, last modified: 2019-06-01
We present the analysis underpinning the measurement of cosmological parameters from 207 spectroscopically classified type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the first three years of the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program (DES-SN), spanning a redshift range of 0.017<$z$<0.849. We combine the DES-SN sample with an external sample of 122 low-redshift ($z$<0.1) SNe Ia, resulting in a "DES-SN3YR" sample of 329 SNe Ia. Our cosmological analyses are blinded: after combining our DES-SN3YR distances with constraints from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB; Planck Collaboration 2016), our uncertainties in the measurement of the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, $w$, are .042 (stat) and .059 (stat+syst) at 68% confidence. We provide a detailed systematic uncertainty budget, which has nearly equal contributions from photometric calibration, astrophysical bias corrections, and instrumental bias corrections. We also include several new sources of systematic uncertainty. While our sample is <1/3 the size of the Pantheon sample, our constraints on $w$ are only larger by 1.4$\times$, showing the impact of the DES SN Ia light curve quality. We find that the traditional stretch and color standardization parameters of the DES SNe Ia are in agreement with earlier SN Ia samples such as Pan-STARRS1 and the Supernova Legacy Survey. However, we find smaller intrinsic scatter about the Hubble diagram (0.077 mag). Interestingly, we find no evidence for a Hubble residual step ( 0.007 $\pm$ 0.018 mag) as a function of host galaxy mass for the DES subset, in 2.4$\sigma$ tension with previous measurements. We also present novel validation methods of our sample using simulated SNe Ia inserted in DECam images and using large catalog-level simulations to test for biases in our analysis pipelines.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02378  [pdf] - 1893289
First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernovae From the Dark Energy Survey: Photometric Pipeline and Light Curve Data Release
Comments: 12 Pages, 8 Figures, Submitted to ApJ, Comments welcome
Submitted: 2018-11-06, last modified: 2019-06-01
We present griz light curves of 251 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the first 3 years of the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program's (DES-SN) spectroscopically classified sample. The photometric pipeline described in this paper produces the calibrated fluxes and associated uncertainties used in the cosmological parameter analysis (Brout et al. 2018-SYS, DES Collaboration et al. 2018) by employing a scene modeling approach that simultaneously forward models a variable transient flux and temporally constant host galaxy. We inject artificial point sources onto DECam images to test the accuracy of our photometric method. Upon comparison of input and measured artificial supernova fluxes, we find flux biases peak at 3 mmag. We require corrections to our photometric uncertainties as a function of host galaxy surface brightness at the transient location, similar to that seen by the DES Difference Imaging Pipeline used to discover transients. The public release of the light curves can be found at https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/sn.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.04206  [pdf] - 1897930
CIV Black Hole Mass Measurements with the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES)
Comments: 15 pages, 12 figures Updated with minor revisions to match version accepted for publication by MNRAS. Results remain the same
Submitted: 2019-02-11, last modified: 2019-05-30
Black hole mass measurements outside the local universe are critically important to derive the growth of supermassive black holes over cosmic time, and to study the interplay between black hole growth and galaxy evolution. In this paper we present two measurements of supermassive black hole masses from reverberation mapping (RM) of the broad CIV emission line. These measurements are based on multi-year photometry and spectroscopy from the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program (DES-SN) and the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES), which together constitute the OzDES RM Program. The observed reverberation lag between the DES continuum photometry and the OzDES emission-line fluxes is measured to be $358^{+126}_{-123}$ and $343^{+58}_{-84}$ days for two quasars at redshifts of $1.905$ and $2.593$ respectively. The corresponding masses of the two supermassive black holes are $4.4 \times 10^{9}$ and $3.3 \times 10^{9}$ M$_\odot$, which are among the highest-redshift and highest-mass black holes measured to date with RM studies. We use these new measurements to better determine the CIV radius$-$luminosity relationship for high-luminosity quasars, which is fundamental to many quasar black hole mass estimates and demographic studies.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.12682  [pdf] - 2065167
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Wide field mass maps via forward fitting in harmonic space
Comments: 19 pages, 16 figures. Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-05-29
We present new wide-field weak lensing mass maps for the Year 1 Dark Energy Survey data, generated via a forward fitting approach. This method of producing maps does not impose any prior constraints on the mass distribution to be reconstructed. The technique is found to improve the map reconstruction on the edges of the field compared to the conventional Kaiser-Squires method, which applies a direct inversion on the data; our approach is in good agreement with the previous direct approach in the central regions of the footprint. The mapping technique is assessed and verified with tests on simulations; together with the Kaiser-Squires method, the technique is then applied to data from the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 data and the differences between the two methods are compared. We also produce the first DES measurements of the convergence Minkowski functionals and compare them to those measured in simulations.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02376  [pdf] - 1890287
First Cosmological Results using Type Ia Supernovae from the Dark Energy Survey: Measurement of the Hubble Constant
Macaulay, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Bacon, D.; Brout, D.; Davis, T. M.; Zhang, B.; Bassett, B. A.; Scolnic, D.; Möller, A.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Hinton, S. R.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A. G.; Lasker, J.; Lidman, C.; Sako, M.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Asorey, J.; Avila, S.; Bechtol, K.; Brooks, D.; Brown, P.; Burke, D. L.; Calcino, J.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carollo, D.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Collett, T.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Filippenko, A. V.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Galbany, L.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Glazebrook, K.; González-Gaitán, S.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Hollowood, D. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hoormann, J. K.; Hoyle, B.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Kasai, E.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, G. F.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Nugent, P.; Palmese, A.; Pan, Y. -C.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sharp, R.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Sommer, N. E.; Suchyta, E.; Swann, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, B. E.; Uddin, S. A.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wiseman, P.
Comments: 15 pages, 5 figures, updated to match accepted version
Submitted: 2018-11-06, last modified: 2019-05-27
We present an improved measurement of the Hubble constant (H_0) using the 'inverse distance ladder' method, which adds the information from 207 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) at redshift 0.018 < z < 0.85 to existing distance measurements of 122 low redshift (z < 0.07) SNe Ia (Low-z) and measurements of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs). Whereas traditional measurements of H_0 with SNe Ia use a distance ladder of parallax and Cepheid variable stars, the inverse distance ladder relies on absolute distance measurements from the BAOs to calibrate the intrinsic magnitude of the SNe Ia. We find H_0 = 67.8 +/- 1.3 km s-1 Mpc-1 (statistical and systematic uncertainties, 68% confidence). Our measurement makes minimal assumptions about the underlying cosmological model, and our analysis was blinded to reduce confirmation bias. We examine possible systematic uncertainties and all are below the statistical uncertainties. Our H_0 value is consistent with estimates derived from the Cosmic Microwave Background assuming a LCDM universe (Planck Collaboration et al. 2018).
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.10522  [pdf] - 1925050
An extended catalog of galaxy-galaxy strong gravitational lenses discovered in DES using convolutional neural networks
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ Supplement Series
Submitted: 2019-05-25
We search Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 3 imaging for galaxy-galaxy strong gravitational lenses using convolutional neural networks, extending previous work with new training sets and covering a wider range of redshifts and colors. We train two neural networks using images of simulated lenses, then use them to score postage stamp images of 7.9 million sources from the Dark Energy Survey chosen to have plausible lens colors based on simulations. We examine 1175 of the highest-scored candidates and identify 152 probable or definite lenses. Examining an additional 20,000 images with lower scores, we identify a further 247 probable or definite candidates. After including 86 candidates discovered in earlier searches using neural networks and 26 candidates discovered through visual inspection of blue-near-red objects in the DES catalog, we present a catalog of 511 lens candidates.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.06081  [pdf] - 1888814
Measurement of the Splashback Feature around SZ-selected Galaxy Clusters with DES, SPT and ACT
Shin, T.; Adhikari, S.; Baxter, E. J.; Chang, C.; Jain, B.; Battaglia, N.; Bleem, L.; Bocquet, S.; DeRose, J.; Gruen, D.; Hilton, M.; Kravtsov, A.; McClintock, T.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Varga, T. N.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wu, H.; Aiola, S.; Allam, S.; Bechtol, K.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bond, J. R.; Brodwin, M.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Choi, S. K.; Cunha, C. E.; Crawford, T. M.; da Costa, L. N.; De Vicente, J.; Desai, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Dunkley, J.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gallardo, P. A.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gralla, M.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Hill, J. C.; Ho, S. P.; Hollowood, D. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; Huffenberger, K.; Hughes, J. P.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Kim, A. G.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Madhavacheril, M. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Maurin, L.; McMahon, J.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Naess, S.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Partridge, L. A. Page B.; Patil, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Serrano, S.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staggs, S. T.; Stark, A.; Stein, G.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; van Engelen, A.; Wollack, E. J.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, Z.
Comments: 17 pages, 13 figures, published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-11-14, last modified: 2019-05-24
We present a detection of the splashback feature around galaxy clusters selected using their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signal. Recent measurements of the splashback feature around optically selected galaxy clusters have found that the splashback radius, $r_{\rm sp}$, is smaller than predicted by N-body simulations. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is that $r_{\rm sp}$ inferred from the observed radial distribution of galaxies is affected by selection effects related to the optical cluster-finding algorithms. We test this possibility by measuring the splashback feature in clusters selected via the SZ effect in data from the South Pole Telescope SZ survey and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter survey. The measurement is accomplished by correlating these clusters with galaxies detected in the Dark Energy Survey Year 3 data. The SZ observable used to select clusters in this analysis is expected to have a tighter correlation with halo mass and to be more immune to projection effects and aperture-induced biases than optically selected clusters. We find that the measured $r_{\rm sp}$ for SZ-selected clusters is consistent with the expectations from simulations, although the small number of SZ-selected clusters makes a precise comparison difficult. In agreement with previous work, when using optically selected redMaPPer clusters, $r_{\rm sp}$ is $\sim$ $2\sigma$ smaller than in the simulations. These results motivate detailed investigations of selection biases in optically selected cluster catalogs and exploration of the splashback feature around larger samples of SZ-selected clusters. Additionally, we investigate trends in the galaxy profile and splashback feature as a function of galaxy color, finding that blue galaxies have profiles close to a power law with no discernible splashback feature, which is consistent with them being on their first infall into the cluster.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02374  [pdf] - 1880991
First Cosmology Results using Type Ia Supernovae from the Dark Energy Survey: Constraints on Cosmological Parameters
Abbott, T. M. C.; Allam, S.; Andersen, P.; Angus, C.; Asorey, J.; Avelino, A.; Avila, S.; Bassett, B. A.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Brout, D.; Brown, P.; Burke, D. L.; Calcino, J.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carollo, D.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Challis, P.; Childress, M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; Davis, T. M.; De Vicente, J.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Filippenko, A. V.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Galbany, L.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Giannantonio, T.; Glazebrook, K.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gupta, R. R.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Hinton, S. R.; Hollowood, D. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hoormann, J. K.; Hoyle, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kasai, E.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A. G.; Kirshner, R. P.; Kovacs, E.; Krause, E.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lasker, J.; Lewis, G. F.; Li, T. S.; Lidman, C.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Macaulay, E.; Maia, M. A. G.; Mandel, K. S.; March, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Miranda, V.; Mohr, J. J.; Morganson, E.; Muthukrishna, D.; Möller, A.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Palmese, A.; Pan, Y. -C.; Plazas, A. A.; Pursiainen, M.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sharp, R.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Sommer, N. E.; Spinka, H.; Suchyta, E.; Sullivan, M.; Swann, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Uddin, S. A.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Wiseman, P.; Wolf, R. C.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, Y.
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-11-06, last modified: 2019-05-10
We present the first cosmological parameter constraints using measurements of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program (DES-SN). The analysis uses a subsample of 207 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia from the first three years of DES-SN, combined with a low-redshift sample of 122 SNe from the literature. Our "DES-SN3YR" result from these 329 SNe Ia is based on a series of companion analyses and improvements covering SN Ia discovery, spectroscopic selection, photometry, calibration, distance bias corrections, and evaluation of systematic uncertainties. For a flat LCDM model we find a matter density Omega_m = 0.331 +_ 0.038. For a flat wCDM model, and combining our SN Ia constraints with those from the cosmic microwave background (CMB), we find a dark energy equation of state w = -0.978 +_ 0.059, and Omega_m = 0.321 +_ 0.018. For a flat w0waCDM model, and combining probes from SN Ia, CMB and baryon acoustic oscillations, we find w0 = -0.885 +_ 0.114 and wa = -0.387 +_ 0.430. These results are in agreement with a cosmological constant and with previous constraints using SNe Ia (Pantheon, JLA).
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02379  [pdf] - 1880992
First Cosmology Results using Type Ia Supernova from the Dark Energy Survey: Simulations to Correct Supernova Distance Biases
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-11-06, last modified: 2019-05-09
We describe catalog-level simulations of Type Ia supernova (SN~Ia) light curves in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program (DES-SN), and in low-redshift samples from the Center for Astrophysics (CfA) and the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP). These simulations are used to model biases from selection effects and light curve analysis, and to determine bias corrections for SN~Ia distance moduli that are used to measure cosmological parameters. To generate realistic light curves, the simulation uses a detailed SN~Ia model, incorporates information from observations (PSF, sky noise, zero point), and uses summary information (e.g., detection efficiency vs. signal to noise ratio) based on 10,000 fake SN light curves whose fluxes were overlaid on images and processed with our analysis pipelines. The quality of the simulation is illustrated by predicting distributions observed in the data. Averaging within redshift bins, we find distance modulus biases up to 0.05~mag over the redshift ranges of the low-z and DES-SN samples. For individual events, particularly those with extreme red or blue color, distance biases can reach 0.4~mag. Therefore, accurately determining bias corrections is critical for precision measurements of cosmological parameters. Files used to make these corrections are available at https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/sn.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02375  [pdf] - 1877871
Cosmological Constraints from Multiple Probes in the Dark Energy Survey
DES Collaboration; Abbott, T. M. C.; Alarcon, A.; Allam, S.; Andersen, P.; Andrade-Oliveira, F.; Annis, J.; Asorey, J.; Avelino, A.; Avila, S.; Bacon, D.; Banik, N.; Bassett, B. A.; Baxter, E.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Blazek, J.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Brout, D.; Burke, D. L.; Calcino, J.; Camacho, H.; Campos, A.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carollo, D.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Challis, P.; Chan, K. C.; Chang, C.; Childress, M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; Davis, T. M.; De Vicente, J.; DePoy, D. L.; DeRose, J.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Filippenko, A. V.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Galbany, L.; García-Bellido, J.; Gatti, M.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Glazebrook, K.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Hinton, S. R.; Hollowood, D. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hoormann, J. K.; Hoyle, B.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jeltema, T.; Kasai, E.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A. G.; Kirshner, R. P.; Kokron, N.; Krause, E.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lasker, J.; Lemos, P.; Lewis, G. F.; Li, T. S.; Lidman, C.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Macaulay, E.; MacCrann, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Mandel, K. S.; March, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Morganson, E.; Muir, J.; Möller, A.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Palmese, A.; Pan, Y. -C.; Peiris, H. V.; Percival, W. J.; Plazas, A. A.; Porredon, A.; Prat, J.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosenfeld, R.; Ross, A. J.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Secco, L. F.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sharp, R.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Sommer, N. E.; Swann, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Uddin, S. A.; Vielzeuf, P.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, M.; Weaverdyck, N.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: 8 pages, 2 figures; v3 matches version accepted by PRL
Submitted: 2018-11-06, last modified: 2019-05-06
The combination of multiple observational probes has long been advocated as a powerful technique to constrain cosmological parameters, in particular dark energy. The Dark Energy Survey has measured 207 spectroscopically--confirmed Type Ia supernova lightcurves; the baryon acoustic oscillation feature; weak gravitational lensing; and galaxy clustering. Here we present combined results from these probes, deriving constraints on the equation of state, $w$, of dark energy and its energy density in the Universe. Independently of other experiments, such as those that measure the cosmic microwave background, the probes from this single photometric survey rule out a Universe with no dark energy, finding $w=-0.80^{+0.09}_{-0.11}$. The geometry is shown to be consistent with a spatially flat Universe, and we obtain a constraint on the baryon density of $\Omega_b=0.069^{+0.009}_{-0.012}$ that is independent of early Universe measurements. These results demonstrate the potential power of large multi-probe photometric surveys and pave the way for order of magnitude advances in our constraints on properties of dark energy and cosmology over the next decade.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.00428  [pdf] - 1905780
Identification of RR Lyrae stars in multiband, sparsely-sampled data from the Dark Energy Survey using template fitting and Random Forest classification
Comments: 34 pages, 21 figures. Accepted for publication in AJ. Data products are available at https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/other/y3-rrl
Submitted: 2019-05-01
Many studies have shown that RR Lyrae variable stars (RRL) are powerful stellar tracers of Galactic halo structure and satellite galaxies. The Dark Energy Survey (DES), with its deep and wide coverage (g ~ 23.5 mag) in a single exposure; over 5000 deg$^{2}$) provides a rich opportunity to search for substructures out to the edge of the Milky Way halo. However, the sparse and unevenly sampled multiband light curves from the DES wide-field survey (median 4 observations in each of grizY over the first three years) pose a challenge for traditional techniques used to detect RRL. We present an empirically motivated and computationally efficient template fitting method to identify these variable stars using three years of DES data. When tested on DES light curves of previously classified objects in SDSS stripe 82, our algorithm recovers 89% of RRL periods to within 1% of their true value with 85% purity and 76% completeness. Using this method, we identify 5783 RRL candidates, ~31% of which are previously undiscovered. This method will be useful for identifying RRL in other sparse multiband data sets.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02381  [pdf] - 1876407
Steve: A hierarchical Bayesian model for Supernova Cosmology
Comments: 27 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2018-11-06, last modified: 2019-05-01
We present a new Bayesian hierarchical model (BHM) named Steve for performing type Ia supernova (SNIa) cosmology fits. This advances previous works by including an improved treatment of Malmquist bias, accounting for additional sources of systematic uncertainty, and increasing numerical efficiency. Given light curve fit parameters, redshifts, and host-galaxy masses, we fit Steve simultaneously for parameters describing cosmology, SNIa populations, and systematic uncertainties. Selection effects are characterised using Monte-Carlo simulations. We demonstrate its implementation by fitting realisations of SNIa datasets where the SNIa model closely follows that used in Steve. Next, we validate on more realistic SNANA simulations of SNIa samples from the Dark Energy Survey and low-redshift surveys. These simulated datasets contain more than $60\,000$ SNeIa, which we use to evaluate biases in the recovery of cosmological parameters, specifically the equation-of-state of dark energy, $w$. This is the most rigorous test of a BHM method applied to SNIa cosmology fitting, and reveals small $w$-biases that depend on the simulated SNIa properties, in particular the intrinsic SNIa scatter model. This $w$-bias is less than $0.03$ on average, less than half the statistical uncertainty on $w$.These simulation test results are a concern for BHM cosmology fitting applications on large upcoming surveys, and therefore future development will focus on minimising the sensitivity of Steve to the SNIa intrinsic scatter model.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.13347  [pdf] - 1966740
Constraints on the redshift evolution of astrophysical feedback with Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect cross-correlations
Comments: 21 pages, 12 figures, comments welcome
Submitted: 2019-04-30
An understanding of astrophysical feedback is important for constraining models of galaxy formation and for extracting cosmological information from current and future weak lensing surveys. The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, quantified via the Compton-$y$ parameter, is a powerful tool for studying feedback, because it directly probes the pressure of the hot, ionized gas residing in dark matter halos. Cross-correlations between galaxies and maps of Compton-$y$ obtained from cosmic microwave background surveys are sensitive to the redshift evolution of the gas pressure, and its dependence on halo mass. In this work, we use galaxies identified in year one data from the Dark Energy Survey and Compton-$y$ maps constructed from Planck observations. We find highly significant (roughly $12\sigma$) detections of galaxy-$y$ cross-correlation in multiple redshift bins. By jointly fitting these measurements as well as measurements of galaxy clustering, we constrain the halo bias-weighted, gas pressure of the Universe as a function of redshift between $0.15 \lesssim z \lesssim 0.75$. We compare these measurements to predictions from hydrodynamical simulations, allowing us to constrain the amount of thermal energy in the halo gas relative to that resulting from gravitational collapse.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.10912  [pdf] - 2065157
Spectral Variability of a Sample of Extreme Variability Quasars and Implications for the MgII Broad-line Region
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-04-24
We present new Gemini/GMOS optical spectroscopy of 16 extreme variability quasars (EVQs) that dimmed by more than 1.5 mag in the $g$ band between the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Dark Energy Survey (DES) epochs (separated by a few years in the quasar rest frame). The quasar sample covers a redshift range of $0.5 < z < 2.1$. Nearly half of these EVQs brightened significantly (by more than 0.5 mag in the $g$ band) in a few years after reaching their previous faintest state, and some EVQs showed rapid (non-blazar) variations of greater than 1-2 mag on timescales of only months. Leveraging on the large dynamic range in continuum variability between the earlier SDSS and the new GMOS spectra, we explore the associated variations in the broad Mg II,$\lambda2798$ line, whose variability properties have not been well studied before. The broad Mg II flux varies in the same direction as the continuum flux, albeit with a smaller amplitude, which indicates at least some portion of Mg II is reverberating to continuum changes. However, the width (FWHM) of Mg II does not vary accordingly as continuum changes for most objects in the sample, in contrast to the case of the broad Balmer lines. Using the width of broad Mg II to estimate the black hole mass therefore introduces a luminosity-dependent bias.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.03181  [pdf] - 1871376
The Dark Energy Survey Data Release 1
Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Amara, A.; Annis, J.; Asorey, J.; Avila, S.; Ballester, O.; Banerji, M.; Barkhouse, W.; Baruah, L.; Baumer, M.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M . R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Blazek, J.; Bocquet, S.; Brooks, D.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Busti, V.; Campisano, R.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Rosell, A. C arnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Chen, X.; Conselice, C.; Costa, G.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Das, R.; Daues, G.; Davis, T. M.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; DePoy, D. L.; DeRose, J.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elliott, A. E.; Evrard, A. E.; Farahi, A.; Neto, A. Fausti; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Fitzpatrick, M.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fosalba, P.; Friedel, D. N.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; tanaga, E. Gaz; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gill, M. S. S.; Glazebrook, K.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gower, M.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gupta, R. R.; Gutierrez, G.; Hamilton, S.; Hartley, W. G.; Hinton, S. R.; Hislop, J. M.; Hollowood, D.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Juneau, S.; Kacprzak, T.; Kent, S.; Khullar, G.; Klein, M.; Kovacs, A.; Koziol, A. M. G.; Krause, E.; Kremin, A.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lasker, J.; Li, T. S.; Li, R. T.; Liddle, A. R.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; López-Reyes, P.; MacCrann, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Maloney, J. D.; Manera, M.; March, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McClintock, T.; McKay, T.; McMahon, R . G.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Morganson, E.; Mould, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nidever, D.; Nikutta, R.; Nogueira, F.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Nunes, L.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Old, L.; Olsen, K.; Pace, A. B.; Palmese, A.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Peiris, H. V.; Percival, W. J.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Poh, J.; Pond, C.; redon, A. Por; Pujol, A.; Refregier, A.; Reil, K.; Ricker, P. M.; Rollins, R. P.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rooney, P.; Ross, A. J.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, M. L.; Santiago, B.; Saro, A.; Scarpine, V.; Scolnic, D.; Scott, A.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Shipp, N.; Silveira, M. L.; Smith, R. C.; Smith, J. A.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; ira, F. Sobre; Song, J.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Sullivan, M.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Vivas, A. K.; ker, A. R. Wal; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; Wolf, R. C.; Wu, H.; Yanny, B.; Zenteno, A.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: 30 pages, 20 Figures. Release page found at this url https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/dr1
Submitted: 2018-01-09, last modified: 2019-04-23
We describe the first public data release of the Dark Energy Survey, DES DR1, consisting of reduced single epoch images, coadded images, coadded source catalogs, and associated products and services assembled over the first three years of DES science operations. DES DR1 is based on optical/near-infrared imaging from 345 distinct nights (August 2013 to February 2016) by the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the 4-m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. We release data from the DES wide-area survey covering ~5,000 sq. deg. of the southern Galactic cap in five broad photometric bands, grizY. DES DR1 has a median delivered point-spread function of g = 1.12, r = 0.96, i = 0.88, z = 0.84, and Y = 0.90 arcsec FWHM, a photometric precision of < 1% in all bands, and an astrometric precision of 151 mas. The median coadded catalog depth for a 1.95" diameter aperture at S/N = 10 is g = 24.33, r = 24.08, i = 23.44, z = 22.69, and Y = 21.44 mag. DES DR1 includes nearly 400M distinct astronomical objects detected in ~10,000 coadd tiles of size 0.534 sq. deg. produced from ~39,000 individual exposures. Benchmark galaxy and stellar samples contain ~310M and ~ 80M objects, respectively, following a basic object quality selection. These data are accessible through a range of interfaces, including query web clients, image cutout servers, jupyter notebooks, and an interactive coadd image visualization tool. DES DR1 constitutes the largest photometric data set to date at the achieved depth and photometric precision.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.04004  [pdf] - 1868032
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 results: Detection of Intra-cluster Light at Redshift $\sim$ 0.25
Comments: Revised to match the published version. Paper data available from https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/other/paper-data
Submitted: 2018-12-10, last modified: 2019-04-15
Using data collected by the Dark Energy Survey (DES), we report the detection of intracluster light (ICL) with $\sim300$ galaxy clusters in the redshift range of 0.2-0.3. We design methods to mask detected galaxies and stars in the images and stack the cluster light profiles, while accounting for several systematic effects (sky subtraction, instrumental point-spread function, cluster selection effects and residual light in the ICL raw detection from background and cluster galaxies). The methods allow us to acquire high signal-to-noise measurements of the ICL and central galaxies (CGs), which we separate with radial cuts. The ICL appears as faint and diffuse light extending to at least 1 Mpc from the cluster center, reaching a surface brightness level of 30 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. The ICL and the cluster CG contribute to $44\%\pm17$\% of the total cluster stellar luminosity within 1 Mpc. The ICL color is overall consistent with that of the cluster red sequence galaxies, but displays the trend of becoming bluer with increasing radius. The ICL demonstrates an interesting self-similarity feature -- for clusters in different richness ranges, their ICL radial profiles are similar after scaling with cluster $R_\mathrm{200m}$, and the ICL brightness appears to be a good tracer of the cluster radial mass distribution. These analyses are based on the DES redMaPPer cluster sample identified in the first year of observations.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.01579  [pdf] - 1943240
A Search for Optical Emission from Binary-Black-Hole Merger GW170814 with the Dark Energy Camera
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2018-12-04, last modified: 2019-04-10
Binary black hole (BBH) mergers found by the LIGO and Virgo detectors are of immense scientific interest to the astrophysics community, but are considered unlikely to be sources of electromagnetic emission. To test whether they have rapidly fading optical counterparts, we used the Dark Energy Camera to perform an $i$-band search for the BBH merger GW170814, the first gravitational wave detected by three interferometers. The 87-deg$^2$ localization region (at 90\% confidence) centered in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) footprint enabled us to image 86\% of the probable sky area to a depth of $i\sim 23$ mag and provide the most comprehensive dataset to search for EM emission from BBH mergers. To identify candidates, we perform difference imaging with our search images and with templates from pre-existing DES images. The analysis strategy and selection requirements were designed to remove supernovae and to identify transients that decline in the first two epochs. We find two candidates, each of which is spatially coincident with a star or a high-redshift galaxy in the DES catalogs, and they are thus unlikely to be associated with GW170814. Our search finds no candidates associated with GW170814, disfavoring rapidly declining optical emission from BBH mergers brighter than $i\sim 23$ mag ($L_{\rm optical} \sim 5\times10^{41}$ erg/s) 1-2 days after coalescence. In terms of GW sky map coverage, this is the most complete search for optical counterparts to BBH mergers to date
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.10806  [pdf] - 1966683
Brown dwarf census with the Dark Energy Survey year 3 data and the thin disk scale height of early L types
Comments: 27 pages, 18 figures. Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-03-26
In this paper we present a catalogue of 11,745 brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from L0 to T9, photometrically classified using data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) year 3 release matched to the Vista Hemisphere Survey (VHS) DR3 and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data, covering approx 2,400 deg2 up to i_AB=22. The classification method follows the same photo-type method previously applied to SDSS-UKIDSS-WISE data. The most significant difference comes from the use of DES data instead of SDSS, which allow us to classify almost an order of magnitude more brown dwarfs than any previous search and reaching distances beyond 400 parsecs for the earliest types. Next, we also present and validate the GalmodBD simulation, which produces brown dwarf number counts as a function of structural parameters with realistic photometric properties of a given survey. We use this simulation to estimate the completeness and purity of our photometric LT catalogue down to i_AB=22, as well as to compare to the observed number of LT types. We put constraints on the thin disk scale height for the early L population to be around 450 parsecs, in agreement with previous findings. For completeness, we also publish in a separate table a catalogue of 20,863 M dwarfs that passed our colour cut with spectral types greater than M6. Both the LT and the late M catalogues are found at https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/other/y3-mlt
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.01540  [pdf] - 1905656
First measurement of the Hubble constant from a dark standard siren using the Dark Energy Survey galaxies and the LIGO/Virgo binary-black-hole merger GW170814
The DES Collaboration; the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; Soares-Santos, M.; Palmese, A.; Hartley, W.; Annis, J.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Lahav, O.; Doctor, Z.; Fishbach, M.; Holz, D. E.; Lin, H.; Pereira, M. E. S.; Garcia, A.; Herner, K.; Kessler, R.; Peiris, H. V.; Sako, M.; Allam, S.; Brout, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Chen, H. Y.; Conselice, C.; deRose, J.; deVicente, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Gill, M. S. S.; Gschwend, J.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Tucker, D. L.; Wechsler, R.; Berger, E.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Metzger, B. D.; Williams, P. K. G.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Avila, S.; Bechtol, K.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Hollowood, D. L.; Hoyle, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, R. C.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abraham, S.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Aloy, M. A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arene, M.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aubin, F.; Aufmuth, P.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avendano, V.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Badaracco, F.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Becsy, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Beniwal, D.; Bergmann, G.; Bernuzzi, S.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhandare, R.; Bidler, J.; Bilenko, I. A.; Bilgili, S. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Boetzel, Y.; Bogaert, G.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Booker, P.; Boom, B. A.; Booth, C. D.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bossilkov, V.; Bosveld, J.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Bramley, A.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Briggs, J. H.; Brighenti, F.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campbell, W. A.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Carullo, G.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cerda-Duran, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chakravarti, K.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E. A.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Chaturvedi, M.; Chatziioannou, K.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. -P.; Cheong, C. K.; Chia, H. Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, G.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciobanu, A. A.; Ciolfi, R.; Cipriano, F.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colgan, R.; Colleoni, M.; Collette, C. G.; Collins, C.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrion, I.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Cotesta, R.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Croquette, M.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Dalya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Datrier, L. E. H.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Deenadayalan, M.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; DeMarchi, L. M.; Demos, N.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Derby, J.; De Rosa, R.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Dietrich, T.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Ding, B.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Dmitriev, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Easter, P. J.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenmann, M.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Estelles, H.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fazio, M.; Fee, C.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Feng, F.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferreira, T. A.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Fishner, J. M.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Flynn, E.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia, A.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giacomazzo, B.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Giordano, G.; Glover, L.; Godwin, P.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Goncharov, B.; Gonzalez, G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Grassia, P.; Gray, C.; Gray, R.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Green, R.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Gulati, H. K.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Haegel, L.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Hayes, F. J.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Vivanco, Francisco Hernandez; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hochheim, S.; Hofman, D.; Holgado, A. M.; Holland, N. A.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hoy, C. G.; Hreibi, A.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Hulko, M.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idzkowski, B.; Iess, A.; Ingram, C.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Irwin, B.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jadhav, S. J.; Jani, K.; Janthalur, N. N.; Jaranowski, P.; Jenkins, A. C.; Jiang, J.; Johnson, D. S.; Jones, A. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kashyap, R.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Keerthana, N. V.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, H.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Khursheed, M.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y. -M.; Kimball, C.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klika, J. H.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koekoek, G.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Koper, N.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnendu, N.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Lam, T. L.; Landry, M.; Lane, B. B.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lecoeuche, Y. K.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, J.; Li, K. J. L.; Li, T. G. F.; Li, X.; Lin, F.; Linde, F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Liu, X.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Longo, A.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lower, M. E.; Luck, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Macquet, A.; Hernandez, I. Magana; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malik, A.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Marsat, S.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCann, J. J.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Mehta, A. K.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Mereni, L.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Millhouse, M.; Mills, J. C.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Mishkin, A.; Mishra, C.; Mistry, T.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Mo, G.; Moffa, D.; Mogushi, K.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morisaki, S.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Ng, K. Y.; Ng, S.; Nguyen, P.; Nichols, D.; Nissanke, S.; Nocera, F.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Obergaulinger, M.; Oberling, J.; O'Brien, B. D.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Ohta, H.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R. G.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Pagano, G.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedersen, C.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Phukon, K. S.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Pong, D. Y. T.; Ponrathnam, S.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Powell, J.; Prajapati, A. K.; Prasad, J.; Prasai, K.; Prasanna, R.; Pratten, G.; Prestegard, T.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quinonez, P. J.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Radkins, H.; Radulescu, N.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rana, Javed; Rao, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Ricci, F.; Richardson, C. J.; Richardson, J. W.; Ricker, P. M.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romanelli, M.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rose, K.; Rosinska, D.; Rosofsky, S. G.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rudiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Santiago, K. A.; Sarin, N.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schonbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sennett, N.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Sharma, P.; Shawhan, P.; Shen, H.; Shink, R.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; ShyamSundar, S.; Siellez, K.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, N.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Sitmukhambetov, S.; Skliris, V.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slaven-Blair, T. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Sowell, E.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Srivastava, V.; Staats, K.; Stachie, C.; Standke, M.; Steer, D. A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stocks, D.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Sudhir, V.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sur, A.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, R.; Thies, F.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thondapu, S. R.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, Shubhanshu; Tiwari, Srishti; Tiwari, V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forne, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tringali, M. C.; Trovato, A.; Trozzo, L.; Trudeau, R.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; Brand, J. F. J. van den; Broeck, C. Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warden, Z. A.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wellmann, F.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Wessels, P.; Westhouse, J. W.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D. M.; Williams, D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, L.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yeeles, D. W.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yuen, S. H. R.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A. K.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, T.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zimmerman, A.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.
Comments: 18 pages, 2 Figures, submitted to ApJL
Submitted: 2019-01-06, last modified: 2019-03-22
We present a multi-messenger measurement of the Hubble constant H_0 using the binary-black-hole merger GW170814 as a standard siren, combined with a photometric redshift catalog from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The luminosity distance is obtained from the gravitational wave signal detected by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration (LVC) on 2017 August 14, and the redshift information is provided by the DES Year 3 data. Black-hole mergers such as GW170814 are expected to lack bright electromagnetic emission to uniquely identify their host galaxies and build an object-by-object Hubble diagram. However, they are suitable for a statistical measurement, provided that a galaxy catalog of adequate depth and redshift completion is available. Here we present the first Hubble parameter measurement using a black-hole merger. Our analysis results in $H_0 = 75.2^{+39.5}_{-32.4}~{\rm km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$, which is consistent with both SN Ia and CMB measurements of the Hubble constant. The quoted 68% credible region comprises 60% of the uniform prior range [20,140] ${\rm km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$, and it depends on the assumed prior range. If we take a broader prior of [10,220] ${\rm km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$, we find $H_0 = 78^{+ 96}_{-24}~{\rm km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$ ($57\%$ of the prior range). Although a weak constraint on the Hubble constant from a single event is expected using the dark siren method, a multifold increase in the LVC event rate is anticipated in the coming years and combinations of many sirens will lead to improved constraints on $H_0$.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.08042  [pdf] - 1971206
Mass Variance from Archival X-ray Properties of Dark Energy Survey Year-1 Galaxy Clusters
Comments: 14 pages. Main results are Figure 3, 5, and 6, Table 2, and Equation 9. Submitted to MNRAS. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2019-03-19
Using archival X-ray observations and a log-normal population model, we estimate constraints on the intrinsic scatter in halo mass at fixed optical richness for a galaxy cluster sample identified in Dark Energy Survey Year-One (DES-Y1) data with the redMaPPer algorithm. We examine the scaling behavior of X-ray temperatures, $T_X$, with optical richness, $\lambda_{RM}$, for clusters in the redshift range $0.2<z<0.7$. X-ray temperatures are obtained from Chandra and XMM observations for 58 and 110 redMaPPer systems, respectively. Despite non-uniform sky coverage, the $T_X$ measurements are $> 50\%$ complete for clusters with $\lambda_{RM} > 130$. Regression analysis on the two samples produces consistent posterior scaling parameters, from which we derive a combined constraint on the residual scatter, $\sigma_{\ln Tx | \lambda} = 0.275 \pm 0.019$. Joined with constraints for $T_X$ scaling with halo mass from the Weighing the Giants program and richness--temperature covariance estimates from the LoCuSS sample, we derive the richness-conditioned scatter in mass, $\sigma_{\ln M | \lambda} = 0.30 \pm 0.04\, _{({\rm stat})} \pm 0.09\, _{({\rm sys})}$, at an optical richness of approximately 70. Uncertainties in external parameters, particularly the slope and variance of the $T_X$--mass relation and the covariance of $T_X$ and $\lambda_{RM}$ at fixed mass, dominate the systematic error. The $95\%$ confidence region from joint sample analysis is relatively broad, $\sigma_{\ln M | \lambda} \in [0.14, \, 0.55]$, or a factor ten in variance.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.07761  [pdf] - 1843825
The First Tidally Disrupted Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxy? - Spectroscopic Analysis of the Tucana III Stream
Comments: 22 pages, 9 figures, 3 tables. Published in ApJ. Comments welcome! See also Erkal et al. "Modelling the Tucana III stream - a close passage with the LMC" on today's astro-ph
Submitted: 2018-04-20, last modified: 2019-03-05
We present a spectroscopic study of the tidal tails and core of the Milky Way satellite Tucana III, collectively referred to as the Tucana III stream, using the 2dF+AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope and the IMACS spectrograph on the Magellan/Baade Telescope. In addition to recovering the brightest 9 previously known member stars in the Tucana III core, we identify 22 members in the tidal tails. We observe strong evidence for a velocity gradient of 8.0 km/s/deg (or 18.3 km/s/kpc over at least 3$^{\circ}$ (or 1.3 kpc) on the sky. Based on the continuity in velocity we confirm that the Tucana III tails are real tidal extensions of Tucana III. The large velocity gradient of the stream implies that Tucana III is likely on a radial orbit. We successfully obtain metallicities for 4 members in the core and 12 members in the tails. We find that members close to the ends of the stream tend to be more metal-poor than members in the core, indicating a possible metallicity gradient between the center of the progenitor halo and its edge. The spread in metallicity suggests that the progenitor of the Tucana III stream is a dwarf galaxy rather than a star cluster. Furthermore, we find that with the precise photometry of the Dark Energy Survey data, there is a discernible color offset between metal-rich disk stars and metal-poor stream members. This metallicity-dependent color offers a more efficient method to recognize metal-poor targets and will increase the selection efficiency of stream members for future spectroscopic follow-up programs on stellar streams.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.01530  [pdf] - 1840662
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Clustering and Weak Lensing
DES Collaboration; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Alarcon, A.; Aleksić, J.; Allam, S.; Allen, S.; Amara, A.; Annis, J.; Asorey, J.; Avila, S.; Bacon, D.; Balbinot, E.; Banerji, M.; Banik, N.; Barkhouse, W.; Baumer, M.; Baxter, E.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M. R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Blazek, J.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Busha, M. T.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Chen, N.; Childress, M.; Choi, A.; Conselice, C.; Crittenden, R.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Das, R.; Davis, T. M.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; DePoy, D. L.; DeRose, J.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elliott, A. E.; Elsner, F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fang, Y.; Fernandez, E.; Ferté, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Friedrich, O.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Garcia-Fernandez, M.; Gatti, M.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gill, M. S. S.; Glazebrook, K.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Hamilton, S.; Hartley, W. G.; Hinton, S. R.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. D.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Kacprzak, T.; Kent, S.; Kim, A. G.; King, A.; Kirk, D.; Kokron, N.; Kovacs, A.; Krause, E.; Krawiec, C.; Kremin, A.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lacasa, F.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Liddle, A. R.; Lidman, C.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Manera, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Miranda, V.; Mudd, D.; Muir, J.; Möller, A.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Palmese, A.; Peacock, J.; Peiris, H. V.; Peoples, J.; Percival, W. J.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Porredon, A.; Prat, J.; Pujol, A.; Rau, M. M.; Refregier, A.; Ricker, P. M.; Roe, N.; Rollins, R. P.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosenfeld, R.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Salvador, A. I.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Scolnic, D.; Secco, L. F.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, R. C.; Smith, M.; Smith, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Tucker, B. E.; Uddin, S. A.; Varga, T. N.; Vielzeuf, P.; Vikram, V.; Vivas, A. K.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, M.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; Wolf, R. C.; Yanny, B.; Yuan, F.; Zenteno, A.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: Matches published version. Results essentially unchanged, except updated covariance matrix leads to improved chi^2 (colored text removed)
Submitted: 2017-08-04, last modified: 2019-03-01
We present cosmological results from a combined analysis of galaxy clustering and weak gravitational lensing, using 1321 deg$^2$ of $griz$ imaging data from the first year of the Dark Energy Survey (DES Y1). We combine three two-point functions: (i) the cosmic shear correlation function of 26 million source galaxies in four redshift bins, (ii) the galaxy angular autocorrelation function of 650,000 luminous red galaxies in five redshift bins, and (iii) the galaxy-shear cross-correlation of luminous red galaxy positions and source galaxy shears. To demonstrate the robustness of these results, we use independent pairs of galaxy shape, photometric redshift estimation and validation, and likelihood analysis pipelines. To prevent confirmation bias, the bulk of the analysis was carried out while blind to the true results; we describe an extensive suite of systematics checks performed and passed during this blinded phase. The data are modeled in flat $\Lambda$CDM and $w$CDM cosmologies, marginalizing over 20 nuisance parameters, varying 6 (for $\Lambda$CDM) or 7 (for $w$CDM) cosmological parameters including the neutrino mass density and including the 457 $\times$ 457 element analytic covariance matrix. We find consistent cosmological results from these three two-point functions, and from their combination obtain $S_8 \equiv \sigma_8 (\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.5} = 0.783^{+0.021}_{-0.025}$ and $\Omega_m = 0.264^{+0.032}_{-0.019}$ for $\Lambda$CDM for $w$CDM, we find $S_8 = 0.794^{+0.029}_{-0.027}$, $\Omega_m = 0.279^{+0.043}_{-0.022}$, and $w=-0.80^{+0.20}_{-0.22}$ at 68% CL. The precision of these DES Y1 results rivals that from the Planck cosmic microwave background measurements, allowing a comparison of structure in the very early and late Universe on equal terms. Although the DES Y1 best-fit values for $S_8$ and $\Omega_m$ are lower than the central values from Planck ...
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.10998  [pdf] - 1835485
Mass Calibration of Optically Selected DES clusters using a Measurement of CMB-Cluster Lensing with SPTpol Data
Raghunathan, S.; Patil, S.; Baxter, E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Chou, T. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Holder, G. P.; McClintock, T.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rozo, E.; Varga, T. N.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Ade, P. A. R.; Allam, S.; Anderson, A. J.; Annis, J.; Austermann, J. E.; Avila, S.; Beall, J. A.; Bechtol, K.; Bender, A. N.; Bernstein, G.; Bertin, E.; Bianchini, F.; Bleem, L.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carretero, J.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Cho, H-M.; Citron, R.; Crites, A. T.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Everett, W.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gallicchio, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; George, E. M.; Gilbert, A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gruen, D.; Gschwend, J.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, G.; de Haan, T.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N.; Hartley, W. G.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; Hoyle, B.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Kim, A. G.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Knox, L.; Kovacs, A.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lee, A. T.; Lima, M.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L.; Montgomery, J.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Rapetti, D.; Romer, A. K.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smecher, G.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; De Vicente, J.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Wu, W. L. K.; Zhang, Y.
Comments: 19 pages, 6 figures, published in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-10-25, last modified: 2019-02-20
We use cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps from the 500 deg$^{2}$ SPTpol survey to measure the stacked lensing convergence of galaxy clusters from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year-3 redMaPPer (RM) cluster catalog. The lensing signal is extracted through a modified quadratic estimator designed to be unbiased by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel{'}dovich (tSZ) effect. The modified estimator uses a tSZ-free map, constructed from the SPTpol 95 and 150 GHz datasets, to estimate the background CMB gradient. For lensing reconstruction, we employ two versions of the RM catalog: a flux-limited sample containing 4003 clusters and a volume-limited sample with 1741 clusters. We detect lensing at a significance of 8.7$\sigma$(6.7$\sigma$) with the flux(volume)-limited sample. By modeling the reconstructed convergence using the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, we find the average lensing masses to be $M_{200m}$ = ($1.62^{+0.32}_{-0.25}$ [stat.] $\pm$ 0.04 [sys.]) and ($1.28^{+0.14}_{-0.18}$ [stat.] $\pm$ 0.03 [sys.]) $\times\ 10^{14}\ M_{\odot}$ for the volume- and flux-limited samples respectively. The systematic error budget is much smaller than the statistical uncertainty and is dominated by the uncertainties in the RM cluster centroids. We use the volume-limited sample to calibrate the normalization of the mass-richness scaling relation, and find a result consistent with the galaxy weak-lensing measurements from DES (Mcclintock et al. 2018).
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.04589  [pdf] - 1871489
Rediscovery of the Sixth Star Cluster in the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, 1 table, submitted to ApJL
Submitted: 2019-02-12
Since first noticed by Shapley in 1939, a faint object coincident with the Fornax dwarf spheroidal has long been discussed as a possible sixth globular cluster system. However, debate has continued over whether this overdensity is a statistical artifact or a blended galaxy group. In this Letter we demonstrate, using deep DECam imaging data, that this object is well resolved into stars and is a bona fide star cluster. The stellar overdensity of this cluster is statistically significant at the level of ~ 6 - 6.7 sigma in several different photometric catalogs including Gaia. Therefore, it is highly unlikely to be caused by random fluctuation. We show that Fornax 6 is a star cluster with a peculiarly low surface brightness and irregular shape, which may indicate a strong tidal influence from its host galaxy. The Hess diagram of Fornax 6 is largely consistent with that of Fornax field stars, but it appears to be slightly bluer. However, it is still likely more metal-rich than most of the globular clusters in the system. Faint clusters like Fornax 6 that orbit and potentially get disrupted in the centers of dwarf galaxies can prove crucial for constraining the dark matter distribution in Milky Way satellites.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.07812  [pdf] - 1830517
More out of less: an excess integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal from supervoids mapped out by the Dark Energy Survey
Comments: 13 pages, 5 figures, accepted MNRAS (minor revision)
Submitted: 2018-11-19, last modified: 2019-01-29
The largest structures in the cosmic web probe the dynamical nature of dark energy through their integrated Sachs-Wolfe imprints. In the strength of the signal, typical cosmic voids have shown good consistency with expectation $A_{\rm ISW}=\Delta T^{\rm data} / \Delta T^{\rm theory}=1$, given the substantial cosmic variance. Discordantly, large-scale hills in the gravitational potential, or supervoids, have shown excess signals. In this study, we mapped out 87 new supervoids in the total 5000 deg$^2$ footprint of the Dark Energy Survey at $0.2<z<0.9$ to probe these anomalous claims. We found an excess imprinted profile with $ A_{\rm ISW}\approx4.1\pm2.0$ amplitude. The combination with independent BOSS data reveals an ISW imprint of supervoids at the $3.3\sigma$ significance level with an enhanced $A_{\rm ISW}\approx5.2\pm1.6$ amplitude. The tension with $\Lambda$CDM predictions is equivalent to $2.6\sigma$ and remains unexplained.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.09278  [pdf] - 1821724
Is every strong lens model unhappy in its own way? Uniform modelling of a sample of 13 quadruply+ imaged quasars
Comments: 22 pages, 9 figures, 8 tables, Accepted to MNRAS. This version: accepted version
Submitted: 2018-07-24, last modified: 2019-01-28
Strong-gravitational lens systems with quadruply-imaged quasars (quads) are unique probes to address several fundamental problems in cosmology and astrophysics. Although they are intrinsically very rare, ongoing and planned wide-field deep-sky surveys are set to discover thousands of such systems in the next decade. It is thus paramount to devise a general framework to model strong-lens systems to cope with this large influx without being limited by expert investigator time. We propose such a general modelling framework (implemented with the publicly available software Lenstronomy) and apply it to uniformly model three-band Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images of 13 quads. This is the largest uniformly modelled sample of quads to date and paves the way for a variety of studies. To illustrate the scientific content of the sample, we investigate the alignment between the mass and light distribution in the deflectors. The position angles of these distributions are well-aligned, except when there is strong external shear. However, we find no correlation between the ellipticity of the light and mass distributions. We also show that the observed flux-ratios between the images depart significantly from the predictions of simple smooth models. The departures are strongest in the bluest band, consistent with microlensing being the dominant cause in addition to millilensing. Future papers will exploit this rich dataset in combination with ground based spectroscopy and time delays to determine quantities such as the Hubble constant, the free streaming length of dark matter, and the normalization of the initial stellar mass function.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.03786  [pdf] - 1822940
Finding high-redshift strong lenses in DES using convolutional neural networks
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-11-09, last modified: 2019-01-22
We search Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 3 imaging data for galaxy-galaxy strong gravitational lenses using convolutional neural networks. We generate 250,000 simulated lenses at redshifts > 0.8 from which we create a data set for training the neural networks with realistic seeing, sky and shot noise. Using the simulations as a guide, we build a catalogue of 1.1 million DES sources with 1.8 < g - i < 5, 0.6 < g -r < 3, r_mag > 19, g_mag > 20 and i_mag > 18.2. We train two ensembles of neural networks on training sets consisting of simulated lenses, simulated non-lenses, and real sources. We use the neural networks to score images of each of the sources in our catalogue with a value from 0 to 1, and select those with scores greater than a chosen threshold for visual inspection, resulting in a candidate set of 7,301 galaxies. During visual inspection we rate 84 as "probably" or "definitely" lenses. Four of these are previously known lenses or lens candidates. We inspect a further 9,428 candidates with a different score threshold, and identify four new candidates. We present 84 new strong lens candidates, selected after a few hours of visual inspection by astronomers. This catalogue contains a comparable number of high-redshift lenses to that predicted by simulations. Based on simulations we estimate our sample to contain most discoverable lenses in this imaging and at this redshift range.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.00807  [pdf] - 1818628
Transfer learning for galaxy morphology from one survey to another
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-07-02, last modified: 2019-01-16
Deep Learning (DL) algorithms for morphological classification of galaxies have proven very successful, mimicking (or even improving) visual classifications. However, these algorithms rely on large training samples of labelled galaxies (typically thousands of them). A key question for using DL classifications in future Big Data surveys is how much of the knowledge acquired from an existing survey can be exported to a new dataset, i.e. if the features learned by the machines are meaningful for different data. We test the performance of DL models, trained with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data, on Dark Energy survey (DES) using images for a sample of $\sim$5000 galaxies with a similar redshift distribution to SDSS. Applying the models directly to DES data provides a reasonable global accuracy ($\sim$ 90%), but small completeness and purity values. A fast domain adaptation step, consisting in a further training with a small DES sample of galaxies ($\sim$500-300), is enough for obtaining an accuracy > 95% and a significant improvement in the completeness and purity values. This demonstrates that, once trained with a particular dataset, machines can quickly adapt to new instrument characteristics (e.g., PSF, seeing, depth), reducing by almost one order of magnitude the necessary training sample for morphological classification. Redshift evolution effects or significant depth differences are not taken into account in this study.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.07456  [pdf] - 1901790
Three new VHS-DES Quasars at 6.7 < z < 6.9 and Emission Line Properties at z > 6.5
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2019-01-11
We report the results from a search for z > 6.5 quasars using the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 3 dataset combined with the VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) and WISE All-Sky Survey. Our photometric selection method is shown to be highly efficient in identifying clean samples of high-redshift quasars leading to spectroscopic confirmation of three new quasars - VDESJ 0244-5008 (z=6.724), VDESJ 0020-3653 (z=6.834) and VDESJ 0246-5219 (z=6.90) - which were selected as the highest priority candidates in the survey data without any need for additional follow-up observations. The new quasars span the full range in luminosity covered by other z>6.5 quasar samples (J AB = 20.2 to 21.3; M1450 = -25.6 to -26.6). We have obtained spectroscopic observations in the near infrared for VDESJ 0244-5008 and VDESJ 0020-3653 as well as our previously identified quasar, VDESJ 0224-4711 at z=6.50 from Reed et al. (2017). We use the near infrared spectra to derive virial black-hole masses from the full-width-half-maximum of the MgII line. These black-hole masses are ~ 1 - 2 x 10$^9$M$_\odot$. Combining with the bolometric luminosities of these quasars of L$_{\rm{bol}}\simeq$ 1 - 3 x 10$^{47}$implies that the Eddington ratios are high - $\simeq$0.6-1.1. We consider the C\textrm{\textsc{IV}} emission line properties of the sample and demonstrate that our high-redshift quasars do not have unusual C\textrm{\textsc{IV}} line properties when compared to carefully matched low-redshift samples. Our new DES+VHS $z>6.5$ quasars now add to the growing census of luminous, rapidly accreting supermassive black-holes seen well into the epoch of reionisation.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.02401  [pdf] - 1811355
The Buzzard Flock: Dark Energy Survey Synthetic Sky Catalogs
Comments: 33 pages, 13 figures, catalogs will be made public upon publication; interested users may contact us beforehand
Submitted: 2019-01-08
We present a suite of 18 synthetic sky catalogs designed to support science analysis of galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 (DES Y1) data. For each catalog, we use a computationally efficient empirical approach, ADDGALS, to embed galaxies within light-cone outputs of three dark matter simulations that resolve halos with masses above ~5x10^12 h^-1 m_sun at z <= 0.32 and 10^13 h^-1 m_sun at z~2. The embedding method is tuned to match the observed evolution of galaxy counts at different luminosities as well as the spatial clustering of the galaxy population. Galaxies are lensed by matter along the line of sight --- including magnification, shear, and multiple images --- using CALCLENS, an algorithm that calculates shear with 0.42 arcmin resolution at galaxy positions in the full catalog. The catalogs presented here, each with the same LCDM cosmology (denoted Buzzard), contain on average 820 million galaxies over an area of 1120 square degrees with positions, magnitudes, shapes, photometric errors, and photometric redshift estimates. We show that the weak-lensing shear catalog, redMaGiC galaxy catalogs and redMaPPer cluster catalogs provide plausible realizations of the same catalogs in the DES Y1 data by comparing their magnitude, color and redshift distributions, angular clustering, and mass-observable relations, making them useful for testing analyses that use these samples. We make public the galaxy samples appropriate for the DES Y1 data, as well as the data vectors used for cosmology analyses on these simulations.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.01581  [pdf] - 1810473
Unraveling the Universe with DESI
Comments: In this article, we provided a short review of the DESI talk presented during the conference {\it Recontres de Moriond 2018}
Submitted: 2019-01-06
The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is a stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment planned to begin operations in 2020. In this article, we provided a short review of DESI presented during the conference {\it Recontres de Moriond 2018}. DESI will use four different tracers for mapping the universe: from redshift 0.05 up to redshift 1.7 with galaxies and from 2.1 to 3.5 using quasars. DESI will measure a total of 35 million spectra covering regions of universe never explored before, providing a map of large scale structure that will enable major advances in the investigation of cosmic acceleration. The key science goals for DESI are to constrain dark energy and potential deviations of General Relativity using two complementary observables: the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and the Redshift Space Distortions (RSD). Additional science goals, such as constraining the sum of neutrino masses and inflation, are expected with the baseline project. DESI installation started on February 2018 and the current construction of the instrument is on track. The imaging surveys that will serve to determine the targets are currently in the final stages, having achieved 80\% completion, and are expected to be finalized by the end of 2018. The DESI Collaboration is actively preparing for survey operations and science analysis, to be ready for the first light in January 2020.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.07355  [pdf] - 1814985
Correcting for Fibre Assignment Incompleteness in the DESI Bright Galaxy Survey
Comments: 18 pages, 17 figures, 4 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-09-19, last modified: 2019-01-04
The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) Bright Galaxy Survey (BGS) will be a survey of bright, low redshift galaxies, which is planned to cover an area of ~14,000 sq deg in 3 passes. Each pass will cover the survey area with ~2000 pointings, each of area ~8 sq deg. The BGS is currently proposed to consist of a bright high priority sample to an r-band magnitude limit r ~ 19.5, with a fainter low priority sample to r ~ 20. The geometry of the DESI fibre positioners in the focal plane of the telescope affects the completeness of the survey, and has a non-trivial impact on clustering measurements. Using a BGS mock catalogue, we show that completeness due to fibre assignment primarily depends on the surface density of galaxies. Completeness is high (>95%) in low density regions, but very low (<10%) in the centre of massive clusters. We apply the pair inverse probability (PIP) weighting correction to clustering measurements from a BGS mock which has been through the fibre assignment algorithm. This method is only unbiased if it is possible to observe every galaxy pair. To facilitate this, we randomly promote a small fraction of the fainter sample to be high priority, and dither the set of tile positions by a small angle. We show that inverse pair weighting combined with angular upweighting provides an unbiased correction to galaxy clustering measurements for the complete 3 pass survey, and also after 1 pass, which is highly incomplete.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.09696  [pdf] - 2046182
Evidence for Color Dichotomy in the Primordial Neptunian Trojan Population
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-06-25, last modified: 2018-12-18
In the current model of early Solar System evolution, the stable members of the Jovian and Neptunian Trojan populations were captured into resonance from the leftover reservoir of planetesimals during the outward migration of the giant planets. As a result, both Jovian and Neptunian Trojans share a common origin with the primordial disk population, whose other surviving members constitute today's trans-Neptunian object (TNO) populations. The cold classical TNOs are ultra-red, while the dynamically excited "hot" population of TNOs contains a mixture of ultra-red and blue objects. In contrast, Jovian and Neptunian Trojans are observed to be blue. While the absence of ultra-red Jovian Trojans can be readily explained by the sublimation of volatile material from their surfaces due to the high flux of solar radiation at 5AU, the lack of ultra-red Neptunian Trojans presents both a puzzle and a challenge to formation models. In this work we report the discovery by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) of two new dynamically stable L4 Neptunian Trojans,2013 VX30 and 2014 UU240, both with inclinations i >30 degrees, making them the highest-inclination known stable Neptunian Trojans. We have measured the colors of these and three other dynamically stable Neptunian Trojans previously observed by DES, and find that 2013 VX30 is ultra-red, the first such Neptunian Trojan in its class. As such, 2013 VX30 may be a "missing link" between the Trojan and TNO populations. Using a simulation of the DES TNO detection efficiency, we find that there are 162 +/- 73 Trojans with Hr < 10 at the L4 Lagrange point of Neptune. Moreover, the blue-to-red Neptunian Trojan population ratio should be higher than 17:1. Based on this result, we discuss the possible origin of the ultra-red Neptunian Trojan population and its implications for the formation history of Neptunian Trojans.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.06211  [pdf] - 1798221
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Galaxy Sample for BAO Measurement
Comments: 15 pages, 12 figures. Added discussion on photo-z validation and other tests added based on referee's comments. Matches published version in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-12-17, last modified: 2018-12-14
We define and characterise a sample of 1.3 million galaxies extracted from the first year of Dark Energy Survey data, optimised to measure Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the presence of significant redshift uncertainties. The sample is dominated by luminous red galaxies located at redshifts $z \gtrsim 0.6$. We define the exact selection using color and magnitude cuts that balance the need of high number densities and small photometric redshift uncertainties, using the corresponding forecasted BAO distance error as a figure-of-merit in the process. The typical photo-$z$ uncertainty varies from $2.3\%$ to $3.6\%$ (in units of 1+$z$) from $z=0.6$ to $1$, with number densities from $200$ to $130$ galaxies per deg$^2$ in tomographic bins of width $\Delta z = 0.1$. Next we summarise the validation of the photometric redshift estimation. We characterise and mitigate observational systematics including stellar contamination, and show that the clustering on large scales is robust in front of those contaminants. We show that the clustering signal in the auto-correlations and cross-correlations is generally consistent with theoretical models, which serves as an additional test of the redshift distributions.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.04533  [pdf] - 1822746
Weak Lensing Analysis of SPT selected Galaxy Clusters using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data
Comments: Revised version in response to referee report
Submitted: 2018-02-13, last modified: 2018-12-12
We present weak lensing (WL) mass constraints for a sample of massive galaxy clusters detected by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE). We use $griz$ imaging data obtained from the Science Verification (SV) phase of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) to fit the WL shear signal of 33 clusters in the redshift range $0.25 \le z \le 0.8$ with NFW profiles and to constrain a four-parameter SPT mass-observable relation. To account for biases in WL masses, we introduce a WL mass to true mass scaling relation described by a mean bias and an intrinsic, log-normal scatter. We allow for correlated scatter within the WL and SZE mass-observable relations and use simulations to constrain priors on nuisance parameters related to bias and scatter from WL. We constrain the normalization of the $\zeta-M_{500}$ relation, $A_\mathrm{SZ}=12.0_{-6.7}^{+2.6}$ when using a prior on the mass slope $B_\mathrm{SZ}$ from the latest SPT cluster cosmology analysis. Without this prior, we recover $A_\mathrm{SZ}=10.8_{-5.2}^{+2.3}$ and $B_\mathrm{SZ}=1.30_{-0.44}^{+0.22}$. Results in both cases imply lower cluster masses than measured in previous work with and without WL, although the uncertainties are large. The WL derived value of $B_\mathrm{SZ}$ is $\approx 20\%$ lower than the value preferred by the most recent SPT cluster cosmology analysis. The method demonstrated in this work is designed to constrain cluster masses and cosmological parameters simultaneously and will form the basis for subsequent studies that employ the full SPT cluster sample together with the DES data.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.05116  [pdf] - 1938330
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 results: Validation of weak lensing cluster member contamination estimates from P(z) decomposition
Comments: 14 pages, 8 figures; submitted to MNNRAS
Submitted: 2018-12-12
Weak lensing source galaxy catalogs used in estimating the masses of galaxy clusters can be heavily contaminated by cluster members, prohibiting accurate mass calibration. In this study we test the performance of an estimator for the extent of cluster member contamination based on decomposing the photometric redshift $P(z)$ of source galaxies into contaminating and background components. We perform a full scale mock analysis on a simulated sky survey approximately mirroring the observational properties of the Dark Energy Survey Year One observations (DES Y1), and find excellent agreement between the true number profile of contaminating cluster member galaxies in the simulation and the estimated one. We further apply the method to estimate the cluster member contamination for the DES Y1 redMaPPer cluster mass calibration analysis, and compare the results to an alternative approach based on the angular correlation of weak lensing source galaxies. We find indications that the correlation based estimates are biased by the selection of the weak lensing sources in the cluster vicinity, which does not strongly impact the $P(z)$ decomposition method. Collectively, these benchmarks demonstrate the strength of the $P(z)$ decomposition method in alleviating membership contamination and enabling highly accurate cluster weak lensing studies without broad exclusion of source galaxies, thereby improving the total constraining power of cluster mass calibration via weak lensing.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.06209  [pdf] - 1794662
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation scale in the distribution of galaxies to redshift 1
The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Alarcon, A.; Allam, S.; Andrade-Oliveira, F.; Annis, J.; Avila, S.; Banerji, M.; Banik, N.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Camacho, H.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chan, K. C.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Hollowood, D.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. D.; Kent, S.; Kokron, N.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lacasa, F.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Manera, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Percival, W. J.; Plazas, A. A.; Porredon, A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosenfeld, R.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, R. C.; Smith, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.
Comments: accepted by MNRAS; main results unchanged, some restructuring, clarifications, and robustness tests added based on referee's comments; all data products are publicly available here: https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/y1a1/bao
Submitted: 2017-12-17, last modified: 2018-12-09
We present angular diameter distance measurements obtained by locating the BAO scale in the distribution of galaxies selected from the first year of Dark Energy Survey data. We consider a sample of over 1.3 million galaxies distributed over a footprint of 1318 deg$^2$ with $0.6 < z_{\rm photo} < 1$ and a typical redshift uncertainty of $0.03(1+z)$. This sample was selected, as fully described in a companion paper, using a color/magnitude selection that optimizes trade-offs between number density and redshift uncertainty. We investigate the BAO signal in the projected clustering using three conventions, the angular separation, the co-moving transverse separation, and spherical harmonics. Further, we compare results obtained from template based and machine learning photometric redshift determinations. We use 1800 simulations that approximate our sample in order to produce covariance matrices and allow us to validate our distance scale measurement methodology. We measure the angular diameter distance, $D_A$, at the effective redshift of our sample divided by the true physical scale of the BAO feature, $r_{\rm d}$. We obtain close to a 4 per cent distance measurement of $D_A(z_{\rm eff}=0.81)/r_{\rm d} = 10.75\pm 0.43 $. These results are consistent with the flat $\Lambda$CDM concordance cosmological model supported by numerous other recent experimental results. All data products are publicly available here: https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/y1a1/bao
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.12422  [pdf] - 1795942
Candidate Massive Galaxies at $z \sim 4$ in the Dark Energy Survey
Comments: 24 pages (41 with appendix), 16 figures, MNRAS in press
Submitted: 2018-11-29
Using stellar population models, we predicted that the Dark Energy Survey (DES) - due to its special combination of area (5000 deg. sq.) and depth ($i = 24.3$) - would be in the position to detect massive ($\gtrsim 10^{11}$ M$_{\odot}$) galaxies at $z \sim 4$. We confront those theoretical calculations with the first $\sim 150$ deg. sq. of DES data reaching nominal depth. From a catalogue containing $\sim 5$ million sources, $\sim26000$ were found to have observed-frame $g-r$ vs $r-i$ colours within the locus predicted for $z \sim 4$ massive galaxies. We further removed contamination by stars and artefacts, obtaining 606 galaxies lining up by the model selection box. We obtained their photometric redshifts and physical properties by fitting model templates spanning a wide range of star formation histories, reddening and redshift. Key to constrain the models is the addition, to the optical DES bands $g$, $r$, $i$, $z$, and $Y$, of near-IR $J$, $H$, $K_{s}$ data from the Vista Hemisphere Survey. We further applied several quality cuts to the fitting results, including goodness of fit and a unimodal redshift probability distribution. We finally select 233 candidates whose photometric redshift probability distribution function peaks around $z\sim4$, have high stellar masses ($\log($M$^{*}$/M$_{\odot})\sim 11.7$ for a Salpeter IMF) and ages around 0.1 Gyr, i.e. formation redshift around 5. These properties match those of the progenitors of the most massive galaxies in the local universe. This is an ideal sample for spectroscopic follow-up to select the fraction of galaxies which is truly at high redshift. These initial results and those at the survey completion, which we shall push to higher redshifts, will set unprecedented constraints on galaxy formation, evolution, and the re-ionisation epoch.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.10724  [pdf] - 1838266
Astrometry and Occultation predictions to Trans-Neptunian and Centaur Objects observed within the Dark Energy Survey
Comments: 25 pages, submitted to Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2018-11-26
Transneptunian objects (TNOs) are a source of invaluable information to access the history and evolution of the outer solar system. However, observing these faint objects is a difficult task. As a consequence, important properties such as size and albedo are known for only a small fraction of them. Now, with the results from deep sky surveys and the Gaia space mission, a new exciting era is within reach as accurate predictions of stellar occultations by numerous distant small solar system bodies become available. From them, diameters with kilometer accuracies can be determined. Albedos, in turn, can be obtained from diameters and absolute magnitudes. We use observations from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) from November 2012 until February 2016, amounting to 4292847 CCD frames. We searched them for all known small solar system bodies and recovered a total of 202 TNOs and Centaurs, 63 of which have been discovered by the DES collaboration until the date of this writing. Their positions were determined using the Gaia Data Release 2 as reference and their orbits were refined. Stellar occultations were then predicted using these refined orbits plus stellar positions from Gaia. These predictions are maintained, and updated, in a dedicated web service. The techniques developed here are also part of an ambitious preparation to use the data from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), that expects to obtain accurate positions and multifilter photometry for tens of thousands of TNOs.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.09565  [pdf] - 1791507
First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernovae From the Dark Energy Survey: Survey Overview and Supernova Spectroscopy
D'Andrea, C. B.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Thomas, R. C.; Kim, A. G.; Möller, A.; Sako, M.; Castander, F. J.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.; Galbany, L.; González-Gaitán, S.; Kasai, E.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lidman, C.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D.; Davis, T. M.; Gupta, R. R.; Hinton, S. R.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Macaulay, E.; Wolf, R. C.; Zhang, B.; Asorey, J.; Avelino, A.; Bassett, B. A.; Calcino, J.; Carollo, D.; Casas, R.; Challis, P.; Childress, M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, S.; Glazebrook, K.; Goldstein, D. A.; Graham, M. L.; Hoormann, J. K.; Kuehn, K.; Lewis, G. F.; Mandel, K. S.; Morganson, E.; Muthukrishna, D.; Nugent, P.; Pan, Y. -C.; Pursiainen, M.; Sharp, R.; Sommer, N. E.; Swann, E.; Tucker, B. E.; Uddin, S. A.; Wiseman, P.; Zheng, W.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Annis, J.; Avila, S.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Hollowood, D. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; James, D. J.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, D. L.; Wester, W.
Comments: 25 pages, 14 figures, 8 tables. Submitted to AJ
Submitted: 2018-11-23
We present spectroscopy from the first three seasons of the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program (DES-SN). We describe the supernova spectroscopic program in full: strategy, observations, data reduction, and classification. We have spectroscopically confirmed 307 supernovae, including 251 type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) over a redshift range of $0.017 < z < 0.85$. We determine the effective spectroscopic selection function for our sample, and use it to investigate the redshift-dependent bias on the distance moduli of SNe Ia we have classified. We also provide a full overview of the strategy, observations, and data products of DES-SN, which has discovered 12,015 likely supernovae during these first three seasons. The data presented here are used for the first cosmology analysis by DES-SN ('DES-SN3YR'), the results of which are given in DES Collaboration (2018a).
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.09795  [pdf] - 1785791
DES Y1 Results: Validating cosmological parameter estimation using simulated Dark Energy Surveys
Comments: 22 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-03-26, last modified: 2018-11-14
We use mock galaxy survey simulations designed to resemble the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 (DES Y1) data to validate and inform cosmological parameter estimation. When similar analysis tools are applied to both simulations and real survey data, they provide powerful validation tests of the DES Y1 cosmological analyses presented in companion papers. We use two suites of galaxy simulations produced using different methods, which therefore provide independent tests of our cosmological parameter inference. The cosmological analysis we aim to validate is presented in DES Collaboration et al. (2017) and uses angular two-point correlation functions of galaxy number counts and weak lensing shear, as well as their cross-correlation, in multiple redshift bins. While our constraints depend on the specific set of simulated realisations available, for both suites of simulations we find that the input cosmology is consistent with the combined constraints from multiple simulated DES Y1 realizations in the $\Omega_m-\sigma_8$ plane. For one of the suites, we are able to show with high confidence that any biases in the inferred $S_8=\sigma_8(\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.5}$ and $\Omega_m$ are smaller than the DES Y1 $1-\sigma$ uncertainties. For the other suite, for which we have fewer realizations, we are unable to be this conclusive; we infer a roughly 70% probability that systematic biases in the recovered $\Omega_m$ and $S_8$ are sub-dominant to the DES Y1 uncertainty. As cosmological analyses of this kind become increasingly more precise, validation of parameter inference using survey simulations will be essential to demonstrate robustness.
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02380  [pdf] - 1846831
First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernovae from the Dark Energy Survey: Effects of Chromatic Corrections to Supernova Photometry on Measurements of Cosmological Parameters
Comments: 17 pages, 12 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-11-06, last modified: 2018-11-07
Calibration uncertainties have been the leading systematic uncertainty in recent analyses using type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) to measure cosmological parameters. To improve the calibration, we present the application of Spectral Energy Distribution (SED)-dependent "chromatic corrections" to the supernova light-curve photometry from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). These corrections depend on the combined atmospheric and instrumental transmission function for each exposure, and they affect photometry at the 0.01 mag (1%) level, comparable to systematic uncertainties in calibration and photometry. Fitting our combined DES and low-z SN Ia sample with Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) priors for the cosmological parameters $\Omega_{\rm m}$ (the fraction of the critical density of the universe comprised of matter) and w (the dark energy equation of state parameter), we compare those parameters before and after applying the corrections. We find the change in w and $\Omega_{\rm m}$ due to not including chromatic corrections are -0.002 and 0.000, respectively, for the DES-SN3YR sample with BAO and CMB priors, consistent with a larger DES-SN3YR-like simulation, which has a w-change of 0.0005 with an uncertainty of 0.008 and an $\Omega_{\rm m}$ change of 0.000 with an uncertainty of 0.002 . However, when considering samples on individual CCDs we find large redshift-dependent biases (approximately 0.02 in distance modulus) for supernova distances.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.02427  [pdf] - 1775543
Star-galaxy classification in the Dark Energy Survey Y1 dataset
Comments: Reference catalogs used in this work will be made available upon publication
Submitted: 2018-05-07, last modified: 2018-10-30
We perform a comparison of different approaches to star-galaxy classification using the broad-band photometric data from Year 1 of the Dark Energy Survey. This is done by performing a wide range of tests with and without external `truth' information, which can be ported to other similar datasets. We make a broad evaluation of the performance of the classifiers in two science cases with DES data that are most affected by this systematic effect: large-scale structure and Milky Way studies. In general, even though the default morphological classifiers used for DES Y1 cosmology studies are sufficient to maintain a low level of systematic contamination from stellar mis-classification, contamination can be reduced to the O(1%) level by using multi-epoch and infrared information from external datasets. For Milky Way studies the stellar sample can be augmented by ~20% for a given flux limit. Reference catalogs used in this work will be made available upon publication.
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.10084  [pdf] - 1791242
Dynamical Analysis of Three Distant Trans-Neptunian Objects with Similar Orbits
Comments: accepted to AJ
Submitted: 2018-10-23
This paper reports the discovery and orbital characterization of two extreme trans-Neptunian objects (ETNOs), 2016 QV$_{89}$ and 2016 QU$_{89}$, which have orbits that appear similar to that of a previously known object, 2013 UH$_{15}$. All three ETNOs have semi-major axes $a\approx 172$ AU and eccentricities $e\approx0.77$. The angular elements $(i,\omega,\Omega)$ vary by 6, 15, and 49 deg, respectively between the three objects. The two new objects add to the small number of TNOs currently known to have semi-major axes between 150 and 250 AU, and serve as an interesting dynamical laboratory to study the outer realm of our Solar System. Using a large ensemble of numerical integrations, we find that the orbits are expected to reside in close proximity in the $(a,e)$ phase plane for roughly 100 Myr before diffusing to more separated values. We then explore other scenarios that could influence their orbits. With aphelion distances over 300 AU, the orbits of these ETNOs extend far beyond the classical Kuiper Belt, and an order of magnitude beyond Neptune. As a result, their orbital dynamics can be affected by the proposed new Solar System member, referred to as Planet Nine in this work. With perihelion distances of 35-40 AU, these orbits are also influenced by resonant interactions with Neptune. A full assessment of any possible, new Solar System planets must thus take into account this emerging class of TNOs.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.09456  [pdf] - 1996667
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Methods for Cluster Cosmology and Application to the SDSS
Comments: 25 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-22
We perform the first blind analysis of cluster abundance data. Specifically, we derive cosmological constraints from the abundance and weak-lensing signal of \redmapper\ clusters of richness $\lambda\geq 20$ in the redshift range $z\in[0.1,0.3]$ as measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We simultaneously fit for cosmological parameters and the richness--mass relation of the clusters. For a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model with massive neutrinos, we find $S_8 \equiv \sigma_{8}(\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.5}=0.79^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$. This value is both consistent and competitive with that derived from cluster catalogues selected in different wavelengths. Our result is also consistent with the combined probes analyses by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS), and with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies as measured by \planck. We demonstrate that the cosmological posteriors are robust against variation of the richness--mass relation model and to systematics associated with the calibration of the selection function. In combination with Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) data and Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) data, we constrain the Hubble rate to be $h=0.66\pm 0.02$, independent of the CMB. Future work aimed at improving our understanding of the scatter of the richness--mass relation has the potential to significantly improve the precision of our cosmological posteriors. The methods described in this work were developed for use in the forthcoming analysis of cluster abundances in the DES. Our SDSS analysis constitutes the first part of a staged-unblinding analysis of the full DES data set.
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.10331  [pdf] - 1767544
Measuring Linear and Non-linear Galaxy Bias Using Counts-in-Cells in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-07-26, last modified: 2018-10-16
Non-linear bias measurements require a great level of control of potential systematic effects in galaxy redshift surveys. Our goal is to demonstrate the viability of using Counts-in-Cells (CiC), a statistical measure of the galaxy distribution, as a competitive method to determine linear and higher-order galaxy bias and assess clustering systematics. We measure the galaxy bias by comparing the first four moments of the galaxy density distribution with those of the dark matter distribution. We use data from the MICE simulation to evaluate the performance of this method, and subsequently perform measurements on the public Science Verification (SV) data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We find that the linear bias obtained with CiC is consistent with measurements of the bias performed using galaxy-galaxy clustering, galaxy-galaxy lensing, CMB lensing, and shear+clustering measurements. Furthermore, we compute the projected (2D) non-linear bias using the expansion $\delta_{g} = \sum_{k=0}^{3} (b_{k}/k!) \delta^{k}$, finding a non-zero value for $b_2$ at the $3\sigma$ level. We also check a non-local bias model and show that the linear bias measurements are robust to the addition of new parameters. We compare our 2D results to the 3D prediction and find compatibility in the large scale regime ($>30$ Mpc $h^{-1}$)
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.00951  [pdf] - 1765368
Unbiased clustering estimates with the DESI fibre assignment
Comments: 11 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2018-05-02, last modified: 2018-10-12
The Emission Line Galaxy survey made by the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) survey will be created from five passes of the instrument on the sky. On each pass, the constrained mobility of the ends of the fibres in the DESI focal plane means that the angular-distribution of targets that can be observed is limited. Thus, the clustering of samples constructed using a limited number of passes will be strongly affected by missing targets. In two recent papers, we showed how the effect of missing galaxies can be corrected when calculating the correlation function using a weighting scheme for pairs. Using mock galaxy catalogues we now show that this method provides an unbiased estimator of the true correlation function for the DESI survey after any number of passes. We use multiple mocks to determine the expected errors given one to four passes, compared to an idealised survey observing an equivalent number of randomly selected targets. On BAO scales, we find that the error is a factor 2 worse after one pass, but that after three or more passes, the errors are very similar. Thus we find that the fibre assignment strategy enforced by the design of DESI will not affect the cosmological measurements to be made by the survey, and can be removed as a potential risk for this experiment.
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.05257  [pdf] - 1811023
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Methodology and Projections for Joint Analysis of Galaxy Clustering, Galaxy Lensing, and CMB Lensing Two-point Functions
Comments: 21 pages, 11 figures; matches version resubmitted to journal
Submitted: 2018-02-14, last modified: 2018-10-04
Optical imaging surveys measure both the galaxy density and the gravitational lensing-induced shear fields across the sky. Recently, the Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration used a joint fit to two-point correlations between these observables to place tight constraints on cosmology (DES Collaboration et al. 2017). In this work, we develop the methodology to extend the DES year one joint probes analysis to include cross-correlations of the optical survey observables with gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as measured by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck. Using simulated analyses, we show how the resulting set of five two-point functions increases the robustness of the cosmological constraints to systematic errors in galaxy lensing shear calibration. Additionally, we show that contamination of the SPT+Planck CMB lensing map by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is a potentially large source of systematic error for two-point function analyses, but show that it can be reduced to acceptable levels in our analysis by masking clusters of galaxies and imposing angular scale cuts on the two-point functions. The methodology developed here will be applied to the analysis of data from the DES, the SPT, and Planck in a companion work.
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02322  [pdf] - 1924924
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Joint Analysis of Galaxy Clustering, Galaxy Lensing, and CMB Lensing Two-point Functions
Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Alarcon, A.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Avila, S.; Aylor, K.; Banerji, M.; Banik, N.; Baxter, E. J.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Bianchini, F.; Blazek, J.; Bleem, L.; Bleem, L. E.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Choi, A.; Chown, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; de Haan, T.; DeRose, J.; Desai, S.; De Vicente, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Everett, W. B.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Friedrich, O.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gatti, M.; Gaztanaga, E.; George, E. M.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hartley, W. G.; Holder, G. P.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; Hoyle, B.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kent, S.; Kirk, D.; Knox, L.; Kokron, N.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Luong-Van, D.; MacCrann, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Manzotti, A.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, J. J.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Muir, J.; Natoli, T.; Nicola, A.; Nord, B.; Omori, Y.; Padin, S.; Pandey, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Porredon, A.; Prat, J.; Pryke, C.; Rau, M. M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rollins, R. P.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Secco, L. F.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Shirokoff, E.; Simard, G.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vielzeuf, P.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Williamson, R.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yanny, B.; Zahn, O.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: 20 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-04
We perform a joint analysis of the auto and cross-correlations between three cosmic fields: the galaxy density field, the galaxy weak lensing shear field, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) weak lensing convergence field. These three fields are measured using roughly 1300 sq. deg. of overlapping optical imaging data from first year observations of the Dark Energy Survey and millimeter-wave observations of the CMB from both the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich survey and Planck. We present cosmological constraints from the joint analysis of the two-point correlation functions between galaxy density and galaxy shear with CMB lensing. We test for consistency between these measurements and the DES-only two-point function measurements, finding no evidence for inconsistency in the context of flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmological models. Performing a joint analysis of five of the possible correlation functions between these fields (excluding only the CMB lensing autospectrum) yields $S_{8}\equiv \sigma_8\sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3} = 0.782^{+0.019}_{-0.025}$ and $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.260^{+0.029}_{-0.019}$. We test for consistency between these five correlation function measurements and the Planck-only measurement of the CMB lensing autospectrum, again finding no evidence for inconsistency in the context of flat $\Lambda$CDM models. Combining constraints from all six two-point functions yields $S_{8}=0.776^{+0.014}_{-0.021}$ and $\Omega_{\rm m}= 0.271^{+0.022}_{-0.016}$. These results provide a powerful test and confirmation of the results from the first year DES joint-probes analysis.
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02342  [pdf] - 1929685
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: tomographic cross-correlations between DES galaxies and CMB lensing from SPT+Planck
Omori, Y.; Giannantonio, T.; Porredon, A.; Baxter, E.; Chang, C.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Alarcon, A.; Banik, N.; Blazek, J.; Bleem, L. E.; Bridle, S. L.; Cawthon, R.; Choi, A.; Chown, R.; Crawford, T.; Dodelson, S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Friedrich, O.; Gruen, D.; Holder, G. P.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Kirk, D.; Kokron, N.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Muir, J.; Prat, J.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sánchez, C.; Secco, L. F.; Simard, G.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Avila, S.; Aylor, K.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Bianchini, F.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Crites, A. T.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; de Haan, T.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Everett, W. B.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; George, E. M.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hartley, W. G.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; Hoyle, B.; Hrubes, J. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lima, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Manzotti, A.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Walker, A. R.; Wu, W. L. K.; Zahn, O.
Comments: 17 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-04
We measure the cross-correlation between redMaGiC galaxies selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year-1 data and gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) reconstructed from South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck data over 1289 sq. deg. When combining measurements across multiple galaxy redshift bins spanning the redshift range of $0.15<z<0.90$, we reject the hypothesis of no correlation at 19.9$\sigma$ significance. When removing small-scale data points where thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal and nonlinear galaxy bias could potentially bias our results, the detection significance is reduced to 9.9$\sigma$. We perform a joint analysis of galaxy-CMB lensing cross-correlations and galaxy clustering to constrain cosmology, finding $\Omega_{\rm m} = 0.276^{+0.029}_{-0.030}$ and $S_{8}=\sigma_{8}\sqrt{\mathstrut \Omega_{\rm m}/0.3} = 0.800^{+0.090}_{-0.094}$. We also perform two alternate analyses aimed at constraining only the growth rate of cosmic structure as a function of redshift, finding consistency with predictions from the concordance $\Lambda$CDM model. The measurements presented here are part of a joint cosmological analysis that combines galaxy clustering, galaxy lensing and CMB lensing using data from DES, SPT and Planck.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02441  [pdf] - 1945701