sort results by

Use logical operators AND, OR, NOT and round brackets to construct complex queries. Whitespace-separated words are treated as ANDed.

Show articles per page in mode

Soler, Juan Diego

Normalized to: Soler, J.

80 article(s) in total. 637 co-authors, from 1 to 43 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 24,5.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2007.01331  [pdf] - 2127557
Detailed 3D structure of OrionA in dust with Gaia DR2
Comments: 8 pages, 9 figures - submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2020-07-02
The unprecedented astrometry from Gaia DR2 provides us with an opportunity to study in detail molecular clouds in the solar neighbourhood. Extracting the wealth of information in these data remains a challenge, however. We have further improved our Gaussian Processes-based, three-dimensional dust mapping technique to allow us to study molecular clouds in more detail. These improvements include a significantly better scaling of the computational cost with the number of stars, and taking into account distance uncertainties to individual stars. Using Gaia DR2 astrometry together with 2MASS and WISE photometry for 30 000 stars, we infer the distribution of dust out to 600 pc in the direction of the Orion A molecular cloud. We identify a bubble-like structure in front of Orion A, centred at a distance of about 350 pc from the Sun. The main Orion A structure is visible at slightly larger distances, and we clearly see a tail extending over 100 pc that is curved and slightly inclined to the line-of-sight. The location of our foreground structure coincides with 5-10 Myr old stellar populations, suggesting a star formation episode that predates that of the Orion Nebula Cluster itself. We identify also the main structure of the Orion B molecular cloud, and in addition discover a background component to this at a distance of about 460 pc from the Sun. Finally, we associate our dust components at different distances with the plane-of-the-sky magnetic field orientation as mapped by Planck. This provides valuable information for modelling the magnetic field in 3D around star forming regions.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.10775  [pdf] - 2124938
The relative orientation between the magnetic field and gradients of surface brightness within thin velocity slices of 12CO and 13CO emission from the Taurus molecular cloud
Comments: 20 pages, 15 figures. Accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Submitted: 2020-06-18, last modified: 2020-06-22
We examine the role of the interstellar magnetic field to modulate the orientation of turbulent flows within the Taurus molecular cloud using spatial gradients of thin velocity slices of 12CO and 13CO antenna temperatures. Our analysis accounts for the random errors of the gradients that arise from the thermal noise of the spectra. The orientations of the vectors normal to the antenna temperature gradient vectors are compared to the magnetic field orientations that are calculated from Planck 353~GHz polarization data. These relative orientations are parameterized with the projected Rayleigh statistic and mean resultant vector. For 12CO, 28 percent and 39 percent of the cloud area exhibit strongly parallel or strongly perpendicular relative orientations respectively. For the lower opacity 13CO emission, strongly parallel and strongly perpendicular orientations are found in 7 percent and 43 percent of the cloud area respectively. For both isotopologues, strongly parallel or perpendicular alignments are restricted to localized regions with low levels of turbulence. If the relative orientations serve as an observational proxy to the Alfvenic Mach number then our results imply local variations of the Alfvenic Mach number throughout the cloud.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.05384  [pdf] - 2119909
Dense Gas in a Giant Molecular Filament
Comments: 17 pages, 13 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2020-03-11, last modified: 2020-06-22
Recent surveys of the Galactic plane in the dust continuum and CO emission lines reveal that large ($\gtrsim 50$~pc) and massive ($\gtrsim 10^5$~$M_\odot$) filaments, know as giant molecular filaments (GMFs), may be linked to galactic dynamics and trace the mid-plane of the gravitational potential in the Milky Way. We have imaged one entire GMF located at $l\sim$52--54$^\circ$ longitude, GMF54 ($\sim$68~pc long), in the empirical dense gas tracers using the HCN(1--0), HNC(1--0), HCO$^+$(1--0) lines, and their $^{13}$C isotopologue transitions, as well as the N$_2$H$^+$(1--0) line. We study the dense gas distribution, the column density probability density functions (N-PDFs) and the line ratios within the GMF. The dense gas molecular transitions follow the extended structure of the filament with area filling factors between 0.06 and 0.28 with respect to $^{13}$CO(1--0). We constructed the N-PDFs of H$_2$ for each of the dense gas tracers based on their column densities and assumed uniform abundance. The N-PDFs of the dense gas tracers appear curved in log-log representation, and the HCO$^+$ N-PDF has the largest log-normal width and flattest power-law slope index. Studying the N-PDFs for sub-regions of GMF54, we found an evolutionary trend in the N-PDFs that high-mass star forming and Photon-Dominate Regions (PDRs) have flatter power-law indices. The integrated intensity ratios of the molecular lines in GMF54 are comparable to those in nearby galaxies. In particular, the N$_2$H$^+$/$^{13}$CO ratio, which traces the dense gas fraction, has similar values in GMF54 and all nearby galaxies except ULIRGs.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.00017  [pdf] - 2088142
From parallel to perpendicular -- On the orientation of magnetic fields in molecular clouds
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures, submitted to MNRAS, comments are welcome, corrected formatting mistake in equations
Submitted: 2020-02-28, last modified: 2020-05-04
We present synthetic dust polarization maps of simulated molecular clouds (MCs) with the goal to systematically explore the origin of the relative orientation of the magnetic field ($\bf{B}$) with respect to the MC sub-structures identified in density ($n$; 3D) and column density ($N$; 2D). The polarization maps are generated with the radiative transfer code POLARIS, including self-consistently calculated efficiencies for radiative torque alignment. The MCs are formed in two sets of 3D MHD simulations: in (i) colliding flows (CF), and (ii) the SILCC-Zoom simulations. In 3D, for the CF simulations with an initial field strength below $\sim$5 $\mu$G, $\bf{B}$ is oriented parallel or randomly with respect to the $n$-structures. For CF runs with stronger initial fields and all SILCC-Zoom simulations, which have an initial field strength of 3 $\mu$G, a flip from parallel to perpendicular orientation occurs at high densities of $n_\text{trans}$ $\simeq$ 10$^2$ - 10$^3$ cm$^{-3}$. We suggest that this flip happens if the MC's mass-to-flux ratio, $\mu$, is close to or below the critical value of 1. This corresponds to a field strength around 3 - 5 $\mu$G. In 2D, we use the Projected Rayleigh Statistics (PRS) to study the orientation of $\bf{B}$. If present, the flip in orientation occurs at $N_\text{trans}$ $\simeq$ 10$^{21 - 21.5}$ cm$^{-2}$, similar to the observed transition value from sub- to supercritical magnetic fields in the ISM. However, projection effects can reduce the power of the PRS method: Depending on the MC or LOS, the projected maps of the SILCC-Zoom simulations do not always show the flip, although expected from the 3D morphology. Such projection effects can explain the variety of recently observed field configurations, in particular within a single MC. Finally, we do not find a correlation between the observed orientation of $\bf{B}$ and the $N$-PDF.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.06501  [pdf] - 2124735
Dynamical cloud formation traced by atomic and molecular gas
Comments: 13 pages, 15 figures, Astronomy & Astrophysics in press, a higher resolution version can be found at http://www.mpia.de/homes/beuther/papers.html
Submitted: 2020-04-14, last modified: 2020-04-16
Context: Atomic and molecular cloud formation is a dynamical process. However, kinematic signatures of these processes are still observationally poorly constrained. Methods: Targeting the cloud-scale environment of the prototypical infrared dark cloud G28.3, we employ spectral line imaging observations of the two atomic lines HI and [CI] as well as molecular lines observations in 13CO in the 1--0 and 3--2 transitions. The analysis comprises investigations of the kinematic properties of the different tracers, estimates of the mass flow rates, velocity structure functions, a Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) study as well as comparisons to simulations. Results: The central IRDC is embedded in a more diffuse envelope of cold neutral medium (CNM) traced by HI self-absorption (HISA) and molecular gas. The spectral line data as well as the HOG and structure function analysis indicate a possible kinematic decoupling of the HI from the other gas compounds. Spectral analysis and position-velocity diagrams reveal two velocity components that converge at the position of the IRDC. Estimated mass flow rates appear rather constant from the cloud edge toward the center. The velocity structure function analysis is consistent with gas flows being dominated by the formation of hierarchical structures. Conclusions: The observations and analysis are consistent with a picture where the IRDC G28 is formed at the center of two converging gas flows. While the approximately constant mass flow rates are consistent with a self-similar, gravitationally driven collapse of the cloud, external compression by, e.g., spiral arm shocks or supernovae explosions cannot be excluded yet. Future investigations should aim at differentiating the origin of such converging gas flows.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.05771  [pdf] - 2080996
Particle response of antenna-coupled TES arrays: results from SPIDER and the lab
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures, Proceedings of the 18th International Workshop on Low Temperature Detectors
Submitted: 2020-02-13
Future mm-wave and sub-mm space missions will employ large arrays of multiplexed Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers. Such instruments must contend with the high flux of cosmic rays beyond our atmosphere that induce "glitches" in bolometer data, which posed a challenge to data analysis from the Planck bolometers. Future instruments will face the additional challenges of shared substrate wafers and multiplexed readout wiring. In this work we explore the susceptibility of modern TES arrays to the cosmic ray environment of space using two data sets: the 2015 long-duration balloon flight of the SPIDER cosmic microwave background polarimeter, and a laboratory exposure of SPIDER flight hardware to radioactive sources. We find manageable glitch rates and short glitch durations, leading to minimal effect on SPIDER analysis. We constrain energy propagation within the substrate through a study of multi-detector coincidences, and give a preliminary look at pulse shapes in laboratory data.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.00953  [pdf] - 2057846
Cloud formation in the atomic and molecular phase: HI self absorption (HISA) towards a Giant Molecular Filament
Comments: 22 pages, 25 figures, accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2020-01-03
Molecular clouds form from the atomic phase of the interstellar medium. However, characterizing the transition between the atomic and the molecular interstellar medium (ISM) is a difficult observational task. Here we address cloud formation processes by combining HSIA with molecular line data. One scenario proposed by numerical simulations is that the column density probability density functions (N-PDF) evolves from a log-normal shape at early times to a power-law-like shape at later times. In this paper, we study the cold atomic component of the giant molecular filament GMF38a (d=3.4 kpc, length$\sim230$ pc). We identify an extended HISA feature, which is partly correlated with the 13CO emission. The peak velocities of the HISA and 13CO observations agree well on the eastern side of the filament, whereas a velocity offset of approximately 4 km s$^{-1}$ is found on the western side. The sonic Mach number we derive from the linewidth measurements shows that a large fraction of the HISA, which is ascribed to the cold neutral medium (CNM), is at subsonic and transonic velocities. The column density of the CNM is on the order of 10$^{20}$ to 10$^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$. The column density of molecular hydrogen is an order of magnitude higher. The N-PDFs from HISA (CNM), HI emission (WNM+CNM), and 13CO (molecular component) are well described by log-normal functions, which is in agreement with turbulent motions being the main driver of cloud dynamics. The N-PDF of the molecular component also shows a power law in the high column-density region, indicating self-gravity. We suggest that we are witnessing two different evolutionary stages within the filament. The eastern subregion seems to be forming a molecular cloud out of the atomic gas, whereas the western subregion already shows high column density peaks, active star formation and evidence of related feedback processes.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.08223  [pdf] - 2046416
The HI/OH/Recombination line survey of the inner Milky Way (THOR): data release 2 and HI overview
Comments: 22 pages, 13 figures, accepted to be published in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2019-12-17, last modified: 2019-12-19
With the $Karl~G.~Jansky$ Very Large Array (VLA) in C-configuration, we observed a large portion of the first Galactic quadrant ($l=14.0-67.4^\circ $ and $\lvert b \rvert \leq 1.25^\circ $) achieving an angular resolution of $\leq 40^{\prime\prime}$. At $L$ Band, the WIDAR correlator at the VLA was set to cover the 21~cm HI line, four OH transitions, a series of H$n\alpha$ radio recombination lines (RRLs; $n=151$ to 186), and eight 128~MHz wide continuum spectral windows (SPWs) simultaneously. The HI emission shows clear filamentary substructures at negative velocities with low velocity crowding. The emission at positive velocities is more smeared-out likely due to higher spatial and velocity crowding of structures at the positive velocities. Comparing to the spiral arm model of the Milky Way, the atomic gas follows the Sagittarius and Perseus Arm well but with significant material in the inter-arm regions. With the C-configuration-only HI+continuum data, we produced a HI optical depth map of the THOR areal coverage from 228 absorption spectra with the nearest-neighbor method. With this $\tau$ map, we corrected the HI emission for optical depth and the derived column density is 38% higher than the column density with optically thin assumption. The total HI mass with optical depth correction in the survey region is 4.7$\times10^8~M_\odot$, 31% more than the mass derived assuming the emission is optically thin. If we apply this 31% correction to the whole Milky Way, the total atomic gas mass would be 9.4-10.5$\times 10^9~M_\odot$. Comparing the HI with existing CO data, we find a significant increase in the atomic-to-molecular gas ratio from the spiral arms to the inter-arm regions.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.08536  [pdf] - 2026394
Strong excess Faraday rotation on the Inside of the Sagittarius spiral arm
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2019-11-19
We present first results for Faraday rotation of compact polarized sources (1 to 2 GHz continuum) in The HI/OH/Recombination line (THOR) survey of the inner Galaxy. In the Galactic longitude range 39 degr < l < 52 degr, we find rotation measures in the range -310 rad/m2 < RM < +4219 rad/m2, with the highest values concentrated within a degree of l = 48 degrees at the Sagittarius arm tangent. Most of the high RMs arise in diffuse plasma, along lines of sight that do not intersect HII regions. For l > 49 degr, RM drops off rapidly, while at l < 47 degr, the mean RM is higher with a larger standard deviation than at l > 49 degr. We attribute the RM structure to the compressed diffuse Warm Ionized Medium in the spiral arm, upstream of the major star formation regions. The Sagittarius arm acts as a significant Faraday screen inside the Galaxy. This has implications for models of the Galactic magnetic field and the expected amount of Faraday rotation of Fast Radio Bursts from their host galaxies. We emphasize the importance of sensitivity to high Faraday depth in future polarization surveys.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.07619  [pdf] - 2008014
Bow Magnetic Morphology Surrounding Filamentary Molecular Clouds? 3D Magnetic Field Structure of Orion-A
Comments: 11 pages, 15 Figures
Submitted: 2019-10-16
Using a method based on Faraday rotation measurements, Tahani et al. 2018 find the line-of-sight component of magnetic fields in Orion-A and show that their direction changes from the eastern side of this filamentary structure to its western side. Three possible magnetic field morphologies that can explain this reversal across the Orion-A region are toroidal, helical, and bow-shaped morphologies. In this paper we construct simple models to represent these three morphologies and compare them with the available observational data to find the most probable morphology(ies). To compare the observations with the models, we use probability values and a Monte-Carlo analysis to determine the most likely magnetic field morphology among these three morphologies. We find that the bow morphology has the highest probability values and that our Monte-Carlo analysis suggests that the bow morphology is more likely. We suggest that the bow morphology is the most likely and the most natural of the three morphologies that could explain a magnetic field reversal across the Orion-A filamentary structure (i.e., bow, helical and toroidal morphologies).
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.10083  [pdf] - 1994244
Gas shells and magnetic fields in the Orion-Eridanus superbubble
Comments: accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-09-22
The Orion-Eridanus superbubble has been blown by supernovae and supersonic winds of the massive stars in the Orion OB associations. The formation history and current structure of the superbubble are still poorly understood. It possibly consists of a combination of nested shells along the line of sight. We have investigated the composite structure of the Eridanus side of the superbubble in the light of a new decomposition of the atomic and molecular gas. We used HI and CO emission lines to separate coherent gas shells in space and velocity, and we studied their relation to the warm ionised gas probed in H$\alpha$ emission, to the hot plasma emitting X-rays, and to the magnetic fields traced by dust polarised emission. We also constrained the relative distances to the clouds using dust reddening maps and X-ray absorption. We used the dust polarisation data to estimate the plane-of-sky components of the magnetic field in several clouds and along the outer rim of the superbubble. Our gas decomposition has revealed several shells inside the superbubble that span distances from about 150 pc to 250 pc. One of these shells forms a nearly complete ring filled with hot plasma. Other shells likely correspond to the layers of swept-up gas that is compressed behind the expanding outer shock wave. We used the gas and magnetic-field data downstream of the shock to derive a shock expansion velocity close to 20 km/s. Taking the X-ray absorption by the gas into account, we find that the pressure of the hot plasma inside the superbubble exceeds that in the Local Bubble. It comprises a mix of hotter (3-9 MK) and cooler (0.3-1.2 MK) gas along the lines of sight. The magnetic field along the western and southern rims and in the approaching wall of the superbubble appears to be shaped and compressed by the ongoing expansion. We find plane-of-sky magnetic strengths ranging from 3 to 15 $\mu$G along the rim.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.04862  [pdf] - 2057735
Using Herschel and Planck observations to delineate the role of magnetic fields in molecular cloud structure
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics (07AUG2019). 27 pages, 21 figures
Submitted: 2019-09-11
We present a study of the relative orientation between the magnetic field projected onto the plane of sky ($B_{\perp}$) on scales down to 0.4 pc, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the distribution of gas column density ($N_{\rm H}$) structures on scales down to 0.026 pc, derived from the observations by Herschel in submillimeter wavelengths, toward ten nearby ($d$$<$450 pc) molecular clouds. Using the histogram of relative orientation technique in combination with tools from circular statistics, we found that the mean relative orientation between $N_{\rm H}$ and $B_{\perp}$ toward these regions increases progressively from 0\deg, where the $N_{\rm H}$ structures lie mostly parallel to $B_{\perp}$, with increasing $N_{\rm H}$, in many cases reaching 90\deg, where the $N_{\rm H}$ structures lie mostly perpendicular to $B_{\perp}$. We also compared the relative orientation between $N_{\rm H}$ and $B_{\perp}$ and the distribution of $N_{\rm H}$, which is characterized by the slope of the tail of the $N_{\rm H}$ probability density functions (PDFs). We found that the slopes of the $N_{\rm H}$ PDF tail are steepest in regions where $N_{\rm H}$ and $B_{\perp}$ are close to perpendicular. This coupling between the $N_{\rm H}$ distribution and the magnetic field suggests that the magnetic fields play a significant role in structuring the interstellar medium in and around molecular clouds. However, we found no evident correlation between the star formation rates, estimated from the counts of young stellar objects, and the relative orientation between $N_{\rm H}$ and $B_{\perp}$ in these regions.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.11720  [pdf] - 1938570
OH maser emission in the THOR survey of the northern Milky Way
Comments: The main paper contains 13 pages and 7 pages. However, the full paper with appendix where all maser sites are shown and also the full catalogue is presented can be found at http://www.mpia.de/thor/Data_%26_Publications.html
Submitted: 2019-07-26
Context: OH masers trace diverse physical processes, from the expanding envelopes around evolved stars to star-forming regions or supernovae remnants. Aims: We identify the ground-state OH masers at 18cm wavelength in the area covered by ``The HI/OH/Recombination line survey of the Milky Way (THOR)''. We present a catalogue of all OH maser features and their possible associated environments. Methods: The THOR survey covers longitude and latitude ranges of 14.3<l<66.8 and b<1.25 deg. All OH ground state lines at 1612, 1665, 1667 and 1720MHz have been observed, employing the Very Large Array. The spatial resolution of the data varies between 12.5'' and 19'', the spectral resolution is 1.5km/s, and the rms sensitivity of the data is ~10mJy/beam per channel. Results: We identify 1585 individual maser spots distributed over 807 maser sites. Based on different criteria from spectral profiles to literature comparison, we try to associate the maser sites with astrophysical source types. Approximately 51\% of the sites exhibit the double-horned 1612MHz spectra typically emitted from the expanding shells of evolved stars. The separations of the two main velocity features of the expanding shells typically vary between 22 and 38km/s. In addition to this, at least 20% of the maser sites are associated with star-forming regions. While the largest fraction of 1720MHz maser spots (21 out of 53) is associated with supernova remnants, a significant fraction of the 1720MHz maser spots (17) are also associated with star-forming regions. We present comparisons to the thermal 13CO(1-0) emission as well as to other surveys of class II CH3OH and H2O maser emission. The catalogue attempts to present associations to astrophysical sources where available, and the full catalogue is available in electronic form.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.00758  [pdf] - 1909229
Feedback in W49A diagnosed with radio recombination lines and models
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures. Published in A&A. Updated to match published version
Submitted: 2018-12-03, last modified: 2019-07-02
We present images of radio recombination lines (RRLs) at wavelengths around 17 cm from the star-forming region W49A to determine the kinematics of ionized gas in the THOR survey (The HI/OH/Recombination line survey of the inner Milky Way) at an angular resolution of 16.8"x13.8". The distribution of ionized gas appears to be affected by feedback processes from the star clusters in W49A. The velocity structure of the RRLs shows a complex behavior with respect to the molecular gas. We find a shell-like distribution of ionized gas as traced by RRL emission surrounding the central cluster of OB stars in W49A. We describe the evolution of the shell with the recent feedback model code WARPFIELD that includes the important physical processes and has previously been applied to the 30 Doradus region in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The cloud structure and dynamics of W49A are in agreement with a feedback-driven shell that is re-collapsing. The shell may have triggered star formation in other parts of W49A. We suggest that W49A is a potential candidate for star formation regulated by feedback-driven and re-collapsing shells.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.03520  [pdf] - 2103355
Probing the cold magnetized Universe with SPICA-POL (B-BOP)
Comments: Accepted for publication in PASA; 37 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2019-05-09
SPICA, the cryogenic infrared space telescope recently pre-selected for a `Phase A' concept study as one of the three remaining candidates for ESA's fifth medium class (M5) mission, is foreseen to include a far-infrared polarimetric imager (SPICA-POL, now called B-BOP), which would offer a unique opportunity to resolve major issues in our understanding of the nearby, cold magnetized Universe. This paper presents an overview of the main science drivers for B-BOP, including high dynamic range polarimetric imaging of the cold interstellar medium (ISM) in both our Milky Way and nearby galaxies. Thanks to a cooled telescope, B-BOP will deliver wide-field 100-350 micron images of linearly polarized dust emission in Stokes Q and U with a resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and both intensity and spatial dynamic ranges comparable to those achieved by Herschel images of the cold ISM in total intensity (Stokes I). The B-BOP 200 micron images will also have a factor ~30 higher resolution than Planck polarization data. This will make B-BOP a unique tool for characterizing the statistical properties of the magnetized interstellar medium and probing the role of magnetic fields in the formation and evolution of the interstellar web of dusty molecular filaments giving birth to most stars in our Galaxy. B-BOP will also be a powerful instrument for studying the magnetism of nearby galaxies and testing galactic dynamo models, constraining the physics of dust grain alignment, informing the problem of the interaction of cosmic rays with molecular clouds, tracing magnetic fields in the inner layers of protoplanetary disks, and monitoring accretion bursts in embedded protostars.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.08979  [pdf] - 1905600
Relative Alignment Between the Magnetic Field and Molecular Gas Structure in the Vela C Giant Molecular Cloud using Low and High Density Tracers
Comments: 27 pages, 15 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-04-24, last modified: 2019-04-02
We compare the magnetic field orientation for the young giant molecular cloud Vela C inferred from 500-$\mu$m polarization maps made with the BLASTPol balloon-borne polarimeter to the orientation of structures in the integrated line emission maps from Mopra observations. Averaging over the entire cloud we find that elongated structures in integrated line-intensity, or zeroth-moment maps, for low density tracers such as $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO $J$ $\rightarrow$ 1 - 0 are statistically more likely to align parallel to the magnetic field, while intermediate or high density tracers show (on average) a tendency for alignment perpendicular to the magnetic field. This observation agrees with previous studies of the change in relative orientation with column density in Vela C, and supports a model where the magnetic field is strong enough to have influenced the formation of dense gas structures within Vela C. The transition from parallel to no preferred/perpendicular orientation appears to happen between the densities traced by $^{13}$CO and by C$^{18}$O $J$ $\rightarrow$ 1 - 0. Using RADEX radiative transfer models to estimate the characteristic number density traced by each molecular line we find that the transition occurs at a molecular hydrogen number density of approximately $10^3$ cm$^{-3}$. We also see that the Centre-Ridge (the highest column density and most active star-forming region within Vela C) appears to have a transition at a lower number density, suggesting that this may depend on the evolutionary state of the cloud.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04635  [pdf] - 1847049
The warm and dense Galaxy - tracing the formation of dense cloud structures out to the Galactic Center
Comments: Science white paper submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey
Submitted: 2019-03-11
The past two decades have seen extensive surveys of the far-infrared to submillimeter continuum emission in the plane of our Galaxy. We line out prospects for the coming decade for corresponding molecular and atomic line surveys which are needed to fully understand the formation of the dense structures that give birth to clusters and stars out of the diffuse interstellar medium. We propose to work towards Galaxy wide surveys in mid-J CO lines to trace shocks from colliding clouds, Galaxy-wide surveys for atomic Carbon lines in order to get a detailed understanding of the relation of atomic and molecular gas in clouds, and to perform extensive surveys of the structure of the dense parts of molecular clouds to understand the importance of filaments/fibers over the full range of Galactic environments and to study how dense cloud cores are formed from the filaments. This work will require a large (50m) Single Dish submillimeter telescope equipped with massively multipixel spectrometer arrays, such as envisaged by the AtLAST project.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.08338  [pdf] - 1834057
Histogram of oriented gradients: a technique for the study of molecular cloud formation
Comments: 32 pages, 36 figures. Accepted for publication at A&A (28DEC2018)
Submitted: 2018-09-21, last modified: 2019-01-02
We introduce the histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), a tool developed for machine vision that we propose as a new metric for the systematic characterization of observations of atomic and molecular gas and the study of molecular cloud formation models. In essence, the HOG technique takes as input extended spectral-line observations from two tracers and provides an estimate of their spatial correlation across velocity channels. We characterize HOG using synthetic observations of HI and $^{13}$CO(J=1-0) emission from numerical simulations of MHD turbulence leading to the formation of molecular gas after the collision of two atomic clouds. We find a significant spatial correlation between the two tracers in velocity channels where $v_{HI}\approx v_{^{13}CO}$, independent of the orientation of the collision with respect to the line of sight. We use HOG to investigate the spatial correlation of the HI, from the THOR survey, and the $^{13}$CO(J=1-0) emission, from the GRS, toward the portion of the Galactic plane 33.75$\lt l\lt$35.25$^{o}$ and $|b|\lt$1.25$^{o}$. We find a significant spatial correlation between the tracers in extended portions of the studied region. Although some of the regions with high spatial correlation are associated with HI self-absorption features, suggesting that it is produced by the cold atomic gas, the correlation is not exclusive to this kind of region. The HOG results also indicate significant differences between individual regions: some show spatial correlation in channels around $v_{HI}\approx v_{^{13}CO}$ while others present this correlation in velocity channels separated by a few km/s. We associate these velocity offsets to the effect of feedback and to the presence of physical conditions that are not included in the atomic-cloud-collision simulations, such as more general magnetic field configurations, shear, and global gas infall.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.04945  [pdf] - 1782697
Planck 2018 results. XI. Polarized dust foregrounds
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Final version to appear in A&A
Submitted: 2018-01-15, last modified: 2018-11-12
The study of polarized dust emission has become entwined with the analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. We use new Planck maps to characterize Galactic dust emission as a foreground to the CMB polarization. We present Planck EE, BB, and TE power spectra of dust polarization at 353 GHz for six nested sky regions covering from 24 to 71 % of the sky. We present power-law fits to the angular power spectra, yielding evidence for statistically significant variations of the exponents over sky regions and a difference between the values for the EE and BB spectra. The TE correlation and E/B power asymmetry extend to low multipoles that were not included in earlier Planck polarization papers. We also report evidence for a positive TB dust signal. Combining data from Planck and WMAP, we determine the amplitudes and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of polarized foregrounds, including the correlation between dust and synchrotron polarized emission, for the six sky regions as a function of multipole. This quantifies the challenge of the component separation procedure required for detecting the reionization and recombination peaks of primordial CMB B modes. The SED of polarized dust emission is fit well by a single-temperature modified blackbody emission law from 353 GHz to below 70 GHz. For a dust temperature of 19.6 K, the mean spectral index for dust polarization is $\beta_{\rm d}^{P} = 1.53\pm0.02 $. By fitting multi-frequency cross-spectra, we examine the correlation of the dust polarization maps across frequency. We find no evidence for decorrelation. If the Planck limit for the largest sky region applies to the smaller sky regions observed by sub-orbital experiments, then decorrelation might not be a problem for CMB experiments aiming at a primordial B-mode detection limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r\simeq0.01$ at the recombination peak.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.06375  [pdf] - 1842364
Submillimeter Polarization Spectrum of the Carina Nebula
Comments: 13 pages, 12 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2018-09-17
Linear polarization maps of the Carina Nebula were obtained at 250, 350, and 500 $\mu$m during the 2012 flight of the BLASTPol balloon-borne telescope. These measurements are combined with Planck 850 $\mu$m data in order to produce a submillimeter spectrum of the polarization fraction of the dust emission, averaged over the cloud. This spectrum is flat to within $\pm$15% (relative to the 350 $\mu$m polarization fraction). In particular, there is no evidence for a pronounced minimum of the spectrum near 350 $\mu$m, as suggested by previous ground-based measurements of other molecular clouds. This result of a flat polarization spectrum in Carina is consistent with recently-published BLASTPol measurements of the Vela C molecular cloud, and also agrees with a published model for an externally-illuminated, dense molecular cloud by Bethell and collaborators. The shape of the spectrum in Carina does not show any dependence on the radiative environment of the dust, as quantified by the Planck-derived dust temperature or dust optical depth at 353 GHz.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.04794  [pdf] - 1795687
OH absorption in the first quadrant of the Milky Way as seen by THOR
Comments: accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics; corrections before publication
Submitted: 2018-03-13, last modified: 2018-09-16
The hydroxyl radical (OH) is present in the diffuse molecular and partially atomic phases of the interstellar medium (ISM), but its abundance relative to hydrogen is not clear. We aim to evaluate the abundance of OH with respect to molecular hydrogen using OH absorption against cm-continuum sources over the first Galactic quadrant. This OH study is part of the HI/OH/Recombination line survey (THOR). THOR is a Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array large program of atomic, molecular and ionized gas in the range 15{\deg}$\leq$l$\leq$67{\deg} and |b|$\leq$1{\deg}. It is the highest-resolution unbiased OH absorption survey to date towards this region. We combine the derived optical depths with literature 13CO(1-0) and HI observations to determine the OH abundance. We detect absorption in the 1665 and 1667 MHz transitions for continuum sources stronger than $F_{\rm cont}\geq$0.1 Jy/beam. OH absorption is found against $\sim$15% of these continuum sources with increasing fractions for stronger sources. Most of the absorption is associated with Galactic HII regions. We find OH and 13CO gas to have similar kinematic properties. The OH abundance decreases with increasing hydrogen column density. The OH abundance with respect to the total hydrogen nuclei column density (atomic and molecular phase) is in agreement with a constant abundance for $A_V$ < 10-20. Towards the lowest column densities, we find sources that exhibit OH absorption but no 13CO emission, indicating that OH is a well suited tracer of the low column density molecular gas. We present spatially resolved OH absorption towards W43. The unbiased nature of the THOR survey opens a new window onto the gas properties of the ISM. The characterization of the OH abundance over a large range of hydrogen gas column densities contributes to the understanding of OH as a molecular gas tracer and provides a starting point for future investigations.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.08597  [pdf] - 1739200
Design and Characterization of a Balloon-Borne Diffraction-Limited Submillimeter Telescope Platform for BLAST-TNG
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures, 2018 SPIE Astronomical Telescopes & Instrumentation Conference
Submitted: 2018-08-26
The Next Generation Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST-TNG) is a submillimeter mapping experiment planned for a 28 day long-duration balloon (LDB) flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica during the 2018-2019 season. BLAST-TNG will detect submillimeter polarized interstellar dust emission, tracing magnetic fields in galactic molecular clouds. BLAST-TNG will be the first polarimeter with the sensitivity and resolution to probe the $\sim$0.1 parsec-scale features that are critical to understanding the origin of structures in the interstellar medium. With three detector arrays operating at 250, 350, and 500 $\mu$m (1200, 857, and 600 GHz), BLAST-TNG will obtain diffraction-limited resolution at each waveband of 30, 41, and 59 arcseconds respectively. To achieve the submillimeter resolution necessary for its science goals, the BLAST-TNG telescope features a 2.5 m aperture carbon fiber composite primary mirror, one of the largest mirrors flown on a balloon platform. Successful performance of such a large telescope on a balloon-borne platform requires stiff, lightweight optical components and mounting structures. Through a combination of optical metrology and finite element modeling of thermal and mechanical stresses on both the telescope optics and mounting structures, we expect diffraction-limited resolution at all our wavebands. We expect pointing errors due to deformation of the telescope mount to be negligible. We have developed a detailed thermal model of the sun shielding, gondola, and optical components to optimize our observing strategy and increase the stability of the telescope over the flight. We present preflight characterization of the telescope and its platform.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.08489  [pdf] - 1739192
Preflight Characterization of the BLAST-TNG Receiver and Detector Arrays
Comments: 15 pages, 7 figures, SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation Conference
Submitted: 2018-08-25
The Next Generation Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST-TNG) is a submillimeter mapping experiment planned for a 28 day long-duration balloon (LDB) flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica during the 2018-2019 season. BLAST-TNG will detect submillimeter polarized interstellar dust emission, tracing magnetic fields in galactic molecular clouds. BLAST-TNG will be the first polarimeter with the sensitivity and resolution to probe the $\sim$0.1 parsec-scale features that are critical to understanding the origin of structures in the interstellar medium. BLAST-TNG features three detector arrays operating at wavelengths of 250, 350, and 500 $\mu$m (1200, 857, and 600 GHz) comprised of 918, 469, and 272 dual-polarization pixels, respectively. Each pixel is made up of two crossed microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). These arrays are cooled to 275 mK in a cryogenic receiver. Each MKID has a different resonant frequency, allowing hundreds of resonators to be read out on a single transmission line. This inherent ability to be frequency-domain multiplexed simplifies the cryogenic readout hardware, but requires careful optical testing to map out the physical location of each resonator on the focal plane. Receiver-level optical testing was carried out using both a cryogenic source mounted to a movable xy-stage with a shutter, and a beam-filling, heated blackbody source able to provide a 10-50 $^\circ$C temperature chop. The focal plane array noise properties, responsivity, polarization efficiency, instrumental polarization were measured. We present the preflight characterization of the BLAST-TNG cryogenic system and array-level optical testing of the MKID detector arrays in the flight receiver.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.05990  [pdf] - 1783863
Radio continuum emission in the northern Galactic plane: Sources and spectral indices from the THOR survey
Comments: 10 pages, 21 figures. Accepted to be published in Astronomy and Astrophysics. The full continuum catalog, full table of Table 4 and all the fits files of the continuum data are available at the project website http://www2.mpia-hd.mpg.de/thor/DATA/www
Submitted: 2018-08-17, last modified: 2018-08-21
Radio continuum surveys of the Galactic plane can find and characterize HII regions, supernova remnants (SNRs), planetary nebulae (PNe), and extragalactic sources. A number of surveys at high angular resolution (<25") at different wavelengths exist to study the interstellar medium (ISM), but no comparable high-resolution and high-sensitivity survey exists at long radio wavelengths around 21cm. We observed a large fraction of the Galactic plane in the first quadrant of the Milky Way (l=14.0-67.4deg and |b| < 1.25deg) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in the C-configuration covering six continuum spectral windows. These data provide a detailed view on the compact as well as extended radio emission of our Galaxy and thousands of extragalactic background sources. We used the BLOBCAT software and extracted 10916 sources. After removing spurious source detections caused by the sidelobes of the synthesised beam, we classified 10387 sources as reliable detections. We smoothed the images to a common resolution of 25" and extracted the peak flux density of each source in each spectral window (SPW) to determine the spectral indices $\alpha$ (assuming $I(\nu)\propto\nu^\alpha$). By cross-matching with catalogs of HII regions, SNRs, PNe, and pulsars, we found radio counterparts for 840 HII regions, 52 SNRs, 164 PNe, and 38 pulsars. We found 79 continuum sources that are associated with X-ray sources. We identified 699 ultra-steep spectral sources ($\alpha < -1.3$) that could be high-redshift galaxies. Around 9000 of the sources we extracted are not classified specifically, but based on their spatial and spectral distribution, a large fraction of them is likely to be extragalactic background sources. More than 7750 sources do not have counterparts in the SIMBAD database, and more than 3760 sources do not have counterparts in the NED database.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.06628  [pdf] - 1793111
Confirmation Of Two Galactic Supernova Remnant Candidates Discovered By THOR
Comments: 12 pages, 4 figures; Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-08-20
Anderson et al. (2017) identified seventy six candidate supernova remnants (SNRs) using data from The HI, OH, Recombination line survey of the Milky Way (THOR). The spectral index and polarization properties can help distinguish between SNRs and H II regions, which are often confused. We confirm two SNR candidates using spectral index data and morphology. However, we observe that the fractional linear polarization cannot distinguish between SNRs and H II regions, likely due to contamination by diffuse Galactic synchrotron emission. We also comment on the association of SNR candidates with pulsars through geometric and age considerations.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.11503  [pdf] - 1729204
SDSS IV MaNGA: Characterizing Non-Axisymmetric Motions in Galaxy Velocity Fields Using the Radon Transform
Comments: 21 pages, 15 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-07-30, last modified: 2018-08-05
We show how the Radon transform (defined as a series of line integrals through an image at different orientations and offsets from the origin) can be used as a simple, non-parametric tool to characterize galaxy velocity fields, specifically their global kinematic position angles (PA_k) and any radial variation or asymmetry in PA_k. This method is fast and easily automated, making it particularly beneficial in an era where IFU and interferometric surveys are yielding samples of thousands of galaxies. We demonstrate the Radon transform by applying it to gas and stellar velocity fields from the first ~2800 galaxies of the SDSS-IV MaNGA IFU survey. We separately classify gas and stellar velocity fields into five categories based on the shape of their radial PA_k profiles. At least half of stellar velocity fields and two-thirds of gas velocity fields are found to show detectable deviations from uniform coplanar circular motion, although most of these variations are symmetric about the center of the galaxy. The behavior of gas and stellar velocity fields is largely independent, even when PA_k profiles for both components are measured over the same radii. We present evidence that one class of symmetric PA_k variations is likely associated with bars and/or oval distortions, while another class is more consistent with warped disks. This analysis sets the stage for more in-depth future studies which explore the origin of diverse kinematic behavior in the galaxy population.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.05215  [pdf] - 1719070
BFORE: A CMB Balloon Payload to Measure Reionization, Neutrino Mass, and Cosmic Inflation
Comments: 11 pages, 2 figures, Submitted to SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation
Submitted: 2018-07-13
BFORE is a high-altitude ultra-long-duration balloon mission to map the cosmic microwave background (CMB). During a 28-day mid-latitude flight launched from Wanaka, New Zealand, the instrument will map half the sky to improve measurements of the optical depth to reionization tau. This will break parameter degeneracies needed to detect neutrino mass. BFORE will also hunt for the gravitational wave B-mode signal, and map Galactic dust foregrounds. The mission will be the first near-space use of TES/mSQUID multichroic detectors (150/217 GHz and 280/353 GHz bands) with low-power readout electronics.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.00005  [pdf] - 1698024
Magnetic fields at the onset of high-mass star formation
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, Astronomy & Astrophysics in press, http://www.mpia.de/homes/beuther/papers.html
Submitted: 2018-01-31
Context: The importance of magnetic fields at the onset of star formation related to the early fragmentation and collapse processes is largely unexplored today. Aims: We want to understand the magnetic field properties at the earliest evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation. Methods: The Atacama Large Millimeter Array is used at 1.3mm wavelength in full polarization mode to study the polarized emission and by that the magnetic field morphologies and strengths of the high-mass starless region IRDC18310-4. Results: The polarized emission is clearly detected in four sub-cores of the region. In general it shows a smooth distribution, also along elongated cores. Estimating the magnetic field strength via the Davis-Chandrasekhar-Fermi method and following a structure function analysis, we find comparably large magnetic field strengths between ~0.6 and 3.7mG. Comparing the data to spectral line observations, the turbulent-to-magnetic energy ratio is low, indicating that turbulence does not significantly contribute to the stability of the gas clump. A mass-to-flux ratio around the critical value 1.0 - depending on column density - indicates that the region starts to collapse which is consistent with the previous spectral line analysis of the region. Conclusions: While this high-mass region is collapsing and thus at the verge of star formation, the high magnetic field values and the smooth spatial structure indicate that the magnetic field is important for the fragmentation and collapse process. This single case study can only be the starting point for larger sample studies of magnetic fields at the onset of star formation.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.03728  [pdf] - 1634232
The magnetic environment of the Orion-Eridanus superbubble as revealed by Planck
Comments: 7 pages, 8 figures. Accepted for publication as a Letter in A&A, section 1. Letters to the Editor (08/12/2017)
Submitted: 2017-12-11
Using the 353-GHz polarization observations by the Planck satellite we characterize the magnetic field in the Orion-Eridanus superbubble, a nearby expanding structure that spans more than 1600 square degrees in the sky. We identify a region of both low dispersion of polarization orientations and high polarization fraction associated with the outer wall of the superbubble identified in the most recent models of the large-scale shape of the region. We use the Davis-Chandrasekhar-Fermi method to derive plane-of-the-sky magnetic field strengths of tens of microGauss toward the southern edge of the bubble. The comparison of these values with existing Zeeman splitting observations of HI in emission suggests that the large-scale magnetic field in the region was primarily shaped by the expanding superbubble.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.04063  [pdf] - 1598114
An application of an optimal statistic for characterising relative orientations
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures, Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-08-14, last modified: 2017-12-04
We present the projected Rayleigh statistic (PRS), a modification of the classic Rayleigh statistic, as a test for non-uniform relative orientation between two pseudo-vector fields. In the application here this gives an effective way of investigating whether polarization pseudo-vectors (spin-2 quantities) are preferentially parallel or perpendicular to filaments in the interstellar medium. For example, there are other potential applications in astrophysics, e.g., when comparing small-scale orientations with larger-scale shear patterns. We compare the efficiency of the PRS against histogram binning methods that have previously been used for characterising the relative orientations of gas column density structures with the magnetic field projected on the plane of the sky. We examine data for the Vela C molecular cloud, where the column density is inferred from Herschel submillimetre observations, and the magnetic field from observations by the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimetre Telescope in the 250-, 350-, and 500-{\mu}m wavelength bands. We find that the PRS has greater statistical power than approaches that bin the relative orientation angles, as it makes more efficient use of the information contained in the data. In particular, the use of the PRS to test for preferential alignment results in a higher statistical significance, in each of the four Vela C regions, with the greatest increase being by a factor 1.3 in the South-Nest region in the 250-{\mu}m band.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.10596  [pdf] - 1783704
SPIDER: CMB polarimetry from the edge of space
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, LTD17 Conference
Submitted: 2017-11-28
SPIDER is a balloon-borne instrument designed to map the polarization of the millimeter-wave sky at large angular scales. SPIDER targets the B-mode signature of primordial gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), with a focus on mapping a large sky area with high fidelity at multiple frequencies. SPIDER's first longduration balloon (LDB) flight in January 2015 deployed a total of 2400 antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) at 90 GHz and 150 GHz. In this work we review the design and in-flight performance of the SPIDER instrument, with a particular focus on the measured performance of the detectors and instrument in a space-like loading and radiation environment. SPIDER's second flight in December 2018 will incorporate payload upgrades and new receivers to map the sky at 285 GHz, providing valuable information for cleaning polarized dust emission from CMB maps.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.04169  [pdf] - 1755845
280 GHz Focal Plane Unit Design and Characterization for the SPIDER-2 Suborbital Polarimeter
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-11-11, last modified: 2017-11-22
We describe the construction and characterization of the 280 GHz bolometric focal plane units (FPUs) to be deployed on the second flight of the balloon-borne SPIDER instrument. These FPUs are vital to SPIDER's primary science goal of detecting or placing an upper limit on the amplitude of the primordial gravitational wave signature in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by constraining the B-mode contamination in the CMB from Galactic dust emission. Each 280 GHz focal plane contains a 16 x 16 grid of corrugated silicon feedhorns coupled to an array of aluminum-manganese transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers fabricated on 150 mm diameter substrates. In total, the three 280 GHz FPUs contain 1,530 polarization sensitive bolometers (765 spatial pixels) optimized for the low loading environment in flight and read out by time-division SQUID multiplexing. In this paper we describe the mechanical, thermal, and magnetic shielding architecture of the focal planes and present cryogenic measurements which characterize yield and the uniformity of several bolometer parameters. The assembled FPUs have high yields, with one array as high as 95% including defects from wiring and readout. We demonstrate high uniformity in device parameters, finding the median saturation power for each TES array to be ~3 pW at 300 mK with a less than 6% variation across each array at one standard deviation. These focal planes will be deployed alongside the 95 and 150 GHz telescopes in the SPIDER-2 instrument, slated to fly from McMurdo Station in Antarctica in December 2018.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.00215  [pdf] - 1582291
A New Limit on CMB Circular Polarization from SPIDER
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, 5 tables - Updated to version accepted for publication in ApJ, modified acknowledgements
Submitted: 2017-04-01, last modified: 2017-08-11
We present a new upper limit on CMB circular polarization from the 2015 flight of SPIDER, a balloon-borne telescope designed to search for $B$-mode linear polarization from cosmic inflation. Although the level of circular polarization in the CMB is predicted to be very small, experimental limits provide a valuable test of the underlying models. By exploiting the non-zero circular-to-linear polarization coupling of the HWP polarization modulators, data from SPIDER's 2015 Antarctic flight provide a constraint on Stokes $V$ at 95 and 150 GHz from $33<\ell<307$. No other limits exist over this full range of angular scales, and SPIDER improves upon the previous limit by several orders of magnitude, providing 95% C.L. constraints on $\ell (\ell+1)C_{\ell}^{VV}/(2\pi)$ ranging from 141 $\mu K ^2$ to 255 $\mu K ^2$ at 150 GHz for a thermal CMB spectrum. As linear CMB polarization experiments become increasingly sensitive, the techniques described in this paper can be applied to obtain even stronger constraints on circular polarization.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.02936  [pdf] - 1670453
First Observation of the Submillimeter Polarization Spectrum in a Translucent Molecular Cloud
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2017-07-10
Polarized emission from aligned dust is a crucial tool for studies of magnetism in the ISM and a troublesome contaminant for studies of CMB polarization. In each case, an understanding of the significance of the polarization signal requires well-calibrated physical models of dust grains. Despite decades of progress in theory and observation, polarized dust models remain largely underconstrained. During its 2012 flight, the balloon-borne telescope BLASTPol obtained simultaneous broad-band polarimetric maps of a translucent molecular cloud at 250, 350, and 500 microns. Combining these data with polarimetry from the Planck 850 micron band, we have produced a submillimeter polarization spectrum for a cloud of this type for the first time. We find the polarization degree to be largely constant across the four bands. This result introduces a new observable with the potential to place strong empirical constraints on ISM dust polarization models in a previously inaccessible density regime. Comparing with models by Draine and Fraisse (2009), our result disfavors two of their models for which all polarization arises due only to aligned silicate grains. By creating simple models for polarized emission in a translucent cloud, we verify that extinction within the cloud should have only a small effect on the polarization spectrum shape compared to the diffuse ISM. Thus we expect the measured polarization spectrum to be a valid check on diffuse ISM dust models. The general flatness of the observed polarization spectrum suggests a challenge to models where temperature and alignment degree are strongly correlated across major dust components.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.01488  [pdf] - 1732527
Measuring Reionization, Neutrino Mass, and Cosmic Inflation with BFORE
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures, to appear in Proceedings of Low Temperature Detectors 17
Submitted: 2017-07-05
BFORE is a NASA high-altitude ultra-long-duration balloon mission proposed to measure the cosmic microwave background (CMB) across half the sky during a 28-day mid-latitude flight launched from Wanaka, New Zealand. With the unique access to large angular scales and high frequencies provided by the balloon platform, BFORE will significantly improve measurements of the optical depth to reionization tau, breaking parameter degeneracies needed for a measurement of neutrino mass with the CMB. The large angular scale data will enable BFORE to hunt for the large-scale gravitational wave B-mode signal, as well as the degree-scale signal, each at the r~0.01 level. The balloon platform allows BFORE to map Galactic dust foregrounds at frequencies where they dominate, in order to robustly separate them from CMB signals measured by BFORE, in addition to complementing data from ground-based telescopes. The combination of frequencies will also lead to velocity measurements for thousands of galaxy clusters, as well as probing how star-forming galaxies populate dark matter halos. The mission will be the first near-space use of TES multichroic detectors (150/217 GHz and 280/353 GHz bands) using highly-multiplexed mSQUID microwave readout, raising the technical readiness level of both technologies.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.10071  [pdf] - 1582217
Interpreting the Star Formation Efficiency of Molecular Clouds with Ionising Feedback
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures, 2 tables. Version re-submitted to MNRAS, comments welcome
Submitted: 2017-03-29, last modified: 2017-06-23
We investigate the origin of observed local star formation relations using radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations with self-consistent star formation and ionising radiation. We compare these clouds to the density distributions of local star-forming clouds and find that the most diffuse simulated clouds match the observed clouds relatively well. We then compute both observationally-motivated and theoretically-motivated star formation efficiencies (SFEs) for these simulated clouds. By including ionising radiation, we can reproduce the observed SFEs in the clouds most similar to nearby Milky Way clouds. For denser clouds, the SFE can approach unity. These observed SFEs are typically 3 to 10 times larger than the "total" SFEs, i.e. the fraction of the initial cloud mass converted to stars. Converting observed to total SFEs is non-trivial. We suggest some techniques for doing so, though estimate up to a factor of ten error in the conversion.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.10927  [pdf] - 1584077
Galactic Supernova Remnant Candidates Discovered by THOR
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-05-30
There is a considerable deficiency in the number of known supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Galaxy compared to that expected. Searches for extended low-surface brightness radio sources may find new Galactic SNRs, but confusion with the much larger population of HII regions makes identifying such features challenging. SNRs can, however, be separated from HII regions using their significantly lower mid-infrared (MIR) to radio continuum intensity ratios. We use the combination of high-resolution 1-2 GHz continuum data from The HI, OH, Recombination line survey of the Milky Way (THOR) and lower-resolution VLA 1.4 GHz Galactic Plane Survey (VGPS) continuum data, together with MIR data from the Spitzer GLIMPSE, Spitzer MIPSGAL, and WISE surveys to identify SNR candidates. To ensure that the candidates are not being confused with HII regions, we exclude radio continuum sources from the WISE Catalog of Galactic HII Regions, which contains all known and candidate H II regions in the Galaxy. We locate 76 new Galactic SNR candidates in the THOR and VGPS combined survey area of 67.4deg>l>17.5deg, |b|<1.25deg and measure the radio flux density for 52 previously-known SNRs. The candidate SNRs have a similar spatial distribution to the known SNRs, although we note a large number of new candidates near l=30deg, the tangent point of the Scutum spiral arm. The candidates are on average smaller in angle compared to the known regions, 6.4'+/-4.7' versus 11.0'+/-7.8', and have lower integrated flux densities. If the 76 candidates are confirmed as true SNRs, for example using radio polarization measurements or by deriving radio spectral indices, this would more than double the number of known Galactic SNRs in the survey area. This large increase would still, however, leave a discrepancy between the known and expected SNR populations of about a factor of two.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00477  [pdf] - 1582983
What are we learning from the relative orientation between density structures and the magnetic field in molecular clouds?
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures. Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2017-05-01
We investigate the conditions of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence responsible for the relative orientation between density structures, characterized by their gradient, $\vec{\nabla}\rho$, and the magnetic field, $\vec{B}$, in molecular clouds (MCs). For that purpose, we construct an expression for the time evolution of the angle, $\phi$, between $\vec{\nabla}\rho$ and $\vec{B}$ based on the transport equations of MHD turbulence. Using this expression, we find that the configuration where $\vec{\nabla}\rho$ and $\vec{B}$ are mostly parallel, $\cos\phi=1$, and where $\vec{\nabla}\rho$ and $\vec{B}$ are mostly perpendicular, $\cos\phi=0$, constitute attractors, that is, the system tends to evolve towards either of these configurations and they are more represented than others. This fact would explain the predominant alignment or anti-alignment between column density, $N_H$, structures and the projected magnetic field orientation, $\hat{B}_\perp$, reported in observations. Additionally, we find that departures from the $\cos\phi=0$ configurations are related to convergent flows, quantified by the divergence of the velocity field, $\vec{\nabla}\cdot\vec{v}$, in the presence of a relatively strong magnetic field. This would explain the observed change in relative orientation between $N_H$-structures and $\hat{B}_\perp$ towards MCs, from mostly parallel at low $N_H$ to mostly perpendicular at the highest $N_H$, as the result of the gravitational collapse and/or convergence of flows. Finally, we show that the density threshold that marks the observed change in relative orientation towards MCs, from $N_H$ and $\hat{B}_\perp$ being mostly parallel at low $N_H$ to mostly perpendicular at the highest $N_H$, is related to the magnetic field strength and constitutes a crucial piece of information for determining the role of the magnetic field in the dynamics of MCs.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.08522  [pdf] - 1550292
Comparing submillimeter polarized emission with near-infrared polarization of background stars for the Vela C molecular cloud
Comments: 23 pages, accepted by the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2016-05-27, last modified: 2017-02-24
We present a large-scale combination of near-infrared (near-IR) interstellar polarization data from background starlight with polarized emission data at submillimeter (sub-mm) wavelengths for the Vela C molecular cloud. The near-IR data consist of more than 6700 detections probing a range of visual extinctions between $2$ and $20\,$mag in and around the cloud. The sub-mm data was collected in Antartica by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol). This is the first direct combination of near-IR and sub-mm polarization data for a molecular cloud aimed at measuring the "polarization efficiency ratio" ($R_{\mathrm{eff}}$), a quantity that is expected to depend only on grain intrinsic physical properties. It is defined as $p_{500}/(p_{I}/\tau_{V})$, where $p_{500}$ and $p_{I}$ are polarization fractions at $500\,\mu$m and $I$-band, respectively, and $\tau_{V}$ is the optical depth. To ensure that the same column density of material is producing both polarization from emission and from extinction, we conducted a careful selection of near-background stars using 2MASS, $Herschel$ and $Planck$ data. This selection excludes objects contaminated by the Galactic diffuse background material as well as objects located in the foreground. Accounting for statistical and systematic uncertainties, we estimate an average $R_{\mathrm{eff}}$ value of $2.4\pm0.8$, which can be used to test the predictions of dust grain models designed for molecular clouds when such predictions become available. $R_{\mathrm{eff}}$ appears to be relatively flat as a function of the cloud depth for the range of visual extinctions probed.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.03853  [pdf] - 1581474
On the relation between the column density structures and the magnetic field orientation in the Vela C molecular complex
Comments: 16 pages, 17 figures. Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2017-02-13
We statistically evaluate the relative orientation between gas column density structures, inferred from Herschel submillimetre observations, and the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by BLASTPol at 250, 350, and 500 micron, towards the Vela C molecular complex. First, we find very good agreement between the polarization orientations in the three wavelength-bands, suggesting that, at the considered common angular resolution of 3.0 arcminutes that corresponds to a physical scale of approximately 0.61 pc, the inferred magnetic field orientation is not significantly affected by temperature or dust grain alignment effects. Second, we find that the relative orientation between gas column density structures and the magnetic field changes progressively with increasing gas column density, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation at low column densities to mostly perpendicular at the highest column densities. This observation is in agreement with previous studies by the Planck collaboration towards more nearby molecular clouds. Finally, we find a correspondence between the trends in relative orientation and the shape of the column density probability distribution functions. In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by one clear filamentary structure, or "ridges", we find a sharp transition from preferentially parallel or having no preferred relative orientation at low column densities to preferentially perpendicular at highest column densities. In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by several filamentary structures with multiple orientations, or "nests", such a transition is also present, but it is clearly less sharp than in the ridge-like sub-regions. Both of these results suggest that the magnetic field is dynamically important for the formation of density structures in this region.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.05400  [pdf] - 1560203
An Open Source, FPGA-based LeKID readout for BLAST-TNG: Pre-flight Results
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-11-16
We present a highly frequency multiplexed readout for large-format superconducting detector arrays intended for use in the next generation of balloon-borne and space-based sub-millimeter and far-infrared missions. We will demonstrate this technology on the upcoming NASA Next Generation Balloon-borne Large Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope (BLAST-TNG) to measure the polarized emission of Galactic dust at wavelengths of 250, 350 and 500 microns. The BLAST-TNG receiver incorporates the first arrays of Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detectors (LeKID) along with the first microwave multiplexing readout electronics to fly in a space-like environment and will significantly advance the TRL for these technologies. After the flight of BLAST-TNG, we will continue to improve the performance of the detectors and readout electronics for the next generation of balloon-borne instruments and for use in a future FIR Surveyor.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.05456  [pdf] - 1459468
Instrumental performance and results from testing of the BLAST-TNG receiver, submillimeter optics, and MKID arrays
Comments: Presented at SPIE Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VIII, June 29th, 2016
Submitted: 2016-08-18
Polarized thermal emission from interstellar dust grains can be used to map magnetic fields in star forming molecular clouds and the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) flew from Antarctica in 2010 and 2012 and produced degree-scale polarization maps of several nearby molecular clouds with arcminute resolution. The success of BLASTPol has motivated a next-generation instrument, BLAST-TNG, which will use more than 3000 linear polarization sensitive microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) combined with a 2.5m diameter carbon fiber primary mirror to make diffraction-limited observations at 250, 350, and 500 $\mu$m. With 16 times the mapping speed of BLASTPol, sub-arcminute resolution, and a longer flight time, BLAST-TNG will be able to examine nearby molecular clouds and the diffuse galactic dust polarization spectrum in unprecedented detail. The 250 $\mu$m detector array has been integrated into the new cryogenic receiver, and is undergoing testing to establish the optical and polarization characteristics of the instrument. BLAST-TNG will demonstrate the effectiveness of kilo-pixel MKID arrays for applications in submillimeter astronomy. BLAST-TNG is scheduled to fly from Antarctica in December 2017 for 28 days and will be the first balloon-borne telescope to offer a quarter of the flight for "shared risk" observing by the community.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.09387  [pdf] - 1530762
Planck intermediate results. XLVIII. Disentangling Galactic dust emission and cosmic infrared background anisotropies
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 26 pages, 25 figures (reduced in quality for arXiv), 1 table. Updated to match version accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2016-05-30, last modified: 2016-08-09
Using the Planck 2015 data release (PR2) temperature maps, we separate Galactic thermal dust emission from cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies. For this purpose, we implement a specifically tailored component-separation method, the so-called generalized needlet internal linear combination (GNILC) method, which uses spatial information (the angular power spectra) to disentangle the Galactic dust emission and CIB anisotropies. We produce significantly improved all-sky maps of Planck thermal dust emission, with reduced CIB contamination, at 353, 545, and 857 GHz. By reducing the CIB contamination of the thermal dust maps, we provide more accurate estimates of the local dust temperature and dust spectral index over the sky with reduced dispersion, especially at high Galactic latitudes above $b = \pm 20{\deg}$. We find that the dust temperature is $T = (19.4 \pm 1.3)$ K and the dust spectral index is $\beta = 1.6 \pm 0.1$ averaged over the whole sky, while $T = (19.4 \pm 1.5)$ K and $\beta = 1.6 \pm 0.2$ on 21 % of the sky at high latitudes. Moreover, subtracting the new CIB-removed thermal dust maps from the CMB-removed Planck maps gives access to the CIB anisotropies over 60 % of the sky at Galactic latitudes $|b| > 20{\deg}$. Because they are a significant improvement over previous Planck products, the GNILC maps are recommended for thermal dust science. The new CIB maps can be regarded as indirect tracers of the dark matter and they are recommended for exploring cross-correlations with lensing and large-scale structure optical surveys. The reconstructed GNILC thermal dust and CIB maps are delivered as Planck products.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.09396  [pdf] - 1530923
Design of 280 GHz feedhorn-coupled TES arrays for the balloon-borne polarimeter SPIDER
Comments: Proceedings of SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2016
Submitted: 2016-06-30, last modified: 2016-07-07
We describe 280 GHz bolometric detector arrays that instrument the balloon-borne polarimeter SPIDER. A primary science goal of SPIDER is to measure the large-scale B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background in search of the cosmic-inflation, gravitational-wave signature. 280 GHz channels aid this science goal by constraining the level of B-mode contamination from galactic dust emission. We present the focal plane unit design, which consists of a 16$\times$16 array of conical, corrugated feedhorns coupled to a monolithic detector array fabricated on a 150 mm diameter silicon wafer. Detector arrays are capable of polarimetric sensing via waveguide probe-coupling to a multiplexed array of transition-edge-sensor (TES) bolometers. The SPIDER receiver has three focal plane units at 280 GHz, which in total contains 765 spatial pixels and 1,530 polarization sensitive bolometers. By fabrication and measurement of single feedhorns, we demonstrate 14.7$^{\circ}$ FHWM Gaussian-shaped beams with $<$1% ellipticity in a 30% fractional bandwidth centered at 280 GHz. We present electromagnetic simulations of the detection circuit, which show 94% band-averaged, single-polarization coupling efficiency, 3% reflection and 3% radiative loss. Lastly, we demonstrate a low thermal conductance bolometer, which is well-described by a simple TES model and exhibits an electrical noise equivalent power (NEP) = 2.6 $\times$ 10$^{-17}$ W/$\sqrt{\mathrm{Hz}}$, consistent with the phonon noise prediction.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.06745  [pdf] - 1424675
Submillimeter Polarization Spectrum in the Vela C Molecular Cloud
Comments: 9 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2015-12-21, last modified: 2016-06-17
Polarization maps of the Vela C molecular cloud were obtained at 250, 350, and 500um during the 2012 flight of the balloon-borne telescope BLASTPol. These measurements are used in conjunction with 850um data from Planck to study the submillimeter spectrum of the polarization fraction for this cloud. The spectrum is relatively flat and does not exhibit a pronounced minimum at \lambda ~350um as suggested by previous measurements of other molecular clouds. The shape of the spectrum does not depend strongly on the radiative environment of the dust, as quantified by the column density or the dust temperature obtained from Herschel data. The polarization ratios observed in Vela C are consistent with a model of a porous clumpy molecular cloud being uniformly heated by the interstellar radiation field.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.08628  [pdf] - 1415245
The NIKA2 commissioning campaign: performance and first results
Comments: 11 pages
Submitted: 2016-05-27, last modified: 2016-05-31
The New IRAM KID Array 2 (NIKA 2) is a dual-band camera operating with three frequency-multiplexed kilopixels arrays of Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detectors (LEKID) cooled at 150 mK. NIKA 2 is designed to observe the intensity and polarisation of the sky at 1.15 and 2.0 mm wavelength from the IRAM 30 m telescope. The NIKA 2 instrument represents a huge step in performance as compared to the NIKA pathfinder instrument, which has already shown state-of-the-art detector and photometric performance. After the commissioning planned to be accomplished at the end of 2016, NIKA 2 will be an IRAM resident instrument for the next ten years or more. NIKA 2 should allow the astrophysical community to tackle a large number of open questions reaching from the role of the Galactic magnetic field in star formation to the discrepancy between cluster-based and CMB-based cosmology possibly induced by the unknown cluster physics. We present an overview of the commissioning phase together with some first results.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.09371  [pdf] - 1528066
Magnetic field morphology in nearby molecular clouds as revealed by starlight and submillimetre polarization
Comments: 15 pages, 10 figures, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2016-05-30
Within four nearby (d < 160 pc) molecular clouds, we statistically evaluate the structure of the interstellar magnetic field, projected on the plane of the sky and integrated along the line of sight, as inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz and from the optical and NIR polarization of background starlight. We compare the dispersion of the field orientation directly in vicinities with an area equivalent to that subtended by the Planck effective beam at 353 GHz (10') and using the second-order structure functions of the field orientation angles. We find that the average dispersion of the starlight-inferred field orientations within 10'-diameter vicinities is less than 20 deg, and that at these scales the mean field orientation is on average within 5 deg of that inferred from the submillimetre polarization observations in the considered regions. We also find that the dispersion of starlight polarization orientations and the polarization fractions within these vicinities are well reproduced by a Gaussian model of the turbulent structure of the magnetic field, in agreement with the findings reported by the Planck collaboration at scales greater than 10' and for comparable column densities. At scales greater than 10', we find differences of up to 14.7 deg between the second-order structure functions obtained from starlight and submillimetre polarization observations in the same positions in the plane of the sky, but comparison with a Gaussian model of the turbulent structure of the magnetic field indicates that these differences are small and are consistent with the difference in angular resolution between both techniques.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.05298  [pdf] - 1429387
Balloon-Borne Submillimeter Polarimetry of the Vela C Molecular Cloud: Systematic Dependence of Polarization Fraction on Column Density and Local Polarization-Angle Dispersion
Comments: 24 pages, 20 figures, and 2 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ. Updated from originally submitted version
Submitted: 2015-09-17, last modified: 2016-04-29
We present results for Vela C obtained during the 2012 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol). We mapped polarized intensity across almost the entire extent of this giant molecular cloud, in bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 {\mu}m. In this initial paper, we show our 500 {\mu}m data smoothed to a resolution of 2.5 arcminutes (approximately 0.5 pc). We show that the mean level of the fractional polarization p and most of its spatial variations can be accounted for using an empirical three-parameter power-law fit, p = p_0 N^(-0.4) S^(-0.6), where N is the hydrogen column density and S is the polarization-angle dispersion on 0.5 pc scales. The decrease of p with increasing S is expected because changes in the magnetic field direction within the cloud volume sampled by each measurement will lead to cancellation of polarization signals. The decrease of p with increasing N might be caused by the same effect, if magnetic field disorder increases for high column density sightlines. Alternatively, the intrinsic polarization efficiency of the dust grain population might be lower for material along higher density sightlines. We find no significant correlation between N and S. Comparison of observed submillimeter polarization maps with synthetic polarization maps derived from numerical simulations provides a promising method for testing star formation theories. Realistic simulations should allow for the possibility of variable intrinsic polarization efficiency. The measured levels of correlation among p, N, and S provide points of comparison between observations and simulations.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.01029  [pdf] - 1530576
Planck intermediate results. XLIV. The structure of the Galactic magnetic field from dust polarization maps of the southern Galactic cap
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arzoumanian, D.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Neveu, J.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Soler, J. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-04-04
We study the statistical properties of interstellar dust polarization at high Galactic latitude, using the Stokes parameter Planck maps at 353 GHz. Our aim is to advance the understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM), and to provide a model of the polarized dust foreground for cosmic microwave background component-separation procedures. Focusing on the southern Galactic cap, we examine the statistical distributions of the polarization fraction ($p$) and angle ($\psi$) to characterize the ordered and turbulent components of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) in the solar neighbourhood. We relate patterns at large angular scales in polarization to the orientation of the mean (ordered) GMF towards Galactic coordinates $(l_0,b_0)=(70^\circ \pm 5^\circ,24^\circ \pm 5^\circ)$. The histogram of $p$ shows a wide dispersion up to 25 %. The histogram of $\psi$ has a standard deviation of $12^\circ$ about the regular pattern expected from the ordered GMF. We use these histograms to build a phenomenological model of the turbulent component of the GMF, assuming a uniform effective polarization fraction ($p_0$) of dust emission. To model the Stokes parameters, we approximate the integration along the line of sight (LOS) as a sum over a set of $N$ independent polarization layers, in each of which the turbulent component of the GMF is obtained from Gaussian realizations of a power-law power spectrum. We are able to reproduce the observed $p$ and $\psi$ distributions using: a $p_0$ value of (26 $\pm$ 3)%; a ratio of 0.9 $\pm$ 0.1 between the strengths of the turbulent and mean components of the GMF; and a small value of $N$. We relate the polarization layers to the density structure and to the correlation length of the GMF along the LOS.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.01771  [pdf] - 1337397
A cryogenic rotation stage with a large clear aperture for the half-wave plates in the Spider instrument
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures, Published in Review of Scientific Instruments. v2 includes reviewer changes and longer literature review
Submitted: 2015-10-06, last modified: 2016-01-08
We describe the cryogenic half-wave plate rotation mechanisms built for and used in Spider, a polarization-sensitive balloon-borne telescope array that observed the Cosmic Microwave Background at 95 GHz and 150 GHz during a stratospheric balloon flight from Antarctica in January 2015. The mechanisms operate at liquid helium temperature in flight. A three-point contact design keeps the mechanical bearings relatively small but allows for a large (305 mm) diameter clear aperture. A worm gear driven by a cryogenic stepper motor allows for precise positioning and prevents undesired rotation when the motors are depowered. A custom-built optical encoder system monitors the bearing angle to an absolute accuracy of +/- 0.1 degrees. The system performed well in Spider during its successful 16 day flight.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.05392  [pdf] - 1330249
BFORE: The B-mode Foreground Experiment
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, conference proceedings published in Journal of Low Temperature Physics
Submitted: 2015-09-17, last modified: 2015-12-20
The B-mode Foreground Experiment (BFORE) is a proposed NASA balloon project designed to make optimal use of the sub-orbital platform by concentrating on three dust foreground bands (270, 350, and 600 GHz) that complement ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) programs. BFORE will survey ~1/4 of the sky with 1.7 - 3.7 arcminute resolution, enabling precise characterization of the Galactic dust that now limits constraints on inflation from CMB B-mode polarization measurements. In addition, BFORE's combination of frequency coverage, large survey area, and angular resolution enables science far beyond the critical goal of measuring foregrounds. BFORE will constrain the velocities of thousands of galaxy clusters, provide a new window on the cosmic infrared background, and probe magnetic fields in the interstellar medium. We review the BFORE science case, timeline, and instrument design, which is based on a compact off-axis telescope coupled to >10,000 superconducting detectors.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.05156  [pdf] - 1530367
Planck intermediate results. XL. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal from the Virgo cluster
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Weller, J.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 21 pages and 20 figures. Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2015-11-16
The Virgo cluster is the largest Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) source in the sky, both in terms of angular size and total integrated flux. Planck's wide angular scale and frequency coverage, together with its high sensitivity, allow a detailed study of this large object through the SZ effect. Virgo is well resolved by Planck, showing an elongated structure, which correlates well with the morphology observed from X-rays, but extends beyond the observed X-ray signal. We find a good agreement between the SZ signal (or Compton paranmeter, y_c) observed by Planck and the expected signal inferred from X-ray observations and simple analytical models. Due to its proximity to us, the gas beyond the virial radius can be studied with unprecedented sensitivity by integrating the SZ signal over tens of square degrees. We study the signal in the outskirts of Virgo and compare it with analytical models and a constrained simulation of the environment of Virgo. Planck data suggest that significant amounts of low-density plasma surround Virgo out to twice the virial radius. We find the SZ signal in the outskirts of Virgo to be consistent with a simple model that extrapolates the inferred pressure at lower radii while assuming that the temperature stays in the keV range beyond the virial radius. The observed signal is also consistent with simulations and points to a shallow pressure profile in the outskirts of the cluster. This reservoir of gas at large radii can be linked with the hottest phase of the elusive warm/hot intergalactic medium. Taking the lack of symmetry of Virgo into account, we find that a prolate model is favoured by the combination of SZ and X-ray data, in agreement with predictions.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.02779  [pdf] - 1354790
Planck intermediate results. XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 18 pages, 15 figures. A&A accepted. Corresponding author: T. Ghosh
Submitted: 2015-05-11, last modified: 2015-10-05
The quest for a B-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. We present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the 353 GHz Planck Stokes maps at high Galactic latitude, relevant to the study of dust emission as a polarized foreground to the CMB. We filter the intensity and polarization maps to isolate filaments in the range of angular scales where the power asymmetry between E-modes and B-modes is observed. Using the Smoothed Hessian Major Axis Filament Finder, we identify 259 filaments at high Galactic latitude, with lengths larger or equal to 2\deg\ (corresponding to 3.5 pc in length for a typical distance of 100 pc). These filaments show a preferred orientation parallel to the magnetic field projected onto the plane of the sky, derived from their polarization angles. We present mean maps of the filaments in Stokes I, Q, U, E, and B, computed by stacking individual images rotated to align the orientations of the filaments. Combining the stacked images and the histogram of relative orientations, we estimate the mean polarization fraction of the filaments to be 11 %. Furthermore, we show that the correlation between the filaments and the magnetic field orientations may account for the E and B asymmetry and the $C_{\ell}^{TE}/C_{\ell}^{EE}$ ratio, reported in the power spectra analysis of the Planck 353 GHz polarization maps. Future models of the dust foreground for CMB polarization studies will need to take into account the observed correlation between the dust polarization and the structure of interstellar matter.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.00922  [pdf] - 1354774
Planck intermediate results. XXXIV. The magnetic field structure in the Rosette Nebula
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Juvela, M.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 16 pages, 11 figures. A&A accepted. Corresponding author: M.I.R. Alves
Submitted: 2015-01-05, last modified: 2015-09-15
Planck has mapped the polarized dust emission over the whole sky, making it possible to trace the Galactic magnetic field structure that pervades the interstellar medium (ISM). We combine polarization data from Planck with rotation measure (RM) observations towards a massive star-forming region, the Rosette Nebula in the Monoceros molecular cloud, to study its magnetic field structure and the impact of an expanding HII region on the morphology of the field. We derive an analytical solution for the magnetic field, assumed to evolve from an initially uniform configuration following the expansion of ionized gas and the formation of a shell of swept-up ISM. From the RM data we estimate a mean value of the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field of about 3microG (towards the observer) in the Rosette Nebula, for a uniform electron density of about 12cm-3. The dust shell that surrounds the Rosette HII region is clearly observed in the Planck intensity map at 353 GHz, with a polarization signal significantly different from that of the local background when considered as a whole. The Planck observations constrain the plane-of-the-sky orientation of the magnetic field in the Rosette's parent molecular cloud to be mostly aligned with the large-scale field along the Galactic plane. The Planck data are compared with the analytical model, which predicts the mean polarization properties of a spherical and uniform dust shell for a given orientation of the field. This comparison leads to an upper limit of about 45degr on the angle between the line of sight and the magnetic field in the Rosette complex, for an assumed intrinsic dust polarization fraction of 4%. This field direction can reproduce the RM values detected in the ionized region if the magnetic field strength in the Monoceros molecular cloud is in the range 6.5--9microG.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.06953  [pdf] - 1275488
The Thermal Design, Characterization, and Performance of the SPIDER Long-Duration Balloon Cryostat
Comments: 15 pgs, 17 figs
Submitted: 2015-06-23, last modified: 2015-09-11
We describe the SPIDER flight cryostat, which is designed to cool six millimeter-wavelength telescopes during an Antarctic long-duration balloon flight. The cryostat, one of the largest to have flown on a stratospheric payload, uses liquid helium-4 to deliver cooling power to stages at 4.2 and 1.6 K. Stainless steel capillaries facilitate a high flow impedance connection between the main liquid helium tank and a smaller superfluid tank, allowing the latter to operate at 1.6 K as long as there is liquid in the 4.2 K main tank. Each telescope houses a closed cycle helium-3 adsorption refrigerator that further cools the focal planes down to 300 mK. Liquid helium vapor from the main tank is routed through heat exchangers that cool radiation shields, providing negative thermal feedback. The system performed successfully during a 17 day flight in the 2014-2015 Antarctic summer. The cryostat had a total hold time of 16.8 days, with 15.9 days occurring during flight.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.04123  [pdf] - 1354777
Planck intermediate results. XXXV. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hennebelle, P.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 28 pages, 20 figures. A&A accepted. Corresponding author: J.D. Soler
Submitted: 2015-02-13, last modified: 2015-09-08
Within ten nearby (d < 450 pc) Gould Belt molecular clouds we evaluate statistically the relative orientation between the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the gas column density structures, quantified by the gradient of the column density, $N_H$. The selected regions, covering several degrees in size, are analyzed at an effective angular resolution of 10' FWHM, thus sampling physical scales from 0.4 to 40 pc in the nearest cloud. The column densities in the selected regions range from $N_H \approx 10^{21}$ to $10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, and hence they correspond to the bulk of the molecular clouds. The relative orientation is evaluated pixel by pixel and analyzed in bins of column density using the novel statistical tool called "Histogram of Relative Orientations". Throughout this study, we assume that the polarized emission observed by Planck at 353 GHz is representative of the projected morphology of the magnetic field in each region, i.e., we assume a constant dust grain alignment efficiency, independent of the local environment. Within most clouds we find that the relative orientation changes progressively with increasing $N_H$, from preferentially parallel or having no preferred orientation to preferentially perpendicular. In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds this trend in relative orientation is a signature of Alfv\'enic or sub-Alfv\'enic turbulence, implying that the magnetic field is significant for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck. We compare the deduced magnetic field strength with estimates we obtain from other methods and discuss the implications of the Planck observations for the general picture of molecular cloud formation and evolution.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.06652  [pdf] - 1284985
Galactic interstellar filaments as probed by LOFAR and Planck
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2015-08-26
Recent Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations at 115-175 MHz of a field at medium Galactic latitudes (centered at the bright quasar 3C196) have shown striking filamentary structures in polarization that extend over more than 4 degrees across the sky. In addition, the Planck satellite has released full sky maps of the dust emission in polarization at 353GHz. The LOFAR data resolve Faraday structures along the line of sight, whereas the Planck dust polarization maps probe the orientation of the sky projected magnetic field component. Hence, no apparent correlation between the two is expected. Here we report a surprising, yet clear, correlation between the filamentary structures, detected with LOFAR, and the magnetic field orientation, probed by the Planck satellite. This finding points to a common, yet unclear, physical origin of the two measurements in this specific area in the sky. A number of follow-up multi- frequency studies are proposed to shed light on this unexpected finding.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.2271  [pdf] - 1354773
Planck intermediate results. XXXIII. Signature of the magnetic field geometry of interstellar filaments in dust polarization maps
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Berné, O.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 16 pages, 14 figures, Submitted to Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2014-11-09, last modified: 2015-07-01
Planck observations at 353GHz provide the first fully-sampled maps of the polarized dust emission towards interstellar filaments and their backgrounds. The polarization data provide insight on the structure of their magnetic field (B). We present the polarization maps of three nearby star forming filament of moderate column density (NH~10^22cm^-2): Musca, B211, and L1506. We use the spatial information to separate Stokes I, Q, and U of the filaments from those of their backgrounds, an essential step to measure the intrinsic polarization fraction (p) and angle (psi) of each emission component. We find that the polarization angles in the three filaments (psi_fil) are coherent along their lengths and not the same as in their backgrounds (psi_bg). The differences between psi_fil and psi_bg are 12deg, 6deg, and 54deg for Musca, B211, and L1506, respectively. These differences for Musca and L1506 are larger than the dispersions of psi, both along the filaments and in their backgrounds. The observed changes of psi are direct evidence for variations of the orientation of the plane of the sky (POS) projection of the B-field. As in previous studies, we find a decrease of several percent of p with NH. We show that the drop in p cannot be explained by random fluctuations of the orientation of B within the filaments because they are too small (sigma_psi<10deg). We recognize the degeneracy between dust alignment efficiency and the structure of B in causing variations in p, but we argue that the decrease of p from the backgrounds to the filaments results in part from depolarization associated with the 3D structure of B: both its orientation in the POS and with respect to the POS. We do not resolve the inner structure of the filaments, but at the smallest scales accessible with Planck (~0.2pc), the observed changes of psi and p hold information on the B-field structure within filaments.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.6728  [pdf] - 1354770
Planck intermediate results. XXXII. The relative orientation between the magnetic field and structures traced by interstellar dust
Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Submitted to Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2014-09-23, last modified: 2015-03-31
The role of the magnetic field in the formation of the filamentary structures observed in the interstellar medium (ISM) is a debated topic. The Planck all-sky maps of linearly polarized emission from dust at 353GHz provide the required combination of imaging and statistics to study the correlation between the structures of the Galactic magnetic field and of interstellar matter, both in the diffuse ISM and in molecular clouds. The data reveal structures, or ridges, in the intensity map with counterparts in the Stokes Q and/or U maps. We focus on structures at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes with column density from $10^{20}$ to $10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$. We measure the magnetic field orientation on the plane of the sky from the polarization data, and present an algorithm to estimate the orientation of the ridges from the dust intensity map. We use analytical models to account for projection effects. Comparing polarization angles on and off the structures, we estimate the mean ratio between the strengths of the turbulent and mean components of the magnetic field to be between 0.6 and 1.0, with a preferred value of 0.8. We find that the ridges are preferentially aligned with the magnetic field measured on the structures. This trend becomes more striking for increasing polarization fraction and decreasing column density. We interpret the increase of alignment with polarization fraction as a consequence of projections effects. The decrease of alignment for high column density is not due to a loss of correlation between the structures and the geometry of the magnetic field. In molecular complexes, we observe structures perpendicular to the magnetic field, which cannot be accounted for by projection effects. We discuss our results in the context of models and MHD simulations, which describe the formation of structures in the magnetized ISM.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.5738  [pdf] - 1354768
Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes
Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B. Rouillé; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 25 pages, 25 figures, accepted in A&A
Submitted: 2014-09-19, last modified: 2014-12-08
The polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100GHz. We exploit the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353GHz to measure the dust angular power spectra $C_\ell^{EE,BB}$ over the range $40<\ell<600$ well away from the Galactic plane. These will bring new insights into interstellar dust physics and a precise determination of the level of contamination for CMB polarization experiments. We show that statistical properties of the emission can be characterized over large fractions of the sky using $C_\ell$. For the dust, they are well described by power laws in $\ell$ with exponents $\alpha^{EE,BB}=-2.42\pm0.02$. The amplitudes of the polarization $C_\ell$ vary with the average brightness in a way similar to the intensity ones. The dust polarization frequency dependence is consistent with modified blackbody emission with $\beta_d=1.59$ and $T_d=19.6$K. We find a systematic ratio between the amplitudes of the Galactic $B$- and $E$-modes of 0.5. We show that even in the faintest dust-emitting regions there are no "clean" windows where primordial CMB $B$-mode polarization could be measured without subtraction of dust emission. Finally, we investigate the level of dust polarization in the BICEP2 experiment field. Extrapolation of the Planck 353GHz data to 150GHz gives a dust power $\ell(\ell+1)C_\ell^{BB}/(2\pi)$ of $1.32\times10^{-2}\mu$K$_{CMB}^2$ over the $40<\ell<120$ range; the statistical uncertainty is $\pm0.29$ and there is an additional uncertainty (+0.28,-0.24) from the extrapolation, both in the same units. This is the same magnitude as reported by BICEP2 over this $\ell$ range, which highlights the need for assessment of the polarized dust signal even in the cleanest windows of the sky.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.0872  [pdf] - 978991
Planck intermediate results. XX. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust with simulations of MHD turbulence
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alina, D.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fanciullo, L.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Pelkonen, V. -M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Part of a series of four papers, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2014-05-05, last modified: 2014-09-25
Polarized emission observed by Planck HFI at 353 GHz towards a sample of nearby fields is presented, focusing on the statistics of polarization fractions $p$ and angles $\psi$. The polarization fractions and column densities in these nearby fields are representative of the range of values obtained over the whole sky. We find that: (i) the largest polarization fractions are reached in the most diffuse fields; (ii) the maximum polarization fraction $p_\mathrm{max}$ decreases with column density $N_\mathrm{H}$ in the more opaque fields with $N_\mathrm{H} > 10^{21}\,\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$; and (iii) the polarization fraction along a given line of sight is correlated with the local spatial coherence of the polarization angle. These observations are compared to polarized emission maps computed in simulations of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence in which we assume a uniform intrinsic polarization fraction of the dust grains. We find that an estimate of this parameter may be recovered from the maximum polarization fraction $p_\mathrm{max}$ in diffuse regions where the magnetic field is ordered on large scales and perpendicular to the line of sight. This emphasizes the impact of anisotropies of the magnetic field on the emerging polarization signal. The decrease of the polarization fraction with column density in nearby molecular clouds is well reproduced in the simulations, indicating that it is essentially due to the turbulent structure of the magnetic field: an accumulation of variously polarized structures along the line of sight leads to such an anti-correlation. In the simulations, polarization fractions are also found to anti-correlate with the angle dispersion function $\mathcal{S}$. [abridged]
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.1883  [pdf] - 1215475
Attitude determination for balloon-borne experiments
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, Presented at SPIE Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes V, June 23, 2014. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9145
Submitted: 2014-07-07, last modified: 2014-07-15
An attitude determination system for balloon-borne experiments is presented. The system provides pointing information in azimuth and elevation for instruments flying on stratospheric balloons over Antarctica. In-flight attitude is given by the real-time combination of readings from star cameras, a magnetometer, sun sensors, GPS, gyroscopes, tilt sensors and an elevation encoder. Post-flight attitude reconstruction is determined from star camera solutions, interpolated by the gyroscopes using an extended Kalman Filter. The multi-sensor system was employed by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol), an experiment that measures polarized thermal emission from interstellar dust clouds. A similar system was designed for the upcoming flight of SPIDER, a Cosmic Microwave Background polarization experiment. The pointing requirements for these experiments are discussed, as well as the challenges in designing attitude reconstruction systems for high altitude balloon flights. In the 2010 and 2012 BLASTPol flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica, the system demonstrated an accuracy of <5' rms in-flight, and <5" rms post-flight.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.3815  [pdf] - 1215668
The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry-BLASTPol: Performance and results from the 2012 Antarctic flight
Comments: Presented at SPIE Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes V, June 23, 2014
Submitted: 2014-07-14
The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) is a suborbital mapping experiment, designed to study the role played by magnetic fields in the star formation process. BLASTPol observes polarized light using a total power instrument, photolithographic polarizing grids, and an achromatic half-wave plate to modulate the polarization signal. During its second flight from Antarctica in December 2012, BLASTPol made degree scale maps of linearly polarized dust emission from molecular clouds in three wavebands, centered at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The instrumental performance was an improvement over the 2010 BLASTPol flight, with decreased systematics resulting in a higher number of confirmed polarization vectors. The resultant dataset allows BLASTPol to trace magnetic fields in star-forming regions at scales ranging from cores to entire molecular cloud complexes.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.2670  [pdf] - 1215575
Thermal design and performance of the balloon-borne large aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry BLASTPol
Comments: 18 pages, 11 figures. Presented at SPIE Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes V, June 23, 2014. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9145
Submitted: 2014-07-09
We present the thermal model of the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol). This instrument was successfully flown in two circumpolar flights from McMurdo, Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. During these two flights, BLASTPol obtained unprecedented information about the magnetic field in molecular clouds through the measurement of the polarized thermal emission of interstellar dust grains. The thermal design of the experiment addresses the stability and control of the payload necessary for this kind of measurement. We describe the thermal modeling of the payload including the sun-shielding strategy. We present the in-flight thermal performance of the instrument and compare the predictions of the model with the temperatures registered during the flight. We describe the difficulties of modeling the thermal behavior of the balloon-borne platform and establish landmarks that can be used in the design of future balloon-borne instruments.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.2906  [pdf] - 1215590
Pre-flight integration and characterization of the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope
Comments: 25 pages, 14 figures. Presented at SPIE Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VII, June 26, 2014. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9153
Submitted: 2014-07-09
We present the results of integration and characterization of the SPIDER instrument after the 2013 pre-flight campaign. SPIDER is a balloon-borne polarimeter designed to probe the primordial gravitational wave signal in the degree-scale $B$-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background. With six independent telescopes housing over 2000 detectors in the 94 GHz and 150 GHz frequency bands, SPIDER will map 7.5% of the sky with a depth of 11 to 14 $\mu$K$\cdot$arcmin at each frequency, which is a factor of $\sim$5 improvement over Planck. We discuss the integration of the pointing, cryogenic, electronics, and power sub-systems, as well as pre-flight characterization of the detectors and optical systems. SPIDER is well prepared for a December 2014 flight from Antarctica, and is expected to be limited by astrophysical foreground emission, and not instrumental sensitivity, over the survey region.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.1880  [pdf] - 1215472
Pointing control for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope
Comments: 20 pages, 12 figures, Presented at SPIE Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes V, June 23, 2014. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9145
Submitted: 2014-07-07
We present the technology and control methods developed for the pointing system of the SPIDER experiment. SPIDER is a balloon-borne polarimeter designed to detect the imprint of primordial gravitational waves in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation. We describe the two main components of the telescope's azimuth drive: the reaction wheel and the motorized pivot. A 13 kHz PI control loop runs on a digital signal processor, with feedback from fibre optic rate gyroscopes. This system can control azimuthal speed with < 0.02 deg/s RMS error. To control elevation, SPIDER uses stepper-motor-driven linear actuators to rotate the cryostat, which houses the optical instruments, relative to the outer frame. With the velocity in each axis controlled in this way, higher-level control loops on the onboard flight computers can implement the pointing and scanning observation modes required for the experiment. We have accomplished the non-trivial task of scanning a 5000 lb payload sinusoidally in azimuth at a peak acceleration of 0.8 deg/s$^2$, and a peak speed of 6 deg/s. We can do so while reliably achieving sub-arcminute pointing control accuracy.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.1882  [pdf] - 1215474
BLASTbus electronics: general-purpose readout and control for balloon-borne experiments
Comments: Presented at SPIE Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes V, June 23, 2014. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9145
Submitted: 2014-07-07
We present the second generation BLASTbus electronics. The primary purposes of this system are detector readout, attitude control, and cryogenic housekeeping, for balloon-borne telescopes. Readout of neutron transmutation doped germanium (NTD-Ge) bolometers requires low noise and parallel acquisition of hundreds of analog signals. Controlling a telescope's attitude requires the capability to interface to a wide variety of sensors and motors, and to use them together in a fast, closed loop. To achieve these different goals, the BLASTbus system employs a flexible motherboard-daughterboard architecture. The programmable motherboard features a digital signal processor (DSP) and field-programmable gate array (FPGA), as well as slots for three daughterboards. The daughterboards provide the interface to the outside world, with versions for analog to digital conversion, and optoisolated digital input/output. With the versatility afforded by this design, the BLASTbus also finds uses in cryogenic, thermometry, and power systems. For accurate timing control to tie everything together, the system operates in a fully synchronous manner. BLASTbus electronics have been successfully deployed to the South Pole, and flown on stratospheric balloons.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.1881  [pdf] - 1215473
Design and construction of a carbon fiber gondola for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope
Comments: 16 pages, 11 figures. Presented at SPIE Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes V, June 23, 2014. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9145
Submitted: 2014-07-07
We introduce the light-weight carbon fiber and aluminum gondola designed for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope. SPIDER is designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation with unprecedented sensitivity and control of systematics in search of the imprint of inflation: a period of exponential expansion in the early Universe. The requirements of this balloon-borne instrument put tight constrains on the mass budget of the payload. The SPIDER gondola is designed to house the experiment and guarantee its operational and structural integrity during its balloon-borne flight, while using less than 10% of the total mass of the payload. We present a construction method for the gondola based on carbon fiber reinforced polymer tubes with aluminum inserts and aluminum multi-tube joints. We describe the validation of the model through Finite Element Analysis and mechanical tests.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.0331  [pdf] - 1209301
Comparison of Prestellar Core Elongations and Large-Scale Molecular Cloud Structures in the Lupus I Region
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2014-05-01
Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on subparsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, is not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 $\mu$m maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to a large-scale filament shape model for Lupus I, or relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 $\mu$m with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics - including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament - and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.4866  [pdf] - 1150867
Empirical modelling of the BLASTPol achromatic half-wave plate for precision submillimetre polarimetry
Comments: 19 pages, 20 figures; MNRAS accepted. Pruned some introductory material; added section comparing HWP design vs as-built parameters and performance; improved discussion on phase shift
Submitted: 2012-08-23, last modified: 2013-11-13
A cryogenic achromatic half-wave plate (HWP) for submillimetre astronomical polarimetry has been designed, manufactured, tested, and deployed in the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol). The design is based on the five-slab Pancharatnam recipe and it works in the wavelength range 200-600 micron, making it the broadest-band HWP built to date at (sub)millimetre wavelengths. The frequency behaviour of the HWP has been fully characterised at room and cryogenic temperatures with incoherent radiation from a polarising Fourier transform spectrometer. We develop a novel empirical model, complementary to the physical and analytical ones available in the literature, that allows us to recover the HWP Mueller matrix and phase shift as a function of frequency and extrapolated to 4K. We show that most of the HWP non-idealities can be modelled by quantifying one wavelength-dependent parameter, the position of the HWP equivalent axes, which is then readily implemented in a map-making algorithm. We derive this parameter for a range of spectral signatures of input astronomical sources relevant to BLASTPol, and provide a benchmark example of how our method can yield improved accuracy on measurements of the polarisation angle on the sky at submillimetre wavelengths.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.5853  [pdf] - 1172892
Lupus I Observations from the 2010 Flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry
Comments: Submitted to ApJ. 28 pages, 2 tables, 2 figures, in preprint format
Submitted: 2013-07-22
The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 {\mu}m. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.). The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.1830  [pdf] - 710835
An Imprint of Molecular Cloud Magnetization in the Morphology of the Dust Polarized Emission
Comments: (16 pages, 11 figures, submitted to ApJ 05MAR2013, accepted 07JUL2013)
Submitted: 2013-03-07, last modified: 2013-07-10
We describe a morphological imprint of magnetization found when considering the relative orientation of the magnetic field direction with respect to the density structures in simulated turbulent molecular clouds. This imprint was found using the Histogram of Relative Orientations (HRO): a new technique that utilizes the gradient to characterize the directionality of density and column density structures on multiple scales. We present results of the HRO analysis in three models of molecular clouds in which the initial magnetic field strength is varied, but an identical initial turbulent velocity field is introduced, which subsequently decays. The HRO analysis was applied to the simulated data cubes and mock-observations of the simulations produced by integrating the data cube along particular lines of sight. In the 3D analysis we describe the relative orientation of the magnetic field $\mathbf{B}$ with respect to the density structures, showing that: 1.The magnetic field shows a preferential orientation parallel to most of the density structures in the three simulated cubes. 2.The relative orientation changes from parallel to perpendicular in regions with density over a critical density $n_{T}$ in the highest magnetization case. 3.The change of relative orientation is largest for the highest magnetization and decreases in lower magnetization cases. This change in the relative orientation is also present in the projected maps. In conjunction with simulations HROs can be used to establish a link between the observed morphology in polarization maps and the physics included in simulations of molecular clouds.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.3087  [pdf] - 659433
SPIDER: Probing the Early Universe with a Suborbital Polarimeter
Comments: 29 pages, 8 figures, 4 tables; v2: matches published version, flight schedule updated, two typos fixed in Table 2, references and minor clarifications added, results unchanged
Submitted: 2011-06-15, last modified: 2013-05-02
We evaluate the ability of SPIDER, a balloon-borne polarimeter, to detect a divergence-free polarization pattern ("B-modes") in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). In the inflationary scenario, the amplitude of this signal is proportional to that of the primordial scalar perturbations through the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. We show that the expected level of systematic error in the SPIDER instrument is significantly below the amplitude of an interesting cosmological signal with r=0.03. We present a scanning strategy that enables us to minimize uncertainty in the reconstruction of the Stokes parameters used to characterize the CMB, while accessing a relatively wide range of angular scales. Evaluating the amplitude of the polarized Galactic emission in the SPIDER field, we conclude that the polarized emission from interstellar dust is as bright or brighter than the cosmological signal at all SPIDER frequencies (90 GHz, 150 GHz, and 280 GHz), a situation similar to that found in the "Southern Hole." We show that two ~20-day flights of the SPIDER instrument can constrain the amplitude of the B-mode signal to r<0.03 (99% CL) even when foreground contamination is taken into account. In the absence of foregrounds, the same limit can be reached after one 20-day flight.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.1368  [pdf] - 1117809
Present-Day Descendants of z=3 Ly-{\alpha} Emitting Galaxies in the Millennium-II Halo Merger Trees
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-04-05
Using the Millennium-II Simulation dark matter sub-halo merger histories, we created mock catalogs of Lyman Alpha Emitting (LAE) galaxies at z=3.1 to study the properties of their descendants. Several models were created by selecting the sub-halos to match the number density and typical dark matter mass determined from observations of these galaxies. We used mass-based and age-based selection criteria to study their effects on descendant populations at z~2, 1 and 0. For the models that best represent LAEs at z=3.1, the z=0 descendants have a median dark matter halo mass of 10^12.7 M_Sun, with a wide scatter in masses (50% between 10^11.8 and 10^13.7 M_Sun). Our study differentiated between central and satellite sub-halos and found that ~55% of z=0 descendants are central sub-halos with M_Median~10^12 M_Sun. This confirms that central z=0 descendants of z=3.1 LAEs have halo masses typical of L* type galaxies. The satellite sub-halos reside in group/cluster environments with dark matter masses around 10^14 M_Sun. The median descendant mass is robust to various methods of age determination, but it could vary by a factor of 5 due to current observational uncertainties in the clustering of LAEs used to determine their typical z=3.1 dark matter mass.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.2507  [pdf] - 372118
Thermal architecture for the SPIDER flight cryostat
Comments: 11 pages, 4 figures; as published in the conference proceedings for SPIE Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy V (2010)
Submitted: 2011-06-13
We describe the cryogenic system for SPIDER, a balloon-borne microwave polarimeter that will map 8% of the sky with degree-scale angular resolution. The system consists of a 1284 L liquid helium cryostat and a 16 L capillary-filled superfluid helium tank, which provide base operating temperatures of 4 K and 1.5 K, respectively. Closed-cycle helium-3 adsorption refrigerators supply sub-Kelvin cooling power to multiple focal planes, which are housed in monochromatic telescope inserts. The main helium tank is suspended inside the vacuum vessel with thermally insulating fiberglass flexures, and shielded from thermal radiation by a combination of two vapor cooled shields and multi-layer insulation. This system allows for an extremely low instrumental background and a hold time in excess of 25 days. The total mass of the cryogenic system, including cryogens, is approximately 1000 kg. This enables conventional long duration balloon flights. We will discuss the design, thermal analysis, and qualification of the cryogenic system.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.2158  [pdf] - 371654
SPIDER: a balloon-borne CMB polarimeter for large angular scales
Comments: 12 pages, 6 figures; as published in the conference proceedings for SPIE Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy V (2010)
Submitted: 2011-06-10
We describe SPIDER, a balloon-borne instrument to map the polarization of the millimeter-wave sky with degree angular resolution. Spider consists of six monochromatic refracting telescopes, each illuminating a focal plane of large-format antenna-coupled bolometer arrays. A total of 2,624 superconducting transition-edge sensors are distributed among three observing bands centered at 90, 150, and 280 GHz. A cold half-wave plate at the aperture of each telescope modulates the polarization of incoming light to control systematics. Spider's first flight will be a 20-30-day Antarctic balloon campaign in December 2011. This flight will map \sim8% of the sky to achieve unprecedented sensitivity to the polarization signature of the gravitational wave background predicted by inflationary cosmology. The Spider mission will also serve as a proving ground for these detector technologies in preparation for a future satellite mission.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.2173  [pdf] - 372068
Design and performance of the Spider instrument
Comments: 12 pages, 5 figures, Proceedings of SPIE, Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2010, San Diego, CA
Submitted: 2011-06-10
Here we describe the design and performance of the Spider instrument. Spider is a balloon-borne cosmic microwave background polarization imager that will map part of the sky at 90, 145, and 280 GHz with sub-degree resolution and high sensitivity. This paper discusses the general design principles of the instrument inserts, mechanical structures, optics, focal plane architecture, thermal architecture, and magnetic shielding of the TES sensors and SQUID multiplexer. We also describe the optical, noise, and magnetic shielding performance of the 145 GHz prototype instrument insert.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.0559  [pdf] - 1051855
Spider Optimization II: Optical, Magnetic and Foreground Effects
Comments: submitted to APJ, 15 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2011-02-02
Spider is a balloon-borne instrument designed to map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with degree-scale resolution over a large fraction of the sky. Spider's main goal is to measure the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves through their imprint on the polarization of the CMB if the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, is greater than 0.03. To achieve this goal, instrumental systematic errors must be controlled with unprecedented accuracy. Here, we build on previous work to use simulations of Spider observations to examine the impact of several systematic effects that have been characterized through testing and modeling of various instrument components. In particular, we investigate the impact of the non-ideal spectral response of the half-wave plates, coupling between focal plane components and the Earth's magnetic field, and beam mismatches and asymmetries. We also present a model of diffuse polarized foreground emission based on a three-dimensional model of the Galactic magnetic field and dust, and study the interaction of this foreground emission with our observation strategy and instrumental effects. We find that the expected level of foreground and systematic contamination is sufficiently low for Spider to achieve its science goals.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.1390  [pdf] - 1033574
The balloon-borne large-aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry: BLAST-Pol
Comments: 14 pages, 9 figures Submitted to SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation Conference 2010
Submitted: 2010-07-06
The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLAST-Pol) is a suborbital mapping experiment designed to study the role played by magnetic fields in the star formation process. BLAST-Pol is the reconstructed BLAST telescope, with the addition of linear polarization capability. Using a 1.8 m Cassegrain telescope, BLAST-Pol images the sky onto a focal plane that consists of 280 bolometric detectors in three arrays, observing simultaneously at 250, 350, and 500 um. The diffraction-limited optical system provides a resolution of 30'' at 250 um. The polarimeter consists of photolithographic polarizing grids mounted in front of each bolometer/detector array. A rotating 4 K achromatic half-wave plate provides additional polarization modulation. With its unprecedented mapping speed and resolution, BLAST-Pol will produce three-color polarization maps for a large number of molecular clouds. The instrument provides a much needed bridge in spatial coverage between larger-scale, coarse resolution surveys and narrow field of view, and high resolution observations of substructure within molecular cloud cores. The first science flight will be from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in December 2010.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.3874  [pdf] - 934286
Modeling and characterization of the SPIDER half-wave plate
Comments:
Submitted: 2010-06-19
Spider is a balloon-borne array of six telescopes that will observe the Cosmic Microwave Background. The 2624 antenna-coupled bolometers in the instrument will make a polarization map of the CMB with approximately one-half degree resolution at 145 GHz. Polarization modulation is achieved via a cryogenic sapphire half-wave plate (HWP) skyward of the primary optic. We have measured millimeter-wave transmission spectra of the sapphire at room and cryogenic temperatures. The spectra are consistent with our physical optics model, and the data gives excellent measurements of the indices of A-cut sapphire. We have also taken preliminary spectra of the integrated HWP, optical system, and detectors in the prototype Spider receiver. We calculate the variation in response of the HWP between observing the CMB and foreground spectra, and estimate that it should not limit the Spider constraints on inflation.