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Singal, J.

Normalized to: Singal, J.

26 article(s) in total. 76 co-authors, from 1 to 9 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 1,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.12881  [pdf] - 2006746
The Radio Synchrotron Background -- A Cosmic Conundrum
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures. To Appear in "Particle Physics at the Year of the 150th Anniversary of Mendeleev's Periodic Table of Chemical Elements," A. Studenikin, Ed. (Proceedings of the 19th Lomonosov Conference on Elementary Particle Physics)
Submitted: 2019-11-28
It has recently become apparent that the background level of diffuse radio emission on the sky is significantly higher than the level that can result from known extragalactic radio source classes or our Galaxy given our current understanding of its large-scale structure.~ In contrast to the more well-known and well-constrained cosmological and astrophysical backgrounds at microwave, infrared, optical/UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths, this ``radio synchrotron background'' at radio wavelengths provides clear motivation for considering the possibilities of new astrophysical sources and new particle-based emission mechanisms.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.04572  [pdf] - 1996811
Photometric Redshift Realism: A Technique for Reducing Catastrophic Outlier Redshift Estimates in Large-Scale Surveys
Comments: 10 pages, 11 figures, 1 table, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-11-11
We present results of using individual galaxies' effective redshift probability density information as a method of identifying potential catastrophic outliers in empirical photometric redshift estimation. In the course we develop a method of modification of the redshift distribution of training sets to improve both the baseline accuracy of high redshift (z>1.5) estimation as well as catastrophic outlier mitigation. We demonstrate these using two real test data sets and one simulated test data set spanning a wide redshift range (0<z<4). We present these results in the context of "photometric redshift realism" and aim to show that the methods and results presented here can inform a 'prescription' that can be applied as a realistic photometric redshift estimation scenario for a hypothetical large-scale survey. We find that with appropriate optimization, we can identify a large percentage (>30%) of catastrophic outlier galaxies while simultaneously incorrectly flagging only a small percentage (<7% and in many cases <3%) of non-outlier galaxies as catastrophic outliers. We find also that our training set redshift distribution modification results in a significant decrease (>10%) in the percentage of outlier galaxies greater than z=1.5 with only a small increase (<3%) in the percentage of outlier galaxies less than z=1.5 compared to the unmodified training set. In addition, we find that this modification can in some cases decrease the percentage of incorrectly identified non-outlier galaxies by almost 20%, while in other cases cause only a small (<1%) increase in this metric.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.01576  [pdf] - 1993929
Tests of Catastrophic Outlier Prediction in Empirical Photometric Redshift Estimation with Redshift Probability Distributions
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures, 2 tables; updated to PASP accepted version
Submitted: 2017-09-05, last modified: 2019-11-06
We present results of using individual galaxies' redshift probability information derived from a photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithm, SPIDERz, to identify potential catastrophic outliers in photometric redshift determinations. By using two test data sets comprised of COSMOS multi-band photometry spanning a wide redshift range (0<z<4) matched with reliable spectroscopic or other redshift determinations we explore the efficacy of a novel method to flag potential catastrophic outliers in an analysis which relies on accurate photometric redshifts. SPIDERz is a custom support vector machine classification algorithm for photo-z analysis that naturally outputs a distribution of redshift probability information for each galaxy in addition to a discrete most probable photo-z value. By applying an analytic technique with flagging criteria to identify the presence of probability distribution features characteristic of catastrophic outlier photo-z estimates, such as multiple redshift probability peaks separated by substantial redshift distances, we can flag potential catastrophic outliers in photo-z determinations. We find that our proposed method can correctly flag large fractions (>50%) of the catastrophic outlier galaxies, while only flagging a small fraction (<5%) of the total non-outlier galaxies, depending on parameter choices. The fraction of non-outlier galaxies flagged varies significantly with redshift and magnitude, however. We examine the performance of this strategy in photo-z determinations using a range of flagging parameter values. These results could potentially be useful for utilization of photometric redshifts in future large scale surveys where catastrophic outliers are particularly detrimental to the science goals.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.03738  [pdf] - 1895531
Waveband Luminosity Correlations in Flux-Limited Multiwavelength Data
Comments: 14 pages, 18 figures, updated to published version
Submitted: 2018-06-10, last modified: 2019-06-05
We explore the general question of correlations among different waveband luminosities in a flux-limited multiband observational data set. Such correlations, often observed for astronomical sources, may either be intrinsic or induced by the redshift evolution of the luminosities and the data truncation due to the flux limits. We first address this question analytically. We then use simulated flux-limited data with three different known intrinsic luminosity correlations, and prescribed luminosity functions and evolution similar to the ones expected for quasars. We explore how the intrinsic nature of luminosity correlations can be deduced, including exploring the efficacy of partial correlation analysis with redshift binning in determining whether luminosity correlations are intrinsic and finding the form of the intrinsic correlation. By applying methods that we have developed in recent works, we show that we can recover the true cosmological evolution of the luminosity functions and the intrinsic correlations between the luminosities. Finally, we demonstrate the methods for determining intrinsic luminosity correlations on actual observed samples of quasars with mid-infrared, radio, and optical fluxes and redshifts, finding that the luminosity-luminosity correlation is significantly stronger between mid-infrared and optical than that between radio and optical luminosities, supporting the canonical jet-launching and heating model of active galaxies.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.09979  [pdf] - 1637587
The Radio Synchrotron Background: Conference Summary and Report
Comments: 19 pages, 12 figures, updated to journal version
Submitted: 2017-11-22, last modified: 2018-02-05
We summarize the radio synchrotron background workshop that took place July 19-21, 2017 at the University of Richmond. This first scientific meeting dedicated to the topic was convened because current measurements of the diffuse radio monopole reveal a surface brightness that is several times higher than can be straightforwardly explained by known Galactic and extragalactic sources and processes, rendering it by far the least well understood photon background at present. It was the conclusion of a majority of the participants that the radio monopole level is at or near that reported by the ARCADE 2 experiment and inferred from several absolutely calibrated zero level lower frequency radio measurements, and unanimously agreed that the production of this level of surface brightness, if confirmed, represents a major outstanding question in astrophysics. The workshop reached a consensus on the next priorities for investigations of the radio synchrotron background.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.00044  [pdf] - 1560992
Analysis of a Custom Support Vector Machine for Photometric Redshift Estimation and the Inclusion of Galaxy Shape Information
Comments: Submitted to A&A, 11 pages, 10 figures, 1 table, updated to version in revision
Submitted: 2016-06-30, last modified: 2017-01-02
Aims: We present a custom support vector machine classification package for photometric redshift estimation, including comparisons with other methods. We also explore the efficacy of including galaxy shape information in redshift estimation. Support vector machines, a type of machine learning, utilize optimization theory and supervised learning algorithms to construct predictive models based on the information content of data in a way that can treat different input features symmetrically. Methods: The custom support vector machine package we have developed is designated SPIDERz and made available to the community. As test data for evaluating performance and comparison with other methods, we apply SPIDERz to four distinct data sets: 1) the publicly available portion of the PHAT-1 catalog based on the GOODS-N field with spectroscopic redshifts in the range $z < 3.6$, 2) 14365 galaxies from the COSMOS bright survey with photometric band magnitudes, morphology, and spectroscopic redshifts inside $z < 1.4$, 3) 3048 galaxies from the overlap of COSMOS photometry and morphology with 3D-HST spectroscopy extending to $z < 3.9$, and 4) 2612 galaxies with five-band photometric magnitudes and morphology from the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey and $z < 1.57$. Results: We find that SPIDER-z achieves results competitive with other empirical packages on the PHAT-1 data, and performs quite well in estimating redshifts with the COSMOS and AEGIS data, including in the cases of a large redshift range ($0 < z < 3.9$). We also determine from analyses with both the COSMOS and AEGIS data that the inclusion of morphological information does not have a statistically significant benefit for photometric redshift estimation with the techniques employed here.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.00465  [pdf] - 1510306
The Mid-Infrared Luminosity Evolution and Luminosity Function of Quasars with SDSS and WISE
Comments: 13 pages, 11 figures, published in ApJ. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1207.3396
Submitted: 2016-08-01, last modified: 2016-10-27
We determine the 22$\mu$m luminosity evolution and luminosity function for quasars from a data set of over 20,000 objects obtained by combining flux-limited Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical and Wide field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-infrared data. We apply methods developed in previous works to access the intrinsic population distributions non-parametrically, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population of quasars exhibits positive luminosity evolution with redshift in the mid-infrared, but with considerably less mid-infrared evolution than in the optical or radio bands. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolution and local mid-infrared luminosity function. The latter displays a sharp flattening at local luminosities below $\sim 10^{31}$ erg sec$^{-1}$ Hz$^{-1}$, which has been reported previously at 15 $\mu$m for AGN classified as both type-1 and type-2. We calculate the integrated total emission from quasars at 22 $\mu$m and find it to be a small fraction of both the cosmic infrared background light and the integrated emission from all sources at this wavelength.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.07994  [pdf] - 1288549
A Determination of the Gamma-ray Flux and Photon Spectral Index Distributions of Blazars from the Fermi-LAT 3LAC
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, 1 table, Accepted to MNRAS. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1106.3111
Submitted: 2015-09-26
We present a determination of the distributions of gamma-ray photon flux -- the so called LogN-LogS relation -- and photon spectral index for blazars, based on the third extragalactic source catalog of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Large Area Telescope, and considering the photon energy range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV. The dataset consists of the 774 blazars in the so-called "Clean" sample detected with a greater than approximately seven sigma detection threshold and located above $\pm$20 deg Galactic latitude. We use non-parametric methods verified in previous works to reconstruct the intrinsic distributions from the observed ones which account for the data truncations introduced by observational bias and includes the effects of the possible correlation between the flux and photon index. The intrinsic flux distribution can be represented by a broken power law with a high flux power-law index of -2.43$\pm$0.08 and a low flux power-law index of -1.87$\pm$0.10. The intrinsic photon index distribution can be represented by a Gaussian with mean of 2.62$\pm$0.05 and width of 0.17$\pm$0.02. We also report the intrinsic distributions for the sub-populations of BL Lac and FSRQ type blazars separately and these differ substantially. We then estimate the contribution of FSRQs and BL Lacs to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background radiation. Under the simplistic assumption that the flux distributions probed in this analysis continue to arbitrary low flux, we calculate that the best fit contribution of FSRQs is 35% and BL Lacs 17% of the total gamma-ray output of the Universe in this energy range.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.00499  [pdf] - 1223839
Axial Ratio of Edge-On Spiral Galaxies as a Test For Extended Bright Radio Halos
Comments: 6 Pages, 4 Figures, 1 Table; To Appear In ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2015-01-02
We use surface brightness contour maps of nearby edge-on spiral galaxies to determine whether extended bright radio halos are common. In particular, we test a recent model of the spatial structure of the diffuse radio continuum by Subrahmanyan and Cowsik which posits that a substantial fraction of the observed high-latitude surface brightness originates from an extended Galactic halo of uniform emissivity. Measurements of the axial ratio of emission contours within a sample of normal spiral galaxies at 1500 MHz and below show no evidence for such a bright, extended radio halo. Either the Galaxy is atypical compared to nearby quiescent spirals or the bulk of the observed high-latitude emission does not originate from this type of extended halo.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.4161  [pdf] - 1223632
On The Relation Between the AGN Jet and Accretion Disk Emissions
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, published in Proc IAU #314, F. Massaro, C.C. Cheung, E. Lopez, A. Siemiginowska, eds
Submitted: 2014-12-12
Active galactic nuclei jets are detected via their radio and/or gamma-ray emissions while the accretion disks are detected by their optical and UV radiation. Observations of the radio and optical luminosities show a strong correlation between the two luminosities. However, part of this correlation is due to the redshift or distances of the sources that enter in calculating the luminosities from the observed fluxes and part of it could be due to the differences in the cosmological evolution of luminosities. Thus, the determination of the intrinsic correlations between the luminosities is not straightforward. It is affected by the observational selection effects and other factors that truncate the data, sometimes in a complex manner (e.g. Antonucci (2011) and Pavildou et al. (2010)). In this paper we describe methods that allow us to determine the evolution of the radio and optical luminosities, and determine the true intrinsic correlation between the two luminosities. We find a much weaker correlation than observed and sub-linear relations between the luminosities. This has a significant implication for jet and accretion disk physics.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.4961  [pdf] - 1208488
Gamma-ray Luminosity and Photon Index Evolution of FSRQ Blazars and Contribution to the Gamma-ray Background
Comments: 9 pages, 10 figures, Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2014-03-19
We present the redshift evolutions and distributions of the gamma-ray luminosity and photon spectral index of flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) type blazars, using non-parametric methods to obtain the evolutions and distributions directly from the data. The sample we use for analysis consists of almost all FSRQs observed with a greater than approximately 7 sigma detection threshold in the first year catalog of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Large Area Telescope, with redshfits as determined from optical spectroscopy by Shaw et al. We find that FSQRs undergo rapid gamma-ray luminosity evolution, but negligible photon index evolution, with redshift. With these evolutions accounted for we determine the density evolution and luminosity function of FSRQs, and calculate their total contribution to the extragalactic gamma-ray background radiation, resolved and unresolved, which is found to be 16(+10/-4)%, in agreement with previous studies.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.2963  [pdf] - 728332
Geant4 Applications for Modeling Molecular Transport in Complex Vacuum Geometries
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, 2 tables, to appear in IJMSSC, updated to accepted version
Submitted: 2013-02-12, last modified: 2013-07-29
We discuss a novel use of the Geant4 simulation toolkit to model molecular transport in a vacuum environment, in the molecular flow regime. The Geant4 toolkit was originally developed by the high energy physics community to simulate the interactions of elementary particles within complex detector systems. Here its capabilities are utilized to model molecular vacuum transport in geometries where other techniques are impractical. The techniques are verified with an application representing a simple vacuum geometry that has been studied previously both analytically and by basic Monte Carlo simulation. We discuss the use of an application with a very complicated geometry, that of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope camera cryostat, to determine probabilities of transport of contaminant molecules to optical surfaces where control of contamination is crucial.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.7297  [pdf] - 1173024
Determination of the intrinsic Luminosity Time Correlation in the X-ray Afterglows of GRBs
Comments: Astrophysical Journal accepted
Submitted: 2013-07-27
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have been observed up to redshifts z approx 9.5 can be good probes of the early universe and have the potential of testing cosmological models. The analysis by Dainotti of GRB Swift afterglow lightcurves with known redshifts and definite X-ray plateau shows an anti-correlation between the rest frame time when the plateau ends (the plateau end time) and the calculated luminosity at that time (or approximately an anti-correlation between plateau duration and luminosity). We present here an update of this correlation with a larger data sample of 101 GRBs with good lightcurves. Since some of this correlation could result from the redshift dependences of these intrinsic parameters, namely their cosmological evolution we use the Efron-Petrosian method to reveal the intrinsic nature of this correlation. We find that a substantial part of the correlation is intrinsic and describe how we recover it and how this can be used to constrain physical models of the plateau emission, whose origin is still unknown. The present result could help clarifing the debated issue about the nature of the plateau emission.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.7293  [pdf] - 699292
Study of luminosity and time evolution in X-ray afterglows of GRBs
Comments: "7th Huntsville Gamma-Ray Burst Symposium, GRB 2013: paper 25 in eConf Proceedings C1304143"
Submitted: 2013-07-27
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have been observed up to redshifts $z \approx 9.5$ can be good probes of the early universe and have the potential of testing cosmological models. The analysis by Dainotti of GRB Swift afterglow lightcurves with known redshifts and definite X-ray plateau shows an anti-correlation between the \underline{rest frame} time when the plateau ends (the plateau end time) and the calculated luminosity at that time (or approximately an anti-correlation between plateau duration and luminosity). We present here an update of this correlation with a larger data sample of 101 GRBs with good lightcurves. Since some of this correlation could result from the redshift dependences of these intrinsic parameters, namely their cosmological evolution we use the Efron-Petrosian method to estimate the luminosity and time evolution and to correct for this effects to determine the intrinsic nature of this correlation.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.3396  [pdf] - 1124830
On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars II - The SDSS Sample
Comments: 16 pages, 17 figures, 1 table. Updated to journal version. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1101.2930
Submitted: 2012-07-14, last modified: 2013-01-14
We determine the radio and optical luminosity evolutions and the true distribution of the radio loudness parameter R, defined as the ratio of the radio to optical luminosity, for a set of more than 5000 quasars combining SDSS optical and FIRST radio data. We apply the method of Efron and Petrosian to access the intrinsic distribution parameters, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population exhibits strong positive evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with somewhat greater radio evolution than optical. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolutions and local radio and optical luminosity functions. The intrinsic distribution of the radio loudness parameter R is found to be quite different than the observed one, and is smooth with no evidence of a bi-modality in radio loudness. The results we find are in general agreement with the previous analysis of Singal et al. 2011 which used POSS-I optical and FIRST radio data.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.3111  [pdf] - 1077326
Flux and Photon Spectral Index Distributions of Fermi-LAT Blazars And Contribution To The Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background
Comments: 13 pages, 13 figures, 2 tables, updated to published version with additional figures
Submitted: 2011-06-15, last modified: 2012-05-17
We present a determination of the distributions of photon spectral index and gamma-ray flux - the so called LogN-LogS relation - for the 352 blazars detected with a greater than approximately seven sigma detection threshold and located above +/- 20 degrees Galactic latitude by the Large Area Telescope of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in its first year catalog. Because the flux detection threshold depends on the photon index, the observed raw distributions do not provide the true LogN-LogS counts or the true distribution of the photon index. We use the non-parametric methods developed by Efron and Petrosian to reconstruct the intrinsic distributions from the observed ones which account for the data truncations introduced by observational bias and includes the effects of the possible correlation between the two variables. We demonstrate the robustness of our procedures using a simulated data set of blazars and then apply these to the real data and find that for the population as a whole the intrinsic flux distribution can be represented by a broken power law with high and low indexes of -2.37 +/- 0.13 and -1.70 +/- 0.26, respectively, and the intrinsic photon index distribution can be represented by a Gaussian with mean of 2.41 +/- 0.13 and width of 0.25 +/- 0.03. We also find the intrinsic distributions for the sub-populations of BL Lac and FSRQs type blazars separately. We then calculate the contribution of Fermi blazars to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background radiation. Under the assumption that the flux distribution of blazars continues to arbitrarily low fluxes, we calculate the best fit contribution of all blazars to the total extragalactic gamma-ray output to be 60%, with a large uncertainty.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.2930  [pdf] - 1051439
On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars
Comments: 15 pages, 15 figures, accepted to ApJ, updated to in press version
Submitted: 2011-01-14, last modified: 2011-11-20
We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities. With this correlation, whether intrinsic or observationally induced accounted for, we find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution for the range of R values considered. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio loud quasars, but rather a smooth transition. Also, this efficiency seems higher for the high-redshift and more luminous sources in the considered sample.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.4011  [pdf] - 1051574
The Efficacy of Galaxy Shape Parameters in Photometric Redshift Estimation: A Neural Network Approach
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, accepted to PASP, updated to accepted version with added references
Submitted: 2011-01-20, last modified: 2011-04-08
We present a determination of the effects of including galaxy morphological parameters in photometric redshift estimation with an artificial neural network method. Neural networks, which recognize patterns in the information content of data in an unbiased way, can be a useful estimator of the additional information contained in extra parameters, such as those describing morphology, if the input data are treated on an equal footing. We use imaging and five band photometric magnitudes from the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey. It is shown that certain principal components of the morphology information are correlated with galaxy type. However, we find that for the data used the inclusion of morphological information does not have a statistically significant benefit for photometric redshift estimation with the techniques employed here. The inclusion of these parameters may result in a trade-off between extra information and additional noise, with the additional noise becoming more dominant as more parameters are added.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.4198  [pdf] - 951084
A Multi-Chamber System for Analyzing the Outgassing, Deposition, and Associated Optical Degradation Properties of Materials in a Vacuum
Comments: 9 pages, 10 figures, published in RSI (minor edits made to match journal accepted version)
Submitted: 2009-10-21, last modified: 2010-08-16
We report on the Camera Materials Test Chamber, a multi-vessel apparatus which analyzes the outgassing consequences of candidate materials for use in the vacuum cryostat of a new telescope camera. The system measures the outgassing products and rates of samples of materials at different temperatures, and collects films of outgassing products to measure the effects on light transmission in six optical bands. The design of the apparatus minimizes potential measurement errors introduced by background contamination.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.1997  [pdf] - 951066
Sources of the Radio Background Considered
Comments: 12 pages, 3 figures, 1 table; MNRAS accepted and in press, (previously submitted ApJ but withdrawn before review)
Submitted: 2009-09-10, last modified: 2010-08-16
We investigate different scenarios for the origin of the extragalactic radio background. The surface brightness of the background, as reported by the ARCADE 2 collaboration, is several times higher than that which would result from currently observed radio sources. We consider contributions to the background from diffuse synchrotron emission from clusters and the intergalactic medium, previously unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of radio sources, and faint point sources below the flux limit of existing surveys. By examining radio source counts available in the literature, we conclude that most of the radio background is produced by radio point sources that dominate at sub microJy fluxes. We show that a truly diffuse background produced by electrons far from galaxes is ruled out because such energetic electrons would overproduce the obserevd X-ray/gamma-ray background through inverse Compton scattering of the other photon fields. Unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of extended radio sources, or moderate flux sources missed entirely by radio source count surveys, cannot explain the bulk of the observed background, but may contribute as much as 10 per cent. We consider both radio supernovae and radio quiet quasars as candidate sources for the background, and show that both fail to produce it at the observed level because of insufficient number of objects and total flux, although radio quiet quasars contribute at the level of at least a few percent. We conclude that if the radio background is at the level reported, a majority of the total surface brightness would have to be produced by ordinary starforming galaxies above redshift 1 characterized by an evolving radio far-infrared correlation, which changes toward the radio loud with redshift.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1008.0658  [pdf] - 1034086
PHAT: PHoto-z Accuracy Testing
Comments: 22 pages, 15 figures, A&A in press
Submitted: 2010-08-03
Here we introduce PHAT, the PHoto-z Accuracy Testing programme, an international initiative to test and compare different methods of photo-z estimation. Two different test environments are set up, one (PHAT0) based on simulations to test the basic functionality of the different photo-z codes, and another one (PHAT1) based on data from the GOODS survey. The accuracy of the different methods is expressed and ranked by the global photo-z bias, scatter, and outlier rates. Most methods agree well on PHAT0 but produce photo-z scatters that can differ by up to a factor of two even in this idealised case. A larger spread in accuracy is found for PHAT1. Few methods benefit from the addition of mid-IR photometry. Remaining biases and systematic effects can be explained by shortcomings in the different template sets and the use of priors on the one hand and an insufficient training set on the other hand. Scatters of 4-8% in Delta_z/(1+z) were obtained, consistent with other studies. However, somewhat larger outlier rates (>7.5% with Delta_z/(1+z)>0.15; >4.5% after cleaning) are found for all codes. There is a general trend that empirical codes produce smaller biases than template-based codes. The systematic, quantitative comparison of different photo-z codes presented here is a snapshot of the current state-of-the-art of photo-z estimation and sets a standard for the assessment of photo-z accuracy in the future. The rather large outlier rates reported here for PHAT1 on real data should be investigated further since they are most probably also present (and possibly hidden) in many other studies. The test data sets are publicly available and can be used to compare new methods to established ones and help in guiding future photo-z method development. (abridged)
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.0546  [pdf] - 332879
The ARCADE 2 Instrument
Comments: 12 pages, 14 figues, 3 tables, 2 figures added, Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2009-01-05, last modified: 2010-04-02
The second generation Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE 2) instrument is a balloon-borne experiment to measure the radiometric temperature of the cosmic microwave background and Galactic and extra-Galactic emission at six frequencies from 3 to 90 GHz. ARCADE 2 utilizes a double-nulled design where emission from the sky is compared to that from an external cryogenic full-aperture blackbody calibrator by cryogenic switching radiometers containing internal blackbody reference loads. In order to further minimize sources of systematic error, ARCADE 2 features a cold fully open aperture with all radiometrically active components maintained at near 2.7 K without windows or other warm objects, achieved through a novel thermal design. We discuss the design and performance of the ARCADE 2 instrument in its 2005 and 2006 flights.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.0555  [pdf] - 1490614
ARCADE 2 Measurement of the Extra-Galactic Sky Temperature at 3-90 GHz
Comments: 11 pages 5 figures Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2009-01-05
The ARCADE 2 instrument has measured the absolute temperature of the sky at frequencies 3, 8, 10, 30, and 90 GHz, using an open-aperture cryogenic instrument observing at balloon altitudes with no emissive windows between the beam-forming optics and the sky. An external blackbody calibrator provides an {\it in situ} reference. Systematic errors were greatly reduced by using differential radiometers and cooling all critical components to physical temperatures approximating the CMB temperature. A linear model is used to compare the output of each radiometer to a set of thermometers on the instrument. Small corrections are made for the residual emission from the flight train, balloon, atmosphere, and foreground Galactic emission. The ARCADE 2 data alone show an extragalactic rise of $50\pm7$ mK at 3.3 GHz in addition to a CMB temperature of $2.730\pm .004$ K. Combining the ARCADE 2 data with data from the literature shows a background power law spectrum of $T=1.26\pm 0.09$ [K] $(\nu/\nu_0)^{-2.60\pm 0.04}$ from 22 MHz to 10 GHz ($\nu_0=1$ GHz) in addition to a CMB temperature of $2.725\pm .001$ K.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.0559  [pdf] - 19994
Interpretation of the Extragalactic Radio Background
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2009-01-05
We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies, to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and the estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 2 sigma upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of mu < 5.8 x 10^{-5} and Y_ff < 6.2 x 10^{-5}. We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. After subtraction of an estimate of the contribution of discrete radio sources, this unexplained signal is consistent with extragalactic emission in the form of a power law with amplitude 1.06 \pm 0.11 K at 1 GHz and a spectral index of -2.56 \pm 0.04.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.0562  [pdf] - 362611
ARCADE 2 Observations of Galactic Radio Emission
Comments: 10 poges, 9 figures. Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2009-01-05
We use absolutely calibrated data from the ARCADE 2 flight in July 2006 to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index beta_synch = -2.5 +/- 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 +/- 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc|b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of CII emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power-law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission towards the north polar cap T_Gal = 0.498 +/- 0.028 K and spectral index beta = -2.55 +/- 0.03 at reference frequency 1 GHz. The well calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emission, based on the integrated intensity of emission from the Galactic plane instead of cross-correlations with the thermal dust spatial morphology. The Galactic plane intensity measured by ARCADE 2 is fainter than predicted by models without spinning dust, and is consistent with spinning dust contributing 0.4 +/- 0.1 of the Galactic plane emission at 22 GHz.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0609373  [pdf] - 84965
ARCADE: Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission
Comments: 12 pages, 6 figures. Proceedings of the Fundamental Physics With CMB workshop, UC Irvine, March 23-25, 2006, to be published in New Astronomy Reviews
Submitted: 2006-09-13
The Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) is a balloon-borne instrument designed to measure the temperature of the cosmic microwave background at centimeter wavelengths. ARCADE searches for deviations from a blackbody spectrum resulting from energy releases in the early universe. Long-wavelength distortions in the CMB spectrum are expected in all viable cosmological models. Detecting these distortions or showing that they do not exist is an important step for understanding the early universe. We describe the ARCADE instrument design, current status, and future plans.