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Short, C. Ian

Normalized to: Short, C.

35 article(s) in total. 96 co-authors, from 1 to 8 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 1,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.03674  [pdf] - 1680344
ChromaStarAtlas: Browser-based visualization of the ATLAS9 stellar structure and spectrum grid
Comments: 13 pages, 2 figures. Un-refereed
Submitted: 2018-05-09
ChromaStaraAtlas (CSA) is a web application that uses the ChromaStar (CS) user interface (UI) to allow users to navigate and display a subset of the uniformly computed comprehensive ATLAS9 grid of atmosphere and spectrum models. It provides almost the same functionality as the CS UI in its more basic display modes, but presents the user with primary and post-processed outputs, including photometric color indices, based on a properly line blanketed spectral energy distribution (SED). CSA interpolates in logarithmic quantities within the subset of the ATLAS9 grid ranging in Teff from 3500 to 25000 K, in log g from 0.0 to 5.0, and in [Fe/H] from 0.0 to -1.0 at a fixed microturbulence parameter of 2 km/s, and presents outputs derived from the monochromatic specific intensity distribution, I_lambda, in the lambda range from 250 to 2500 nm, and performs an approximate continuum rectification of the corresponding flux spectrum F_lambda based on its own internal model of the corresponding continuous extinction distribution, kappa^C_lambda, based on the procedures of CS. Optional advanced plots can be turned on that display both the primary atmospheric structure quantities from the public ATLAS9 data files, and secondary structure quantities computed from internal modeling. Unlike CS, CSA allows for activities in which students derive Teff values from fitting observed colors. The application may be found at www.ap.smu.ca/~ishort/OpenStars.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.07208  [pdf] - 1641450
ChromaStarPy: A stellar atmosphere and spectrum modeling and visualization lab in python
Comments: See DOI zenodo.1095687. Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2018-01-22
We announce ChromaStarPy, an integrated general stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code written entirely in python V. 3. ChromaStarPy is a direct port of the ChromaStarServer (CSServ) Java modeling code described in earlier papers in this series, and many of the associated JavaScript (JS) post-processing procedures have been ported and incorporated into CSPy so that students have access to ready-made "data products". A python integrated development environment (IDE) allows a student in a more advanced course to experiment with the code and to graphically visualize intermediate and final results, ad hoc, as they are running it. CSPy allows students and researchers to compare modeled to observed spectra in the same IDE in which they are processing observational data, while having complete control over the stellar parameters affecting the synthetic spectra. We also take the opportunity to describe improvements that have been made to the related codes, ChromaStar (CS), CSServ and ChromaStarDB (CSDB) that, where relevant, have also been incorporated into CSPy. The application may be found at the home page of the OpenStars project: http://www.ap.smu.ca/~ishort/OpenStars/ .
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.07725  [pdf] - 1586327
ChromaStarDB: SQL database-driven spectrum synthesis, and more
Comments: Accepted for publication in PASP
Submitted: 2017-07-24
We present an alternate deployment of the GrayStarServer (now ChromaStarServer (CSS)) pedagogical stellar atmosphere and spectrum synthesis WWW-application, namely ChromaStarDB (CSDB), in which the atomic line list used for spectrum synthesis is implemented as an SQL database table rather than as a more conventional byte-data file. This allows for very flexible selection criteria to determine which transitions are extracted from the line list for inclusion in the synthesis, and enables novel pedagogical and research experiments in spectrum synthesis. This line selection flexibility is reflected in the CSDB UI. The database extraction is very fast and would be appropriate for the larger line lists of research-grade modeling codes. We also take the opportunity to present major additions to the ChromaStar and CSS codes that are also reflected in CSDB: i) TiO band opacity in the JOLA approximation, ii) Metal b-f and Rayleigh scattering opacity, iii) 2D implementation of the flux integral, iv) Improvement of the N_e convergence, and v) Expansion of the exo-planet modeling parameters, and vi) General improvements to the UI. The applications may be found at the home page of the OpenStar project: www.ap.smu.ca/OpenStars/.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.08951  [pdf] - 1533910
NLTE Stellar Population Synthesis of Globular Clusters using Synthetic Integrated Light Spectra I: Constructing the IL Spectra
Comments: 9 figures, 3 Tables, Accepted for publication in ApJ as of Dec 2016, Presented at AAS Meeting 229
Submitted: 2016-12-28
We present an investigation of the globular cluster population synthesis method of McWilliam & Bernstein (2008), focusing on the impact of NLTE modeling effects and CMD discretization. Johnson-Cousins-Bessel U-B, B-V, V-I, and J-K colors are produced for 96 synthetic integrated light spectra with two different discretization prescriptions and three degrees of NLTE treatment. These color values are used to compare NLTE and LTE derived population ages. Relative contributions of different spectral types to the integrated light spectra for different wavebands are measured. Integrated light NLTE spectra are shown to be more luminous in the UV and optical than LTE spectra, but show stronger absorption features in the IR. The main features showing discrepancies between NLTE and LTE integrated light spectra may be attributed to light metals, primarily Fe I, Ca I, and Ti I, as well as TiO molecular bands. Main Sequence stars are shown to have negligible NLTE effects at IR wavelengths compared to more evolved stars. Photometric color values are shown to vary at the millimagnitude level as a function of CMD discretization. Finer CMD sampling for the upper main sequence and turnoff, base of the red giant branch, and the horizontal branch minimizes this variation. Differences in ages derived from LTE and NLTE IL spectra are found to range from 0.55 to 2.54 Gyr, comparable to the uncertainty in GC ages derived from color indices with observational uncertainties of 0.01 magnitudes, the limiting precision of the Harris catalog (Harris 1996).
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.09368  [pdf] - 1470673
GrayStarServer: Server-side spectrum synthesis with a browser-based client-side user interface
Comments: Accepted for publication in Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 37 pages in review format
Submitted: 2016-05-30
I present GrayStarServer (GSS), a stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code of pedagogical accuracy that is accessible in any web browser on commonplace computational devices and that runs on a time-scale of a few seconds. The addition of spectrum synthesis annotated with line identifications extends the functionality and pedagogical applicability of GSS beyond that of its predecessor, GrayStar3 (GS3). The spectrum synthesis is based on a line list acquired from the NIST atomic spectra database, and the GSS post-processing and user interface (UI) client allows the user to inspect the plain text ASCII version of the line list, as well as to apply macroscopic broadening. Unlike GS3, GSS carries out the physical modeling on the server side in Java, and communicates with the JavaScript and HTML client via an asynchronous HTTP request. I also describe other improvements beyond GS3 such as more realistic modeling physics and use of the HTML <canvas> element for higher quality plotting and rendering of results, and include a comparison to Phoenix modeling. I also present LineListServer, a Java code for converting custom ASCII line lists in NIST format to the byte data type file format required by GSS so that users can prepare their own custom line lists. I propose a standard for marking up and packaging model atmosphere and spectrum synthesis output for data transmission and storage that will facilitate a web-based approach to stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis. I describe some pedagogical demonstrations and exercises enabled by easily accessible, on-demand, responsive spectrum synthesis. GSS may serve as a research support tool by providing quick spectroscopic reconnaissance. GSS may be found at www.ap.smu.ca/~ishort/OpenStars/.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.06775  [pdf] - 1282279
grayStar3 - gray no more: More physical realism and a more intuitive interface - all still in a WWW browser
Comments: 31 pages double-spaced single-column
Submitted: 2015-09-22
The goal of the openStar project is to turn any WWW browser, running on any platform, into a virtual star equipped with parameter knobs and instrumented with output displays that any user can experiment with using any device for which a browser is available. grayStar3 (gS3) is a major improvement upon GrayStar 2.0 (GS2), both in the physical realism of the modeling and the intuitiveness of the user interface. The code integrates scientific modeling in JavaScript with output visualization HTML. The user interface is adaptable so as to be appropriate for a large range of audiences from the high-school to the introductory graduate level. The modeling is physically based and all outputs are determined entirely and directly by the results of in situ modeling, giving the code significant generality and credibility for pedagogical applications. gS3 also models and displays the circumstellar habitable zone (CHZ) and allows the user to adjust the greenhouse effect and albedo of the planet. In its default mode the code is guaranteed to return a result within a few second of wall-clock time on any device. The more advanced user has the option of turning on more realistic physics modules that address more advanced topics in stellar astrophysics. gS3 is a public domain, open source project and the code is available from www.ap.smu.ca/~ishort/grayStar3/ and is on GitHub. gS3 effectively serves as a public library of generic JavaScript+HTML plotting routines that may be recycled by the community.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.04686  [pdf] - 1277194
NLTE and LTE Lick indices for red giants from [M/H] 0.0 to -6.0 at SDSS and IDS spectral resolution
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. Tables 6 and 7 available electronically from the author
Submitted: 2015-08-19
We investigate the dependence of the complete system of 22 Lick indices on overall metallicity scaled from solar abundances, [M/H], from the solar value, 0.0, down to the extremely-metal-poor (XMP) value of -6.0, for late-type giant stars (MK luminosity class III, log(g)=2.0) of MK spectral class late-K to late-F (3750 < Teff < 6500 K) of the type that are detected as "fossils" of early galaxy formation in the Galactic halo and in extra-galactic structures. Our investigation is based on synthetic index values, I, derived from atmospheric models and synthetic spectra computed with PHOENIX in LTE and Non-LTE (NLTE), where the synthetic spectra have been convolved to the spectral resolution, R, of both IDS and SDSS (and LAMOST) spectroscopy. We identify nine indices, that we designate "Lick-XMP", that remain both detectable and significantly [M/H]-dependent down to [M/H] values of at least ~-5.0, and down to [M/H] ~ -6.0 in five cases, while also remaining well-behaved . For these nine, we study the dependence of I on NLTE effects, and on spectral resolution. For our LTE I values for spectra of SDSS resolution, we present the fitted polynomial coefficients, C_n, from multi-variate linear regression for I with terms up to third order in the independent variable pairs (Teff, [M/H]), and (V-K, [M/H]), and compare them to the fitted C_n values of Worthey et al. (1994) at IDS spectral resolution.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.1891  [pdf] - 864419
GrayStar: A Web application for pedagogical stellar atmosphere and spectral line modelling and visualisation
Comments: Submitted to the Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (JRASC), 16 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2014-09-05
GrayStar is a stellar atmospheric and spectral line modelling, post-processing, and visualisation code, suitable for classroom demonstrations and laboratory-style assignments, that has been developed in Java and deployed in JavaScript and HTML. The only software needed to compute models and post-processed observables, and to visualise the resulting atmospheric structure and observables, is a common Web browser. Therefore, the code will run on any common PC or related X86 (-64) computer of the type that typically serves classroom data projectors, is found in undergraduate computer laboratories, or that students themselves own, including those with highly portable form-factors such as net-books and tablets. The user requires no experience with compiling source code, reading data files, or using plotting packages. More advanced students can view the JavaScript source code using the developer tools provided by common Web browsers. The code is based on the approximate gray atmospheric solution and runs quickly enough on current common PCs to provide near-instantaneous results, allowing for real time exploration of parameter space. I describe the user interface and its inputs and outputs and suggest specific pedagogical applications and projects. Therefore, this paper may serve as a GrayStar user manual for both instructors and students. In an accompanying paper, I describe the computational strategy and methodology as necessitated by Java and JavaScript. I have made the application itself, and the HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Java source files available to the community. The Web application and source files may be found at www.ap.smu.ca/~ishort/GrayStar.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.1893  [pdf] - 864420
GrayStar: A Web application for pedagogical stellar atmosphere and spectral line modelling and visualisation II: Methods
Comments: 23 pages, 2 figures. Necessarily includes some overlap with astro-ph submission GrayStar: A Web application for pedagogical stellar atmosphere and spectral line modelling and visualisation
Submitted: 2014-09-05
GrayStar is a stellar atmospheric and spectral line modelling, post-processing, and visualisation code, suitable for classroom demonstrations and laboratory-style assignments, that has been developed in Java and deployed in JavaScript and HTML. The only software needed to compute models and post-processed observables, and to visualise the resulting atmospheric structure and observables, is a common Web browser. Therefore, the code will run on any common PC or related X86 (-64) computer of the type that typically serves classroom data projectors, is found in undergraduate computer laboratories, or that students themselves own, including those with highly portable form-factors such as net-books and tablets. The user requires no experience with compiling source code, reading data files, or using plotting packages. More advanced students can view the JavaScript source code using the developer tools provided by common Web browsers. The code is based on the approximate gray atmospheric solution and runs quickly enough on current common PCs to provide near-instantaneous results, allowing for real time exploration of parameter space. I describe the computational strategy and methodology as necessitated by Java and JavaScript. In an accompanying paper, I describe the user interface and its inputs and outputs and suggest specific pedagogical applications and projects. I have made the application itself, and the HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Java source files available to the community. The Web application and source files may be found at www.ap.smu.ca/~ishort/GrayStar.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.7028  [pdf] - 818924
NLTE 1.5D Modeling of Red Giant Stars
Comments: 46 pages, 14 figures, 7 tables, accepted for publication in ApJ on April 5, 2014
Submitted: 2014-04-28
Spectra for 2D stars in the 1.5D approximation are created from synthetic spectra of 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) spherical model atmospheres produced by the PHOENIX code. The 1.5D stars have the spatially averaged Rayleigh-Jeans flux of a K3-4 III star, while varying the temperature difference between the two 1D component models ($\Delta T_{\mathrm{1.5D}}$), and the relative surface area covered. Synthetic observable quantities from the 1.5D stars are fitted with quantities from NLTE and local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) 1D models to assess the errors in inferred $T_{\mathrm{eff}}$ values from assuming horizontal homogeneity and LTE. Five different quantities are fit to determine the $T_{\mathrm{eff}}$ of the 1.5D stars: UBVRI photometric colors, absolute surface flux SEDs, relative SEDs, continuum normalized spectra, and TiO band profiles. In all cases except the TiO band profiles, the inferred $T_{\mathrm{eff}}$ value increases with increasing $\Delta T_{\mathrm{1.5D}}$. In all cases, the inferred $T_{\mathrm{eff}}$ value from fitting 1D LTE quantities is higher than from fitting 1D NLTE quantities and is approximately constant as a function of $\Delta T_{\mathrm{1.5D}}$ within each case. The difference between LTE and NLTE for the TiO bands is caused indirectly by the NLTE temperature structure of the upper atmosphere, as the bands are computed in LTE. We conclude that the difference between $T_{\mathrm{eff}}$ values derived from NLTE and LTE modelling is relatively insensitive to the degree of the horizontal inhomogeneity of the star being modeled, and largely depends on the observable quantity being fit.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.4962  [pdf] - 1166063
Modeling the near-UV band of GK stars, Paper III: Dependence on abundance pattern
Comments: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2013-04-17
We extend the grid of NLTE models presented in Paper II to explore variations in abundance pattern in two ways: 1) The adoption of the Asplund et al. (2009) (GASS10) abundances, 2) For stars of metallicity, [M/H], of -0.5, the adoption of a non-solar enhancement of alpha-elements by +0.3 dex. Moreover, our grid of synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) is interpolated to a finer numerical resolution in both T_eff (Delta T_eff = 25 K) and log g (Delta log g = 0.25). We compare the values of T_eff and log g inferred from fitting LTE and Non-LTE SEDs to observed SEDs throughout the entire visible band, and in an ad hoc "blue" band. We compare our spectrophotometrically derived T_eff values to a variety of T_eff calibrations, including more empirical ones, drawn from the literature. For stars of solar metallicity, we find that the adoption of the GASS10 abundances lowers the inferred T_eff value by 25 - 50 K for late-type giants, and NLTE models computed with the GASS10 abundances give T_eff results that are marginally in better agreement with other T_eff calibrations. For stars of [M/H]=-0.5 there is marginal evidence that adoption of alpha-enhancement further lowers the derived T_eff value by 50 K. Stellar parameters inferred from fitting NLTE models to SEDs are more dependent than LTE models on the wavelength region being fitted, and we find that the effect depends on how heavily line blanketed the fitting region is, whether the fitting region is to the blue of the Wien peak of the star's SED, or both.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.0052  [pdf] - 1123823
Galaxy formation in WMAP1 and WMAP7 cosmologies
Comments: 16 pages, accepted version (MNRAS)
Submitted: 2012-05-31, last modified: 2013-02-05
Using the technique of Angulo & White (2010) we scale the Millennium and Millennium-II simulations of structure growth in a LCDM universe from the cosmological parameters with which they were carried out (based on first-year results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, WMAP1) to parameters consistent with the seven-year WMAP data (WMAP7). We implement semi-analytic galaxy formation modelling on both simulations in both cosmologies to investigate how the formation, evolution and clustering of galaxies are predicted to vary with cosmological parameters. The increased matter density Omega_m and decreased linear fluctuation amplitude sigma8 in WMAP7 have compensating effects, so that the abundance and clustering of dark halos are predicted to be very similar to those in WMAP1 for z <= 3. As a result, local galaxy properties can be reproduced equally well in the two cosmologies by slightly altering galaxy formation parameters. The evolution of the galaxy populations is then also similar. In WMAP7, structure forms slightly later. This shifts the peak in cosmic star formation rate to lower redshift, resulting in slightly bluer galaxies at z=0. Nevertheless, the model still predicts more passive low-mass galaxies than are observed. For rp< 1Mpc, the z=0 clustering of low-mass galaxies is weaker for WMAP7 than for WMAP1 and closer to that observed, but the two cosmologies give very similar results for more massive galaxies and on large scales. At z>1 galaxies are predicted to be more strongly clustered for WMAP7. Differences in galaxy properties, including, clustering, in these two cosmologies are rather small up to redshift 3. Given that there are still considerable residual uncertainties in galaxy formation models, it is very difficult to distinguish WMAP1 from WMAP7 through observations of galaxy properties or their evolution.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.1104  [pdf] - 582487
Heating and enriching the intracluster medium
Comments: 23 pages, accepted by MNRAS. Some changes in response to referee's comments. New figures 22 & 23
Submitted: 2012-01-05, last modified: 2012-10-29
We present numerical simulations of galaxy clusters with stochastic heating from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that are able to reproduce the observed entropy and temperature profiles of non-cool-core (NCC) clusters. Our study uses N-body hydrodynamical simulations to investigate how star formation, metal production, black hole accretion and the associated feedback from supernovae and AGN heat and enrich diffuse gas in galaxy clusters. We assess how different implementations of these processes affect the thermal and chemical properties of the intracluster medium (ICM), using high-quality X-ray observations of local clusters to constrain our models. For the purposes of this study we have resimulated a sample of 25 massive galaxy clusters extracted from the Millennium Simulation. Sub-grid physics is handled using a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, thus guaranteeing that the source of feedback in our simulations is a population of galaxies with realistic properties. We find that supernova feedback has no effect on the entropy and metallicity structure of the ICM, regardless of the method used to inject energy and metals into the diffuse gas. By including AGN feedback, we are able to explain the observed entropy and metallicity profiles of clusters, as well as the X-ray luminosity-temperature scaling relation for NCC systems. A stochastic model of AGN energy injection motivated by anisotropic jet heating - presented for the first time here - is crucial for this success. With the addition of metal-dependent radiative cooling, our model is also able to produce CC clusters, without overcooling of gas in dense, central regions.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1209.2656  [pdf] - 1151361
Comparative Modelling of the Spectra of Cool Giants
Comments: accepted for publication in A&A. This version includes also the online tables. Reference spectra will later be available via the CDS
Submitted: 2012-09-12
Our ability to extract information from the spectra of stars depends on reliable models of stellar atmospheres and appropriate techniques for spectral synthesis. Various model codes and strategies for the analysis of stellar spectra are available today. We aim to compare the results of deriving stellar parameters using different atmosphere models and different analysis strategies. The focus is set on high-resolution spectroscopy of cool giant stars. Spectra representing four cool giant stars were made available to various groups and individuals working in the area of spectral synthesis, asking them to derive stellar parameters from the data provided. The results were discussed at a workshop in Vienna in 2010. Most of the major codes currently used in the astronomical community for analyses of stellar spectra were included in this experiment. We present the results from the different groups, as well as an additional experiment comparing the synthetic spectra produced by various codes for a given set of stellar parameters. Similarities and differences of the results are discussed. Several valid approaches to analyze a given spectrum of a star result in quite a wide range of solutions. The main causes for the differences in parameters derived by different groups seem to lie in the physical input data and in the details of the analysis method. This clearly shows how far from a definitive abundance analysis we still are.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.5570  [pdf] - 1123657
The XMM Cluster Survey: Evidence for energy injection at high redshift from evolution of the X-ray luminosity-temperature relation
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS; 12 pages, 6 figures; added references to match published version
Submitted: 2012-05-24, last modified: 2012-07-04
We measure the evolution of the X-ray luminosity-temperature (L_X-T) relation since z~1.5 using a sample of 211 serendipitously detected galaxy clusters with spectroscopic redshifts drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey first data release (XCS-DR1). This is the first study spanning this redshift range using a single, large, homogeneous cluster sample. Using an orthogonal regression technique, we find no evidence for evolution in the slope or intrinsic scatter of the relation since z~1.5, finding both to be consistent with previous measurements at z~0.1. However, the normalisation is seen to evolve negatively with respect to the self-similar expectation: we find E(z)^{-1} L_X = 10^{44.67 +/- 0.09} (T/5)^{3.04 +/- 0.16} (1+z)^{-1.5 +/- 0.5}, which is within 2 sigma of the zero evolution case. We see milder, but still negative, evolution with respect to self-similar when using a bisector regression technique. We compare our results to numerical simulations, where we fit simulated cluster samples using the same methods used on the XCS data. Our data favour models in which the majority of the excess entropy required to explain the slope of the L_X-T relation is injected at high redshift. Simulations in which AGN feedback is implemented using prescriptions from current semi-analytic galaxy formation models predict positive evolution of the normalisation, and differ from our data at more than 5 sigma. This suggests that more efficient feedback at high redshift may be needed in these models.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.6337  [pdf] - 1118346
Matching the Spectral Energy Distribution and p Mode Oscillation Frequencies of the Rapidly Rotating Delta Scuti Star ? Ophiuchi with a 2D Rotating Stellar Model
Comments: Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2012-04-27
Spectral energy distributions are computed using 2D rotating stellar models and NLTE plane parallel model atmospheres. A rotating, 2D stellar model has been found which matches the observed ultraviolet and visible spectrum of ? Oph. The SED match occurs for the interferometrically deduced surface shape and inclination, and is different from the SED produced by spherical models. The p mode oscillation frequencies in which the latitudinal variation is modelled by a linear combination of eight Legendre polynomials were computed for this model. The five highest and seven of the nine highest amplitude modes show agreement between computed axisymmetric, equatorially symmetric mode frequencies and the mode frequencies observed by MOST to within the observational error. Including nonaxisymmetric modes up through |m| = 2 and allowing the possibility that the eight lowest amplitude modes could be produced by modes which are not equatorially symmetric produces matches for 24 out of the 35 MOST modes to within the observational error and another eight modes to within twice the observational error. The remaining three observed modes can be fit within 4.2 times the observational error, but even these may be fit to within the observational error if the criteria for computed modes are expanded.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.3769  [pdf] - 1092427
Sunyaev-Zel'dovich clusters in Millennium Gas simulations
Comments: 28 pages, 24 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS following minor revision. Now includes figure showing log-normal scatter in Y-M relation
Submitted: 2011-12-16, last modified: 2012-01-30
We have exploited the large-volume Millennium Gas cosmological N-body hydrodynamics simulations to study the SZ cluster population at low and high redshift, for three models with varying gas physics. We confirm previous results using smaller samples that the intrinsic (spherical) Y_{500}-M_{500} relation has very little scatter (sigma_{log_{10}Y}~0.04), is insensitive to cluster gas physics and evolves to redshift one in accord with self-similar expectations. Our pre-heating and feedback models predict scaling relations that are in excellent agreement with the recent analysis from combined Planck and XMM-Newton data by the Planck Collaboration. This agreement is largely preserved when r_{500} and M_{500} are derived using the hydrostatic mass proxy, Y_{X,500}, albeit with significantly reduced scatter (sigma_{log_{10}Y}~0.02), a result that is due to the tight correlation between Y_{500} and Y_{X,500}. Interestingly, this assumption also hides any bias in the relation due to dynamical activity. We also assess the importance of projection effects from large-scale structure along the line-of-sight, by extracting cluster Y_{500} values from fifty simulated 5x5 square degree sky maps. Once the (model-dependent) mean signal is subtracted from the maps we find that the integrated SZ signal is unbiased with respect to the underlying clusters, although the scatter in the (cylindrical) Y_{500}-M_{500} relation increases in the pre-heating case, where a significant amount of energy was injected into the intergalactic medium at high redshift. Finally, we study the hot gas pressure profiles to investigate the origin of the SZ signal and find that the largest contribution comes from radii close to r_{500} in all cases. The profiles themselves are well described by generalised Navarro, Frenk & White profiles but there is significant cluster-to-cluster scatter.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.0910  [pdf] - 1092714
Modeling the near-UV band of GK stars, Paper II: NLTE models
Comments: Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal. Observed spectrophotometric library, and grids of NLTE and LTE) synthetic spectra for GK stars available at http://www.ap.smu.ca/~ishort/PHOENIX
Submitted: 2012-01-04
We present a grid of atmospheric models and synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for late-type dwarfs and giants of solar and 1/3 solar metallicity with many opacity sources computed in self-consistent Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE), and compare them to the LTE grid of Short & Hauschildt (2010) (Paper I). We describe, for the first time, how the NLTE treatment affects the thermal equilibrium of the atmospheric structure (T(tau) relation) and the SED as a finely sampled function of Teff, log g, and [A/H] among solar metallicity and mildly metal poor red giants. We compare the computed SEDs to the library of observed spectrophotometry described in Paper I across the entire visible band, and in the blue and red regions of the spectrum separately. We find that for the giants of both metallicities, the NLTE models yield best fit Teff values that are ~30 to 90 K lower than those provided by LTE models, while providing greater consistency between \log g values, and, for Arcturus, Teff values, fitted separately to the blue and red spectral regions. There is marginal evidence that NLTE models give more consistent best fit Teff values between the red and blue bands for earlier spectral classes among the solar metallicity GK giants than they do for the later classes, but no model fits the blue band spectrum well for any class. For the two dwarf spectral classes that we are able to study, the effect of NLTE on derived parameters is less significant.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.3056  [pdf] - 1077311
The XMM Cluster Survey: Optical analysis methodology and the first data release
Comments: MNRAS submitted, 30 pages, 20 figures, 3 electronic tables. The X-ray analysis methodology used to construct and analyse the XCS-DR1 cluster sample is presented in the companion paper, Lloyd-Davies et al. (2010). The XCS-DR1 catalogue, together with optical and X-ray (colour-composite and greyscale) images for each cluster, is publicly available from http://xcs-home.org/datareleases
Submitted: 2011-06-15, last modified: 2011-06-17
The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is a serendipitous search for galaxy clusters using all publicly available data in the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Its main aims are to measure cosmological parameters and trace the evolution of X-ray scaling relations. In this paper we present the first data release from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS-DR1). This consists of 503 optically confirmed, serendipitously detected, X-ray clusters. Of these clusters, 255 are new to the literature and 356 are new X-ray discoveries. We present 464 clusters with a redshift estimate (0.06 < z < 1.46), including 261 clusters with spectroscopic redshifts. In addition, we have measured X-ray temperatures (Tx) for 402 clusters (0.4 < Tx < 14.7 keV). We highlight seven interesting subsamples of XCS-DR1 clusters: (i) 10 clusters at high redshift (z > 1.0, including a new spectroscopically-confirmed cluster at z = 1.01); (ii) 67 clusters with high Tx (> 5 keV); (iii) 131 clusters/groups with low Tx (< 2 keV); (iv) 27 clusters with measured Tx values in the SDSS `Stripe 82' co-add region; (v) 78 clusters with measured Tx values in the Dark Energy Survey region; (vi) 40 clusters detected with sufficient counts to permit mass measurements (under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium); (vii) 105 clusters that can be used for applications such as the derivation of cosmological parameters and the measurement of cluster scaling relations. The X-ray analysis methodology used to construct and analyse the XCS-DR1 cluster sample has been presented in a companion paper, Lloyd-Davies et al. (2010).
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1103.1390  [pdf] - 327043
Spectral Type and Radial Velocity Variations in Three SRC Variables
Comments: To appear in the Odessa Variable Stars 2010 conference proceedings (see http://uavso.org.ua/?page=vs2010), edited by I. Andronov and V. Kovtyukh
Submitted: 2011-03-07
SRC variables are M supergiants, precursors to Type II supernovae, that vary in brightness with moderately regular periods of order 100-1000 days. Although identified as pulsating stars that obey their own period-luminosity relation, few have been examined in enough detail to follow the temperature and spectral changes that they undergo during their long cycles. The present study examines such changes for several SRC variables revealed by CCD spectra obtained at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) during 2005-2009, as well as by archival spectra from the DAO (and elsewhere) for some stars from the 1960s to 1980s, and Cambridge radial velocity spectrometer measures for Betelgeuse. Described here is our classification procedure and information on the spectral type and radial velocity changes in three of the stars. The results provide insights into the pulsation mechanism in M supergiants.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.4539  [pdf] - 1025360
The evolution of galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations
Comments: 23 pages, 14 figures, 3 tables. Minor revisons in line with referee's comments. Published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-02-24, last modified: 2010-12-15
We use numerical simulations to investigate, for the first time, the joint effect of feedback from supernovae (SNe) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) on the evolution of galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations. Our simulations are drawn from the Millennium Gas Project and are some of the largest hydrodynamical N-body simulations ever carried out. Feedback is implemented using a hybrid scheme, where the energy input into intracluster gas by SNe and AGN is taken from a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. This ensures that the source of feedback is a population of galaxies that closely resembles that found in the real universe. We show that our feedback model is capable of reproducing observed local X-ray scaling laws, at least for non-cool core clusters, but that almost identical results can be obtained with a simplistic preheating model. However, we demonstrate that the two models predict opposing evolutionary behaviour. We have examined whether the evolution predicted by our feedback model is compatible with observations of high-redshift clusters. Broadly speaking, we find that the data seems to favour the feedback model for z<0.5, and the preheating model at higher redshift. However, a statistically meaningful comparison with observations is impossible, because the large samples of high-redshift clusters currently available are prone to strong selection biases. As the observational picture becomes clearer in the near future, it should be possible to place tight constraints on the evolution of the scaling laws, providing us with an invaluable probe of the physical processes operating in galaxy clusters.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.0887  [pdf] - 1033517
Baryon fractions in clusters of galaxies: evidence against a preheating model for entropy generation
Comments: 16 pages, 18 figures, 4 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-07-06, last modified: 2010-12-07
The Millennium Gas project aims to undertake smoothed-particle hydrodynamic resimulations of the Millennium Simulation, providing many hundred massive galaxy clusters for comparison with X-ray surveys (170 clusters with kTsl > 3 keV). This paper looks at the hot gas and stellar fractions of clusters in simulations with different physical heating mechanisms. These fail to reproduce cool-core systems but are successful in matching the hot gas profiles of non-cool-core clusters. Although there is immense scatter in the observational data, the simulated clusters broadly match the integrated gas fractions within r500 . In line with previous work, however, they fare much less well when compared to the stellar fractions, having a dependence on cluster mass that is much weaker than is observed. The evolution with redshift of the hot gas fraction is much larger in the simulation with early preheating than in one with continual feedback; observations favour the latter model. The strong dependence of hot gas fraction on cluster physics limits its use as a probe of cosmological parameters.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.1433  [pdf] - 200395
Modeling the near-UV band of GK stars, Paper I: LTE models
Comments: Accepted by the Astrophysical Journal, June 2010
Submitted: 2010-07-08
We present a grid of LTE atmospheric models and synthetic spectra that cover the spectral class range from mid-G to mid-K, and luminosity classes from V to III, that is dense in Teff sampling (Delta Teff=62.5 K), for stars of solar metallicity and moderately metal poor scaled solar abundance ([A/H]=0.0 and -0.5). All models have been computed with two choices of atomic line list: a) the "big" line lists of Kurucz (1992) that best reproduce the broad-band solar blue and near UV flux level, and b) the "small" lists of Kurucz & Peytremann (1975) that provide the best fit to the high resolution solar blue and near-UV spectrum. We compare our model SEDs to a sample of stars carefully selected from the large catalog of uniformly re-calibrated spectrophotometry of Burnashev (1985) with the goal of determining how the quality of fit varies with stellar parameters, especially in the historically troublesome blue and near-UV bands. We confirm that our models computed with the "big" line list recover the derived Teff values of the PHOENIX NextGen grid, but find that the models computed with the "small" line list provide greater internal self-consistency among different spectral bands, and closer agreement with the empirical Teff scale of Ramirez & Melendez (2005), but not to the interferometrically derived Teff values of Baines et al. (2010). We find no evidence that the near UV band discrepancy between models and observations for Arcturus (alpha Boo) reported by Short & Hauschildt (2003 and 2009) is pervasive, and that Arcturus may be peculiar in this regard.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.3166  [pdf] - 18698
Combining Semi-analytic Models with Simulations of Galaxy Clusters: the Need for Heating from Active Galactic Nuclei
Comments: 25 pages and 10 colour figures. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2008-11-19, last modified: 2009-09-16
We present hydrodynamical N-body simulations of clusters of galaxies with feedback taken from semi-analytic models of galaxy formation. The advantage of this technique is that the source of feedback in our simulations is a population of galaxies that closely resembles that found in the real universe. We demonstrate that, to achieve the high entropy levels found in clusters, active galactic nuclei must inject a large fraction of their energy into the intergalactic/intracluster media throughout the growth period of the central black hole. These simulations reinforce the argument of Bower et al., who arrived at the same conclusion on the basis of purely semi-analytic reasoning.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.0872  [pdf] - 1017378
Combining Semi-Analytic Models of Galaxy Formation with Simulations of Galaxy Clusters: the Need for AGN Heating
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure. To appear in the proceedings of "The Monster's Fiery Breath", Eds. Sebastian Heinz and Eric Wilcots (AIP conference series)
Submitted: 2009-09-04
We present hydrodynamical N-body simulations of clusters of galaxies with feedback taken from semi-analytic models of galaxy formation. The advantage of this technique is that the source of feedback in our simulations is a population of galaxies that closely resembles that found in the real universe. We demonstrate that, to achieve the high entropy levels found in clusters, active galactic nuclei must inject a large fraction of their energy into the intergalactic/intracluster media throughout the growth period of the central black hole. These simulations reinforce the argument of Bower et al. (2008), who arrived at the same conclusion on the basis of purely semi-analytic reasoning.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.1145  [pdf] - 315291
Non-LTE modeling of the near UV band of late-type stars
Comments: 45 pages, 17 figures
Submitted: 2008-11-07
We investigate the ability of both LTE and Non-LTE models to fit the near UV band absolute flux distribution and individual spectral line profiles of three standard stars for which high quality spectrophotometry and high resolution spectroscopy are available: The Sun (G2 V), Arcturus (K2 III), and Procyon (F5 IV-V). We investigate 1) the effect of the choice of atomic line list on the ability of NLTE models to fit the near UV band flux level, 2) the amount of a hypothesized continuous thermal absorption extinction source required to allow NLTE models to fit the observations, and 3) the semi-empirical temperature structure required to fit the observations with NLTE models and standard continuous near UV extinction. We find that all models that are computed with high quality atomic line lists predict too much flux in the near UV band for Arcturus, but fit the warmer stars well. The variance among independent measurements of the solar irradiance in the near UV is sufficiently large that we cannot definitely conclude that models predict too much near UV flux, in contrast to other recent results. We surmise that the inadequacy of current atmospheric models of K giants in the near UV band is best addressed by hypothesizing that there is still missing continuous thermal extinction, and that the missing near UV extinction becomes more important with decreasing effective temperature for spectral classes later than early G, suggesting a molecular origin.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605012  [pdf] - 81700
Gravitational instability via the Schrodinger equation
Comments: 49 pages, 9 figures. Shortened to 35 pages, 6 figures. Re-structured with some changed content. Original figures corrected
Submitted: 2006-04-29, last modified: 2006-11-22
We explore a novel approach to the study of large-scale structure formation in which self-gravitating cold dark matter (CDM) is represented by a complex scalar field whose dynamics are governed by coupled Schrodinger and Poisson equations. We show that, in the quasi-linear regime, the Schrodinger equation can be reduced to the free-particle Schrodinger equation. We advocate using the free-particle Schrodinger equation as the basis of a new approximation method - the free-particle approximation - that is similar in spirit to the successful adhesion model. In this paper we test the free-particle approximation by appealing to a planar collapse scenario and find that our results are in excellent agreement with those of the Zeldovich approximation, provided care is taken when choosing a value for the effective Planck constant in the theory. We also discuss how extensions of the free-particle approximation are likely to require the inclusion of a time-dependent potential in the Schrodinger equation. Since the Schrodinger equation with a time-dependent potential is typically impossible to solve exactly, we investigate whether standard quantum-mechanical approximation techniques can be used, in a cosmological setting, to obtain useful solutions of the Schrodinger equation. In this paper we focus on one particular approximation method: time-dependent perturbation theory (TDPT). We elucidate the properties of perturbative solutions of the Schrodinger equation by considering a simple example: the gravitational evolution of a plane-symmetric density fluctuation. We use TDPT to calculate an approximate solution of the relevant Schrodinger equation and show that this perturbative solution can be used to successfully follow gravitational collapse beyond the linear regime, but there are several pitfalls to be avoided.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605013  [pdf] - 81701
Wave-mechanics and the adhesion approximation
Comments: 27 pages, 8 figures. Shortened to 19 pages, 7 figures. Re-structured with some changed content. Title changed accordingly
Submitted: 2006-04-29, last modified: 2006-11-22
The dynamical equations describing the evolution of a self-gravitating fluid of cold dark matter (CDM) can be written in the form of a Schrodinger equation coupled to a Poisson equation describing Newtonian gravity. It has recently been shown that, in the quasi-linear regime, the Schrodinger equation can be reduced to the exactly solvable free-particle Schrodinger equation. The free-particle Schrodinger equation forms the basis of a new approximation scheme -the free-particle approximation - that is capable of evolving cosmological density perturbations into the quasi-linear regime. The free-particle approximation is essentially an alternative to the adhesion model in which the artificial viscosity term in Burgers' equation is replaced by a non-linear term known as the quantum pressure. Simple one-dimensional tests of the free-particle method have yielded encouraging results. In this paper we comprehensively test the free-particle approximation in a more cosmologically relevant scenario by appealing to an N-body simulation. We compare our results with those obtained from two established methods: the linearized fluid approach and the Zeldovich approximation. We find that the free-particle approximation comprehensively out-performs both of these approximation schemes in all tests carried out and thus provides another useful analytical tool for studying structure formation on cosmological scales.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0602084  [pdf] - 79660
Surface temperature and synthetic spectral energy distributions for rotationally deformed stars
Comments: 38 pages, 9 figures (AAStex preprint format). Accepted for publication in the ApJ
Submitted: 2006-02-03
The spectral energy distribution (SED) of a non-spherical star could differ significantly from the SED of a spherical star with the same average temperature and luminosity. Calculation of the SED of a deformed star is often approximated as a composite of several spectra, each produced by a plane parallel model of given effective temperature and gravity. The weighting of these spectra over the stellar surface, and hence the inferred effective temperature and luminosity, will be dependent on the inclination of the rotation axis of the star with respect to the observer, as well as the temperature and gravity distribution on the stellar surface. Here we calculate the surface conditions of rapidly rotating stars with a 2D stellar structure and evolution code and compare the effective temperature distribution to that predicted by von Zeipel's law. We calculate the composite spectrum for a deformed star by interpolating within a grid of intensity spectra of plane parallel model atmospheres and integrating over the surface of the star. Using this method, we find that the deduced variation of effective temperature with inclination can be as much as 3000 K for an early B star, depending on the details of the underlying model.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0601210  [pdf] - 79068
NLTE Strontium and Barium in metal poor red giant stars
Comments: 28 pages, 10 figures. Accepted for publication in April 2006 Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2006-01-10
We present atmospheric models of red giant stars of various metallicities, including extremely metal poor (XMP, [Fe/H]<-3.5) models, with many chemical species, including, significantly, the first two ionization stages of Strontium (Sr) and Barium (Ba), treated in Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) with various degrees of realism. We conclude that 1) for all lines that are useful Sr and Ba abundance diagnostics the magnitude and sense of the computed NLTE effect on the predicted line strength is metallicity dependent, 2) the indirect NLTE effect of overlap between Ba and Sr transitions and transitions of other species that are also treated in NLTE non-negligibly enhances NLTE abundance corrections for some lines, 3) the indirect NLTE effect of NLTE opacity of other species on the equilibrium structure of the atmospheric model is not significant, 4) the computed NLTE line strengths differ negligibly if collisional b-b and b-f rates are an order of magnitude smaller or larger than those calculated with standard analytic formulae, and 5) the effect of NLTE upon the resonance line of Ba II at 4554.03 AA is independent of whether that line is treated with hyperfine splitting. As a result, the derivation of abundances of Ba and Sr for metal-poor red giant stars with LTE modeling that are in the literature should be treated with caution.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0409693  [pdf] - 67774
A NLTE line blanketed model of a solar type star
Comments: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2004-09-28
We present LTE and NLTE atmospheric models of a star with solar parameters, and study the effect of treating many thousands of Iron group lines out of LTE on the computed atmospheric structure, overall absolute flux distribution, and the moderately high resolution spectrum in the visible and near UV bands. Our NLTE modeling includes the first two or three ionization stages of 20 chemical elements, up to and including much of the Fe-group, and includes about 20000 Fe I and II lines. We investigate separately the effects of treating the light metals and the Fe-group elements in NLTE. Our main conclusions are that 1) NLTE line blanketed models with direct multi-level NLTE for many actual transitions gives qualitatively similar results as the more approximate treatment of Anderson (1989) for both the Fe statistical equilibrium and the atmospheric temperature structure, 2) models with many Fe lines in NLTE have a temperature structure that agrees more closely with LTE semi-empirical models based on center-to-limb variation and a wide variety of spectra lines, whereas LTE models agree more with semi-empirical models based only on an LTE calculation of the Fe I excitation equilibrium, 3) the NLTE effects of Fe-group elements on the model structure and flux distribution are much more important than the NLTE effects of all the light metals combined, and serve to substantially increases the violet and near UV flux level as a result of NLTE Fe over-ionization. These results suggest that there may still be important UV opacity missing from the models.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0306531  [pdf] - 57612
Atmospheric models of red giants with massive scale NLTE
Comments: 25 pages, 7 figures, accepted by The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2003-06-25
We present plane-parallel and spherical LTE and NLTE atmospheric models of a variety of stellar parameters of the red giant star Arcturus (alpha Boo, HD124897, HR5340) and study their ability to fit the measured absolute flux distribution. Our NLTE models include tens of thousands of the strongest lines in NLTE, and we investigate separately the effects of treating the light metals and the Fe group elements Fe and Ti in NLTE. We find that the NLTE effects of Fe group elements on the model structure and flux distribution are much more important than the NLTE effects of all the light metals combined, and serve to substantially increases the violet and near UV flux level as a result of NLTE Fe over-ionization. Both the LTE and NLTE models predict significantly more flux in the blue and UV bands than is observed. We find that within the moderately metal-poor metallicity range, the effect of NLTE on the overall UV flux level decreases with decreasing metallicity. These results suggest that there may still be important UV opacity missing from the models. We find that models of solar metallicity giants of similar spectral type to Arcturus fit well the observed flux distributions of those stars from the red to the near UV band. This suggests that the blue and near UV flux discrepancy is metallicity dependent, increasing with decreasing metallicity.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0009502  [pdf] - 38344
Non-LTE Modeling of Nova Cygni 1992
Comments: 24 pages, 17 figures, Accepted by Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2000-09-29
We present a grid of nova models that have an extremely large number of species treated in non-LTE, and apply it to the analysis of an extensive time series of ultraviolet spectroscopic data for Nova Cygni 1992. We use ultraviolet colors to derive the time development of the effective temperature of the expanding atmosphere during the fireball phase and the first ten days of the optically thick wind phase. We find that the nova has a pure optically thick wind spectrum until about 10 days after the explosion. During this interval, we find that synthetic spectra based on our derived temperature sequence agree very well with the observed spectra. We find that a sequence of hydrogen deficient models provides an equally good fit providing the model effective temperature is shifted upwards by ~1000 K. We find that high resolution UV spectra of the optically thick wind phase are fit moderately well by the models. We find that a high resolution spectrum of the fireball phase is better fit by a model with a steep density gradient, similar to that of a supernova, than by a nova model.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9906238  [pdf] - 106959
Massive Multi-species, Multi-level NLTE Model Atmospheres for Novae in Outburst
Comments: 29 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 1999-06-14
We have used our PHOENIX multi-purpose model atmosphere code to calculate atmospheric models that represent novae in the optically thick wind phases of their outburst. We have improved the treatment of NLTE effects by expanding the number of elements that are included in the calculations from 15 to 19, and the number of ionization stages from 36 to 87. The code can now treat a total of 10713 levels and 102646 lines in NLTE. Aluminum, P, K, and Ni are included for the first time in the NLTE treatment and most elements now have at least the lowest six ionization stages included in the NLTE calculation. We have investigated the effects of expanded NLTE treatment on the chemical concentration of astrophysically significant species in the atmosphere, the equilibrium structure of the atmosphere, and the emergent flux distribution. Although we have found general qualitative agreement with previous, more limited NLTE models, the expanded NLTE treatment leads to significantly different values for the size of many of the NLTE deviations. In particular, for the hottest model presented here (effective temperature of 35000 K), for which NLTE effects are largest, we find that the expanded NLTE treatment reduces the NLTE effects for these important variables: neutral Hydrogen concentration, pressure structure, and emergent far UV flux. Moreover, we find that the addition of new NLTE species may greatly affect the concentration of species that were already treated in NLTE, so that, generally, all species that contribute significantly to the electron reservoir or to the total opacity, or whose line spectrum overlaps or interlocks with that of a species of interest, must be treated in NLTE to insure an accurate result for any particular species.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9410013  [pdf] - 91897
Missing Opacity in the Atmospheric Models of Red Giants
Comments: 8 pages, DDO 94-1720
Submitted: 1994-10-04
Synthetic spectra of Arcturus computed with the latest theoretical stellar atmospheres disagree strongly with both the spectral energy distribution and with the spectroscopic data for $\lambda < 4000$ \AA , even though the stellar parameters are well constrained. We find that the discrepancy can be removed by adding a continuous absorption opacity that is approximately equal to that which is already included in the {\sc atlas9} code. Spectroscopy of other K2 III stars shows that the spectrum of Arcturus in not anomalous. Therefore, missing opacity may be a common feature of the models for stars in this temperature and luminosity range.