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Scarpetta, G.

Normalized to: Scarpetta, G.

87 article(s) in total. 783 co-authors, from 1 to 76 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 33,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.09613  [pdf] - 2042338
OGLE-2013-BLG-0911Lb: A Secondary on the Brown-Dwarf Planet Boundary around an M-dwarf
Comments: 22 pages, 10 figures, Accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2019-12-19
We present the analysis of the binary-lens microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0911. The best-fit solutions indicate the binary mass ratio of q~0.03 which differs from that reported in Shvartzvald+2016. The event suffers from the well-known close/wide degeneracy, resulting in two groups of solutions for the projected separation normalized by the Einstein radius of s~0.15 or s~7. The finite source and the parallax observations allow us to measure the lens physical parameters. The lens system is an M-dwarf orbited by a massive Jupiter companion at very close (M_{host}=0.30^{+0.08}_{-0.06} M_{Sun}, M_{comp}=10.1^{+2.9}_{-2.2} M_{Jup}, a_{exp}=0.40^{+0.05}_{-0.04} au) or wide (M_{host}=0.28^{+0.10}_{-0.08} M_{Sun}, M_{comp}=9.9^{+3.8}_{-3.5}M_{Jup}, a_{exp}=18.0^{+3.2}_{-3.2} au) separation. Although the mass ratio is slightly above the planet-brown dwarf (BD) mass-ratio boundary of q=0.03 which is generally used, the median physical mass of the companion is slightly below the planet-BD mass boundary of 13M_{Jup}. It is likely that the formation mechanisms for BDs and planets are different and the objects near the boundaries could have been formed by either mechanism. It is important to probe the distribution of such companions with masses of ~13M_{Jup} in order to statistically constrain the formation theories for both BDs and massive planets. In particular, the microlensing method is able to probe the distribution around low-mass M-dwarfs and even BDs which is challenging for other exoplanet detection methods.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.07281  [pdf] - 2034320
Full orbital solution for the binary system in the northern Galactic disc microlensing event Gaia16aye
Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Mróz, P.; Rybicki, K. A.; Gromadzki, M.; Kołaczkowski, Z.; Zieliński, M.; Zieliński, P.; Britavskiy, N.; Gomboc, A.; Sokolovsky, K.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Abe, L.; Aldi, G. F.; AlMannaei, A.; Altavilla, G.; Qasim, A. Al; Anupama, G. C.; Awiphan, S.; Bachelet, E.; Bakıs, V.; Baker, S.; Bartlett, S.; Bendjoya, P.; Benson, K.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Birenbaum, G.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boeva, S.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Bruni, I.; Burenin, R. A.; Burgaz, U.; Butterley, T.; Caines, H. E.; Caton, D. B.; Novati, S. Calchi; Carrasco, J. M.; Cassan, A.; Cepas, V.; Cropper, M.; Chruślińska, M.; Clementini, G.; Clerici, A.; Conti, D.; Conti, M.; Cross, S.; Cusano, F.; Damljanovic, G.; Dapergolas, A.; D'Ago, G.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Dennefeld, M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Dominik, M.; Dziedzic, J.; Ereceantalya, O.; Eselevich, M. V.; Esenoglu, H.; Eyer, L.; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Fossey, S. J.; Galeev, A. I.; Grebenev, S. A.; Gupta, A. C.; Gutaev, A. G.; Hallakoun, N.; Hamanowicz, A.; Han, C.; Handzlik, B.; Haislip, J. B.; Hanlon, L.; Hardy, L. K.; Harrison, D. L.; van Heerden, H. J.; Hoette, V. L.; Horne, K.; Hudec, R.; Hundertmark, M.; Ihanec, N.; Irtuganov, E. N.; Itoh, R.; Iwanek, P.; Jovanovic, M. D.; Janulis, R.; Jelínek, M.; Jensen, E.; Kaczmarek, Z.; Katz, D.; Khamitov, I. M.; Kilic, Y.; Klencki, J.; Kolb, U.; Kopacki, G.; Kouprianov, V. V.; Kruszyńska, K.; Kurowski, S.; Latev, G.; Lee, C-H.; Leonini, S.; Leto, G.; Lewis, F.; Li, Z.; Liakos, A.; Littlefair, S. P.; Lu, J.; Manser, C. J.; Mao, S.; Maoz, D.; Martin-Carrillo, A.; Marais, J. P.; Maskoliūnas, M.; Maund, J. R.; Meintjes, P. J.; Melnikov, S. S.; Ment, K.; Mikołajczyk, P.; Morrell, M.; Mowlavi, N.; Moździerski, D.; Murphy, D.; Nazarov, S.; Netzel, H.; Nesci, R.; Ngeow, C. -C.; Norton, A. J.; Ofek, E. O.; Pakstienė, E.; Palaversa, L.; Pandey, A.; Paraskeva, E.; Pawlak, M.; Penny, M. T.; Penprase, B. E.; Piascik, A.; Prieto, J. L.; Qvam, J. K. T.; Ranc, C.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Reichart, D. E.; Reig, P.; Rhodes, L.; Rivet, J. -P.; Rixon, G.; Roberts, D.; Rosi, P.; Russell, D. M.; Sanchez, R. Zanmar; Scarpetta, G.; Seabroke, G.; Shappee, B. J.; Schmidt, R.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Sitek, M.; Skowron, J.; Śniegowska, M.; Snodgrass, C.; Soares, P. S.; van Soelen, B.; Spetsieri, Z. T.; Stankeviciūtė, A.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; Strobl, J.; Strubble, E.; Szegedi, H.; Ramirez, L. M. Tinjaca; Tomasella, L.; Tsapras, Y.; Vernet, D.; Villanueva, S.; Vince, O.; Wambsganss, J.; van der Westhuizen, I. P.; Wiersema, K.; Wium, D.; Wilson, R. W.; Yoldas, A.; Zhuchkov, R. Ya.; Zhukov, D. G.; Zdanavicius, J.; Zoła, S.; Zubareva, A.
Comments: accepted for publication in A&A, 24 pages, 10 figures, tables with the data will be available electronically
Submitted: 2019-01-22, last modified: 2019-10-28
Gaia16aye was a binary microlensing event discovered in the direction towards the northern Galactic disc and was one of the first microlensing events detected and alerted to by the Gaia space mission. Its light curve exhibited five distinct brightening episodes, reaching up to I=12 mag, and it was covered in great detail with almost 25,000 data points gathered by a network of telescopes. We present the photometric and spectroscopic follow-up covering 500 days of the event evolution. We employed a full Keplerian binary orbit microlensing model combined with the motion of Earth and Gaia around the Sun to reproduce the complex light curve. The photometric data allowed us to solve the microlensing event entirely and to derive the complete and unique set of orbital parameters of the binary lensing system. We also report on the detection of the first-ever microlensing space-parallax between the Earth and Gaia located at L2. The properties of the binary system were derived from microlensing parameters, and we found that the system is composed of two main-sequence stars with masses 0.57$\pm$0.05 $M_\odot$ and 0.36$\pm$0.03 $M_\odot$ at 780 pc, with an orbital period of 2.88 years and an eccentricity of 0.30. We also predict the astrometric microlensing signal for this binary lens as it will be seen by Gaia as well as the radial velocity curve for the binary system. Events such as Gaia16aye indicate the potential for the microlensing method of probing the mass function of dark objects, including black holes, in directions other than that of the Galactic bulge. This case also emphasises the importance of long-term time-domain coordinated observations that can be made with a network of heterogeneous telescopes.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.02630  [pdf] - 1896102
An analysis of binary microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0060
Comments: 13 pages, 5 figures, Published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-06-06
We present the analysis of stellar binary microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0060 based on observations obtained from 13 different telescopes. Intensive coverage of the anomalous parts of the light curve was achieved by automated follow-up observations from the robotic telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory. We show that, for the first time, all main features of an anomalous microlensing event are well covered by follow-up data, allowing us to estimate the physical parameters of the lens. The strong detection of second-order effects in the event light curve necessitates the inclusion of longer-baseline survey data in order to constrain the parallax vector. We find that the event was most likely caused by a stellar binary-lens with masses $M_{\star1} = 0.87 \pm 0.12 M_{\odot}$ and $M_{\star2} = 0.77 \pm 0.11 M_{\odot}$. The distance to the lensing system is 6.41 $\pm 0.14$ kpc and the projected separation between the two components is 13.85 $\pm 0.16$ AU. Alternative interpretations are also considered.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.01869  [pdf] - 1779501
The KELT Follow-Up Network and Transit False Positive Catalog: Pre-vetted False Positives for TESS
Collins, Karen A.; Collins, Kevin I.; Pepper, Joshua; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Stassun, Keivan; Gaudi, B. Scott; Bayliss, Daniel; Bento, Joao; Colón, Knicole D.; Feliz, Dax; James, David; Johnson, Marshall C.; Kuhn, Rudolf B.; Lund, Michael B.; Penny, Matthew T.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert J.; Stevens, Daniel J.; Yao, Xinyu; Zhou, George; Akshay, Mundra; Aldi, Giulio F.; Ashcraft, Cliff; Awiphan, Supachai; Baştürk, Özgür; Baker, David; Beatty, Thomas G.; Benni, Paul; Berlind, Perry; Berriman, G. Bruce; Berta-Thompson, Zach; Bieryla, Allyson; Bozza, Valerio; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; Calkins, Michael L.; Cann, Jenna M.; Ciardi, David R.; Clark, Ian R.; Cochran, William D.; Cohen, David H.; Conti, Dennis; Crepp, Justin R.; Curtis, Ivan A.; D'Ago, Giuseppe; Diazeguigure, Kenny A.; Dressing, Courtney D.; Dubois, Franky; Ellingson, Erica; Ellis, Tyler G.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Evans, Phil; Friedli, Alison; Fukui, Akihiko; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Gonzales, Erica J.; Good, John C.; Gregorio, Joao; Gumusayak, Tolga; Hancock, Daniel A.; Harada, Caleb K.; Hart, Rhodes; Hintz, Eric G.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Jeffery, Elizabeth J.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Jofré, Emiliano; Joner, Michael D.; Kar, Aman; Kasper, David H.; Keten, Burak; Kielkopf, John F.; Komonjinda, Siramas; Kotnik, Cliff; Latham, David W.; Leuquire, Jacob; Lewis, Tiffany R.; Logie, Ludwig; Lowther, Simon J.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Martin, Trevor J.; Mawet, Dimitri; McLeod, Kim K.; Murawski, Gabriel; Narita, Norio; Nordhausen, Jim; Oberst, Thomas E.; Odden, Caroline; Panka, Peter A.; Petrucci, Romina; Plavchan, Peter; Quinn, Samuel N.; Rau, Steve; Reed, Phillip A.; Relles, Howard; Renaud, Joe P.; Scarpetta, Gaetano; Sorber, Rebecca L.; Spencer, Alex D.; Spencer, Michelle; Stephens, Denise C.; Stockdale, Chris; Tan, Thiam-Guan; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia; Vanaverbeke, Siegfried; Villanueva, Steven; Warner, Elizabeth M.; West, Mary Lou; Yalçınkaya, Selçuk; Yeigh, Rex; Zambelli, Roberto
Comments: Accepted for publication in AJ, 21 pages, 12 figures, 7 tables
Submitted: 2018-03-05, last modified: 2018-09-19
The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project has been conducting a photometric survey for transiting planets orbiting bright stars for over ten years. The KELT images have a pixel scale of ~23"/pixel---very similar to that of NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)---as well as a large point spread function, and the KELT reduction pipeline uses a weighted photometric aperture with radius 3'. At this angular scale, multiple stars are typically blended in the photometric apertures. In order to identify false positives and confirm transiting exoplanets, we have assembled a follow-up network (KELT-FUN) to conduct imaging with higher spatial resolution, cadence, and photometric precision than the KELT telescopes, as well as spectroscopic observations of the candidate host stars. The KELT-FUN team has followed-up over 1,600 planet candidates since 2011, resulting in more than 20 planet discoveries. Excluding ~450 false alarms of non-astrophysical origin (i.e., instrumental noise or systematics), we present an all-sky catalog of the 1,128 bright stars (6<V<10) that show transit-like features in the KELT light curves, but which were subsequently determined to be astrophysical false positives (FPs) after photometric and/or spectroscopic follow-up observations. The KELT-FUN team continues to pursue KELT and other planet candidates and will eventually follow up certain classes of TESS candidates. The KELT FP catalog will help minimize the duplication of follow-up observations by current and future transit surveys such as TESS.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.03149  [pdf] - 1838164
OGLE-2014-BLG-1186: gravitational microlensing providing evidence for a planet orbiting the foreground star or for a close binary source?
Comments: 26 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-09
(abridged) Using the particularly long gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-1186 with a time-scale $t_\mathrm{E}$ ~ 300 d, we present a methodology for identifying the nature of localised deviations from single-lens point-source light curves, which ensures that 1) the claimed signal is substantially above the noise floor, 2) the inferred properties are robustly determined and their estimation not subject to confusion with systematic noise in the photometry, 3) there are no alternative viable solutions within the model framework that might have been missed. Annual parallax and binarity could be separated and robustly measured from the wing and the peak data, respectively. We find matching model light curves that involve either a binary lens or a binary source. Our binary-lens models indicate a planet of mass $M_2$ = (45 $\pm$ 9) $M_\oplus$, orbiting a star of mass $M_1$ = (0.35 $\pm$ 0.06) $M_\odot$, located at a distance $D_\mathrm{L}$ = (1.7 $\pm$ 0.3) kpc from Earth, whereas our binary-source models suggest a brown-dwarf lens of $M$ = (0.046 $\pm$ 0.007) $M_\odot$, located at a distance $D_\mathrm{L}$ = (5.7 $\pm$ 0.9) kpc, with the source potentially being a (partially) eclipsing binary involving stars predicted to be of similar colour given the ratios between the luminosities and radii. The ambiguity in the interpretation would be resolved in favour of a lens binary by observing the luminous lens star separating from the source at the predicted proper motion of $\mu$ = (1.6 $\pm$ 0.3) mas yr$^{-1}$, whereas it would be resolved in favour of a source binary if the source could be shown to be a (partially) eclipsing binary matching the obtained model parameters. We experienced that close binary source stars pose a challenge for claiming the detection of planets by microlensing in events where the source passes very close to the lens star hosting the planet.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.03241  [pdf] - 1634229
KELT-21b: A Hot Jupiter Transiting the Rapidly-Rotating Metal-Poor Late-A Primary of a Likely Hierarchical Triple System
Comments: Accepted for publication in AJ. Updated to match accepted version. 25 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2017-12-08, last modified: 2018-01-17
We present the discovery of KELT-21b, a hot Jupiter transiting the $V=10.5$ A8V star HD 332124. The planet has an orbital period of $P=3.6127647\pm0.0000033$ days and a radius of $1.586_{-0.040}^{+0.039}$ $R_J$. We set an upper limit on the planetary mass of $M_P<3.91$ $M_J$ at $3\sigma$ confidence. We confirmed the planetary nature of the transiting companion using this mass limit and Doppler tomographic observations to verify that the companion transits HD 332124. These data also demonstrate that the planetary orbit is well-aligned with the stellar spin, with a sky-projected spin-orbit misalignment of $\lambda=-5.6_{-1.9}^{+1.7 \circ}$. The star has $T_{\mathrm{eff}}=7598_{-84}^{+81}$ K, $M_*=1.458_{-0.028}^{+0.029}$ $M_{\odot}$, $R_*=1.638\pm0.034$ $R_{\odot}$, and $v\sin I_*=146$ km s$^{-1}$, the highest projected rotation velocity of any star known to host a transiting hot Jupiter. The star also appears to be somewhat metal-poor and $\alpha$-enhanced, with [Fe/H]$=-0.405_{-0.033}^{+0.032}$ and [$\alpha$/Fe]$=0.145 \pm 0.053$; these abundances are unusual, but not extraordinary, for a young star with thin-disk kinematics like KELT-21. High-resolution imaging observations revealed the presence of a pair of stellar companions to KELT-21, located at a separation of 1.2" and with a combined contrast of $\Delta K_S=6.39 \pm 0.06$ with respect to the primary. Although these companions are most likely physically associated with KELT-21, we cannot confirm this with our current data. If associated, the candidate companions KELT-21 B and C would each have masses of $\sim0.12$ $M_{\odot}$, a projected mutual separation of $\sim20$ AU, and a projected separation of $\sim500$ AU from KELT-21. KELT-21b may be one of only a handful of known transiting planets in hierarchical triple stellar systems.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.06723  [pdf] - 1584963
A giant planet undergoing extreme ultraviolet irradiation by its hot massive-star host
Comments: 39 pages, 3 figures, 1 table, 3 extended data figures, 3 extended data tables. Published in Nature on 22 June 2017
Submitted: 2017-06-20
The amount of ultraviolet irradiation and ablation experienced by a planet depends strongly on the temperature of its host star. Of the thousands of extra-solar planets now known, only four giant planets have been found that transit hot, A-type stars (temperatures of 7300-10,000K), and none are known to transit even hotter B-type stars. WASP-33 is an A-type star with a temperature of ~7430K, which hosts the hottest known transiting planet; the planet is itself as hot as a red dwarf star of type M. The planet displays a large heat differential between its day-side and night-side, and is highly inflated, traits that have been linked to high insolation. However, even at the temperature of WASP-33b's day-side, its atmosphere likely resembles the molecule-dominated atmospheres of other planets, and at the level of ultraviolet irradiation it experiences, its atmosphere is unlikely to be significantly ablated over the lifetime of its star. Here we report observations of the bright star HD 195689, which reveal a close-in (orbital period ~1.48 days) transiting giant planet, KELT-9b. At ~10,170K, the host star is at the dividing line between stars of type A and B, and we measure the KELT-9b's day-side temperature to be ~4600K. This is as hot as stars of stellar type K4. The molecules in K stars are entirely dissociated, and thus the primary sources of opacity in the day-side atmosphere of KELT-9b are likely atomic metals. Furthermore, KELT-9b receives ~700 times more extreme ultraviolet radiation (wavelengths shorter than 91.2 nanometers) than WASP-33b, leading to a predicted range of mass-loss rates that could leave the planet largely stripped of its envelope during the main-sequence lifetime of the host star.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.10889  [pdf] - 1584073
OGLE-2014-BLG-1112LB: A Microlensing Brown Dwarf Detected Through the Channel of a Gravitational Binary-Lens Event
Comments: 7 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2017-05-30
Due to the nature depending on only the gravitational field, microlensing, in principle, provides an important tool to detect faint and even dark brown dwarfs. However, the number of identified brown dwarfs is limited due to the difficulty of the lens mass measurement that is needed to check the substellar nature of the lensing object. In this work, we report a microlensing brown dwarf discovered from the analysis of the gravitational binary-lens event OGLE-2014-BLG-1112. We identify the brown-dwarf nature of the lens companion by measuring the lens mass from the detections of both microlens-parallax and finite-source effects. We find that the companion has a mass of $(3.03 \pm 0.78)\times 10^{-2}\ M_\odot$ and it is orbiting a solar-type primary star with a mass of $1.07 \pm 0.28\ M_\odot$. The estimated projected separation between the lens components is $9.63 \pm 1.33$ au and the distance to the lens is $4.84 \pm 0.67$ kpc. We discuss the usefulness of space-based microlensing observations in detecting brown dwarfs through the channel of binary-lens events.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.01657  [pdf] - 1581394
KELT-18b: Puffy Planet, Hot Host, Probably Perturbed
Comments: 16 pages, 13 figures, 6 tables, accepted to AJ
Submitted: 2017-02-06, last modified: 2017-04-10
We report the discovery of KELT-18b, a transiting hot Jupiter in a 2.87d orbit around the bright (V=10.1), hot, F4V star BD+60 1538 (TYC 3865-1173-1). We present follow-up photometry, spectroscopy, and adaptive optics imaging that allow a detailed characterization of the system. Our preferred model fits yield a host stellar temperature of 6670+/-120 K and a mass of 1.524+/-0.069 Msun, situating it as one of only a handful of known transiting planets with hosts that are as hot, massive, and bright. The planet has a mass of 1.18+/-0.11 Mjup, a radius of 1.57+/-0.04 Rjup, and a density of 0.377+/-0.040 g/cm^3, making it one of the most inflated planets known around a hot star. We argue that KELT-18b's high temperature and low surface gravity, which yield an estimated ~600 km atmospheric scale height, combined with its hot, bright host make it an excellent candidate for observations aimed at atmospheric characterization. We also present evidence for a bound stellar companion at a projected separation of ~1100 AU, and speculate that it may have contributed to the strong misalignment we suspect between KELT-18's spin axis and its planet's orbital axis. The inferior conjunction time is 2457542.524998 +/-0.000416 (BJD_TDB) and the orbital period is 2.8717510 +/- 0.0000029 days. We encourage Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements in the near future to confirm the suspected spin-orbit misalignment of this system.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.03511  [pdf] - 1533244
Faint source star planetary microlensing: the discovery of the cold gas giant planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2016-12-11
We report the discovery of a planet --- OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb --- via gravitational microlensing. Observations for the lensing event were made by the MOA, OGLE, Wise, RoboNET/LCOGT, MiNDSTEp and $\mu$FUN groups. All analyses of the light curve data favour a lens system comprising a planetary mass orbiting a host star. The most favoured binary lens model has a mass ratio between the two lens masses of $(4.78 \pm 0.13)\times 10^{-3}$. Subject to some important assumptions, a Bayesian probability density analysis suggests the lens system comprises a $3.09_{-1.12}^{+1.02}$ M_jup planet orbiting a $0.62_{-0.22}^{+0.20}$ M_sun host star at a deprojected orbital separation of $4.40_{-1.46}^{+2.16}$ AU. The distance to the lens system is $2.22_{-0.83}^{+0.96}$ kpc. Planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb provides additional data to the growing number of cool planets discovered using gravitational microlensing against which planetary formation theories may be tested. Most of the light in the baseline of this event is expected to come from the lens and thus high-resolution imaging observations could confirm our planetary model interpretation.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.03732  [pdf] - 1532020
MiNDSTEp differential photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756: Microlensing and a new time delay
Comments: 16 pages, 15 figures, 10 tables. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2016-10-12
We present V and R photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756. The data were taken by the MiNDSTEp collaboration with the 1.54 m Danish telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory from 2008 to 2012. Differential photometry has been carried out using the image subtraction method as implemented in the HOTPAnTS package, additionally using GALFIT for quasar photometry. The quasar WFI2033-4723 showed brightness variations of order 0.5 mag in V and R during the campaign. The two lensed components of quasar HE0047-1756 varied by 0.2-0.3 mag within five years. We provide, for the first time, an estimate of the time delay of component B with respect to A of $\Delta t= 7.6\pm1.8$ days for this object. We also find evidence for a secular evolution of the magnitude difference between components A and B in both filters, which we explain as due to a long-duration microlensing event. Finally we find that both quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756 become bluer when brighter, which is consistent with previous studies.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.04714  [pdf] - 1557695
KELT-12b: A $P \sim 5$ Day, Highly Inflated Hot Jupiter Transiting a Mildly Evolved Hot Star
Comments: 16 pages, 14 figures, 6 tables. Submitted to AAS Journals
Submitted: 2016-08-16, last modified: 2016-09-02
We report the discovery of KELT-12b, a highly inflated Jupiter-mass planet transiting a mildly evolved host star. We identified the initial transit signal in the KELT-North survey data and established the planetary nature of the companion through precise follow-up photometry, high-resolution spectroscopy, precise radial velocity measurements, and high-resolution adaptive optics imaging. Our preferred best-fit model indicates that the $V = 10.64$ host, TYC 2619-1057-1, has $T_{\rm eff} = 6278 \pm 51$ K, $\log{g_\star} = 3.89^{+0.054}_{-0.051}$, and [Fe/H] = $0.19^{+0.083}_{-0.085}$, with an inferred mass $M_{\star} = 1.59^{+0.071}_{-0.091} M_\odot$ and radius $R_\star = 2.37 \pm 0.18 R_\odot$. The planetary companion has $M_{\rm P} = 0.95 \pm 0.14 M_{\rm J}$, $R_{\rm P} = 1.79^{+0.18}_{-0.17} R_{\rm J}$, $\log{g_{\rm P}} = 2.87^{+0.097}_{-0.098}$, and density $\rho_{\rm P} = 0.21^{+0.075}_{-0.054}$ g cm$^{-3}$, making it one of the most inflated giant planets known. The time of inferior conjunction in ${\rm BJD_{TDB}}$ is $2457088.692055 \pm 0.0009$ and the period is $P = 5.0316144 \pm 0.0000306$ days. Despite the relatively large separation of $\sim0.07$ AU implied by its $\sim 5.03$-day orbital period, KELT-12b receives significant flux of $2.93^{+0.33}_{-0.30} \times 10^9$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ from its host. We compare the radii and insolations of transiting gas-giant planets around hot ($T_{\rm eff} \geq 6250$ K) and cool stars, noting that the observed paucity of known transiting giants around hot stars with low insolation is likely due to selection effects. We underscore the significance of long-term ground-based monitoring of hot stars and space-based targeting of hot stars with the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) to search for inflated giants in longer-period orbits.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.09357  [pdf] - 1475398
OGLE-2015-BLG-0479LA,B: Binary Gravitational Microlens Characterized by Simultaneous Ground-based and Space-based Observation
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2016-06-30
We present a combined analysis of the observations of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 taken both from the ground and by the {\it Spitzer Space Telescope}. The light curves seen from the ground and from space exhibit a time offset of $\sim 13$ days between the caustic spikes, indicating that the relative lens-source positions seen from the two places are displaced by parallax effects. From modeling the light curves, we measure the space-based microlens parallax. Combined with the angular Einstein radius measured by analyzing the caustic crossings, we determine the mass and distance of the lens. We find that the lens is a binary composed of two G-type stars with masses $\sim 1.0\ M_\odot$ and $\sim 0.9\ M_\odot$ located at a distance $\sim 3$ kpc. In addition, we are able to constrain the complete orbital parameters of the lens thanks to the precise measurement of the microlens parallax derived from the joint analysis. In contrast to the binary event OGLE-2014-BLG-1050, which was also observed by {\it Spitzer}, we find that the interpretation of OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 does not suffer from the degeneracy between $(\pm,\pm)$ and $(\pm,\mp)$ solutions, confirming that the four-fold parallax degeneracy in single-lens events collapses into the two-fold degeneracy for the general case of binary-lens events. The location of the blend in the color-magnitude diagram is consistent with the lens properties, suggesting that the blend is the lens itself. The blend is bright enough for spectroscopy and thus this possibility can be checked from future follow-up observations.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.02292  [pdf] - 1513546
First simultaneous microlensing observations by two space telescopes: $Spitzer$ & $Swift$ reveal a brown dwarf in event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319
Comments: 28 pages, 6 figures, 2 tables. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2016-06-07
Simultaneous observations of microlensing events from multiple locations allow for the breaking of degeneracies between the physical properties of the lensing system, specifically by exploring different regions of the lens plane and by directly measuring the "microlens parallax". We report the discovery of a 30-55$M_J$ brown dwarf orbiting a K dwarf in microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319. The system is located at a distance of $\sim$5 kpc toward the Galactic bulge. The event was observed by several ground-based groups as well as by $Spitzer$ and $Swift$, allowing the measurement of the physical properties. However, the event is still subject to an 8-fold degeneracy, in particular the well-known close-wide degeneracy, and thus the projected separation between the two lens components is either $\sim$0.25 AU or $\sim$45 AU. This is the first microlensing event observed by $Swift$, with the UVOT camera. We study the region of microlensing parameter space to which $Swift$ is sensitive, finding that while for this event $Swift$ could not measure the microlens parallax with respect to ground-based observations, it can be important for other events. Specifically, for detecting nearby brown dwarfs and free-floating planets in high magnification events.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.06141  [pdf] - 1451904
Many new variable stars discovered in the core of the globular cluster NGC 6715 (M54) with EMCCD observations
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics, 18 pages, 7 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2016-05-19
We show the benefits of using Electron-Multiplying CCDs and the shift-and-add technique as a tool to minimise the effects of the atmospheric turbulence such as blending between stars in crowded fields and to avoid saturated stars in the fields observed. We intend to complete, or improve, the census of the variable star population in globular cluster NGC~6715. Our aim is to obtain high-precision time-series photometry of the very crowded central region of this stellar system via the collection of better angular resolution images than has been previously achieved with conventional CCDs on ground-based telescopes. Observations were carried out using the Danish 1.54-m Telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory in Chile. The telescope is equipped with an Electron-Multiplying CCD that allowed to obtain short-exposure-time images (ten images per second) that were stacked using the shift-and-add technique to produce the normal-exposure-time images (minutes). The high precision photometry was performed via difference image analysis employing the DanDIA pipeline. We attempted automatic detection of variable stars in the field. We statistically analysed the light curves of 1405 stars in the crowded central region of NGC~6715 to automatically identify the variable stars present in this cluster. We found light curves for 17 previously known variable stars near the edges of our reference image (16 RR Lyrae and 1 semi-regular) and we discovered 67 new variables (30 RR Lyrae, 21 long-period irregular, 3 semi-regular, 1 W Virginis, 1 eclipsing binary, and 11 unclassified). Photometric measurements for these stars are available in electronic form through the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Centre.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.02097  [pdf] - 1432906
Mass Measurements of Isolated Objects from Space-based Microlensing
Comments: 10 papers, 4 figures, 2 tables; ApJ in press
Submitted: 2015-10-07, last modified: 2016-04-21
We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 \emph{Spitzer} microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is very likely a brown dwarf. Assuming that the source star lies behind the same amount of dust as the Bulge red clump, we find the lens is a $45\pm7$ $M_{\rm J}$ brown dwarf at $5.9\pm1.0$ kpc. The lens of of the second event, OGLE-2015-BLG-0763, is a $0.50\pm0.04$ $M_\odot$ star at $6.9\pm1.0$ kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.05549  [pdf] - 1373185
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. VIII. WASP-22, WASP-41, WASP-42 and WASP-55
Comments: 13 pages, 8 tables, 11 figures. Version 2 is the final accepted version of the paper
Submitted: 2015-12-17, last modified: 2016-03-14
We present 13 high-precision and four additional light curves of four bright southern-hemisphere transiting planetary systems: WASP-22, WASP-41, WASP-42 and WASP-55. In the cases of WASP-42 and WASP-55, these are the first follow-up observations since their discovery papers. We present refined measurements of the physical properties and orbital ephemerides of all four systems. No indications of transit timing variations were seen. All four planets have radii inflated above those expected from theoretical models of gas-giant planets; WASP-55b is the most discrepant with a mass of 0.63 Mjup and a radius of 1.34 Rjup. WASP-41 shows brightness anomalies during transit due to the planet occulting spots on the stellar surface. Two anomalies observed 3.1 d apart are very likely due to the same spot. We measure its change in position and determine a rotation period for the host star of 18.6 +/- 1.5 d, in good agreement with a published measurement from spot-induced brightness modulation, and a sky-projected orbital obliquity of lambda = 6 +/- 11 degrees. We conclude with a compilation of obliquity measurements from spot-tracking analyses and a discussion of this technique in the study of the orbital configurations of hot Jupiters.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.09142  [pdf] - 1521160
Campaign 9 of the $K2$ Mission: Observational Parameters, Scientific Drivers, and Community Involvement for a Simultaneous Space- and Ground-based Microlensing Survey
Henderson, Calen B.; Poleski, Radosław; Penny, Matthew; Street, Rachel A.; Bennett, David P.; Hogg, David W.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Zhu, W.; Barclay, T.; Barentsen, G.; Howell, S. B.; Mullally, F.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Mao, S.; Ranc, C.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Wambsganss, J.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Novati, S. Calchi; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Husser, T. -O.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Bryson, S. T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Haas, M. R.; Larson, K.; McCalmont, K.; Packard, M.; Peterson, C.; Putnam, D.; Reedy, L.; Ross, S.; Van Cleve, J. E.; Akeson, R.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Beichman, C. A.; Bryden, G.; Ciardi, D.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Foreman-Mackey, D.; Fouqué, P.; Friedmann, M.; Gelino, C.; Kaspi, S.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Lang, D.; Lee, C. -H.; Lineweaver, C. H.; Maoz, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Mogavero, F.; Morales, J. C.; Nataf, D.; Pogge, R. W.; Santerne, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Suzuki, D.; Tamura, M.; Tisserand, P.; Wang, D.
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures, 3 tables; submitted to PASP
Submitted: 2015-12-30, last modified: 2016-03-07
$K2$'s Campaign 9 ($K2$C9) will conduct a $\sim$3.7 deg$^{2}$ survey toward the Galactic bulge from 7/April through 1/July of 2016 that will leverage the spatial separation between $K2$ and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax $\pi_{\rm E}$ for $\gtrsim$127 microlensing events. These will include several that are planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this white paper we provide an overview of the $K2$C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of $K2$C9, and the array of resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues through which the larger community can become involved, and generally encourage participation in $K2$C9, which constitutes an important pathfinding mission and community exercise in anticipation of $WFIRST$.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.09141  [pdf] - 1429413
Microlensing Parallax for Observers in Heliocentric Motion
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-12-30, last modified: 2016-02-21
Motivated by the ongoing Spitzer observational campaign, and the forecoming K2 one, we revisit, working in an heliocentric reference frame, the geometrical foundation for the analysis of the microlensing parallax, as measured with the simultaneous observation of the same microlensing event from two observers with relative distance of order AU. For the case of observers at rest we discuss the well known fourfold microlensing parallax degeneracy and determine an equation for the degenerate directions of the lens trajectory. For the case of observers in motion, we write down an extension of the Gould (1994) relationship between the microlensing parallax and the observable quantities and, at the same time, we highlight the functional dependence of these same quantities from the timescale of the underlying microlensing event. Furthermore, through a series of examples, we show the importance of taking into account the motion of the observers to correctly recover the parameters of the underlying microlensing event. In particular we discuss the cases of the amplitude of the microlensing parallax and that of the difference of the timescales between the observed microlensing events, key to understand the breaking of the microlensing parallax degeneracy. Finally, we consider the case of the simultaneous observation of the same microlensing event from ground and two satellites, a case relevant for the expected joint K2 and Spitzer observational programs in 2016.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.01699  [pdf] - 1385444
Spitzer Observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 Reveal a New Path to Breaking Strong Microlens Degeneracies
Comments: 27 pages, 6 figures, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2016-01-07, last modified: 2016-02-10
Spitzer microlensing parallax observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 decisively breaks a degeneracy between planetary and binary solutions that is somewhat ambiguous when only ground-based data are considered. Only eight viable models survive out of an initial set of 32 local minima in the parameter space. These models clearly indicate that the lens is a stellar binary system possibly located within the bulge of our Galaxy, ruling out the planetary alternative. We argue that several types of discrete degeneracies can be broken via such space-based parallax observations.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.07913  [pdf] - 1382100
Exploring the crowded central region of 10 Galactic globular clusters using EMCCDs. Variable star searches and new discoveries
Comments: 23 pages, 39 figures and 13 tables. Accepted for publication in the Astronomy & Astrophysics Journal (A&A)
Submitted: 2015-12-24
Obtain time-series photometry of the very crowded central regions of Galactic globular clusters with better angular resolution than previously achieved with conventional CCDs on ground-based telescopes to complete, or improve, the census of the variable star population in those stellar systems. Images were taken using the Danish 1.54-m Telescope at the ESO observatory at La Silla in Chile. The telescope was equipped with an electron-multiplying CCD and the short-exposure-time images obtained (10 images per second) were stacked using the shift-and-add technique to produce the normal-exposure-time images (minutes). Photometry was performed via difference image analysis. Automatic detection of variable stars in the field was attempted. The light curves of 12541 stars in the cores of 10 globular clusters were statistically analysed in order to automatically extract the variable stars. We obtained light curves for 31 previously known variable stars (3 L, 2 SR, 20 RR Lyrae, 1 SX Phe, 3 cataclysmic variables, 1 EW and 1 NC) and we discovered 30 new variables (16 L, 7 SR, 4 RR Lyrae, 1 SX Phe and 2 NC).
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.06636  [pdf] - 1330228
Spitzer Microlens Measurement of a Massive Remnant in a Well-Separated Binary
Comments: ApJ. accepted, 34 pages, 7 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2015-08-26, last modified: 2015-12-18
We report the detection and mass measurement of a binary lens OGLE-2015-BLG-1285La,b, with the more massive component having $M_1>1.35\,M_\odot$ (80% probability). A main-sequence star in this mass range is ruled out by limits on blue light, meaning that a primary in this mass range must be a neutron star or black hole. The system has a projected separation $r_\perp= 6.1\pm 0.4\,{\rm AU}$ and lies in the Galactic bulge. These measurements are based on the "microlens parallax" effect, i.e., comparing the microlensing light curve as seen from $Spitzer$, which lay at $1.25\,{\rm AU}$ projected from Earth, to the light curves from four ground-based surveys, three in the optical and one in the near infrared. Future adaptive optics imaging of the companion by 30m class telescopes will yield a much more accurate measurement of the primary mass. This discovery both opens the path and defines the challenges to detecting and characterizing black holes and neutron stars in wide binaries, with either dark or luminous companions. In particular, we discuss lessons that can be applied to future $Spitzer$ and $Kepler$ K2 microlensing parallax observations.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.05171  [pdf] - 1339029
Physical properties of the planetary systems WASP-45 and WASP-46 from simultaneous multi-band photometry
Comments: 14 pages, 10 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-11-16
Accurate measurements of the physical characteristics of a large number of exoplanets are useful to strongly constrain theoretical models of planet formation and evolution, which lead to the large variety of exoplanets and planetary-system configurations that have been observed. We present a study of the planetary systems WASP-45 and WASP-46, both composed of a main-sequence star and a close-in hot Jupiter, based on 29 new high-quality light curves of transits events. In particular, one transit of WASP-45 b and four of WASP-46 b were simultaneously observed in four optical filters, while one transit of WASP-46 b was observed with the NTT obtaining precision of 0.30 mmag with a cadence of roughly three minutes. We also obtained five new spectra of WASP-45 with the FEROS spectrograph. We improved by a factor of four the measurement of the radius of the planet WASP-45 b, and found that WASP-46 b is slightly less massive and smaller than previously reported. Both planets now have a more accurate measurement of the density (0.959 +\- 0.077 \rho Jup instead of 0.64 +\- 0.30 \rho Jup for WASP-45 b, and 1.103 +\- 0.052 \rho Jup instead of 0.94 +\- 0.11 \rho Jup for WASP-46 b). We tentatively detected radius variations with wavelength for both planets, in particular in the case of WASP-45 b we found a slightly larger absorption in the redder bands than in the bluer ones. No hints for the presence of an additional planetary companion in the two systems were found either from the photometric or radial velocity measurements.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.02724  [pdf] - 1301609
Red noise versus planetary interpretations in the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-446
Comments: accepted ApJ 2015
Submitted: 2015-10-09, last modified: 2015-10-28
For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing datasets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (A_{max} \sim 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (\sim 3M_\oplus ) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favour the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.08099  [pdf] - 1319719
Rotation periods and astrometric motions of the Luhman 16AB brown dwarfs by high-resolution lucky-imaging monitoring
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication by Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2015-10-27
Context. Photometric monitoring of the variability of brown dwarfs can provide useful information about the structure of clouds in their cold atmospheres. The brown-dwarf binary system Luhman 16AB is an interesting target for such a study, as its components stand at the L/T transition and show high levels of variability. Luhman 16AB is also the third closest system to the Solar system, allowing precise astrometric investigations with ground-based facilities. Aims. The aim of the work is to estimate the rotation period and study the astrometric motion of both components. Methods. We have monitored Luhman 16AB over a period of two years with the lucky-imaging camera mounted on the Danish 1.54m telescope at La Silla, through a special i+z long-pass filter, which allowed us to clearly resolve the two brown dwarfs into single objects. An intense monitoring of the target was also performed over 16 nights, in which we observed a peak-to-peak variability of 0.20 \pm 0.02 mag and 0.34 \pm 0.02 mag for Luhman 16A and 16B, respectively. Results. We used the 16-night time-series data to estimate the rotation period of the two components. We found that Luhman 16B rotates with a period of 5.1 \pm 0.1 hr, in very good agreement with previous measurements. For Luhman 16A, we report that it rotates slower than its companion and, even though we were not able to get a robust determination, our data indicate a rotation period of roughly 8 hr. This implies that the rotation axes of the two components are well aligned and suggests a scenario in which the two objects underwent the same accretion process. The 2-year complete dataset was used to study the astrometric motion of Luhman 16AB. We predict a motion of the system that is not consistent with a previous estimate based on two months of monitoring, but cannot confirm or refute the presence of additional planetary-mass bodies in the system.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.07027  [pdf] - 1374092
Spitzer Parallax of OGLE-2015-BLG-0966: A Cold Neptune in the Galactic Disk
Street, R. A.; Udalski, A.; Novati, S. Calchi; Hundertmark, M. P. G.; Zhu, W.; Gould, A.; Yee, J.; Tsapras, Y.; Bennett, D. P.; Project, The RoboNet; Consortium, MiNDSTEp; Jorgensen, U. G.; Dominik, M.; Andersen, M. I.; Bachelet, E.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Cassan, A.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Dong, Subo; Evans, D. F.; Gu, Sheng-hong; Harkonnen, H.; Hinse, T. C.; Horne, Keith; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Menzies, J.; Mao, S.; Peixinho, N.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ranc, C.; Rasmussen, R. Tronsgaard; Scarpetta, G.; Schmidt, R.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Steele, I. A.; Surdej, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Verma, P.; von Essen, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Wang, Yi-Bo.; Wertz, O.; Project, The OGLE; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mroz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Beichman, The Spitzer Team C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Collaboration, The MOA; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Inayama, K.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Nishioka, T.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; P.; Tristram, J.; Wakiyama, Y.; Yonehara, A.; Han, KMTNet Modeling Team C.; Choi, J. -Y.; Park, H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I. -G.
Comments: 28 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2015-08-27
We report the detection of a Cold Neptune m_planet=21+/-2MEarth orbiting a 0.38MSol M dwarf lying 2.5-3.3 kpc toward the Galactic center as part of a campaign combining ground-based and Spitzer observations to measure the Galactic distribution of planets. This is the first time that the complex real-time protocols described by Yee et al. (2015), which aim to maximize planet sensitivity while maintaining sample integrity, have been carried out in practice. Multiple survey and follow-up teams successfully combined their efforts within the framework of these protocols to detect this planet. This is the second planet in the Spitzer Galactic distribution sample. Both are in the near-to-mid disk and clearly not in the Galactic bulge.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.09184  [pdf] - 1935100
Transits and starspots in the WASP-6 planetary system
Comments: 11 Pages, 6 Figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2015-03-31
We present updates to \textsc{prism}, a photometric transit-starspot model, and \textsc{gemc}, a hybrid optimisation code combining MCMC and a genetic algorithm. We then present high-precision photometry of four transits in the WASP-6 planetary system, two of which contain a starspot anomaly. All four transits were modelled using \textsc{prism} and \textsc{gemc}, and the physical properties of the system calculated. We find the mass and radius of the host star to be $0.836\pm 0.063\,{\rm M}_\odot$ and $0.864\pm0.024\,{\rm R}_\odot$, respectively. For the planet we find a mass of $0.485\pm 0.027\,{\rm M}_{\rm Jup}$, a radius of $1.230\pm0.035\,{\rm R}_{\rm Jup}$ and a density of $0.244\pm0.014\,\rho_{\rm Jup}$. These values are consistent with those found in the literature. In the likely hypothesis that the two spot anomalies are caused by the same starspot or starspot complex, we measure the stars rotation period and velocity to be $23.80 \pm 0.15$\,d and $1.78 \pm 0.20$\,km\,s$^{-1}$, respectively, at a co-latitude of 75.8$^\circ$. We find that the sky-projected angle between the stellar spin axis and the planetary orbital axis is $\lambda = 7.2^{\circ} \pm 3.7^{\circ}$, indicating axial alignment. Our results are consistent with and more precise than published spectroscopic measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. These results suggest that WASP-6\,b formed at a much greater distance from its host star and suffered orbital decay through tidal interactions with the protoplanetary disc.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.7378  [pdf] - 1223360
Pathway to the Galactic Distribution of Planets: Combined Spitzer and Ground-Based Microlens Parallax Measurements of 21 Single-Lens Events
Comments: accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-11-26, last modified: 2015-02-24
We present microlens parallax measurements for 21 (apparently) isolated lenses observed toward the Galactic bulge that were imaged simultaneously from Earth and Spitzer, which was ~1 AU West of Earth in projection. We combine these measurements with a kinematic model of the Galaxy to derive distance estimates for each lens, with error bars that are small compared to the Sun's Galactocentric distance. The ensemble therefore yields a well-defined cumulative distribution of lens distances. In principle it is possible to compare this distribution against a set of planets detected in the same experiment in order to measure the Galactic distribution of planets. Since these Spitzer observations yielded only one planet, this is not yet possible in practice. However, it will become possible as larger samples are accumulated.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.8252  [pdf] - 1222886
OGLE-2011-BLG-0265Lb: a Jovian Microlensing Planet Orbiting an M Dwarf
Skowron, J.; Shin, I. -G.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Sumi, T.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Gould, A.; Dominis-Prester, D.; Street, R. A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Bennett, D. P.; Bozza, V.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Koshimoto, N.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Philpott, L. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, T.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Friedman, M.; Almeida, L. A.; Batista, V.; Christie, G.; Choi, J. -Y.; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Hwang, K. -H.; Jablonski, F.; Jung, Y. K.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Yee, J.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kains, N.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Ranc, C.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis; Harpsøe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lundkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wertz, O.
Comments: 10 pages, 2 tables, 5 figures. Accepted in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-10-30, last modified: 2015-02-23
We report the discovery of a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting an M-dwarf star that gave rise to the microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0265. Such a system is very rare among known planetary systems and thus the discovery is important for theoretical studies of planetary formation and evolution. High-cadence temporal coverage of the planetary signal combined with extended observations throughout the event allows us to accurately model the observed light curve. The final microlensing solution remains, however, degenerate yielding two possible configurations of the planet and the host star. In the case of the preferred solution, the mass of the planet is $M_{\rm p} = 0.9\pm 0.3\ M_{\rm J}$, and the planet is orbiting a star with a mass $M = 0.22\pm 0.06\ M_\odot$. The second possible configuration (2$\sigma$ away) consists of a planet with $M_{\rm p}=0.6\pm 0.3\ M_{\rm J}$ and host star with $M=0.14\pm 0.06\ M_\odot$. The system is located in the Galactic disk 3 -- 4 kpc towards the Galactic bulge. In both cases, with an orbit size of 1.5 -- 2.0 AU, the planet is a "cold Jupiter" -- located well beyond the "snow line" of the host star. Currently available data make the secure selection of the correct solution difficult, but there are prospects for lifting the degeneracy with additional follow-up observations in the future, when the lens and source star separate.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.8827  [pdf] - 919927
Searching for variable stars in the cores of five metal rich globular clusters using EMCCD observations
Comments: Accepted to A&A, 24 pages, 23 figures, 11 tables. Updated to match version published in A&A
Submitted: 2014-10-31, last modified: 2015-01-12
In this paper, we present the analysis of time-series observations from 2013 and 2014 of five metal rich ([Fe/H] $>$ -1) globular clusters: NGC~6388, NGC~6441, NGC~6528, NGC~6638, and NGC~6652. The data have been used to perform a census of the variable stars in the central parts of these clusters. The observations were made with the electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera at the Danish 1.54m Telescope at La Silla, Chile, and they were analysed using difference image analysis (DIA) to obtain high-precision light curves of the variable stars. It was possible to identify and classify all of the previously known or suspected variable stars in the central regions of the five clusters. Furthermore, we were able to identify, and in most cases classify 48, 49, 7, 8, and 2 previously unknown variables in NGC~6388, NGC~6441, NGC~6528, NGC~6638, and NGC~6652, respectively. Especially interesting is the case of NGC~6441, for which the variable star population of about 150 stars has been thoroughly examined by previous studies, including a Hubble Space Telescope study. In this paper we are able to present 49 new variable stars for this cluster, of which one (possibly two) are RR Lyrae stars, two are W Virginis stars, and the rest are long period semi-regular/irregular variables on the red giant branch. We have also detected the first double mode RR Lyrae in the cluster.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.6253  [pdf] - 1215864
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. VI. WASP-24, WASP-25 and WASP-26
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 14 pages, 10 figures, 8 tables. Data and supplementary information are available on request
Submitted: 2014-07-23
We present time-series photometric observations of thirteen transits in the planetary systems WASP-24, WASP-25 and WASP-26. All three systems have orbital obliquity measurements, WASP-24 and WASP-26 have been observed with Spitzer, and WASP-25 was previously comparatively neglected. Our light curves were obtained using the telescope-defocussing method and have scatters of 0.5 to 1.2 mmag relative to their best-fitting geometric models. We used these data to measure the physical properties and orbital ephemerides of the systems to high precision, finding that our improved measurements are in good agreement with previous studies. High-resolution Lucky Imaging observations of all three targets show no evidence for faint stars close enough to contaminate our photometry. We confirm the eclipsing nature of the star closest to WASP-24 and present the detection of a detached eclipsing binary within 4.25 arcmin of WASP-26.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.2989  [pdf] - 1202717
M31 Pixel Lensing PLAN Campaign: MACHO Lensing and Self Lensing Signals
Comments: ApJ accepted, 13 pages, 5 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2014-01-13
We present the final analysis of the observational campaign carried out by the PLAN (Pixel Lensing Andromeda) collaboration to detect a dark matter signal in form of MACHOs through the microlensing effect. The campaign consists of about 1 month/year observations carried out during 4 years (2007-2010) at the 1.5m Cassini telescope in Loiano ("Astronomical Observatory of BOLOGNA", OAB) plus 10 days of data taken in 2010 at the 2m Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT) monitoring the central part of M31 (two fields of about 13'x12.6'). We establish a fully automated pipeline for the search and the characterization of microlensing flux variations: as a result we detect 3 microlensing candidates. We evaluate the expected signal through a full Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment completed by an analysis of the detection efficiency of our pipeline. We consider both "self lensing" and "MACHO lensing" lens populations, given by M31 stars and dark matter halo MACHOs, in the M31 and the Milky Way (MW), respectively. The total number of events is compatible with the expected self-lensing rate. Specifically, we evaluate an expected signal of about 2 self-lensing events. As for MACHO lensing, for full 0.5 (0.01) solar mass MACHO halos, our prediction is for about 4 (7) events. The comparatively small number of expected MACHO versus self lensing events, together with the small number statistics at disposal, do not enable us to put strong constraints on that population. Rather, the hypothesis, suggested by a previous analysis, on the MACHO nature of OAB-07-N2, one of the microlensing candidates, translates into a sizeable lower limit for the halo mass fraction in form of the would be MACHO population, f, of about 15% for 0.5 solar mass MACHOs.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.2428  [pdf] - 1179818
A Super-Jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406
Tsapras, Y.; Choi, J. -Y.; Street, R. A.; Han, C.; Bozza, V.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Udalski, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Sumi, T.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Ipatov, S.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Andersen, J. M.; Novati, S. Calchi; Damerdji, Y.; Diehl, C.; Elyiv, A.; Giannini, E.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Juncher, D.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Vilela, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Barry, R.; Batista, V.; Bhattacharya, A.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J.; P`ere, C.; Pollard, K. R.; Wouters, D.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hwang, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kavka, A.; Koo, J. -R.; Lee, C. -U.; Maoz, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Shin, I. -G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Tan, T. G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yonehara, P. C. M. Yock A.
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2013-10-09, last modified: 2013-12-05
We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the lightcurve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a $2.73\pm 0.43\ M_{\rm J}$ planet orbiting a $0.44\pm 0.07\ M_{\odot}$ early M-type star. The distance to the lens is $4.97\pm 0.29$\ kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is $3.45\pm 0.26$ AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.6384  [pdf] - 746524
Physical properties, transmission and emission spectra of the WASP-19 planetary system from multi-colour photometry
Comments: 18 pages, 12 figures, 11 tables
Submitted: 2013-06-26, last modified: 2013-11-14
We present new ground-based, multi-colour, broad-band photometric measurements of the physical parameters, transmission and emission spectra of the transiting extrasolar planet WASP-19b. The measurements are based on observations of 8 transits and four occultations using the 1.5m Danish Telescope, 14 transits at the PEST observatory, and 1 transit observed simultaneously through four optical and three near-infrared filters, using the GROND instrument on the ESO 2.2m telescope. We use these new data to measure refined physical parameters for the system. We find the planet to be more bloated and the system to be twice as old as initially thought. We also used published and archived datasets to study the transit timings, which do not depart from a linear ephemeris. We detected an anomaly in the GROND transit light curve which is compatible with a spot on the photosphere of the parent star. The starspot position, size, spot contrast and temperature were established. Using our new and published measurements, we assembled the planet's transmission spectrum over the 370-2350 nm wavelength range and its emission spectrum over the 750-8000 nm range. By comparing these data to theoretical models we investigated the theoretically-predicted variation of the apparent radius of WASP-19b as a function of wavelength and studied the composition and thermal structure of its atmosphere. We conclude that: there is no evidence for strong optical absorbers at low pressure, supporting the common idea that the planet's atmosphere lacks a dayside inversion; the temperature of the planet is not homogenized, because the high warming of its dayside causes the planet to be more efficient in re-radiating than redistributing energy to the night side; the planet seems to be outside of any current classification scheme.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.6041  [pdf] - 1152352
MOA-2010-BLG-311: A planetary candidate below the threshold of reliable detection
Yee, J. C.; Hung, L. -W.; Bond, I. A.; Allen, W.; Monard, L. A. G.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Dominik, M.; Tsapras, Y.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Zellem, R.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gorbikov, E.; Han, C.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Lee, C. -U.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Nola, M.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shporer, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Skowron, J.; Thornley, G.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beatty, T. G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Henderson, C. B.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J. W.; Shappee, B.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; van Saders, J.; Zub, M.; Street, R. A.; Horne, K.; Bramich, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Sahu, K. C.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsgans, J.
Comments: 29 pages, 6 Figures, 3 Tables. For a brief video presentation on this paper, please see http://www.youtube.com/user/OSUAstronomy 10/25/2012 - Updated author list. Replaced 10/10/13 to reflect the version published in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-10-22, last modified: 2013-10-10
We analyze MOA-2010-BLG-311, a high magnification (A_max>600) microlensing event with complete data coverage over the peak, making it very sensitive to planetary signals. We fit this event with both a point lens and a 2-body lens model and find that the 2-body lens model is a better fit but with only Delta chi^2~80. The preferred mass ratio between the lens star and its companion is $q=10^(-3.7+/-0.1), placing the candidate companion in the planetary regime. Despite the formal significance of the planet, we show that because of systematics in the data the evidence for a planetary companion to the lens is too tenuous to claim a secure detection. When combined with analyses of other high-magnification events, this event helps empirically define the threshold for reliable planet detection in high-magnification events, which remains an open question.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.7714  [pdf] - 1179574
MOA-2010-BLG-328Lb: a sub-Neptune orbiting very late M dwarf ?
Furusawa, K.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Gould, A.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Snodgrass, C.; Prester, D. Dominis; Albrow, M. D.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Choi, J. Y.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Hung, L. -W.; Jung, Y. -K.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Nola, M.; Ofek, E.; Park, B. G.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I. -G.; Skowron, J.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Street, R. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Horne, K.; Donatowicz, J.; Sahu, K. C.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beatty, T. G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, C. S.; Black, C.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Fouque, P.; Greenhill, J.; Henderson, C. B.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J. W.; Shappee, B.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; van Saders, J.; Zellem, R.; Zub, M.
Comments: 30 pages, 6 figures. accepted for publication in ApJ. Figure 1 and 2 are updated
Submitted: 2013-09-29, last modified: 2013-10-09
We analyze the planetary microlensing event MOA-2010-BLG-328. The best fit yields host and planetary masses of Mh = 0.11+/-0.01 M_{sun} and Mp = 9.2+/-2.2M_Earth, corresponding to a very late M dwarf and sub-Neptune-mass planet, respectively. The system lies at DL = 0.81 +/- 0.10 kpc with projected separation r = 0.92 +/- 0.16 AU. Because of the host's a-priori-unlikely close distance, as well as the unusual nature of the system, we consider the possibility that the microlens parallax signal, which determines the host mass and distance, is actually due to xallarap (source orbital motion) that is being misinterpreted as parallax. We show a result that favors the parallax solution, even given its close host distance. We show that future high-resolution astrometric measurements could decisively resolve the remaining ambiguity of these solutions.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.2243  [pdf] - 713744
EMCCD photometry reveals two new variable stars in the crowded central region of the globular cluster NGC 6981
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, Submitted to A&A, Version 3 contains the correct celestial coordinates in Table 1
Submitted: 2013-04-08, last modified: 2013-09-02
Two previously unknown variable stars in the crowded central region of the globular cluster NGC 6981 are presented. The observations were made using the Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera at the Danish 1.54m Telescope at La Silla, Chile.The two variables were not previously detected by conventional CCD imaging because of their proximity to a bright star. This discovery demonstrates that EMCCDs are a powerful tool for performing high-precision time-series photometry in crowded fields and near bright stars, especially when combined with difference image analysis (DIA).
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.4281  [pdf] - 724631
Microlensing towards the SMC: a new analysis of OGLE and EROS results
Comments: MNRAS in press, 17 pages, 7 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2013-08-20
We present a new analysis of the results of the EROS-2, OGLE-II, and OGLE-III microlensing campaigns towards the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Through a statistical analysis we address the issue of the \emph{nature} of the reported microlensing candidate events, whether to be attributed to lenses belonging to known population (the SMC luminous components or the Milky Way disc, to which we broadly refer to as "self lensing") or to the would be population of dark matter compact halo objects (MACHOs). To this purpose, we present profiles of the optical depth and, comparing to the observed quantities, we carry out analyses of the events position and duration. Finally, we evaluate and study the microlensing rate. Overall, we consider five reported microlensing events towards the SMC (one by EROS and four by OGLE). The analysis shows that in terms of number of events the expected self lensing signal may indeed explain the observed rate. However, the characteristics of the events, spatial distribution and duration (and for one event, the projected velocity) rather suggest a non-self lensing origin for a few of them. In particular we evaluate, through a likelihood analysis, the resulting upper limit for the halo mass fraction in form of MACHOs given the expected self-lensing and MACHO lensing signal. At 95% CL, the tighter upper limit, about 10%, is found for MACHO mass of $10^{-2} \mathrm{M}_\odot$, upper limit that reduces to above 20% for $0.5 \mathrm{M}_\odot$ MACHOs.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.3509  [pdf] - 1172053
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. V. WASP-15 and WASP-16
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS; 9 pages, 7 tables, 6 figures. The light curves are available from http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/jkt/data-teps.html and the results are included in TEPCat at http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/jkt/tepcat/
Submitted: 2013-06-14
We present new photometric observations of WASP-15 and WASP-16, two transiting extrasolar planetary systems with measured orbital obliquities but without photometric follow-up since their discovery papers. Our new data for WASP-15 comprise observations of one transit simultaneously in four optical passbands using GROND on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope, plus coverage of half a transit from DFOSC on the Danish 1.54m telescope, both at ESO La Silla. For WASP-16 we present observations of four complete transits, all from the Danish telescope. We use these new data to refine the measured physical properties and orbital ephemerides of the two systems. Whilst our results are close to the originally-determined values for WASP-15, we find that the star and planet in the WASP-16 system are both larger and less massive than previously thought.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.3206  [pdf] - 1172013
A detailed census of variable stars in the globular cluster NGC 6333 (M9) from CCD differential photometry
Comments: 20 pages, 17 figures, 5 tables, 1 electronic table
Submitted: 2013-06-13
We report CCD $V$ and $I$ time-series photometry of the globular cluster NGC 6333 (M9). The technique of difference image analysis has been used, which enables photometric precision better than 0.05 mag for stars brighter than $V \sim 19.0$ mag, even in the crowded central regions of the cluster. The high photometric precision has resulted in the discovery of two new RRc stars, three eclipsing binaries, seven long-term variables and one field RRab star behind the cluster. A detailed identification chart and equatorial coordinates are given for all the variable stars in the field of our images of the cluster. Our data together with literature $V$-data obtained in 1994 and 1995 allowed us to refine considerably the periods for all RR Lyrae stars. The nature of the new variables is discussed. We argue that variable V12 is a cluster member and an Anomalous Cepheid. Secular period variations, double mode pulsations and/or the Blazhko-like modulations in some RRc variables are addressed. Through the light curve Fourier decomposition of 12 RR Lyrae stars we have calculated a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]$_{\rm ZW}$=$-1.70 \pm 0.01{\rm(statistical)} \pm 0.14{\rm(systematic)}$ or [Fe/H]$_{UVES}=-1.67 \pm 0.01{\rm(statistical)} \pm 0.19{\rm(systematic)}$.Absolute magnitudes, radii and masses are also estimated for the RR Lyrae stars. A detailed search for SX Phe stars in the Blue Straggler region was conducted but none were discovered. If SX Phe exist in the cluster then their amplitudes must be smaller than the detection limit of our photometry. The CMD has been corrected for heavy differential reddening using the detailed extinction map of the cluster of Alonso-Garc\'ia et al. (2012). This has allowed us to set the mean cluster distance from two independent estimates; from the RRab and RRc absolute magnitudes, we find $8.04\pm 0.19$ kpc and $7.88\pm0.30$ kpc respectively.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.3606  [pdf] - 1382035
Estimating the parameters of globular cluster M 30 (NGC 7099) from time-series photometry
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, 10 tables, A&A in press
Submitted: 2013-05-15
We present the analysis of 26 nights of V and I time-series observations from 2011 and 2012 of the globular cluster M 30 (NGC 7099). We used our data to search for variable stars in this cluster and refine the periods of known variables; we then used our variable star light curves to derive values for the cluster's parameters. We used difference image analysis to reduce our data to obtain high-precision light curves of variable stars. We then estimated the cluster parameters by performing a Fourier decomposition of the light curves of RR Lyrae stars for which a good period estimate was possible. We also derive an estimate for the age of the cluster by fitting theoretical isochrones to our colour-magnitude diagram (CMD). Out of 13 stars previously catalogued as variables, we find that only 4 are bona fide variables. We detect two new RR Lyrae variables, and confirm two additional RR Lyrae candidates from the literature. We also detect four other new variables, including an eclipsing blue straggler system, and an SX Phoenicis star. This amounts to a total number of confirmed variable stars in M 30 of 12. We perform Fourier decomposition of the light curves of the RR Lyrae stars to derive cluster parameters using empirical relations. We find a cluster metallicity [Fe/H]_ZW=-2.01 +- 0.04, or [Fe/H]_UVES=-2.11 +- 0.06, and a distance of 8.32 +- 0.20 kpc (using RR0 variables), 8.10 kpc (using one RR1 variable), and 8.35 +- 0.42 kpc (using our SX Phoenicis star detection in M 30). Fitting isochrones to the CMD, we estimate an age of 13.0 +- 1.0 Gyr for M 30.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.0766  [pdf] - 659935
Flux and color variations of the doubly imaged quasar UM673
Comments: 7 pages, 8 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2013-02-04, last modified: 2013-05-06
With the aim of characterizing the flux and color variations of the multiple components of the gravitationally lensed quasar UM673 as a function of time, we have performed multi-epoch and multi-band photometric observations with the Danish 1.54m telescope at the La Silla Observatory. The observations were carried out in the VRi spectral bands during four seasons (2008--2011). We reduced the data using the PSF (Point Spread Function) photometric technique as well as aperture photometry. Our results show for the brightest lensed component some significant decrease in flux between the first two seasons (+0.09/+0.11/+0.05 mag) and a subsequent increase during the following ones (-0.11/-0.11/-0.10 mag) in the V/R/i spectral bands, respectively. Comparing our results with previous studies, we find smaller color variations between these seasons as compared with previous ones. We also separate the contribution of the lensing galaxy from that of the fainter and close lensed component.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.4169  [pdf] - 1164679
Microlensing Discovery of a Population of Very Tight, Very Low-mass Binary Brown Dwarfs
Choi, J. -Y.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Almeida, L. A.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gorbikov, E.; Jablonski, F.; Henderson, C. B.; Hwang, K. -H.; Janczak, J.; Jung, Y. -K.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Malamud, U.; Maoz, D.; McGregor, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Park, B. -G.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Shin, I. -G.; Yee, J. C.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Fang, X. -S.; Finet, F.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, S. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M. N.; Lundkvist, M.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Zimmer, F.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J. W.; Sahu, K. C.; Zub, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, 3 tables, ApJ submitted
Submitted: 2013-02-18, last modified: 2013-03-20
Although many models have been proposed, the physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of low-mass brown dwarfs are poorly understood. The multiplicity properties and minimum mass of the brown-dwarf mass function provide critical empirical diagnostics of these mechanisms. We present the discovery via gravitational microlensing of two very low-mass, very tight binary systems. These binaries have directly and precisely measured total system masses of 0.025 Msun and 0.034 Msun, and projected separations of 0.31 AU and 0.19 AU, making them the lowest-mass and tightest field brown-dwarf binaries known. The discovery of a population of such binaries indicates that brown dwarf binaries can robustly form at least down to masses of ~0.02 Msun. Future microlensing surveys will measure a mass-selected sample of brown-dwarf binary systems, which can then be directly compared to similar samples of stellar binaries.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.1184  [pdf] - 1165025
A Giant Planet beyond the Snow Line in Microlensing Event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251
Kains, N.; Street, R.; Choi, J. -Y.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Almeida, L. A.; Jablonski, F.; Tristram, P.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozlowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Skowron, J.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lundkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Sahu, K. C.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Bajek, D.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Ipatov, S.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, T.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Allen, W.; Batista, V.; Chung, S. -J.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Henderson, C.; Jung, Y. -K.; Koo, J. -R.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I. -G.; Yee, J.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouque, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Meintjes, P.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; Zub, M.
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, 3 tables; A&A in press
Submitted: 2013-03-05
We present the analysis of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251. This anomalous event was observed by several survey and follow-up collaborations conducting microlensing observations towards the Galactic Bulge. Based on detailed modelling of the observed light curve, we find that the lens is composed of two masses with a mass ratio q=1.9 x 10^-3. Thanks to our detection of higher-order effects on the light curve due to the Earth's orbital motion and the finite size of source, we are able to measure the mass and distance to the lens unambiguously. We find that the lens is made up of a planet of mass 0.53 +- 0.21,M_Jup orbiting an M dwarf host star with a mass of 0.26 +- 0.11 M_Sun. The planetary system is located at a distance of 2.57 +- 0.61 kpc towards the Galactic Centre. The projected separation of the planet from its host star is d=1.408 +- 0.019, in units of the Einstein radius, which corresponds to 2.72 +- 0.75 AU in physical units. We also identified a competitive model with similar planet and host star masses, but with a smaller orbital radius of 1.50 +- 0.50 AU. The planet is therefore located beyond the snow line of its host star, which we estimate to be around 1-1.5 AU.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.3782  [pdf] - 1157842
MOA-2010-BLG-073L: An M-Dwarf with a Substellar Companion at the Planet/Brown Dwarf Boundary
Street, R. A.; Choi, J. -Y.; Tsapras, Y.; Han, C.; Furusawa, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Bond, I. A.; Wouters, D.; Zellem, R.; Udalski, A.; Snodgrass, C.; Horne, K.; Dominik, M.; Browne, P.; Kains, N.; Bramich, D. M.; Bajek, D.; Steele, I. A.; Ipatov, S.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagayama, T.; Nishimaya, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Yee, J.; Dong, S.; Shin, I. -G.; Lee, C. -U.; Skowron, J.; De Almeida, L. Andrade; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Hwang, K. -H.; Koo, J. -R.; Maoz, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishhook, D.; Shporer, A.; McCormick, J.; Christie, G.; Natusch, T.; Allen, B.; Drummond, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Thornley, G.; Knowler, M.; Bos, M.; Bolt, G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouque, P.; Bachelet, E.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F.; Hinse, T. C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.
Comments: 24 pages, 8 figures, best viewed in colour, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2012-11-15, last modified: 2012-12-11
We present an analysis of the anomalous microlensing event, MOA-2010-BLG-073, announced by the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics survey on 2010-03-18. This event was remarkable because the source was previously known to be photometrically variable. Analyzing the pre-event source lightcurve, we demonstrate that it is an irregular variable over time scales >200d. Its dereddened color, $(V-I)_{S,0}$, is 1.221$\pm$0.051mag and from our lens model we derive a source radius of 14.7$\pm$1.3 $R_{\odot}$, suggesting that it is a red giant star. We initially explored a number of purely microlensing models for the event but found a residual gradient in the data taken prior to and after the event. This is likely to be due to the variability of the source rather than part of the lensing event, so we incorporated a slope parameter in our model in order to derive the true parameters of the lensing system. We find that the lensing system has a mass ratio of q=0.0654$\pm$0.0006. The Einstein crossing time of the event, $T_{\rm{E}}=44.3$\pm$0.1d, was sufficiently long that the lightcurve exhibited parallax effects. In addition, the source trajectory relative to the large caustic structure allowed the orbital motion of the lens system to be detected. Combining the parallax with the Einstein radius, we were able to derive the distance to the lens, $D_L$=2.8$\pm$0.4kpc, and the masses of the lensing objects. The primary of the lens is an M-dwarf with $M_{L,p}$=0.16$\pm0.03M_{\odot}$ while the companion has $M_{L,s}$=11.0$\pm2.0M_{\rm{J}}$ putting it in the boundary zone between planets and brown dwarfs.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.6045  [pdf] - 1152354
MOA-2010-BLG-523: "Failed Planet" = RS CVn Star
Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Bond, I. A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Greenhill, J.; Tsapras, Y.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Bensby, T.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nola, M.; Pogge, R. W.; Skowron, J.; Thornley, G.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Sahu, K. C.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Street, R. A.; Horne, K.; Bramich, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beatty, T. G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouque, P.; Henderson, C. B.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B; Martin, R.; Menzies, J. W.; Shappee, B.; Williams, A.; van Saders, J.; Zub, M.
Comments: 29 pp, 6 figs, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2012-10-22, last modified: 2012-10-26
The Galactic bulge source MOA-2010-BLG-523S exhibited short-term deviations from a standard microlensing lightcurve near the peak of an Amax ~ 265 high-magnification microlensing event. The deviations originally seemed consistent with expectations for a planetary companion to the principal lens. We combine long-term photometric monitoring with a previously published high-resolution spectrum taken near peak to demonstrate that this is an RS CVn variable, so that planetary microlensing is not required to explain the lightcurve deviations. This is the first spectroscopically confirmed RS CVn star discovered in the Galactic bulge.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.2323  [pdf] - 1150645
Microlensig Binaries with Candidate Brown Dwarf Companions
Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Janczak, J.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G.; Polishook, D.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Shporer, A.; Thornley, G.; Malamud, U.; Yee, J. C.; Choi, J. -Y.; Jung, Y. -K.; Park, H.; Lee, C. -U.; Park, B. -G.; Koo, J. -R.; Bajek, D.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Ipatov, S.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Street, R.; Alsubai, K. A.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lundkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wertz, O.; Zimmer, F.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Calitz, J. J.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Cook, K. H.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Hill, K.; Hoffman, M.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Meintjes, P.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Vinter, C.; Zub, M.
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2012-08-11, last modified: 2012-10-02
Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation history. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing events discovered during 2004 - 2011 observation seasons. Based on the low mass ratio criterion of q < 0.2, we found 7 candidate events, including OGLE-2004-BLG-035, OGLE-2004-BLG-039, OGLE-2007-BLG-006, OGLE-2007-BLG-399/MOA-2007-BLG-334, MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172, MOA-2011-BLG-149, and MOA-201-BLG-278/OGLE-2011-BLG-012N. Among them, we are able to confirm that the companions of the lenses of MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149 are brown dwarfs by determining the mass of the lens based on the simultaneous measurement of the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured mass of the brown dwarf companions are (0.02 +/- 0.01) M_Sun and (0.019 +/- 0.002) M_Sun for MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149, respectively, and both companions are orbiting low mass M dwarf host stars. More microlensing brown dwarfs are expected to be detected as the number of lensing events with well covered light curves increases with new generation searches.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.3064  [pdf] - 600754
The Transiting System GJ1214: High-Precision Defocused Transit Observations and a Search for Evidence of Transit Timing Variation
Comments: Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2012-07-12, last modified: 2012-09-10
Aims: We present 11 high-precision photometric transit observations of the transiting super-Earth planet GJ1214b. Combining these data with observations from other authors, we investigate the ephemeris for possible signs of transit timing variations (TTVs) using a Bayesian approach. Methods: The observations were obtained using telescope-defocusing techniques, and achieve a high precision with random errors in the photometry as low as 1mmag per point. To investigate the possibility of TTVs in the light curve, we calculate the overall probability of a TTV signal using Bayesian methods. Results: The observations are used to determine the photometric parameters and the physical properties of the GJ1214 system. Our results are in good agreement with published values. Individual times of mid-transit are measured with uncertainties as low as 10s, allowing us to reduce the uncertainty in the orbital period by a factor of two. Conclusions: A Bayesian analysis reveals that it is highly improbable that the observed transit times is explained by TTV, when compared with the simpler alternative of a linear ephemeris.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.5797  [pdf] - 1125066
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. IV. Confirmation of the huge radius of WASP-17b
Comments: 11 pages, 7 tables, 7 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-07-24
We present photometric observations of four transits in the WASP-17 planetary system, obtained using telescope defocussing techniques and with scatters reaching 0.5 mmag per point. Our revised orbital period is 4.0 +/- 0.6 s longer than previous measurements, a difference of 6.6 sigma, and does not support the published detections of orbital eccentricity in this system. We model the light curves using the JKTEBOP code and calculate the physical properties of the system by recourse to five sets of theoretical stellar model predictions. The resulting planetary radius, Rb = 1.932 +/- 0.052 +/- 0.010 Rjup (statistical and systematic errors respectively), provides confirmation that WASP-17b is the largest planet currently known. All fourteen planets with radii measured to be greater than 1.6 Rjup are found around comparatively hot (Teff > 5900 K) and massive (MA > 1.15 Msun) stars. Chromospheric activity indicators are available for eight of these stars, and all imply a low activity level. The planets have small or zero orbital eccentricities, so tidal effects struggle to explain their large radii. The observed dearth of large planets around small stars may be natural but could also be due to observational biases against deep transits, if these are mistakenly labelled as false positives and so not followed up.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.2869  [pdf] - 1453901
Characterizing Low-Mass Binaries From Observation of Long Time-scale Caustic-crossing Gravitational Microlensing Events
Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Choi, J. -Y.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Fouqué, P.; Horne, K.; M.; Szymański, K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Kobara, S.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohmori, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Bramich, D. M.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lunkkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Almeida, L. A.; Batista, V.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Jablonski, F.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, S. -Y.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J. W.; Sahu, K. C.; Zub, M.
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2012-04-12, last modified: 2012-06-12
Despite astrophysical importance of binary star systems, detections are limited to those located in small ranges of separations, distances, and masses and thus it is necessary to use a variety of observational techniques for a complete view of stellar multiplicity across a broad range of physical parameters. In this paper, we report the detections and measurements of 2 binaries discovered from observations of microlensing events MOA-2011-BLG-090 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. Determinations of the binary masses are possible by simultaneously measuring the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the binary components are 0.43 $M_{\odot}$ and 0.39 $M_{\odot}$ for MOA-2011-BLG-090 and 0.57 $M_{\odot}$ and 0.17 $M_{\odot}$ for OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 and thus both lens components of MOA-2011-BLG-090 and one component of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 are M dwarfs, demonstrating the usefulness of microlensing in detecting binaries composed of low-mass components. From modeling of the light curves considering full Keplerian motion of the lens, we also measure the orbital parameters of the binaries. The blended light of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 comes very likely from the lens itself, making it possible to check the microlensing orbital solution by follow-up radial-velocity observation. For both events, the caustic-crossing parts of the light curves, which are critical for determining the physical lens parameters, were resolved by high-cadence survey observations and thus it is expected that the number of microlensing binaries with measured physical parameters will increase in the future.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.6323  [pdf] - 1123726
MOA-2010-BLG-477Lb: constraining the mass of a microlensing planet from microlensing parallax, orbital motion and detection of blended light
Bachelet, E.; Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Fouqué, P.; Gould, A.; Menzies, J. W.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Dong, Subo; Heyrovský, D.; Marquette, J. B.; Marshall, J.; Skowron, J.; Street, R. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Abe, L.; Agabi, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Allen, W.; Bertin, E.; Bos, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Chavez, J.; Christie, G. W.; Cole, A. A.; Crouzet, N.; Dieters, S.; Dominik, M.; Drummond, J.; Greenhill, J.; Guillot, T.; Henderson, C. B.; Hessman, F. V.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kandori, R.; Liebig, C.; Mékarnia, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Nagayama, T.; Nataf, D.; Natusch, T.; Nishiyama, S.; Rivet, J. -P.; Sahu, K. C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Thornley, G.; Tomczak, A. R.; Tsapras, Y.; Yee, J. C.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Kubas, D.; Martin, R.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; de Almeida, L. Andrade; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Lee, C. -U.; Lee, Y.; Koo, J. -R.; Maoz, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shporer, A.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Kobara, S.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Ohmori, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Kerins, E.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.
Comments: 3 Tables, 12 Figures, accepted in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-05-29
Microlensing detections of cool planets are important for the construction of an unbiased sample to estimate the frequency of planets beyond the snow line, which is where giant planets are thought to form according to the core accretion theory of planet formation. In this paper, we report the discovery of a giant planet detected from the analysis of the light curve of a high-magnification microlensing event MOA-2010-BLG-477. The measured planet-star mass ratio is $q=(2.181\pm0.004)\times 10^{-3}$ and the projected separation is $s=1.1228\pm0.0006$ in units of the Einstein radius. The angular Einstein radius is unusually large $\theta_{\rm E}=1.38\pm 0.11$ mas. Combining this measurement with constraints on the "microlens parallax" and the lens flux, we can only limit the host mass to the range $0.13<M/M_\odot<1.0$. In this particular case, the strong degeneracy between microlensing parallax and planet orbital motion prevents us from measuring more accurate host and planet masses. However, we find that adding Bayesian priors from two effects (Galactic model and Keplerian orbit) each independently favors the upper end of this mass range, yielding star and planet masses of $M_*=0.67^{+0.33}_{-0.13}\ M_\odot$ and $m_p=1.5^{+0.8}_{-0.3}\ M_{\rm JUP}$ at a distance of $D=2.3\pm0.6$ kpc, and with a semi-major axis of $a=2^{+3}_{-1}$ AU. Finally, we show that the lens mass can be determined from future high-resolution near-IR adaptive optics observations independently from two effects, photometric and astrometric.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.4789  [pdf] - 1118180
A New Type of Ambiguity in the Planet and Binary Interpretations of Central Perturbations of High-Magnification Gravitational Microlensing Events
Choi, J. -Y.; Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Fouqué, P.; Horne, K.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Kobara, S.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohmori, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Bramich, D. M.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lunkkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Almeida, L. A.; Batista, V.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Jablonski, F.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, S. -Y.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J. W.; Sahu, K. C.; Zub, M.
Comments: 8 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2012-04-21, last modified: 2012-04-25
High-magnification microlensing events provide an important channel to detect planets. Perturbations near the peak of a high-magnification event can be produced either by a planet or a binary companion. It is known that central perturbations induced by both types of companions can be generally distinguished due to the basically different magnification pattern around caustics. In this paper, we present a case of central perturbations for which it is difficult to distinguish the planetary and binary interpretations. The peak of a lensing light curve affected by this perturbation appears to be blunt and flat. For a planetary case, this perturbation occurs when the source trajectory passes the negative perturbation region behind the back end of an arrowhead-shaped central caustic. For a binary case, a similar perturbation occurs for a source trajectory passing through the negative perturbation region between two cusps of an astroid-shaped caustic. We demonstrate the degeneracy for 2 high-magnification events of OGLE-2011-BLG-0526 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0950/MOA-2011-BLG-336. For OGLE-2011-BLG-0526, the $\chi^2$ difference between the planetary and binary model is $\sim$ 3, implying that the degeneracy is very severe. For OGLE-2011-BLG-0950/MOA-2011-BLG-336, the stellar binary model is formally excluded with $\Delta \chi^2 \sim$ 105 and the planetary model is preferred. However, it is difficult to claim a planet discovery because systematic residuals of data from the planetary model are larger than the difference between the planetary and binary models. Considering that 2 events observed during a single season suffer from such a degeneracy, it is expected that central perturbations experiencing this type of degeneracy is common.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.4032  [pdf] - 1091733
Characterizing Lenses and Lensed Stars of High-Magnification Single-lens Gravitational Microlensing Events With Lenses Passing Over Source Stars
Choi, J. -Y.; Shin, I. -G.; Park, S. -Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Street, R.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Janczak, J.; Lee, C. -U.; Mallia, F.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G. "TG"; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Barnard, E.; Baudry, J.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Menzies, J.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Clay, N.; Fraser, S.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Mottram, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Zimmer, F.
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2011-11-17, last modified: 2012-03-20
We present the analysis of the light curves of 9 high-magnification single-lens gravitational microlensing events with lenses passing over source stars, including OGLE-2004-BLG-254, MOA-2007-BLG-176, MOA-2007-BLG-233/OGLE-2007-BLG-302, MOA-2009-BLG-174, MOA-2010-BLG-436, MOA-2011-BLG-093, MOA-2011-BLG-274, OGLE-2011-BLG-0990/MOA-2011-BLG-300, and OGLE-2011-BLG-1101/MOA-2011-BLG-325. For all events, we measure the linear limb-darkening coefficients of the surface brightness profile of source stars by measuring the deviation of the light curves near the peak affected by the finite-source effect. For 7 events, we measure the Einstein radii and the lens-source relative proper motions. Among them, 5 events are found to have Einstein radii less than 0.2 mas, making the lenses candidates of very low-mass stars or brown dwarfs. For MOA-2011-BLG-274, especially, the small Einstein radius of $\theta_{\rm E}\sim 0.08$ mas combined with the short time scale of $t_{\rm E}\sim 2.7$ days suggests the possibility that the lens is a free-floating planet. For MOA-2009-BLG-174, we measure the lens parallax and thus uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens. We also find that the measured lens mass of $\sim 0.84\ M_\odot$ is consistent with that of a star blended with the source, suggesting that the blend is likely to be the lens. Although we find planetary signals for none of events, we provide exclusion diagrams showing the confidence levels excluding the existence of a planet as a function of the separation and mass ratio.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1203.1291  [pdf] - 1117102
OGLE-2008-BLG-510: first automated real-time detection of a weak microlensing anomaly - brown dwarf or stellar binary?
Comments: 17 pages with 8 figures, MNRAS submitted
Submitted: 2012-03-06
The microlensing event OGLE-2008-BLG-510 is characterised by an evident asymmetric shape of the peak, promptly detected by the ARTEMiS system in real time. The skewness of the light curve appears to be compatible both with binary-lens and binary-source models, including the possibility that the lens system consists of an M dwarf orbited by a brown dwarf. The detection of this microlensing anomaly and our analysis demonstrates that: 1) automated real-time detection of weak microlensing anomalies with immediate feedback is feasible, efficient, and sensitive, 2) rather common weak features intrinsically come with ambiguities that are not easily resolved from photometric light curves, 3) a modelling approach that finds all features of parameter space rather than just the `favourite model' is required, and 4) the data quality is most crucial, where systematics can be confused with real features, in particular small higher-order effects such as orbital motion signatures. It moreover becomes apparent that events with weak signatures are a silver mine for statistical studies, although not easy to exploit. Clues about the apparent paucity of both brown-dwarf companions and binary-source microlensing events might hide here.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.3295  [pdf] - 1084111
Microlensing Binaries Discovered through High-Magnification Channel
Shin, I. -G.; Choi, J. -Y.; Park, S. -Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Janczak, J.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Mallia, F.; Maoz, D.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Shporer, A.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Calitz, J. J.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Cook, K. H.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Hoffman, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Meintjes, P.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Vinter, C.; Zub, M.; Allan, A.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Street, R.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Zimmer, F.
Comments: 10 figures, 6 tables, 26 pages
Submitted: 2011-09-15, last modified: 2011-11-28
Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of 8 binary lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010. The perturbations, which are confined near the peak of the light curves, can be easily distinguished from the central perturbations caused by planets. However, the degeneracy between close and wide binary solutions cannot be resolved with a $3\sigma$ confidence level for 3 events, implying that the degeneracy would be an important obstacle in studying binary distributions. The dependence of the degeneracy on the lensing parameters is consistent with a theoretic prediction that the degeneracy becomes severe as the binary separation and the mass ratio deviate from the values of resonant caustics. The measured mass ratio of the event OGLE-2008-BLG-510/MOA-2008-BLG-369 is $q\sim 0.1$, making the companion of the lens a strong brown-dwarf candidate.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.2160  [pdf] - 1077213
Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star
Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Suzuki, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Street, R.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kundurthy, P.; Skowron, J.; Becker, A. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Heyrovsky, D.; Barry, R. K.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Wellnitz, D. D.; Bond, I. A.; Sumi, T.; Dong, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Korpela, A. V.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Gorbikov, E.; Gould, A.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Mallia, F.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shporer, A.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Allan, A.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Tsapras, Y.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, R.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J; Sahu, K. C.; Waldman, I.; Zub, A. Williams M.; Bourhrous, H.; Matsuoka, Y.; Nagayama, T.; Oi, N.; Randriamanakoto, Z.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Glitrup, M.; Harpsoe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Zimmer, F.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Ulaczyk, K.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.
Comments: 38 pages with 7 figures
Submitted: 2011-06-10
We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of m_p = 10.4 +- 1.7 Earth masses and orbits a star of mass M_* = 0.56 +- 0.09 Solar masses at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 (+1.9 -0.5) AU and an orbital period of P = 7.6 (+7.7 -1.5} yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are enabled by the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect, which is seen primarily in the light curve distortion due to the orbital motion of the Earth. But, the analysis also demonstrates the capability to measure microlensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a "failed" gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.0452  [pdf] - 958326
XV International Conference on Gravitational Microlensing: Conference Book
Comments: Extended abstracts for the XV Microlensing conference; 129 pages
Submitted: 2011-02-02
Microlensing is a mature and established tool of research over a broad range of astrophysical issues, from dark matter searches to the detection of new extrasolar planets of very low mass, down to Earth-size. This volume collects the abstracts in extended format of the 15th Microlensing Conference held in the University of Salerno on January 20-22, 2011 (http://smc2011.physics.unisa.it). The topics include: the status of current surveys, planetary events, dark matter searches, cosmological microlensing, theoretical investigations and an outlook towards the future, with in particular a discussion on the possible role to be played by microlensing searches of exoplanets in the forecoming space missions, WFIRST and EUCLID.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.5181  [pdf] - 1042746
A much lower density for the transiting extrasolar planet WASP-7
Comments: Accepted for publication as a Research Note in A&A. 5 pages, 4 tables, 3 figures
Submitted: 2010-12-23
We present the first high-precision photometry of the transiting extrasolar planetary system WASP-7, obtained using telescope defocussing techniques and reaching a scatter of 0.68 mmag per point. We find that the transit depth is greater and that the host star is more evolved than previously thought. The planet has a significantly larger radius (1.330 +/- 0.093 Rjup versus 0.915 +0.046 -0.040 Rjup) and much lower density (0.41 +/- 0.10 rhojup versus 1.26 +0.25 -0.21 rhojup) and surface gravity (13.4 +/- 2.6 m/s2 versus 26.4 +4.4 -4.0 m/s2) than previous measurements showed. Based on the revised properties it is no longer an outlier in planetary mass--radius and period--gravity diagrams. We also obtain a more precise transit ephemeris for the WASP-7 system.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.1809  [pdf] - 1041176
A sub-Saturn Mass Planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb
Miyake, N.; Sumi, T.; Dong, Subo; Street, R.; Mancini, L.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Tsapras, Y.; Yee, J. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Bond, I. A.; Fouque, P.; Browne, P.; Han, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Finet, F.; Furusawa, K.; Harpsoe, K.; Allen, W.; Hundertmark, M.; Freeman, M.; Suzuki, D.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Douchin, D.; Fukui, A.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagayama, T.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Collaboration, The MOA; Bolt, G.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gorbikov, E.; Higgins, D.; Janczak, K. -H. Hwang J.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Koo, J. -R.; lowski, S. Koz; Lee, Y.; Mallia, F.; Maury, A.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Mu~noz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Ofek, E. O.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Santallo, R.; Shporer, A.; Spector, O.; Thornley, G.; Collaboration, The Micro FUN; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Steele, I.; Collaboration, The RoboNet; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Glitrup, M.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mathiasen, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Zimmer, F.; Consortium, The MiNDSTEp; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Menzies, J.; Collaboration, The PLANET
Comments: accepted to ApJ, 28 pages, 6 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2010-10-09, last modified: 2010-12-10
We report the gravitational microlensing discovery of a sub-Saturn mass planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb, orbiting a K or M-dwarf star in the inner Galactic disk or Galactic bulge. The high cadence observations of the MOA-II survey discovered this microlensing event and enabled its identification as a high magnification event approximately 24 hours prior to peak magnification. As a result, the planetary signal at the peak of this light curve was observed by 20 different telescopes, which is the largest number of telescopes to contribute to a planetary discovery to date. The microlensing model for this event indicates a planet-star mass ratio of q = (3.95 +/- 0.02) x 10^{-4} and a separation of d = 0.97537 +/- 0.00007 in units of the Einstein radius. A Bayesian analysis based on the measured Einstein radius crossing time, t_E, and angular Einstein radius, \theta_E, along with a standard Galactic model indicates a host star mass of M_L = 0.38^{+0.34}_{-0.18} M_{Sun} and a planet mass of M_p = 50^{+44}_{-24} M_{Earth}, which is half the mass of Saturn. This analysis also yields a planet-star three-dimensional separation of a = 2.4^{+1.2}_{-0.6} AU and a distance to the planetary system of D_L = 6.1^{+1.1}_{-1.2} kpc. This separation is ~ 2 times the distance of the snow line, a separation similar to most of the other planets discovered by microlensing.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.0338  [pdf] - 1034634
OGLE-2009-BLG-092/MOA-2009-BLG-137: A Dramatic Repeating Event With the Second Perturbation Predicted by Real-Time Analysis
Comments: 18 pages, 5 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2010-09-02
We report the result of the analysis of a dramatic repeating gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2009-BLG-092/MOA-2009-BLG-137, for which the light curve is characterized by two distinct peaks with perturbations near both peaks. We find that the event is produced by the passage of the source trajectory over the central perturbation regions associated with the individual components of a wide-separation binary. The event is special in the sense that the second perturbation, occurring $\sim 100$ days after the first, was predicted by the real-time analysis conducted after the first peak, demonstrating that real-time modeling can be routinely done for binary and planetary events. With the data obtained from follow-up observations covering the second peak, we are able to uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event occurred on a bulge clump giant and it was produced by a binary lens composed of a K and M-type main-sequence stars. The estimated masses of the binary components are $M_1=0.69 \pm 0.11\ M_\odot$ and $M_2=0.36\pm 0.06\ M_\odot$, respectively, and they are separated in projection by $r_\perp=10.9\pm 1.3\ {\rm AU}$. The measured distance to the lens is $D_{\rm L}=5.6 \pm 0.7\ {\rm kpc}$. We also detect the orbital motion of the lens system.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.4464  [pdf] - 1033269
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. III. The transiting planetary system WASP-2
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 9 pages, 3 figures, 10 tables
Submitted: 2010-06-23
We present high-precision photometry of three transits of the extrasolar planetary system WASP-2, obtained by defocussing the telescope, and achieving point-to-point scatters of between 0.42 and 0.73 mmag. These data are modelled using the JKTEBOP code, and taking into account the light from the recently-discovered faint star close to the system. The physical properties of the WASP-2 system are derived using tabulated predictions from five different sets of stellar evolutionary models, allowing both statistical and systematic errorbars to be specified. We find the mass and radius of the planet to be M_b = 0.847 +/- 0.038 +/- 0.024 Mjup and R_b = 1.044 +/- 0.029 +/- 0.015 Rjup. It has a low equilibrium temperature of 1280 +/- 21 K, in agreement with a recent finding that it does not have an atmospheric temperature inversion. The first of our transit datasets has a scatter of only 0.42 mmag with respect to the best-fitting light curve model, which to our knowledge is a record for ground-based observations of a transiting extrasolar planet.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1004.3865  [pdf] - 416191
M31 pixel lensing event OAB-N2: a study of the lens proper motion
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ - minor changes to match the accepted version - Figure 1 updated
Submitted: 2010-04-22, last modified: 2010-05-20
We present an updated analysis of the M31 pixel lensing candidate event OAB-N2 previously reported in Calchi Novati et al. (2009). Here we take advantage of new data both astrometric and photometric. Astrometry: using archival 4m-KPNO and HST/WFPC2 data we perform a detailed analysis on the event source whose result, although not fully conclusive on the source magnitude determination, is confirmed by the following light curve photometry analysis. Photometry: first, unpublished WeCAPP data allows us to confirm OAB-N2, previously reported only as a viable candidate, as a well constrained pixel lensing event. Second, this photometry enables a detailed analysis in the event parameter space including the effects due to finite source size. The combined results of these analyses allow us to put a strong lower limit on the lens proper motion. This outcome favors the MACHO lensing hypothesis over self lensing for this individual event and points the way toward distinguishing between the MACHO and self-lensing hypotheses from larger data sets.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.0966  [pdf] - 1026693
OGLE 2008--BLG--290: An accurate measurement of the limb darkening of a Galactic Bulge K Giant spatially resolved by microlensing
Fouque, P.; Heyrovsky, D.; Dong, S.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Novati, S. Calchi; Cassan, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominik, M.; Prester, D. Dominis; Greenhill, J.; Horne, K.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kozlowski, S.; Kubas, D.; Lee, C. -H.; Marquette, J. -B.; Mathiasen, M.; Menzies, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nishiyama, S.; Papadakis, I.; Street, R.; Sumi, T.; Williams, A.; Yee, J. C.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cole, A.; Cook, K. H.; Donatowicz, J.; Kains, N.; Kane, S. R.; Martin, R.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Tsapras, Y.; Wambsganss, J.; Zub, M.; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Lee, C. -U.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Szewczyk, O.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Abe, F.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Gilmore, A. C.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Itow, Y.; ~Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Korpela, A. V.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Perrott, Y.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sako, T.; Sato, S.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D.; Sweatman, W.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.; Allan, A.; Bode, M. F.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Clay, N.; Fraser, S. N.; Hawkins, E.; Kerins, E.; Lister, T. A.; Mottram, C. J.; Saunders, E. S.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wheatley, P. J.; Anguita, T.; Bozza, V.; Harpsoe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Masi, G.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Thone, C. C.; Riffeser, A.; ~Seitz, S.; Bender, R.
Comments: Astronomy & Astrophysics in press
Submitted: 2010-05-06
Gravitational microlensing is not only a successful tool for discovering distant exoplanets, but it also enables characterization of the lens and source stars involved in the lensing event. In high magnification events, the lens caustic may cross over the source disk, which allows a determination of the angular size of the source and additionally a measurement of its limb darkening. When such extended-source effects appear close to maximum magnification, the resulting light curve differs from the characteristic Paczynski point-source curve. The exact shape of the light curve close to the peak depends on the limb darkening of the source. Dense photometric coverage permits measurement of the respective limb-darkening coefficients. In the case of microlensing event OGLE 2008-BLG-290, the K giant source star reached a peak magnification of about 100. Thirteen different telescopes have covered this event in eight different photometric bands. Subsequent light-curve analysis yielded measurements of linear limb-darkening coefficients of the source in six photometric bands. The best-measured coefficients lead to an estimate of the source effective temperature of about 4700 +100-200 K. However, the photometric estimate from colour-magnitude diagrams favours a cooler temperature of 4200 +-100 K. As the limb-darkening measurements, at least in the CTIO/SMARTS2 V and I bands, are among the most accurate obtained, the above disagreement needs to be understood. A solution is proposed, which may apply to previous events where such a discrepancy also appeared.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.4875  [pdf] - 316002
Physical properties of the 0.94-day period transiting planetary system WASP-18
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures, 4 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ. Data can be obtained from http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/~jkt/
Submitted: 2009-10-26
We present high-precision photometry of five consecutive transits of WASP-18, an extrasolar planetary system with one of the shortest orbital periods known. Through the use of telescope defocussing we achieve a photometric precision of 0.47 to 0.83 mmag per observation over complete transit events. The data are analysed using the JKTEBOP code and three different sets of stellar evolutionary models. We find the mass and radius of the planet to be M_b = 10.43 +/- 0.30 +/- 0.24 Mjup R_b = 1.165 +/- 0.055 +/- 0.014 Rjup (statistical and systematic errors) respectively. The systematic errors in the orbital separation and the stellar and planetary masses, arising from the use of theoretical predictions, are of a similar size to the statistical errors and set a limit on our understanding of the WASP-18 system. We point out that seven of the nine known massive transiting planets (M_b > 3 Mjup) have eccentric orbits, whereas significant orbital eccentricity has been detected for only four of the 46 less massive planets. This may indicate that there are two different populations of transiting planets, but could also be explained by observational biases. Further radial velocity observations of low-mass planets will make it possible to choose between these two scenarios.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:0908.3836  [pdf] - 1017230
LMC self lensing for OGLE-II microlensing observations
Comments: accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-08-26
In the framework of microlensing searches towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we discuss the results presented by the OGLE collaboration for their OGLE-II campaign \citep{lukas09}. We evaluate the optical depth, the duration and the expected rate of events for the different possible lens populations: both luminous, dominated by the LMC self lensing, and "dark", the would be compact halo objects (MACHOs) belonging to either the Galactic or to the LMC halo. The OGLE-II observational results, 2 microlensing candidate events located in the LMC bar region with duration of 24.2 and 57.2 days, compare well with the expected signal from the luminous lens populations: $n_\mathrm{exp}=1.5$, with typical duration, for LMC self lensing, of about 50 days. Because of the small statistics at disposal, however, the conclusions that can be drawn as for the halo mass fraction, $f$, in form of compact halo objects are not too severe. By means of a likelihood analysis we find an \emph{upper} limit for $f$, at 95% confidence level, of about 15% in the mass range $(10^{-2}-10^{-1}) \mathrm{M}_\odot$ and 26% for $0.5 \mathrm{M}_\odot$.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.3356  [pdf] - 1002978
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. II. The transiting planetary system WASP-4
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 8 pages plus appendix, 4 figures, 8 tables
Submitted: 2009-07-20
We present and analyse light curves of four transits of the Southern hemisphere extrasolar planetary system WASP-4, obtained with a telescope defocussed so the radius of each point spread function was 17 arcsec (44 pixels). This approach minimises both random and systematic errors, allowing us to achieve scatters of between 0.60 and 0.88 mmag per observation over complete transit events. The light curves are augmented by published observations and analysed using the JKTEBOP code. The results of this process are combined with theoretical stellar model predictions to derive the physical properties of the WASP-4 system. We find that the mass and radius of the planet are M_b = 1.289 {+0.090 -0.090} {+0.039 -0.000} MJup and R_b = 1.371 {+0.032 -0.035} {+0.021 -0.000} RJup, respectively (statistical and systematic uncertainties). These quantities give a surface gravity and density of g_b = 17.03 +0.97 -0.54 m/s2 and rho_b = 0.500 {+0.032 -0.021} {+0.000 -0.008} rhoJup, and fit the trends for short-period extrasolar planets to have relatively high masses and surface gravities. WASP-4 is now one of the best-quantified transiting extrasolar planetary systems, and significant further progress requires improvements to our understanding of the physical properties of low-mass stars.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.2139  [pdf] - 1001621
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. I. The transiting planetary system WASP-5
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 9 pages, 4 figures, quite a few tables
Submitted: 2009-03-12
We present high-precision photometry of two transit events of the extrasolar planetary system WASP-5, obtained with the Danish 1.54m telescope at ESO La Silla. In order to minimise both random and flat-fielding errors, we defocussed the telescope so its point spread function approximated an annulus of diameter 40 pixels (16 arcsec). Data reduction was undertaken using standard aperture photometry plus an algorithm for optimally combining the ensemble of comparison stars. The resulting light curves have point-to-point scatters of 0.50 mmag for the first transit and 0.59 mmag for the second. We construct detailed signal to noise calculations for defocussed photometry, and apply them to our observations. We model the light curves with the JKTEBOP code and combine the results with tabulated predictions from theoretical stellar evolutionary models to derive the physical properties of the WASP-5 system. We find that the planet has a mass of M_b = 1.637 +/- 0.075 +/- 0.033 Mjup, a radius of R_b = 1.171 +/- 0.056 +/- 0.012 Rjup, a large surface gravity of g_b = 29.6 +/- 2.8 m/s2 and a density of rho_b = 1.02 +/- 0.14 +/- 0.01 rhojup (statistical and systematic uncertainties). The planet's high equilibrium temperature of T_eq = 1732 +/- 80 K makes it a good candidate for detecting secondary eclipses.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.1721  [pdf] - 315489
Candidate microlensing events from M31 observations with the Loiano telescope
Comments: 12 pages, 6 figures, 5 tables - Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2009-01-13
Microlensing observations towards M31 are a powerful tool for the study of the dark matter population in the form of MACHOs both in the Galaxy and the M31 halos, a still unresolved issue, as well as for the analysis of the characteristics of the M31 luminous populations. In this work we present the second year results of our pixel lensing campaign carried out towards M31 using the 152 cm Cassini telescope in Loiano. We have established an automatic pipeline for the detection and the characterisation of microlensing variations. We have carried out a complete simulation of the experiment and evaluated the expected signal, including an analysis of the efficiency of our pipeline. As a result, we select 1-2 candidate microlensing events (according to different selection criteria). This output is in agreement with the expected rate of M31 self-lensing events. However, the statistics are still too low to draw definitive conclusions on MACHO lensing.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.0004  [pdf] - 15037
Inferring statistics of planet populations by means of automated microlensing searches
Comments: 10 pages in PDF format. White paper submitted to ESA's Exo-Planet Roadmap Advisory Team (EPR-AT); typos corrected. The embedded figures are available from the author on request. See also "Towards A Census of Earth-mass Exo-planets with Gravitational Microlensing" by J.P. Beaulieu, E. Kerins, S. Mao et al. (arXiv:0808.0005)
Submitted: 2008-07-31
(abridged) The study of other worlds is key to understanding our own, and not only provides clues to the origin of our civilization, but also looks into its future. Rather than in identifying nearby systems and learning about their individual properties, the main value of the technique of gravitational microlensing is in obtaining the statistics of planetary populations within the Milky Way and beyond. Only the complementarity of different techniques currently employed promises to yield a complete picture of planet formation that has sufficient predictive power to let us understand how habitable worlds like ours evolve, and how abundant such systems are in the Universe. A cooperative three-step strategy of survey, follow-up, and anomaly monitoring of microlensing targets, realized by means of an automated expert system and a network of ground-based telescopes is ready right now to be used to obtain a first census of cool planets with masses reaching even below that of Earth orbiting K and M dwarfs in two distinct stellar populations, namely the Galactic bulge and disk. The hunt for extra-solar planets acts as a principal science driver for time-domain astronomy with robotic-telescope networks adopting fully-automated strategies. Several initiatives, both into facilities as well as into advanced software and strategies, are supposed to see the capabilities of gravitational microlensing programmes step-wise increasing over the next 10 years. New opportunities will show up with high-precision astrometry becoming available and studying the abundance of planets around stars in neighbouring galaxies becoming possible. Finally, we should not miss out on sharing the vision with the general public, and make its realization to profit not only the scientists but all the wider society.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:0711.3758  [pdf] - 7332
Microlensing constraints on the Galactic Bulge Initial Mass Function
Comments: A&A in press - Minor changes to match the published version
Submitted: 2007-11-23, last modified: 2008-03-04
Aims. We seek to probe the Galactic bulge IMF starting from microlensing observations. Methods. We analyse the recent results of the microlensing campaigns carried out towards the Galactic bulge presented by the EROS, MACHO and OGLE collaborations. In particular, we study the duration distribution of the events. We assume a power law initial mass function, $\xi(\mu)\propto \mu^{-\alpha}$, and we study the slope $\alpha$ both in the brown dwarf and in the main sequence ranges. Moreover, we compare the observed and expected optical depth profiles. Results. The values of the mass function slopes are strongly driven by the observed timescales of the microlensing events. The analysis of the MACHO data set gives, for the main sequence stars, $\alpha=1.7 \pm 0.5$, compatible with the result we obtain with the EROS and OGLE data sets, and a similar, though less constrained slope for brown dwarfs. The lack of short duration events in both EROS and OGLE data sets, on the other hand, only allows the determination of an \emph{upper} limit in this range of masses, making the overall result less robust. The optical depth analysis gives a very good agreement between the observed and the expected values, and we show that the available data do not allow one to discriminate between different bulge models.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:0705.0246  [pdf] - 925
Strong deflection limit of black hole gravitational lensing with arbitrary source distances
Comments: 20 pages, 8 figures, appendix added. In press on Physical Review D
Submitted: 2007-05-02, last modified: 2007-09-12
The gravitational field of supermassive black holes is able to strongly bend light rays emitted by nearby sources. When the deflection angle exceeds $\pi$, gravitational lensing can be analytically approximated by the so-called strong deflection limit. In this paper we remove the conventional assumption of sources very far from the black hole, considering the distance of the source as an additional parameter in the lensing problem to be treated exactly. We find expressions for critical curves, caustics and all lensing observables valid for any position of the source up to the horizon. After analyzing the spherically symmetric case we focus on the Kerr black hole, for which we present an analytical 3-dimensional description of the higher order caustic tubes.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:0704.1408  [pdf] - 309
Probing MACHOs by observation of M31 pixel lensing with the 1.5m Loiano telescope
Comments: Accepted for publication as a research Note in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2007-04-11
We analyse a series of pilot observations in order to study microlensing of (unresolved) stars in M31 with the 1.5m Loiano telescope, including observations on both identified variable source stars and reported microlensing events. We also look for previously unknown variability and discover a nova. We discuss an observing strategy for an extended campaign with the goal of determining whether MACHOs exist or whether all microlensing events are compatible with lens stars in M31.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610367  [pdf] - 85791
Baryogenesis in $f(R)$-Theories of Gravity
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2006-10-12
$f(R)$-theories of gravity are reviewed in the context of the so called gravitational baryogenesis. The latter is a mechanism for generating the baryon asymmetry in the Universe, and relies on the coupling between the Ricci scalar curvature $R$ and the baryon current. Gravity Lagrangians of the form ${\cal L}(R)\sim R^n$, where $n$ differs from 1 (the case of the General Relativity) only for tiny deviations of a few percent, are consistent with the current bounds on the observed baryon asymmetry.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610239  [pdf] - 85663
A new analysis of the MEGA M31 microlensing events
Comments: in press on A&A
Submitted: 2006-10-09
We discuss the results of the MEGA microlensing campaign towards M31. Our analysis is based on an analytical evaluation of the microlensing rate, taking into account the observational efficiency as given by the MEGA collaboration. In particular, we study the spatial and time duration distributions of the microlensing events for several mass distribution models of the M31 bulge. We find that only for extreme models of the M31 luminous components it is possible to reconcile the total observed MEGA events with the expected self-lensing contribution. Nevertheless, the expected spatial distribution of self-lensing events is more concentrated and hardly in agreement with the observed distribution. We find it thus difficult to explain all events as being due to self-lensing alone. On the other hand, the small number of events does not yet allow to draw firm conclusions on the halo dark matter fraction in form of MACHOs.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/0604093  [pdf] - 112164
Kerr black hole lensing for generic observers in the strong deflection limit
Comments: 17 pages, 4 figures, one section added, to appear on Physical Review D
Submitted: 2006-04-21, last modified: 2006-08-03
We generalize our previous work on gravitational lensing by a Kerr black hole in the strong deflection limit, removing the restriction to observers on the equatorial plane. Starting from the Schwarzschild solution and adding corrections up to the second order in the black hole spin, we perform a complete analytical study of the lens equation for relativistic images created by photons passing very close to a Kerr black hole. We find out that, to the lowest order, all observables (including shape and shift of the black hole shadow, caustic drift and size, images position and magnification) depend on the projection of the spin on a plane orthogonal to the line of sight. In order to break the degeneracy between the black hole spin and its inclination relative to the observer, it is necessary to push the expansion to higher orders. In terms of future VLBI observations, this implies that very accurate measures are needed to determine these two parameters separately.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0607358  [pdf] - 83561
Microlensing towards LMC: a study of the LMC halo contribution
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2006-07-16
We carry on a new analysis of the sample of MACHO microlensing candidates towards the LMC. Our main purpose is to determine the lens population to which the events may belong. We give particular emphasis to the possibility of characterizing the Milky Way dark matter halo population with respect to the LMC one. Indeed, we show that only a fraction of the events have characteristics that match those expected for lenses belonging to the MACHO population of the Milky Way halo. This suggests that this component cannot explain all the candidates. Accordingly, we challenge the view that the dark matter halo fraction of both the Milky Way and the LMC halos are equal, and indeed we show that, for a MACHO mass in the range 0.1-0.3 M$_\odot$, the LMC halo fraction can be significantly larger than the Milky Way one. In this perspective, our main conclusion is that up to about half of the observed events could be attributed to the LMC MACHO dark matter halo.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/0512154  [pdf] - 112059
Lower Neutrino Mass Bound from SN1987A Data and Quantum Geometry
Comments: 22 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2005-12-27
A lower bound on the light neutrino mass $m_\nu$ is derived in the framework of a geometrical interpretation of quantum mechanics. Using this model and the time of flight delay data for neutrinos coming from SN1987A, we find that the neutrino masses are bounded from below by $m_\nu\gtrsim 10^{-4}-10^{-3}$eV, in agreement with the upper bound $m_\nu\lesssim$ $({\cal O}(0.1) - {\cal O} (1))$ eV currently available. When the model is applied to photons with effective mass, we obtain a lower limit on the electron density in intergalactic space that is compatible with recent baryon density measurements.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/0507137  [pdf] - 111923
Analytic Kerr black hole lensing for equatorial observers in the strong deflection limit
Comments: 19 pages, 9 figures, published on Phys. Rev. D
Submitted: 2005-07-29, last modified: 2005-10-05
In this paper we present an analytical treatment of gravitational lensing by Kerr black holes in the limit of very large deflection angles, restricting to observers in the equatorial plane. We accomplish our objective starting from the Schwarzschild black hole and adding corrections up to second order in the black hole spin. This is sufficient to provide a full description of all caustics and the inversion of lens mapping for sources near them. On the basis of these formulae we argue that relativistic images of Low Mass X-ray Binaries around Sgr A* are very likely to be seen by future X-ray interferometry missions.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0409016  [pdf] - 426322
On the mass of the gravitational lenses in LMC
Comments: To appear in the proceedings of the Marcel Grossmann Meeeting X
Submitted: 2004-09-01
In the self--lensing framework, we estimate the modal values of the mass of the gravitational lenses found by the MACHO collaboration towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Our results suggest that only the events located near the center can be identified as a low mass star population belonging to the LMC disk or bar components.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0405257  [pdf] - 880729
LMC Self-lensing from a new perspective
Comments: revised version (minor changes) Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2004-05-13, last modified: 2004-07-08
We present a new analysis on the issue of the location of the observed microlensing events in direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This is carried out starting from a recently drawn coherent picture of the geometrical structure and dynamics of the LMC disk and by considering different configurations for the LMC bar. In this framework it clearly emerges that the spatial distribution of the events observed so far shows a near--far asymmetry. This turns out to be compatible with the optical depth calculated for the LMC halo objects. In this perspective, our main conclusion, supported by a statistical analysis on the outcome of an evaluation of the microlensing rate, is that self lensing can not account for all the observed events. Finally we propose a general inequality to calculate quickly an upper limit to the optical depth along a line of view through the LMC center.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0304485  [pdf] - 56393
Microlensing towards M31 with MDM data
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2003-04-27
We report the final analysis of a search for microlensing events in the direction of the Andromeda galaxy, which aimed to probe the MACHO composition of the M31 halo using data collected during the 1998-99 observational campaign at the MDM observatory. In a previous paper, we discussed the results from a first set of observations. Here, we deal with the complete data set, and we take advantage of some INT observations in the 1999-2000 seasons. This merging of data sets taken by different instruments turns out to be very useful, the study of the longer baseline available allowing us to test the uniqueness characteristic of microlensing events. As a result, all the candidate microlensing events previously reported turn out to be variable stars. We further discuss a selection based on different criteria, aimed at the detection of short--duration events. We find three candidates whose positions are consistent with self--lensing events, although the available data do not allow us to conclude unambiguously that they are due to microlensing.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0207252  [pdf] - 50395
Microlensing towards the Large Magellanic Cloud
Comments: To appear in A&A, 20 pages with 7 figures
Submitted: 2002-07-11
The nature and the location of the lenses discovered in the microlensing surveys done so far towards the LMC remain unclear. Motivated by these questions we compute the optical depth and particularly the number of expected events for self-lensing for both the MACHO and EROS2 observations. We calculate these quantities also for other possible lens populations such as thin and thick disk and galactic spheroid. Moreover, we estimate for each of these components the corresponding average event duration and mean mass using the mass moment method. By comparing the theoretical quantities with the values of the observed events it is possible to put some constraints on the location and the nature of the MACHOs. Clearly, given the large uncertainties and the few events at disposal it is not possible to draw sharp conclusions, nevertheless we find that certainly at least 3-4 MACHO events are due to lenses in LMC, which are most probably low mass stars, but that hardly all events can be due to self-lensing. This conclusions is even stronger when considering the EROS2 events, due to their spatial distribution. The most plausible solution is that the events observed so far are due to lenses belonging to different intervening populations: low mass stars in the LMC, in the thick disk, in the spheroid and possibly some true MACHOs in the halo.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0111079  [pdf] - 45845
Microlensing by Compact Objects associated to Gas Clouds
Comments: 11 pages with 4 figures. Accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2001-11-05
We investigate gravitational microlensing of point-like lenses surrounded by diffuse gas clouds. Besides gravitational bending, one must also consider refraction and absorption phenomena. According to the cloud density, the light curves may suffer small to large deviations from Paczynski curves, up to complete eclipses. Moreover, the presence of the cloud endows this type of microlensing events with a high chromaticity and absorption lines recognizable by spectral analysis. It is possible that these objects populate the halo of our galaxy, giving a conspicuous contribution to the fraction of the baryonic dark matter. The required features for the extension and the mass of the cloud to provide appreciable signatures are also met by several astrophysical objects.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0110706  [pdf] - 45763
Microlensing search towards M31
Comments: 13 pages, To appear in A&A
Submitted: 2001-10-31
We present the first results of the analysis of data collected during the 1998-99 observational campaign at the 1.3 meter McGraw-Hill Telescope, towards the Andromeda galaxy (M31), aimed to the detection of gravitational microlensing effects as a probe of the presence of dark matter in our and in M31 halo. The analysis is performed using the pixel lensing technique, which consists in the study of flux variations of unresolved sources and has been proposed and implemented by the AGAPE collaboration. We carry out a shape analysis by demanding that the detected flux variations be achromatic and compatible with a Paczynski light curve. We apply the Durbin-Watson hypothesis test to the residuals. Furthermore, we consider the background of variables sources. Finally five candidate microlensing events emerge from our selection. Comparing with the predictions of a Monte Carlo simulation, assuming a standard spherical model for the M31 and Galactic haloes, and typical values for the MACHO mass, we find that our events are only marginally consistent with the distribution of observable parameters predicted by the simulation.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/0102068  [pdf] - 1237399
Strong field limit of black hole gravitational lensing
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2001-02-14
We give the formulation of the gravitational lensing theory in the strong field limit for a Schwarzschild black hole as a counterpart to the weak field approach. It is possible to expand the full black hole lens equation to work a simple analytical theory that describes at a high accuracy degree the physics in the strong field limit. In this way, we derive compact and reliable mathematical formulae for the position of additional critical curves, relativistic images and their magnification, arising in this limit.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9907162  [pdf] - 1943630
Slott-Agape Project
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, proceeding of XLIII Congresso della Societa' Astronomica Italiana, Napoli, 4-8 Maggio, 1999
Submitted: 1999-07-13, last modified: 1999-07-21
SLOTT-AGAPE (Systematic Lensing Observation at Toppo Telescope - Andromeda Gravitational Amplification Pixel Lensing Experiment) is a new collaboration project among international partners from England, France, Germany, Italy and Switzerland that intends to perform microlensing observation by using M31 as target. The MACHOs search is made thanks to the pixel lensing technique.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9902373  [pdf] - 105392
Higher Order Corrections in Gravitational Microlensing
Comments: 10 pages, LATEX, to appear in Phys. Lett. A
Submitted: 1999-02-26
We show that, in cosmological microlensing, corrections of order $v/c \sim \Delta\lambda/\lambda$, to the deflection angle of light beams from a distant source are not negligible and that all microlensing quantities should be corrected up to this order independently of the cosmological model used.