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Savin, D. W.

Normalized to: Savin, D.

65 article(s) in total. 573 co-authors, from 1 to 18 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 6,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.08094  [pdf] - 2054017
Laboratory Calibrations of Fe XII-XIV Line-Intensity Ratios for Electron Density Diagnostics
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-08-21
We have used an electron beam ion trap to measure electron-density-diagnostic line-intensity ratios for extreme ultraviolet lines from F XII, XIII, and XIV at wavelengths of 185-205 255-276 Angstroms. These ratios can be used as density diagnostics for astrophysical spectra and are especially relevant to solar physics. We found that density diagnostics using the Fe XIII 196.53/202.04 and the Fe XIV 264.79/274.21 and 270.52A/274.21 line ratios are reliable using the atomic data calculated with the Flexible Atomic Code. On the other hand, we found a large discrepancy between the FAC theory and experiment for the commonly used Fe XII (186.85 + 186.88)/195.12 line ratio. These FAC theory calculations give similar results to the data tabulated in CHIANTI, which are commonly used to analyze solar observations. Our results suggest that the discrepancies seen between solar coronal density measurements using the Fe XII (186.85 + 186.88)/195.12 and Fe XIII 196.54/202.04 line ratios are likely due to issues with the atomic calculations for Fe XII.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.05252  [pdf] - 2025697
Near L-edge photoionization of triply charged iron ions
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-08-14
Relative cross sections for $m$-fold photoionization ($m=1,\ldots,5$) of Fe$^{3+}$ by single photon absorption were measured employing the photon-ion merged-beams setup PIPE at the PETRA III synchrotron light source operated at DESY in Hamburg, Germany. The photon energies used spanned the range of $680-950\,\mathrm{eV}$, covering both the photoexcitation resonances from the $2p$ and $2s$ shells as well as the direct ionization from both shells. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) calculations were performed to simulate the total photoexcitation spectra. Good agreement was found with the experimental results. These computations helped to assign several strong resonance features to specific transitions. We also carried out Hartree-Fock calculations with relativistic extensions taking into account both photoexcitation and photoionization. Furthermore, we performed extensive MCDHF calculations of the Auger cascades that result when an electron is removed from the $2p$ and $2s$ shells of Fe$^{3+}$. Our theoretically predicted charge-state fractions are in good agreement with the experimental results, representing a substantial improvement over previous theoretical calculations. The main reason for the disagreement with the previous calculations is their lack of inclusion of slow Auger decays of several configurations that can only proceed when accompanied by de-excitation of two electrons. In such cases, this additional shake-down transition of a (sub-)valence electron is required to gain the necessary energy for the release of the Auger electron.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.12650  [pdf] - 1966737
Measured reduction in Alfv\'en wave energy propagating through longitudinal gradients scaled to match solar coronal holes
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-04-26, last modified: 2019-07-04
We have explored the effectiveness of a longitudinal gradient in Alfv\'en speed in reducing the energy of propagating Alfv\'en waves under conditions scaled to match solar coronal holes. The experiments were conducted in the Large Plasma Device at the University of California, Los Angeles. Our results show that the energy of the transmitted Alfv\'en wave decreases as the inhomogeneity parameter, $\lambda/L_{\rm A}$, increases. Here, $\lambda$ is the wavelength of the Alfv\'en wave and $L_{\rm A}$ is the scale length of Alfv\'en speed gradient. For gradients similar to those in coronal holes, the waves are observed to lose a factor of $\approx 5$ more energy than they do when propagating through a uniform plasma without a gradient. We have carried out further experiments and analyses to constrain the cause of wave energy reduction in the gradient. The loss of Alfv\'en wave energy from mode coupling is unlikely, as we have not detected any other modes. Contrary to theoretical expectations, the reduction in the energy of the transmitted wave is not accompanied by a detectable reflected wave. Nonlinear effects are ruled out as the amplitude of the initial wave is too small and the wave frequency well below the ion cyclotron frequency. Since the total energy must be conserved, it is possible that the lost wave energy is being deposited in the plasma. Further studies are needed to explore where the energy is going.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.07064  [pdf] - 1884966
The Need for Laboratory Measurements and Ab Initio Studies to Aid Understanding of Exoplanetary Atmospheres
Fortney, Jonathan J.; Robinson, Tyler D.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Gharib-Nezhad, Ehsan; Lewis, Nikole; Sousa-Silva, Clara; Airapetian, Vladimir; Drouin, Brian; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Karman, Tijs; Ramirez, Ramses M.; Rieker, Gregory B.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Wordsworth, Robin; Yurchenko, Sergei N; Johnson, Alexandria V; Lee, Timothy J.; Dong, Chuanfei; Kane, Stephen; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Fauchez, Thomas; Lee, Timothy; Marley, Mark S.; Sung, Keeyoon; Haghighipour, Nader; Robinson, Tyler; Horst, Sarah; Gao, Peter; Kao, Der-you; Dressing, Courtney; Lupu, Roxana; Savin, Daniel Wolf; Fleury, Benjamin; Venot, Olivia; Ascenzi, Daniela; Milam, Stefanie; Linnartz, Harold; Gudipati, Murthy; Gronoff, Guillaume; Salama, Farid; Gavilan, Lisseth; Bouwman, Jordy; Turbet, Martin; Benilan, Yves; Henderson, Bryana; Batalha, Natalie; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca; Lyons, Timothy; Freedman, Richard; Schwieterman, Edward; Goyal, Jayesh; Mancini, Luigi; Irwin, Patrick; Desert, Jean-Michel; Molaverdikhani, Karan; Gizis, John; Taylor, Jake; Lothringer, Joshua; Pierrehumbert, Raymond; Zellem, Robert; Batalha, Natasha; Rugheimer, Sarah; Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Hu, Renyu; Kempton, Eliza; Arney, Giada; Line, Mike; Alam, Munazza; Moses, Julianne; Iro, Nicolas; Kreidberg, Laura; Blecic, Jasmina; Louden, Tom; Molliere, Paul; Stevenson, Kevin; Swain, Mark; Bott, Kimberly; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Deming, Drake; Kitiashvili, Irina; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Rustamkulov, Zafar; Rogers, Leslie; Close, Laird
Comments: Submitted as an Astro2020 Science White Paper
Submitted: 2019-05-16
We are now on a clear trajectory for improvements in exoplanet observations that will revolutionize our ability to characterize their atmospheric structure, composition, and circulation, from gas giants to rocky planets. However, exoplanet atmospheric models capable of interpreting the upcoming observations are often limited by insufficiencies in the laboratory and theoretical data that serve as critical inputs to atmospheric physical and chemical tools. Here we provide an up-to-date and condensed description of areas where laboratory and/or ab initio investigations could fill critical gaps in our ability to model exoplanet atmospheric opacities, clouds, and chemistry, building off a larger 2016 white paper, and endorsed by the NAS Exoplanet Science Strategy report. Now is the ideal time for progress in these areas, but this progress requires better access to, understanding of, and training in the production of spectroscopic data as well as a better insight into chemical reaction kinetics both thermal and radiation-induced at a broad range of temperatures. Given that most published efforts have emphasized relatively Earth-like conditions, we can expect significant and enlightening discoveries as emphasis moves to the exotic atmospheres of exoplanets.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.12790  [pdf] - 1874678
Astro 2020: Astromineralogy of interstellar dust with X-ray spectroscopy
Comments: Astro2020 decadal survey science white paper submitted to the National Academy of Sciences
Submitted: 2019-04-29
X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) in the 0.2-2 keV band is a crucial component in multi-wavelength studies of dust mineralogy, size, and shape -- parameters that are necessary for interpreting astronomical observations and building physical models across all fields, from cosmology to exoplanets. Despite its importance, many fundamental questions about dust remain open. What is the origin of the dust that suffuses the interstellar medium (ISM)? Where is the missing interstellar oxygen? How does iron, predominantly produced by Type Ia supernovae, become incorporated into dust? What is the main form of carbon in the ISM, and how does it differ from carbon in stellar winds? The next generation of X-ray observatories, employing microcalorimeter technology and $R \equiv \lambda/\Delta \lambda \geq 3000$ gratings, will provide pivotal insights for these questions by measuring XAFS in absorption and scattering. However, lab measurements of mineralogical candidates for astrophysical dust, with R > 1000, are needed to fully take advantage of the coming observations.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.02955  [pdf] - 1888340
Experimental and theoretical studies of D + H$_3^+$ $\rightarrow$ H$_2$D$^+$ + H
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ; 21 pages, 7 figures, and 5 table
Submitted: 2019-04-05
Deuterated molecules are important chemical tracers of prestellar and protostellar cores. Up to now, the titular reaction has been assumed to contribute to the generation of these deuterated molecules. We have measured the merged-beams rate coefficient for this reaction as function of the relative collision energy in the range of about 10 meV to 10 eV. By varying the internal temperature of the reacting H$_3^+$ molecules, we found indications for the existence of a reaction barrier. We have performed detailed theoretical calculations for the zero-point-corrected energy profile of the reaction and determined a new value for the barrier height of $\approx$ 68 meV. Furthermore, we have calculated the tunneling probability through the barrier. Our experimental and theoretical results show that the reaction is essentially closed at astrochemically relevant temperatures. We derive a thermal rate coefficient of $<1\times 10^{-12}$ cm$^3$ s$^{-1}$ for temperatures below 75 K with tunneling effects included and below 155 K without tunneling.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.08213  [pdf] - 1853150
Unlocking the Capabilities of Future High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy Missions Through Laboratory Astrophysics
Comments: Science white paper submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey
Submitted: 2019-03-19
Thanks to high-resolution and non-dispersive spectrometers onboard future X-ray missions such as XRISM and Athena, we are finally poised to answer important questions about the formation and evolution of galaxies and large-scale structure. However, we currently lack an adequate understanding of many atomic processes behind the spectral features we will soon observe. Large error bars on parameters as critical as transition energies and atomic cross sections can lead to unacceptable uncertainties in the calculations of e.g., elemental abundance, velocity, and temperature. Unless we address these issues, we risk limiting the full scientific potential of these missions. Laboratory astrophysics, which comprises theoretical and experimental studies of the underlying physics behind observable astrophysical processes, is therefore central to the success of these missions.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.02915  [pdf] - 1828935
Catching Element Formation In The Act
Fryer, Chris L.; Timmes, Frank; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Couture, Aaron; Adams, Fred; Aoki, Wako; Arcones, Almudena; Arnett, David; Auchettl, Katie; Avila, Melina; Badenes, Carles; Baron, Eddie; Bauswein, Andreas; Beacom, John; Blackmon, Jeff; Blondin, Stephane; Bloser, Peter; Boggs, Steve; Boss, Alan; Brandt, Terri; Bravo, Eduardo; Brown, Ed; Brown, Peter; Budtz-Jorgensen, Steve Bruenn. Carl; Burns, Eric; Calder, Alan; Caputo, Regina; Champagne, Art; Chevalier, Roger; Chieffi, Alessandro; Chipps, Kelly; Cinabro, David; Clarkson, Ondrea; Clayton, Don; Coc, Alain; Connolly, Devin; Conroy, Charlie; Cote, Benoit; Couch, Sean; Dauphas, Nicolas; deBoer, Richard James; Deibel, Catherine; Denisenkov, Pavel; Desch, Steve; Dessart, Luc; Diehl, Roland; Doherty, Carolyn; Dominguez, Inma; Dong, Subo; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Fan, Doreen; Fields, Brian; Fields, Carl; Filippenko, Alex; Fisher, Robert; Foucart, Francois; Fransson, Claes; Frohlich, Carla; Fuller, George; Gibson, Brad; Giryanskaya, Viktoriya; Gorres, Joachim; Goriely, Stephane; Grebenev, Sergei; Grefenstette, Brian; Grohs, Evan; Guillochon, James; Harpole, Alice; Harris, Chelsea; Harris, J. Austin; Harrison, Fiona; Hartmann, Dieter; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Heger, Alexander; Hernanz, Margarita; Herwig, Falk; Hirschi, Raphael; Hix, Raphael William; Hoflich, Peter; Hoffman, Robert; Holcomb, Cole; Hsiao, Eric; Iliadis, Christian; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Janka, Thomas; Jerkstrand, Anders; Johns, Lucas; Jones, Samuel; Jose, Jordi; Kajino, Toshitaka; Karakas, Amanda; Karpov, Platon; Kasen, Dan; Kierans, Carolyn; Kippen, Marc; Korobkin, Oleg; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Kozma, Cecilia; Krot, Saha; Kumar, Pawan; Kuvvetli, Irfan; Laird, Alison; Laming, Martin; Larsson, Josefin; Lattanzio, John; Lattimer, James; Leising, Mark; Lennarz, Annika; Lentz, Eric; Limongi, Marco; Lippuner, Jonas; Livne, Eli; Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole; Longland, Richard; Lopez, Laura A.; Lugaro, Maria; Lutovinov, Alexander; Madsen, Kristin; Malone, Chris; Matteucci, Francesca; McEnery, Julie; Meisel, Zach; Messer, Bronson; Metzger, Brian; Meyer, Bradley; Meynet, Georges; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Miller, Jonah; Miller, Richard; Milne, Peter; Misch, Wendell; Mitchell, Lee; Mosta, Philipp; Motizuki, Yuko; Muller, Bernhard; Mumpower, Matthew; Murphy, Jeremiah; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Nakar, Ehud; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Nugent, Peter; Nunes, Filomena; O'Shea, Brian; Oberlack, Uwe; Pain, Steven; Parker, Lucas; Perego, Albino; Pignatari, Marco; Pinedo, Gabriel Martinez; Plewa, Tomasz; Poznanski, Dovi; Priedhorsky, William; Pritychenko, Boris; Radice, David; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Rauscher, Thomas; Reddy, Sanjay; Rehm, Ernst; Reifarth, Rene; Richman, Debra; Ricker, Paul; Rijal, Nabin; Roberts, Luke; Ropke, Friedrich; Rosswog, Stephan; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Ruiz, Chris; Savin, Daniel Wolf; Schatz, Hendrik; Schneider, Dieter; Schwab, Josiah; Seitenzahl, Ivo; Shen, Ken; Siegert, Thomas; Sim, Stuart; Smith, David; Smith, Karl; Smith, Michael; Sollerman, Jesper; Sprouse, Trevor; Spyrou, Artemis; Starrfield, Sumner; Steiner, Andrew; Strong, Andrew W.; Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Suntzeff, Nick; Surman, Rebecca; Tanimori, Toru; The, Lih-Sin; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Tolstov, Alexey; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tomsick, John; Townsley, Dean; Tsintari, Pelagia; Tsygankov, Sergey; Vartanyan, David; Venters, Tonia; Vestrand, Tom; Vink, Jacco; Waldman, Roni; Wang, Lifang; Wang, Xilu; Warren, MacKenzie; West, Christopher; Wheeler, J. Craig; Wiescher, Michael; Winkler, Christoph; Winter, Lisa; Wolf, Bill; Woolf, Richard; Woosley, Stan; Wu, Jin; Wrede, Chris; Yamada, Shoichi; Young, Patrick; Zegers, Remco; Zingale, Michael; Zwart, Simon Portegies
Comments: 14 pages including 3 figures
Submitted: 2019-02-07
Gamma-ray astronomy explores the most energetic photons in nature to address some of the most pressing puzzles in contemporary astrophysics. It encompasses a wide range of objects and phenomena: stars, supernovae, novae, neutron stars, stellar-mass black holes, nucleosynthesis, the interstellar medium, cosmic rays and relativistic-particle acceleration, and the evolution of galaxies. MeV gamma-rays provide a unique probe of nuclear processes in astronomy, directly measuring radioactive decay, nuclear de-excitation, and positron annihilation. The substantial information carried by gamma-ray photons allows us to see deeper into these objects, the bulk of the power is often emitted at gamma-ray energies, and radioactivity provides a natural physical clock that adds unique information. New science will be driven by time-domain population studies at gamma-ray energies. This science is enabled by next-generation gamma-ray instruments with one to two orders of magnitude better sensitivity, larger sky coverage, and faster cadence than all previous gamma-ray instruments. This transformative capability permits: (a) the accurate identification of the gamma-ray emitting objects and correlations with observations taken at other wavelengths and with other messengers; (b) construction of new gamma-ray maps of the Milky Way and other nearby galaxies where extended regions are distinguished from point sources; and (c) considerable serendipitous science of scarce events -- nearby neutron star mergers, for example. Advances in technology push the performance of new gamma-ray instruments to address a wide set of astrophysical questions.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.06157  [pdf] - 1785914
Perspectives on Astrophysics Based on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical (AMO) Techniques
Comments: White paper submission to the Decadal Assessment and Outlook Report on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical (AMO) Science (AMO 2020)
Submitted: 2018-11-14
About two generations ago, a large part of AMO science was dominated by experimental high energy collision studies and perturbative theoretical methods. Since then, AMO science has undergone a transition and is now dominated by quantum, ultracold, and ultrafast studies. But in the process, the field has passed over the complexity that lies between these two extremes. Most of the Universe resides in this intermediate region. We put forward that the next frontier for AMO science is to explore the AMO complexity that describes most of the Cosmos.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.10138  [pdf] - 1705278
Density Fluctuations in a Polar Coronal Hole
Comments: Accepted for Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2018-04-26
We have measured the root-mean-square (RMS) amplitude of intensity fluctuations, $\Delta I$, in plume and interplume regions of a polar coronal hole. These intensity fluctuations correspond to density fluctuations. Using data from the \rev{Sun Watcher using Active Pixel System detector and Image Processing} (SWAP) on \textit{Project for Onboard Autonomy (Proba2)}, our results extend up to a height of about 1.35~$R_{\sun}$. One advantage of the RMS analysis is that it does not rely on a detailed evaluation of the power spectrum, which is limited by noise levels to low heights in the corona. The RMS approach can be performed up to larger heights where the noise level is greater, provided that the noise itself can be quantified. At low heights, both the absolute $\Delta I$, and the amplitude relative to the mean intensity, $\Delta I/I$, decrease with height. However, starting at about 1.2~$R_{\sun}$ $\Delta I/I$ increases, reaching 20--40\% by 1.35~$R_{\sun}$. This corresponds to density fluctuations of $\Delta n_{\mathrm{e}}/n_{\mathrm{e}} \approx$~10--20\%. The increasing relative amplitude implies that the density fluctuations are generated in the corona itself. One possibility is that the density fluctuations are generated by an instability of Alfv\'en waves. This generation mechanism is consistent with some theoretical models and with observations of Alfv\'en wave amplitudes in coronal holes. Although we find that the energy of the observed density fluctuations is small, these fluctuations are likely to play an important indirect role in coronal heating by promoting the reflection of Alfv\'en waves and driving turbulence.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.07104  [pdf] - 1652494
Spectroscopic Measurements of the Ion Velocity Distribution at the Base of the Fast Solar Wind
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2018-02-20
In situ measurements of the fast solar wind reveal non-thermal distributions of electrons, protons and, minor ions extending from $0.3$ AU to the heliopause. The physical mechanisms responsible for these non-thermal properties and the location where these properties originate remain open questions. Here we present spectroscopic evidence, from extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy, that the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of minor ions are already non-Gaussian at the base of the fast solar wind in a coronal hole, at altitudes of $< 1.1 R_{\odot}$. Analysis of Fe, Si, and Mg spectral lines reveal a peaked line-shape core and broad wings that can be characteristed by a kappa VDF. A kappa distribution fit gives very small kappa indices off-limb of $\kappa\approx1.9-2.5$, indicating either (a) ion populations far from thermal equilibrium, (b) fluid motions such as non-Gaussian turbulent fluctuations or non-uniform wave motions, or (c) some combination of both. These observations provide important empirical constraints for the source region of the fast solar wind and for the theoretical models of the different acceleration, heating, and energy deposition processes therein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the ion VDF in the fast solar wind has been probed so close to its source region. The findings are also a timely precursor to the upcoming 2018 launch of the Parker Solar Probe, which will provide the closest in situ measurements of the solar wind at approximately $0.04$ AU ($8.5$ solar radii).
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.09092  [pdf] - 1938278
Near L-Edge Single and Multiple Photoionization of Singly Charged Iron Ions
Comments: 18 pages, 10 figures, 4 tables, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2017-09-26
Absolute cross sections for m-fold photoionization (m=1,...,6) of Fe+ by a single photon were measured employing the photon-ion merged-beams setup PIPE at the PETRA III synchrotron light source, operated by DESY in Hamburg, Germany. Photon energies were in the range 680-920 eV which covers the photoionization resonances associated with 2p and 2s excitation to higher atomic shells as well as the thresholds for 2p and 2s ionization. The corresponding resonance positions were measured with an uncertainty of +- 0.2 eV. The cross section for Fe+ photoabsorption is derived as the sum of the individually measured cross-sections for m-fold ionization. Calculations of the Fe+ absorption cross sections have been carried out using two different theoretical approaches, Hartree-Fock including relativistic extensions and fully relativistic Multi-Configuration Dirac Fock. Apart from overall energy shifts of up to about 3 eV, the theoretical cross sections are in good agreement with each other and with the experimental results. In addition, the complex deexcitation cascades after the creation of inner-shell holes in the Fe+ ion have been tracked on the atomic fine-structure level. The corresponding theoretical results for the product charge-state distributions are in much better agreement with the experimental data than previously published configuration-average results. The present experimental and theoretical results are valuable for opacity calculations and are expected to pave the way to a more accurate determination of the iron abundance in the interstellar medium.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.02155  [pdf] - 1598106
Electron-Impact Multiple Ionization Cross Sections for Atoms and Ions of Helium through Zinc
Comments: Submitted to Astrophysical Journal Supplement. The cross section database (Table 2 in the manuscript) is available upon request
Submitted: 2017-08-07
We have compiled a set of electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI) cross sections for astrophysically relevant ions. EIMI can have a significant effect on the ionization balance of non-equilibrium plasmas. For example, it can be important if there is a rapid change in the electron temperature or if there is a non-thermal electron energy distribution, such as a kappa distribution. Cross sections for EIMI are needed in order to account for these processes in plasma modeling and for spectroscopic interpretation. Here, we describe our comparison of proposed semiempirical formulae to the available experimental EIMI cross section data. Based on this comparison, we have interpolated and extrapolated fitting parameters to systems that have not yet been measured. A tabulation of the fit parameters is provided for 3466 EIMI cross sections. We also highlight some outstanding issues that remain to be resolved.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.01456  [pdf] - 1585554
On the Energetics of the HCO$^+$ + C $\to$ CH$^+$ + CO Reaction and Some Astrochemical Implications
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ; 14 pages, 2 figures, and 1 table
Submitted: 2017-07-05
We explore the energetics of the titular reaction, which current astrochemical databases consider open at typical dense molecular (i.e., dark) cloud conditions. As is common for reactions involving the transfer of light particles, we assume that there are no intersystem crossings of the potential energy surfaces involved. In the absence of any such crossings, we find that this reaction is endoergic and will be suppressed at dark cloud temperatures. Updating accordingly a generic astrochemical model for dark clouds changes the predicted gas-phase abundances of 224 species by greater than a factor of 2. Of these species, 43 have been observed in the interstellar medium. Our findings demonstrate the astrochemical importance of determining the role of intersystem crossings, if any, in the titular reaction.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.00048  [pdf] - 1521192
Recommended Thermal Rate Coefficients for the C + H$_3^+$ Reaction and Some Astrochemical Implications
Comments: 19 pages, 5 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-04-29, last modified: 2016-09-11
We have incorporated our experimentally derived thermal rate coefficients for C + H$_3^+$ forming CH$^+$ and CH$_2^+$ into a commonly used astrochemical model. We find that the Arrhenius-Kooij equation typically used in chemical models does not accurately fit our data and use instead a more versatile fitting formula. At a temperature of 10 K and a density of 10$^4$ cm$^{-3}$, we find no significant differences in the predicted chemical abundances, but at higher temperatures of 50, 100, and 300 K we find up to factor of 2 changes. Additionally, we find that the relatively small error on our thermal rate coefficients, $\sim15\%$, significantly reduces the uncertainties on the predicted abundances compared to those obtained using the currently implemented Langevin rate coefficient with its estimated factor of 2 uncertainty.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.06247  [pdf] - 1486887
Inferring the Coronal Density Irregularity from EUV Spectra
Comments: Submitted to the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2016-06-20
Understanding the density structure of the solar corona is important for modeling both coronal heating and the solar wind. Direct measurements are difficult because of line-of-sight integration and possible unresolved structures. We present a new method for quantifying such structure using density-sensitive EUV line intensities to derive a density irregularity parameter, a relative measure of the amount of structure along the line of sight. We also present a simple model to relate the inferred irregularities to physical quantities, such as the filling factor and density contrast. For quiet Sun regions and interplume regions of coronal holes, we find a density contrast of at least a factor of three to ten and corresponding filling factors of about 10-20%. Our results are in rough agreement with other estimates of the density structures in these regions. The irregularity diagnostic provides a useful relative measure of unresolved structure in various regions of the corona.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.07882  [pdf] - 1338948
Merged-beams Reaction Studies of O + H_3^+
Comments: 43 pages, 11 figures. Submitted to the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2015-08-31
We have measured the reaction of O + H3+ forming OH+ and H2O+. This is one of the key gas-phase astrochemical processes initiating the formation of water molecules in dense molecular clouds. For this work, we have used a novel merged fast-beams apparatus which overlaps a beam of H3+ onto a beam of ground-term neutral O. Here, we present cross section data for forming OH+ and H2O+ at relative energies from \approx 3.5 meV to \approx 15.5 and 0.13 eV, respectively. Measurements were performed for statistically populated O(3PJ) in the ground term reacting with hot H3+ (with an internal temperature of \approx 2500-3000 K). From these data, we have derived rate coefficients for translational temperatures from \approx 25 K to \approx 10^5 and 10^3 K, respectively. Using state-of-the-art theoretical methods as a guide, we have converted these results to a thermal rate coefficient for forming either OH+ or H2O+, thereby accounting for the temperature dependence of the O fine-structure levels. Our results are in good agreement with two independent flowing afterglow measurements at a temperature of \approx 300 K, and with a corresponding level of H3+ internal excitation. This good agreement strongly suggests that the internal excitation of the H3+ does not play a significant role in this reaction. The Langevin rate coefficient is in reasonable agreement with the experimental results at 10 K but a factor of \approx 2 larger at 300 K. The two published classical trajectory studies using quantum mechanical potential energy surfaces lie a factor of \approx 1.5 above our experimental results over this 10-300 K range.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.07127  [pdf] - 1273172
A Simple Method for Modeling Collision Processes in Plasmas with a Kappa Energy Distribution
Comments: Accepted in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2015-06-23, last modified: 2015-07-21
We demonstrate that a nonthermal distribution of particles described by a kappa distribution can be accurately approximated by a weighted sum of Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions. We apply this method to modeling collision processes in kappa-distribution plasmas, with a particular focus on atomic processes important for solar physics. The relevant collision process rate coefficients are generated by summing appropriately weighted Maxwellian rate coefficients. This method reproduces the rate coefficients for a kappa distribution to an estimated accuracy of better than 5%. This is equal to or better than the accuracy of rate coefficients generated using "reverse engineering" methods, which attempt to extract the needed cross sections from the published Maxwellian rate coefficient data and then reconvolve the extracted cross sections with the desired kappa distribution. Our approach of summing Maxwellian rate coefficients is easy to implement using existing spectral analysis software. Moreover, the weights in the sum of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution rate coefficients can be found for any value of the parameter kappa, thereby enabling one to model plasmas with a time-varying kappa. Tabulated Maxwellian fitting parameters are given for specific values of kappa from 1.7 to 100. We also provide polynomial fits to these parameters over this entire range. Several applications of our technique are presented, including the plasma equilibrium charge state distribution (CSD), predicting line ratios, modeling the influence of electron impact multiple ionization on the equilibrium CSD of kappa-distribution plasmas, and calculating the time-varying CSD of plasmas during a solar flare.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.04216  [pdf] - 1300231
Storage Ring Cross Section Measurements for Electron Impact Ionization of Fe 7+
Comments: Submitted to the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2015-07-15
We have measured electron impact ionization (EII) for Fe 7+ from the ionization threshold up to 1200 eV. The measurements were performed using the TSR heavy ion storage ring. The ions were stored long enough prior to measurement to remove most metastables, resulting in a beam of 94% ground state ions. Comparing with the previously recommended atomic data, we find that the Arnaud & Raymond (1992) cross section is up to about 40\% larger than our measurement, with the largest discrepancies below about 400~eV. The cross section of Dere (2007) agrees to within 10%, which is about the magnitude of the experimental uncertainties. The remaining discrepancies between measurement and the most recent theory are likely due to shortcomings in the theoretical treatment of the excitation-autoionization contribution.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.4696  [pdf] - 1245618
Reaction Studies of Neutral Atomic ${\rm C}$ with ${\rm H_3^+}$ using a Merged-Beams Apparatus
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement
Submitted: 2014-08-20, last modified: 2015-04-27
We have investigated the chemistry of ${\rm C + H_3^+}$ forming CH$^+$, CH$_2^+$, and CH$_3^+$. These reactions are believed to be some of the key gas-phase astrochemical processes initiating the formation of organic molecules in molecular clouds. For this work we have constructed a novel merged fast-beams apparatus which overlaps a beam of molecular ions onto a beam of ground-term neutral atoms. Here we present cross section data for forming CH$^+$ and CH$_2^+$ at collision energies from $\approx 9$ meV to $\approx20$ and 3 eV, respectively. Using these data we have derived thermal rate coefficients for reaction temperatures from $\approx72$ K to $\approx2.3 \times 10^5$ and $3.4 \times 10^4$ K, respectively. For the formation of CH$_3^+$ we are able only to put an upper limit on the rate coefficient. Our results for CH$^+$ and CH$_2^+$ are in good agreement with the mass-scaled results from a previous ion trap study of ${\rm C + D_3^+}$ at a reaction temperature of $\sim 1000$ K. At molecular cloud temperatures our thermal rate coefficient for forming CH$^+$ lies a factor of $\sim 2-4$ below the Langevin rate coefficient currently given in astrochemical databases and below the published semi-classical calculations. Our results for CH$_2^+$ formation are a factor of $\sim 26$ above the semi-classical results. Astrochemical databases do not currently include this channel.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.06044  [pdf] - 1245710
Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes
Comments: 21 pages; 3 tables; 12 figures
Submitted: 2015-03-20
We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) < 10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for element with a high-FIP (> 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provides constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.5914  [pdf] - 910692
Innershell Photoionization Studies of Neutral Atomic Nitrogen
Comments: Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal, 19 pages, 2 tables, and 3 figures
Submitted: 2014-12-18
Innershell ionization of a $1s$ electron by either photons or electrons is important for X-ray photoionized objects such as active galactic nuclei and electron-ionized sources such as supernova remnants. Modeling and interpreting observations of such objects requires accurate predictions for the charge state distribution (CSD) which results as the $1s$-hole system stabilizes. Due to the complexity of the complete stabilization process, few modern calculations exist and the community currently relies on 40-year-old atomic data. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study for innershell photoionization of neutral atomic nitrogen for photon energies of $403-475$~eV. Results are reported for the total ion yield cross section, for the branching ratios for formation of N$^+$, N$^{2+}$, and N$^{3+}$, and for the average charge state. We find significant differences when comparing to the data currently available to the astrophysics community. For example, while the branching ratio to N$^{2+}$ is somewhat reduced, that for N$^+$ is greatly increased, and that to N$^{3+}$, which was predicted not to be zero, grows to $\approx 10\%$ at the higher photon energies studied. This work demonstrates some of the shortcomings in the theoretical CSD data base for innershell ionization and points the way for the improvements needed to more reliably model the role of innershell ionization of cosmic plasmas.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.4850  [pdf] - 1222638
Influence of Electron-Impact Multiple Ionization on Equilibrium and Dynamic Charge State Distributions: A Case Study Using Iron
Comments: Submitted to the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2014-10-17
We describe the influence of electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI) on the ionization balance of collisionally ionized plasmas. We are unaware of any previous ionization balance calculations that have included EIMI, which is usually assumed to be unimportant. Here, we incorporate EIMI cross-section data into calculations of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions (CSDs). For equilibrium CSDs, we find that EIMI has only a small effect and can usually be ignored. However, for non-equilibrium plasmas the influence of EIMI can be important. In particular, we find that for plasmas in which the temperature oscillates there are significant differences in the CSD when including versus neglecting EIMI. These results have implications for modeling and spectroscopy of impulsively heated plasmas, such as nanoflare heating of the solar corona.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.0538  [pdf] - 863039
Dissociative recombination measurements of NH$^+$ using an ion storage ring
Comments: July 1st 2014: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-07-02, last modified: 2014-07-18
We have investigated dissociative recombination (DR) of NH$^+$ with electrons using a merged beams configuration at the TSR heavy-ion storage ring located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. We present our measured absolute merged beams recombination rate coefficient for collision energies from 0 to 12 eV. From these data we have extracted a cross section which we have transformed to a plasma rate coefficient for the collisional plasma temperature range from $T_{\rm pl} = 10$ to $18000$ K. We show that the NH$^+$ DR rate coefficient data in current astrochemical models are underestimated by up to a factor of $\sim 9$. Our new data will result in predicted NH$^+$ abundances lower than calculated by present models. This is in agreement with the sensitivity limits of all observations attempting to detect NH$^+$ in interstellar clouds.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.3250  [pdf] - 1215626
Evidence for Wave Heating of the Quiet Sun Corona
Comments: Submitted to the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2014-07-11
We have measured the energy and dissipation of Alfvenic waves in the quiet Sun. A magnetic field was used to infer the location and orientation of the magnetic field lines along which the waves are expected to travel. The waves were measured using spectral lines to infer the wave amplitude. The waves cause a non-thermal broadening of the spectral lines, which can be expressed as a non-thermal velocity v_nt. By combining the spectroscopic measurements with this magnetic field model we were able to trace the variation of v_nt along the magnetic field. At the footpoints of the quiet Sun loops we find that waves inject an energy flux in the range of 1.2-5.2 x 10^5 erg cm^-2 s^-1. At the minimum of this range, this amounts to more than 80% of the energy needed to heat the quiet Sun. We also find that these waves are dissipated over a region centered on the top of the loops. The position along the loop where the damping begins is strongly correlated with the length of the loop, implying that the damping mechanism depends on the global loop properties rather than on local collisional dissipation.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.5403  [pdf] - 1164776
Observational Quantification of the Energy Dissipated by Alfv\'en Waves in a Polar Coronal Hole: Evidence that Waves Drive the Fast Solar Wind
Comments: Accepted for the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2013-02-21, last modified: 2013-08-29
We present a measurement of the energy carried and dissipated by Alfv\'en waves in a polar coronal hole. Alfv\'en waves have been proposed as the energy source that heats the corona and drives the solar wind. Previous work has shown that line widths decrease with height in coronal holes, which is a signature of wave damping, but have been unable to quantify the energy lost by the waves. This is because line widths depend on both the non-thermal velocity v_nt and the ion temperature T_i. We have implemented a means to separate the T_i and v_nt contributions using the observation that at low heights the waves are undamped and the ion temperatures do not change with height. This enables us to determine the amount of energy carried by the waves at low heights, which is proportional to v_nt. We find the initial energy flux density present was 6.7 +/- 0.7 x 10^5 erg cm^-2 s^-1, which is sufficient to heat the coronal hole and acccelerate the solar wind during the 2007 - 2009 solar minimum. Additionally, we find that about 85% of this energy is dissipated below 1.5 R_sun, sufficiently low that thermal conduction can transport the energy throughout the coronal hole, heating it and driving the fast solar wind. The remaining energy is roughly consistent with what models show is needed to provide the extended heating above the sonic point for the fast solar wind. We have also studied T_i, which we found to be in the range of 1 - 2 MK, depending on the ion species.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.2995  [pdf] - 735677
Dissociative recombination measurements of HCl+ using an ion storage ring
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ (July 7, 2013)
Submitted: 2013-07-11
We have measured dissociative recombination of HCl+ with electrons using a merged beams configuration at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. We present the measured absolute merged beams recombination rate coefficient for collision energies from 0 to 4.5 eV. We have also developed a new method for deriving the cross section from the measurements. Our approach does not suffer from approximations made by previously used methods. The cross section was transformed to a plasma rate coefficient for the electron temperature range from T=10 to 5000 K. We show that the previously used HCl+ DR data underestimate the plasma rate coefficient by a factor of 1.5 at T=10 K and overestimate it by a factor of 3.0 at T=300 K. We also find that the new data may partly explain existing discrepancies between observed abundances of chlorine-bearing molecules and their astrochemical models.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.0991  [pdf] - 1157516
Measurements of Anisotropic Ion Temperatures, Non-Thermal Velocities, and Doppler Shifts in a Coronal Hole
Comments: Accepted for The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2012-11-05, last modified: 2012-12-14
We present a new diagnostic allowing one to measure the anisotropy of ion temperatures and non-thermal velocities as well as Doppler shifts with respect to the ambient magnetic field. This method provides new results, as well as independent test for previous measurements obtained with other techniques. Our spectral data come from observations of a low latitude, on-disk coronal hole. A potential field source surface model was used to calculate the angle between the magnetic field lines and the line of sight for each spatial bin of the observation. A fit was performed to determine the line widths and Doppler shifts parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For each line width component we derived parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures and non-thermal velocities. The perpendicular ion temperature was cooler than off-limb polar coronal hole measurements. The parallel ion temperature was consistent with a uniform temperature of 1.8 +/- 0.2 x 10^{6} K for each ion. Since parallel ion heating is expected to be weak, this ion temperature should reflect the proton temperature. A comparison between our results and others implies a large proton temperature gradient around 1.02 R_sun. The non-thermal velocities are thought to be proportional to the amplitudes of various waves. Our results for the perpendicular non-thermal velocity agree with Alfv\'en wave amplitudes inferred from off-limb polar coronal hole line width measurements. Our parallel non-thermal velocity results are consistent with slow magnetosonic wave amplitudes inferred from Fourier analysis of time varying intensity fluctuations. Doppler shift measurements yield outflows of ~5 km s^-1 for ions formed over a broad temperature range. This differs from other studies which found a strong Doppler shift dependence on formation temperature.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.1743  [pdf] - 1116477
Evidence of Wave Damping at Low Heights in a Polar Coronal Hole
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal, April 2012
Submitted: 2012-02-08, last modified: 2012-04-30
We have measured the widths of spectral lines from a polar coronal hole using the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer onboard Hinode. Polar coronal holes are regions of open magnetic field and the source of the fast solar wind. We find that the line widths decrease at relatively low heights. Previous observations have attributed such decreases to systematic effects, but we find that such effects are too small to explain our results. We conclude that the line narrowing is real. The non-thermal line widths are believed to be proportional to the amplitude of Alfven waves propagating along these open field lines. Our results suggest that Alfven waves are damped at unexpectedly low heights in a polar coronal hole. We derive an estimate on the upper limit for the energy dissipated between 1.1 and 1.3 solar radii and find that it is enough to account for up to 70% of that required to heat the polar coronal hole and accelerate the solar wind.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.6215  [pdf] - 524903
Electron-ion Recombination of Fe XII forming Fe XI: Laboratory Measurements and Theoretical Calculations
Comments: April 24, 2012: accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2012-04-27
We have measured electron-ion recombination for Fe XII forming Fe XI using a merged beams configuration at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. The measured merged beams recombination rate coefficient (MBRRC) for collision energies from 0 to 1500 eV is presented. This work uses a new method for determining the absolute MBRRC based on a comparison of the ion beam decay rate with and without the electron beam on. For energies below 75 eV, the spectrum is dominated by dielectronic recombination (DR) resonances associated with 3s-3p and 3p-3d core excitations. At higher energies we observe contributions from 3-N' and 2-N' core excitations DR. We compare our experimental results to state-of-the-art multi-configuration Breit-Pauli (MCBP) calculations and find significant differences, both in resonance energies and strengths. We have extracted the DR contributions from the measured MBRRC data and transformed them into a plasma recombination rate coefficient (PRRC) for temperatures in the range of 10^3 to 10^7 K. We show that the previously recommended DR data for Fe XII significantly underestimate the PRRC at temperatures relevant for both photoionized plasmas (PPs) and collisionaly ionized plasmas (CPs). This is to be contrasted with our MCBP PRRC results which agree with the experiment to within 30% at PP temperatures and even better at CP temperatures. We find this agreement despite the disagreement shown by the detailed comparison between our MCBP and experimental MBRRC results. Lastly, we present a simple parameterized form of the experimentally derived PRRC for easy use in astrophysical modelling codes.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.2770  [pdf] - 486726
The Impact of Recent Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics on our Understanding of the Cosmos
Comments: 61 pages. 11 figures; to appear in Reports on Progress in Physics
Submitted: 2011-12-09
An emerging theme in modern astrophysics is the connection between astronomical observations and the underlying physical phenomena that drive our cosmos. Both the mechanisms responsible for the observed astrophysical phenomena and the tools used to probe such phenomena - the radiation and particle spectra we observe - have their roots in atomic, molecular, condensed matter, plasma, nuclear and particle physics. Chemistry is implicitly included in both molecular and condensed matter physics. This connection is the theme of the present report, which provides a broad, though non-exhaustive, overview of progress in our understanding of the cosmos resulting from recent theoretical and experimental advances in what is commonly called laboratory astrophysics. This work, carried out by a diverse community of laboratory astrophysicists, is increasingly important as astrophysics transitions into an era of precise measurement and high fidelity modeling.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1103.1341  [pdf] - 326712
Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper (based on the 2010 NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop in Gatlinberg, Tennessee, 25-28 October 2010)
Comments: 22 page White Paper from the 2010 NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop in Gatlinberg, Tennessee, 25-28 October 2010
Submitted: 2011-03-07
The purpose of the 2010 NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop (LAW) was, as given in the Charter from NASA, "to provide a forum within which the scientific community can review the current state of knowledge in the field of Laboratory Astrophysics, assess the critical data needs of NASA's current and future Space Astrophysics missions, and identify the challenges and opportunities facing the field as we begin a new decade". LAW 2010 was the fourth in a roughly quadrennial series of such workshops sponsored by the Astrophysics Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate. In this White Paper, we report the findings of the workshop.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.2144  [pdf] - 956001
Storage Ring Cross Section Measurements for Electron Impact Ionization of Fe^11+ Forming Fe^12+ and Fe^13+
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2011-01-11
We report ionization cross section measurements for electron impact single ionization (EISI) of Fe^11+$ forming Fe^12+ and electron impact double ionization (EIDI) of Fe^11+ forming Fe^13+. The measurements cover the center-of-mass energy range from approximately 230 eV to 2300 eV. The experiment was performed using the heavy ion storage ring TSR located at the Max-Planck-Institut fur Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. The storage ring approach allows nearly all metastable levels to relax to the ground state before data collection begins. We find that the cross section for single ionization is 30% smaller than was previously measured in a single pass experiment using an ion beam with an unknown metastable fraction. We also find some significant differences between our experimental cross section for single ionization and recent distorted wave (DW) calculations. The DW Maxwellian EISI rate coefficient for Fe^11+ forming Fe^12+ may be underestimated by as much as 25% at temperatures for which Fe^11+ is abundant in collisional ionization equilibrium. This is likely due to the absence of 3s excitation-autoionization (EA) in the calculations. However, a precise measurement of the cross section due to this EA channel was not possible because this process is not distinguishable experimentally from electron impact excitation of an n=3 electron to levels of n > 44 followed by field ionization in the charge state analyzer after the interaction region. Our experimental results also indicate that the double ionization cross section is dominated by the indirect process in which direct single ionization of an inner shell 2l electron is followed by autoionization resulting in a net double ionization.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1011.4052  [pdf] - 264469
Science Objectives for an X-Ray Microcalorimeter Observing the Sun
Comments: 7 pages, white paper submitted the Solar and Heliophsyics Decadal Survey
Submitted: 2010-11-17
We present the science case for a broadband X-ray imager with high-resolution spectroscopy, including simulations of X-ray spectral diagnostics of both active regions and solar flares. This is part of a trilogy of white papers discussing science, instrument (Bandler et al. 2010), and missions (Bookbinder et al. 2010) to exploit major advances recently made in transition-edge sensor (TES) detector technology that enable resolution better than 2 eV in an array that can handle high count rates. Combined with a modest X-ray mirror, this instrument would combine arcsecondscale imaging with high-resolution spectra over a field of view sufficiently large for the study of active regions and flares, enabling a wide range of studies such as the detection of microheating in active regions, ion-resolved velocity flows, and the presence of non-thermal electrons in hot plasmas. It would also enable more direct comparisons between solar and stellar soft X-ray spectra, a waveband in which (unusually) we currently have much better stellar data than we do of the Sun.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.4277  [pdf] - 1041429
Properties of a Polar Coronal Hole During the Solar Minimum in 2007
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2010-10-20
We report measurements of a polar coronal hole during the recent solar minimum using the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode. Five observations are analyzed that span the polar coronal hole from the central meridian to the boundary with the quiet Sun corona. We study the observations above the solar limb in the height range of 1.03 - 1.20 solar radii. The electron temperature Te and emission measure EM are found using the Geometric mean Emission Measure (GEM) method. The EM derived from the elements Fe, Si, S, and Al are compared in order to measure relative coronal-to-photospheric abundance enhancement factors. We also studied the ion temperature Ti and the non-thermal velocity Vnt using the line profiles. All these measurements are compared to polar coronal hole observations from the previous (1996-1997) solar minimum and to model predictions for relative abundances. There are many similarities in the physical properties of the polar coronal holes between the two minima at these low heights. We find that Te, electron density Ne, and Ti are comparable in both minima. Te shows a comparable gradient with height. Both minima show a decreasing Ti with increasing charge-to-mass ratio q/M. A previously observed upturn of Ti for ions above q/M > 0.25 was not found here. We also compared relative coronal-to-photospheric elemental abundance enhancement factors for a number of elements. These ratios were about 1 for both the low first ionization potential (FIP) elements Si and Al and the marginally high FIP element S relative to the low FIP element Fe, as is expected based on earlier observations and models for a polar coronal hole. These results are consistent with no FIP effect in a polar coronal hole.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.3678  [pdf] - 323239
Dielectronic recombination data for astrophysical applications: Plasma rate-coefficients for Fe^q+ (q=7-10, 13-22) and Ni^25+ ions from storage-ring experiments
Comments: submitted for publication in the International Review of Atomic and Molecular Physics, 8 figures, 3 tables, 68 references
Submitted: 2010-02-19
This review summarizes the present status of an ongoing experimental effort to provide reliable rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination of highly charged iron ions for the modeling of astrophysical and other plasmas. The experimental work has been carried out over more than a decade at the heavy-ion storage-ring TSR of the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. The experimental and data reduction procedures are outlined. The role of previously disregarded processes such as fine-structure core excitations and trielectronic recombination is highlighted. Plasma rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination of Fe^q+ ions (q=7-10, 13-22) and Ni^25+ are presented graphically and in a simple parameterized form allowing for easy use in plasma modeling codes. It is concluded that storage-ring experiments are presently the only source for reliable low-temperature dielectronic recombination rate-coefficients of complex ions.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.0442  [pdf] - 1932174
Laboratory Studies for Planetary Sciences. A Planetary Decadal Survey White Paper Prepared by the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA)
Comments:
Submitted: 2009-10-02
The WGLA of the AAS (http://www.aas.org/labastro/) promotes collaboration and exchange of knowledge between astronomy and planetary sciences and the laboratory sciences (physics, chemistry, and biology). Laboratory data needs of ongoing and next generation planetary science missions are carefully evaluated and recommended in this white paper submitted by the WGLA to Planetary Decadal Survey.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.3195  [pdf] - 901760
Deriving the Coronal Hole Electron Temperature: Electron Density Dependent Ionization/Recombination Considerations
Comments: 5 pages
Submitted: 2009-09-17, last modified: 2009-09-25
Comparison of appropriate theoretical derived line ratios with observational data can yield estimates of a plasma's physical parameters, such as electron density or temperature. The usual practice in the calculation of the line ratio is the assumption of excitation by electrons/protons followed by radiative decay. Furthermore, it is normal to use the so-called coronal approximation, i.e. one only considers ionization and recombination to and from the ground state. A more accurate treatment is to include the ionization/recombination to and from meta-stable levels. Here, we apply this to two lines from adjacent ionization stages; Mg IX 368A and Mg X 625A, which has been shown to be a very useful temperature diagnostic. At densities typical of coronal hole conditions, the difference between the electron temperature derived assuming the zero density limit compared with the electron density dependent ionization/recombination is small. This however is not the case for flares where the electron density is orders of magnitude larger. The derived temperature for the coronal hole at solar maximum is around 1.04 MK compared to just below 0.82 MK at solar minimum.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.0151  [pdf] - 298339
Electron-ion Recombination of Fe X forming Fe IX and of Fe XI forming Fe X: Laboratory Measurements and Theoretical Calculations
Comments: 44 Pages, 5 Figures. Accepted for publication in Astrophys. J
Submitted: 2009-04-01
We have measured electron-ion recombination for Fe$^{9+}$ forming Fe$^{8+}$ and for Fe$^{10+}$ forming Fe$^{9+}$ using merged beams at the TSR heavy-ion storage-ring in Heidelberg. The measured merged beams recombination rate coefficients (MBRRC) for relative energies from 0 to 75 eV are presented, covering all dielectronic recombination (DR) resonances associated with 3s->3p and 3p->3d core transitions in the spectroscopic species Fe X and Fe XI, respectively. We compare our experimental results to multi-configuration Breit-Pauli (MCBP) calculations and find significant differences. From the measured MBRRC we have extracted the DR contributions and transform them into plasma recombination rate coefficients (PRRC) for astrophysical plasmas with temperatures from 10^2 to 10^7 K. This spans across the regimes where each ion forms in photoionized or in collisionally ionized plasmas. For both temperature regimes the experimental uncertainties are 25% at a 90% confidence level. The formerly recommended DR data severely underestimated the rate coefficient at temperatures relevant for photoionized gas. At the temperatures relevant for photoionized gas, we find agreement between our experimental results and MCBP theory. At the higher temperatures relevant for collisionally ionized gas, the MCBP calculations yield a Fe XI DR rate coefficent which is significantly larger than the experimentally derived one. We present parameterized fits to our experimentally derived DR PRRC.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.4592  [pdf] - 1932072
Roles and Needs of Laboratory Astrophysics in NASA's Space and Earth Science Mission
Comments: White Paper submitted by the AAS Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA) to the National Academy of Science, Space Sciences Board, Ad Hoc Committee studying "The Role and Scope of Mission-Enabling Activities in NASA's Space and Earth Science Missions"
Submitted: 2009-03-26
Laboratory astrophysics and complementary theoretical calculations are the foundations of astronomy and astrophysics and will remain so into the foreseeable future. The mission enabling impact of laboratory astrophysics ranges from the scientific conception stage for airborne and space-based observatories, all the way through to the scientific return of these missions. It is our understanding of the under-lying physical processes and the measurements of critical physical parameters that allows us to address fundamental questions in astronomy and astrophysics. In this regard, laboratory astrophysics is much like detector and instrument development at NASA. These efforts are necessary for the success of astronomical research being funded by NASA. Without concomitant efforts in all three directions (observational facilities, detector/instrument development, and laboratory astrophysics) the future progress of astronomy and astrophysics is imperiled. In addition, new developments in experimental technologies have allowed laboratory studies to take on a new role as some questions which previously could only be studied theoretically can now be addressed directly in the lab. With this in mind we, the members of the AAS Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA), have prepared this White Paper on the laboratory astrophysics infrastructure needed to maximize the scientific return from NASA's space and Earth sciences program.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.2469  [pdf] - 554081
Laboratory Astrophysics and the State of Astronomy and Astrophysics
Comments: Position paper submitted by the AAS Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA) to the State of the Profession (Facilities, Funding and Programs Study Group) of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey (Astro2010)
Submitted: 2009-03-13
Laboratory astrophysics and complementary theoretical calculations are the foundations of astronomy and astrophysics and will remain so into the foreseeable future. The impact of laboratory astrophysics ranges from the scientific conception stage for ground-based, airborne, and space-based observatories, all the way through to the scientific return of these projects and missions. It is our understanding of the under-lying physical processes and the measurements of critical physical parameters that allows us to address fundamental questions in astronomy and astrophysics. In this regard, laboratory astrophysics is much like detector and instrument development at NASA, NSF, and DOE. These efforts are necessary for the success of astronomical research being funded by the agencies. Without concomitant efforts in all three directions (observational facilities, detector/instrument development, and laboratory astrophysics) the future progress of astronomy and astrophysics is imperiled. In addition, new developments in experimental technologies have allowed laboratory studies to take on a new role as some questions which previously could only be studied theoretically can now be addressed directly in the lab. With this in mind we, the members of the AAS Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics, have prepared this State of the Profession Position Paper on the laboratory astrophysics infrastructure needed to ensure the advancement of astronomy and astrophysics in the next decade.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.4882  [pdf] - 21886
New Discoveries in Planetary Systems and Star Formation through Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics
Comments: White paper submitted by the AAS Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA) to the PSF SFP of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey (Astro2010)
Submitted: 2009-02-27
As the panel on Planetary Systems and Star Formation (PSF) is fully aware, the next decade will see major advances in our understanding of these areas of research. To quote from their charge, these advances will occur in studies of solar system bodies (other than the Sun) and extrasolar planets, debris disks, exobiology, the formation of individual stars, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, molecular clouds and the cold ISM, dust, and astrochemistry. Central to the progress in these areas are the corresponding advances in laboratory astro- physics which are required for fully realizing the PSF scientific opportunities in the decade 2010-2020. Laboratory astrophysics comprises both theoretical and experimental studies of the underlying physics and chemistry which produce the observed spectra and describe the astrophysical processes. We discuss four areas of laboratory astrophysics relevant to the PSF panel: atomic, molecular, solid matter, and plasma physics. Section 2 describes some of the new opportunities and compelling themes which will be enabled by advances in laboratory astrophysics. Section 3 provides the scientific context for these opportunities. Section 4 discusses some experimental and theoretical advances in laboratory astrophysics required to realize the PSF scientific opportunities of the next decade. As requested in the Call for White Papers, we present in Section 5 four central questions and one area with unusual discovery potential. We give a short postlude in Section 6.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.4666  [pdf] - 554074
New Discoveries in Cosmology and Fundamental Physics through Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics
Comments: White paper submitted by the AAS Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA) to the CFP SFP of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey (Astro2010)
Submitted: 2009-02-26
As the Cosmology and Fundamental Physics (CFP) panel is fully aware, the next decade will see major advances in our understanding of these areas of research. To quote from their charge, these advances will occur in studies of the early universe, the microwave background, the reionization and galaxy formation up to virialization of protogalaxies, large scale structure, the intergalactic medium, the determination of cosmological parameters, dark matter, dark energy, tests of gravity, astronomically determined physical constants, and high energy physics using astronomical messengers. Central to the progress in these areas are the corresponding advances in laboratory astrophysics which are required for fully realizing the CFP scientific opportunities within the decade 2010-2020. Laboratory astrophysics comprises both theoretical and experimental studies of the underlying physics which produce the observed astrophysical processes. The 5 areas of laboratory astrophysics which we have identified as relevant to the CFP panel are atomic, molecular, plasma, nuclear, and particle physics. Here, Section 2 describes some of the new scientific opportunities and compelling scientific themes which will be enabled by advances in laboratory astrophysics. In Section 3, we provide the scientific context for these opportunities. Section 4 briefly discusses some of the experimental and theoretical advances in laboratory astrophysics required to realize the CFP scientific opportunities of the next decade. As requested in the Call for White Papers, Section 5 presents four central questions and one area with unusual discovery potential. Lastly, we give a short postlude in Section 6.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.4681  [pdf] - 554075
New Discoveries in Galaxies across Cosmic Time through Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics
Comments: White paper submitted by the AAS Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA) to the GCT SFP of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey (Astro2010)
Submitted: 2009-02-26
As the Galaxies across Cosmic Time (GCT) panel is fully aware, the next decade will see major advances in our understanding of these areas of research. To quote from their charge, these advances will occur in studies of the formation, evolution, and global properties of galaxies and galaxy clusters, as well as active galactic nuclei and QSOs, mergers, star formation rate, gas accretion, and supermassive black holes. Central to the progress in these areas are the corresponding advances in laboratory astrophysics that are required for fully realizing the GCT scientific opportunities within the decade 2010-2020. Laboratory astrophysics comprises both theoretical and experimental studies of the underlying physics that produce the observed astrophysical processes. The 5 areas of laboratory astrophysics that we have identified as relevant to the CFP panel are atomic, molecular, solid matter, plasma, nuclear, and particle physics. In this white paper, we describe in Section 2 some of the new scientific opportunities and compelling scientific themes that will be enabled by advances in laboratory astrophysics. In Section 3, we provide the scientific context for these opportunities. Section 4 briefly discusses some of the experimental and theoretical advances in laboratory astrophysics required to realize the GCT scientific opportunities of the next decade. As requested in the Call for White Papers, Section 5 presents four central questions and one area with unusual discovery potential. Lastly, we give a short postlude in Section 6.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.4688  [pdf] - 554076
New Discoveries in Stars and Stellar Evolution through Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics
Comments: White paper submitted by the AAS Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA) to the SSE SFP of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey (Astro2010)
Submitted: 2009-02-26
As the Stars and Stellar Evolution (SSE) panel is fully aware, the next decade will see major advances in our understanding of these areas of research. To quote from their charge, these advances will occur in studies of the Sun as a star, stellar astrophysics, the structure and evolution of single and multiple stars, compact objects, SNe, gamma-ray bursts, solar neutrinos, and extreme physics on stellar scales. Central to the progress in these areas are the corresponding advances in laboratory astrophysics, required to fully realize the SSE scientific opportunities within the decade 2010-2020. Laboratory astrophysics comprises both theoretical and experimental studies of the underlying physics that produces the observed astrophysical processes. The 6 areas of laboratory astrophysics, which we have identified as relevant to the CFP panel, are atomic, molecular, solid matter, plasma, nuclear physics, and particle physics. In this white paper, we describe in Section 2 the scientific context and some of the new scientific opportunities and compelling scientific themes which will be enabled by advances in laboratory astrophysics. In Section 3, we discuss some of the experimental and theoretical advances in laboratory astrophysics required to realize the SSE scientific opportunities of the next decade. As requested in the Call for White Papers, Section 4 presents four central questions and one area with unusual discovery potential. Lastly, we give a short postlude in Section 5.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.4747  [pdf] - 21859
New Discoveries in the Galactic Neighborhood through Advances in Laboratory Astrophysics
Comments: White paper submitted by the AAS Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA) to the GAN SFP of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey (Astro2010)
Submitted: 2009-02-26
As the Galactic Neighborhood (GAN) panel is fully aware, the next decade will see major advances in our understanding of this area of research. To quote from their charge, these advances will occur in studies of the galactic neighborhood, including the structure and properties of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, and their stellar populations and evolution, as well as interstellar media and star clusters. Central to the progress in these areas are the corresponding advances in laboratory astrophysics that are required for fully realizing the GAN scientific opportunities within the decade 2010-2020. Laboratory astrophysics comprises both theoretical and experimental studies of the underlying physics and chemistry that produces the observed astrophysical processes. The 5 areas of laboratory astrophysics that we have identified as relevant to the GAN panel are atomic, molecular, solid matter, plasma, and nuclear physics. In this white paper, we describe in Section 2 some of the new scientific opportunities and compelling scientific themes that will be enabled by advances in laboratory astrophysics. In Section 3, we provide the scientific context for these opportunities. Section 4 briefly discusses some of the experimental and theoretical advances in laboratory astrophysics required to realize the GAN scientific opportunities of the next decade. As requested in the Call for White Papers, Section 5 presents four central questions and one area with unusual discovery potential. Lastly, we give a short postlude in Section 6.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.4504  [pdf] - 315125
Molecular cloud chemistry and the importance of dielectronic recombination
Comments: 24 pages, 2 tables, 9 figures. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2008-09-25
Dielectronic recombination (DR) of singly charged ions is a reaction pathway that is commonly neglected in chemical models of molecular clouds. In this study we include state-of-the-art DR data for He$^+$, C$^+$, N$^+$, O$^+$, Na$^+$, and Mg$^+$ in chemical models used to simulate dense molecular clouds, protostars, and diffuse molecular clouds. We also update the radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficients for H$^+$, He$^+$, C$^+$, N$^+$, O$^+$, Na$^+$, and Mg$^+$ to the current state-of-the-art values. The new RR data has little effect on the models. However, the inclusion of DR results in significant differences in gas-grain models of dense, cold molecular clouds for the evolution of a number of surface and gas-phase species. We find differences of a factor of 2 in the abundance for 74 of the 655 species at times of $10^4$--$10^6$ years in this model when we include DR. Of these 74 species, 16 have at least a factor of 10 difference in abundance. We find the largest differences for species formed on the surface of dust grains. These differences are due primarily to the addition of C$^+$ DR, which increases the neutral C abundance, thereby enhancing the accretion of C onto dust. These results may be important for the warm-up phase of molecular clouds when surface species are desorbed into the gas phase. We also note that no reliable state-of-the-art RR or DR data exist for Si$^+$, P$^+$, S$^+$, Cl$^+$, and Fe$^+$. Modern calculations for these ions are needed to better constrain molecular cloud models.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.3302  [pdf] - 314935
A new approach to analyzing solar coronal spectra and updated collisional ionization equilibrium calculations. II. Additional ionization rate coefficients
Comments: 147 pages (102 of which are online only tables and figures). Submitted to ApJ. Version 2 is updated addressing the referee's report
Submitted: 2008-05-21, last modified: 2008-09-05
We have reanalyzed SUMER observations of a parcel of coronal gas using new collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) calculations. These improved CIE fractional abundances were calculated using state-of-the-art electron-ion recombination data for K-shell, L-shell, Na-like, and Mg-like ions of all elements from H through Zn and, additionally, Al- through Ar-like ions of Fe. They also incorporate the latest recommended electron impact ionization data for all ions of H through Zn. Improved CIE calculations based on these recombination and ionization data are presented here. We have also developed a new systematic method for determining the average emission measure ($EM$) and electron temperature ($T_e$) of an isothermal plasma. With our new CIE data and our new approach for determining average $EM$ and $T_e$, we have reanalyzed SUMER observations of the solar corona. We have compared our results with those of previous studies and found some significant differences for the derived $EM$ and $T_e$. We have also calculated the enhancement of coronal elemental abundances compared to their photospheric abundances, using the SUMER observations themselves to determine the abundance enhancement factor for each of the emitting elements. Our observationally derived first ionization potential (FIP) factors are in reasonable agreement with the theoretical model of Laming (2008).
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.0780  [pdf] - 15971
Is H3+ cooling ever important in primordial gas?
Comments: 60 pages, 22 figures. Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2008-09-04
Studies of the formation of metal-free Population III stars usually focus primarily on the role played by H2 cooling, on account of its large chemical abundance relative to other possible molecular or ionic coolants. However, while H2 is generally the most important coolant at low gas densities, it is not an effective coolant at high gas densities, owing to the low critical density at which it reaches local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and to the large opacities that develop in its emission lines. It is therefore possible that emission from other chemical species may play an important role in cooling high density primordial gas. A particularly interesting candidate is the H3+ molecular ion. This ion has an LTE cooling rate that is roughly a billion times larger than that of H2, and unlike other primordial molecular ions such as H2+ or HeH+, it is not easily removed from the gas by collisions with H or H2. It is already known to be an important coolant in at least one astrophysical context -- the upper atmospheres of gas giants -- but its role in the cooling of primordial gas has received little previous study. In this paper, we investigate the potential importance of H3+ cooling in primordial gas using a newly-developed H3+ cooling function and the most detailed model of primordial chemistry published to date. We show that although H3+ is, in most circumstances, the third most important coolant in dense primordial gas (after H2 and HD), it is nevertheless unimportant, as it contributes no more than a few percent of the total cooling. We also show that in gas irradiated by a sufficiently strong flux of cosmic rays or X-rays, H3+ can become the dominant coolant in the gas, although the size of the flux required renders this scenario unlikely to occur.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:0709.1363  [pdf] - 4758
Electron-ion recombination of Si IV forming Si III: Storage-ring measurement and multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures, 3 tables. Accepted for publication in Physical Review A
Submitted: 2007-09-10
The electron-ion recombination rate coefficient for Si IV forming Si III was measured at the heavy-ion storage-ring TSR. The experimental electron-ion collision energy range of 0-186 eV encompassed the 2p(6) nl n'l' dielectronic recombination (DR) resonances associated with 3s to nl core excitations, 2s 2p(6) 3s nl n'l' resonances associated with 2s to nl (n=3,4) core excitations, and 2p(5) 3s nl n'l' resonances associated with 2p to nl (n=3,...,infinity) core excitations. The experimental DR results are compared with theoretical calculations using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method for DR via the 3s to 3p n'l' and 3s to 3d n'l' (both n'=3,...,6) and 2p(5) 3s 3l n'l' (n'=3,4) capture channels. Finally, the experimental and theoretical plasma DR rate coefficients for Si IV forming Si III are derived and compared with previously available results.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:0704.0905  [pdf] - 183
Dielectronic Recombination of Fe XV forming Fe XIV: Laboratory Measurements and Theoretical Calculations
Comments:
Submitted: 2007-04-06
We have measured resonance strengths and energies for dielectronic recombination (DR) of Mg-like Fe XV forming Al-like Fe XIV via N=3 -> N' = 3 core excitations in the electron-ion collision energy range 0-45 eV. All measurements were carried out using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. We have also carried out new multiconfiguration Breit-Pauli (MCBP) calculations using the AUTOSTRUCTURE code. For electron-ion collision energies < 25 eV we find poor agreement between our experimental and theoretical resonance energies and strengths. From 25 to 42 eV we find good agreement between the two for resonance energies. But in this energy range the theoretical resonance strengths are ~ 31% larger than the experimental results. This is larger than our estimated total experimental uncertainty in this energy range of +/- 26% (at a 90% confidence level). Above 42 eV the difference in the shape between the calculated and measured 3s3p(^1P_1)nl DR series limit we attribute partly to the nl dependence of the detection probabilities of high Rydberg states in the experiment. We have used our measurements, supplemented by our AUTOSTRUCTURE calculations, to produce a Maxwellian-averaged 3 -> 3 DR rate coefficient for Fe XV forming Fe XIV. The resulting rate coefficient is estimated to be accurate to better than +/- 29% (at a 90% confidence level) for k_BT_e > 1 eV. At temperatures of k_BT_e ~ 2.5-15 eV, where Fe XV is predicted to form in photoionized plasmas, significant discrepancies are found between our experimentally-derived rate coefficient and previously published theoretical results. Our new MCBP plasma rate coefficient is 19-28% smaller than our experimental results over this temperature range.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0604363  [pdf] - 81432
Collisional Ionization Equilibrium for Optically Thin Plasmas. I. Updated Recombination Rate Coefficients for Bare though Sodium-like Ions
Comments: 83 pages, 38 figures, 41 tables Accepted to ApJS
Submitted: 2006-04-17, last modified: 2006-08-01
Reliably interpreting spectra from electron-ionized cosmic plasmas requires accurate ionization balance calculations for the plasma in question. However, much of the atomic data needed for these calculations have not been generated using modern theoretical methods and are often highly suspect. This translates directly into the reliability of the collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) calculations. We make use of state-of-the-art calculations of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the hydrogenic through Na-like ions of all elements from He up to and including Zn. We also make use of state-of-the-art radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficient calculations for the bare through Na-like ions of all elements from H through to Zn. Here we present improved CIE calculations for temperatures from $10^4$ to $10^9$ K using our data and the recommended electron impact ionization data of \citet{Mazz98a} for elements up to and including Ni and Mazzotta (private communication) for Cu and Zn. DR and RR data for ionization stages that have not been updated are also taken from these two additional sources. We compare our calculated fractional ionic abundances using these data with those presented by Mazzotta et al. for all elements from H to Ni. The differences in peak fractional abundance are up to 60%. We also compare with the fractional ionic abundances for Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni derived from the modern DR calculations of \citet{Gu03a,Gu04a} for the H-like through Na-like ions, and the RR calculations of \citet{Gu03b} for the bare through F-like ions. These results are in better agreement with our work, with differences in peak fractional abundance of less than 10%.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603340  [pdf] - 298711
Electron-ion recombination measurements motivated by AGN X-ray absorption features: Fe XIV forming Fe XIII
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures, 1 table submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2006-03-14
Recent spectroscopic models of active galactic nuclei (AGN) have indicated that the recommended electron-ion recombination rate coefficients for iron ions with partially filled M-shells are incorrect in the temperature range where these ions form in photoionized plasmas. We have investigated this experimentally for Fe XIV forming Fe XIII. The recombination rate coefficient was measured employing the electron-ion merged beams method at the Heidelberg heavy-ion storage-ring TSR. The measured energy range of 0-260 eV encompassed all dielectronic recombination (DR) 1s2 2s2 2p6 3l 3l' 3l'' nl''' resonances associated with the 3p1/2 -> 3p3/2, 3s -> 3p, 3p -> 3d and 3s -> 3d core excitations within the M-shell of the Fe XIV 1s2 2s2 2p6 3s2 3p parent ion. This range also includes the 1s2 2s2 2p6 3l 3l' 4l'' nl''' resonances associated with 3s -> 4l'' and 3p -> 4l'' core excitations. We find that in the temperature range 2--14 eV, where Fe XIV is expected to form in a photoionized plasma, the Fe XIV recombination rate coefficient is orders of magnitude larger than previously calculated values.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0506221  [pdf] - 73621
Cosmological Implications of the Uncertainty in H- Destruction Rate Coefficients
Comments: 40 pages, 17 figures, AASTex. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2005-06-09
In primordial gas, molecular hydrogen forms primarily through associative detachment of H- and H, thereby destroying the H-. The H- anion can also be destroyed by a number of other reactions, most notably by mutual neutralization with protons. However, neither the associative detachment nor the mutual neutralization rate coefficients are well determined: both may be uncertain by as much as an order of magnitude. This introduces a corresponding uncertainty into the H2 formation rate, which may have cosmological implications. Here, we examine the effect that these uncertainties have on the formation of H2 and the cooling of protogalactic gas in a variety of situations. We show that the effect is particularly large for protogalaxies forming in previously ionized regions, affecting our predictions of whether or not a given protogalaxy can cool and condense within a Hubble time, and altering the strength of the ultraviolet background that is required to prevent collapse.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0404288  [pdf] - 1233354
Rate Coefficient for H^+ + H_2(X ^1Sigma_g^+, nu=0, J=0) --> H(1s) + H_2^+ Charge Transfer and Some Cosmological Implications
Comments: This version corrects a typo in Eq. 4 of our ApJL. 11 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2004-04-14
Krstic has carried out the first quantum mechanical calculations near threshold for the charge transfer (CT) process H^+ + H_2(X ^1Sigma_g^+, nu=0, J=0) --> H(1s) + H_2^+. These results are relevant for models of primordial galaxy and first star formation that require reliable atomic and molecular data for obtaining the early universe hydrogen chemistry. Using the results of Krstic, we calculate the relevant CT rate coefficient for temperatures between 100 and 30,000 K. We also present a simple fit which can be readily implemented into early universe chemical models. Additionally, we explore how the range of previously published data for this reaction translates into uncertainties in the predicted gas temperature and H_2 relative abundance in a collapsing primordial gas cloud. Our new data significantly reduce these cosmological uncertainties that are due to the uncertainties in the previously published CT rate coefficients.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0304200  [pdf] - 56108
Assessment of the Fluorescence and Auger Data Base used in Plasma Modeling
Comments: 19 pages with 6 figures, AAS TeX, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2003-04-10
We have investigated the accuracy of the 1s-vacancy fluorescence data base of Kaastra & Mewe (1993, A&AS, 97, 443) resulting from the initial atomic physics calculations and the subsequent scaling along isoelectronic sequences. In particular, we have focused on the relatively simple Be-like and F-like 1s-vacancy sequences. We find that the earlier atomic physics calculations for the oscillator strengths and autoionization rates of singly-charged B II and Ne II are in sufficient agreement with our present calculations. However, the substantial charge dependence of these quantities along each isoelectronic sequence, the incorrect configuration averaging used for B II, and the neglect of spin-orbit effects (which become important at high-Z) all cast doubt on the reliability of the Kaastra & Mewe data for application to plasma modeling.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0301170  [pdf] - 287224
Recombination rate coefficients for astrophysical applications from storage-ring experiments
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures, Workshop on Stellar Coronae in the Chandra and XMM-Newton era, June 2001, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, for a recent theoretical treatment of C IV DR see Pradhan and al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 183201 (2001)
Submitted: 2003-01-10, last modified: 2003-01-21
The basic approach for measuring electron-ion recombination rate coefficients in merged-beams electron-ion collision experiments at heavy-ion storage rings is outlined. As an example experimental results for the low temperature recombination of C IV ions are compared with the recommended theoretical rate coefficient by Mazzotta et al. The latter deviates by factors of up to 5 from the experimental one.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0109356  [pdf] - 44855
Rate Coefficients for D(1s) + H^+ <--> D^+ + H(1s) Charge Transfer and Some Astrophysical Implications
Comments: 13 pages, 1 figure, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2001-09-20
We have calculated the rate coefficients for D(1s) + H^+ <--> D^+ + H(1s) using recently published theoretical cross sections. We present results for temperatures T from 1 K to 2x10^5 K and provide fits to our data for use in plasma modeling. Our calculations are in good agreement with previously published rate coefficients for 25 <= T <= 300 K, which covers most of the limited range for which those results were given. Our new rate coefficients for T >~ 100 K are significantly larger than the values most commonly used for modeling the chemistry of the early universe and of molecular clouds. This may have important implications for the predicted HD abundance in these environments. Using our results, we have modeled the ionization balance in high redshift QSO absorbers. We find that the new rate coefficients decrease the inferred D/H ratio by <~ 0.4%. This is a factor of >~ 25 smaller than the current >~ 10% uncertainties in QSO absorber D/H measurements.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0108058  [pdf] - 44034
Atomic Data Needs for Modeling Photoionized Plasmas
Comments: To be published in Spectroscopic Challenges of Photoionized Plasmas, ASP Conference Series, Gary Ferland and Daniel Wolf Savin, eds. 7 pages
Submitted: 2001-08-03
Many of the fundamental questions in astrophysics can be addressed using spectroscopic observations of photoionized cosmic plasmas. However, the reliability of the inferred astrophysics depends on the accuracy of the underlying atomic data used to interpret the collected spectra. In this paper, we review some of the most glaring atomic data needs for better understanding photoionized plasmas.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0108048  [pdf] - 44024
Dielectronic Recombination (via N=2 --> N'=2 Core Excitations) and Radiative Recombination of Fe XX: Laboratory Measurements and Theoretical Calculations
Comments: To be published in ApJS. 65 pages with 4 tables and lots of figures
Submitted: 2001-08-02
We have measured the resonance strengths and energies for dielectronic recombination (DR) of Fe XX forming Fe XIX via N=2 --> N'=2 (Delta_N=0) core excitations. We have also calculated the DR resonance strengths and energies using AUTOSTRUCTURE, HULLAC, MCDF, and R-matrix methods, four different state-of-the-art theoretical techniques. On average the theoretical resonance strengths agree to within <~10% with experiment. However, the 1 sigma standard deviation for the ratios of the theoretical-to-experimental resonance strengths is >~30% which is significantly larger than the estimated relative experimental uncertainty of <~10%. This suggests that similar errors exist in the calculated level populations and line emission spectrum of the recombined ion. We confirm that theoretical methods based on inverse-photoionization calculations (e.g., undamped R-matrix methods) will severely overestimate the strength of the DR process unless they include the effects of radiation damping. We also find that the coupling between the DR and radiative recombination (RR) channels is small. We have used our experimental and theoretical results to produce Maxwellian-averaged rate coefficients for Delta_N=0 DR of Fe XX. For kT>~1 eV, which includes the predicted formation temperatures for Fe XX in an optically thin, low-density photoionized plasma with cosmic abundances, our experimental and theoretical results are in good agreement. We have also used our R-matrix results, topped off using AUTOSTRUCTURE for RR into J>=25 levels, to calculate the rate coefficient for RR of Fe XX. Our RR results are in good agreement with previously published calculations.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0108026  [pdf] - 44002
Uncertainties in Dielectronic Recombination Rate Coefficients: Effects on Solar and Stellar Upper Atmosphere Abundance Determinations
Comments: 33 pages, including 3 figures and 4 tables. To be published in ApJ
Submitted: 2001-08-01
We have investigated how the relative elemental abundances inferred from the solar upper atmosphere are affected by uncertainties in the dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients used to analyze the spectra. We find that the inferred relative abundances can be up to a factor of ~5 smaller or ~1.6 times larger than those inferred using the currently recommended DR rate coefficients. We have also found a plausible set of variations to the DR rate coefficients which improve the inferred (and expected) isothermal nature of solar coronal observations at heights of >~ 50 arcsec off the solar limb. Our results can be used to help prioritize the enormous amount of DR data needed for modeling solar and stellar upper atmospheres. Based on the work here, our list of needed rate coefficients for DR onto specific isoelectronic sequences reads, in decreasing order of importance, as follows: O-like, C-like, Be-like, N-like, B-like, F-like, Li-like, He-like, and Ne-like. It is our hope that this work will help to motivate and prioritize future experimental and theoretical studies of DR.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0008349  [pdf] - 37665
Interstellar X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oxygen, Neon, and Iron with the Chandra LETGS Spectrum of X0614+091
Comments: 16 pages, 4 figures; ApJ, accepted
Submitted: 2000-08-22
We find resolved interstellar O K, Ne K, and Fe L absorption spectra in the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer spectrum of the low mass X-ray binary X0614+091. We measure the column densities in O and Ne, and find direct spectroscopic constraints on the chemical state of the interstellar O. These measurements probably probe a low-density line of sight through the Galaxy and we discuss the results in the context of our knowledge of the properties of interstellar matter in regions between the spiral arms.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9910567  [pdf] - 1475744
Chemical Abundances and the Metagalactic Radiation Field at High Redshift
Comments: Submitted to ApJL. AASTex, 14 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 1999-11-01
We have carried out model calculations of the photoionized intergalactic medium (IGM) to determine the effects on the predicted ionic column densities due to uncertainties in the published dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients. Based on our previous experimental work and a comparison of published theoretical DR rates, we estimate there is in general a factor of 2 uncertainty in existing DR rates used for modeling the IGM. We demonstrate that this uncertainty results in factors of ~1.9 uncertainty in the predicted N V and Si IV column densities, ~1.6 for O VI, and ~1.7 for C IV. We show that these systematic uncertainties translate into a systematic uncertainty of up to a factor of ~3.1 in the Si/C abundance ratio inferred from observations. The inferred IGM abundance ratio could thus be less than the solar Si/C ratio or greater than 3 times the solar ratio. If the latter is true, then it suggests the metagalactic radiation field is not due purely to active galactic nuclei, but includes a significant stellar component. Lastly, column density ratios of Si IV to C IV versus C II to C IV are often used to constrain the decrement in the metagalactic radiation field at the He II absorption edge. We show that the variation in the predicted Si IV to C IV ratio due to a factor of 2 uncertainty in the DR rates is almost as large as that due to a factor of 10 change in the decrement. Laboratory measurements of the relevant DR resonance strengths and energies are the only unambiguous method to remove the effects of these atomic physics uncertainties from models of the IGM.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9904258  [pdf] - 106155
Experimentally Derived Dielectronic Recombination Rate Coefficients for Heliumlike C V and Hydrogenic O VIII
Comments: 16 pages including 6 figures, AASTeX, to appear in ApJ
Submitted: 1999-04-20
Using published measurements of dielectronic recombination (DR) resonance strengths and energies for C V to C IV and O VIII to O VII, we have calculated the DR rate coefficient for these ions. Our derived rates are in good agreement with multiconfiguration, intermediate-coupling and multiconfiguration, fully-relativistic calculations as well as with most LS coupling calculations. Our results are not in agreement with the recommended DR rates commonly used for modeling cosmic plasmas. We have used theoretical radiative recombination (RR) rates in conjunction with our derived DR rates to produce a total recombination rate for comparison with unified RR+DR calculations in LS coupling. Our results are not in agreement with undamped, unified calculations for C V but are in reasonable agreement with damped, unified calculations for O VIII. For C V, the Burgess general formula (GF) yields a rate which is in very poor agreement with our derived rate. The Burgess & Tworkowski modification of the GF yields a rate which is also in poor agreement. The Merts et al. modification of the GF yields a rate which is in fair agreement. For O VIII the GF yields a rate which is in fair agreement with our derived rate. The Burgess & Tworkowski modification of the GF yields a rate which is in good agreement. And the Merts et al. modification yields a rate which is in very poor agreement. These results suggest that for DN=1 DR it is not possible to know a priori which formula will yield a rate closer to the true DR rate. We describe the technique used to obtain DR rate coefficients from laboratory measurements of DR resonance strengths and energies. For use in plasma modeling, we also present easy-to-use fitting formulae for the experimentally derived DR rates.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9903203  [pdf] - 105607
Dielectronic Recombination in Photoionized Gas. II. Laboratory Measurements for Fe XVIII and Fe XIX
Comments: To appear in ApJS, 44 pages with 13 figures, AASTeX with postsript figures
Submitted: 1999-03-12
In photoionized gases with cosmic abundances, dielectronic recombination (DR) proceeds primarily via nlj --> nl'j' core excitations (Dn=0 DR). We have measured the resonance strengths and energies for Fe XVIII to Fe XVII and Fe XIX to Fe XVIII Dn=0 DR. Using our measurements, we have calculated the Fe XVIII and Fe XIX Dn=0 DR DR rate coefficients. Significant discrepancies exist between our inferred rates and those of published calculations. These calculations overestimate the DR rates by factors of ~2 or underestimate it by factors of ~2 to orders of magnitude, but none are in good agreement with our results. Almost all published DR rates for modeling cosmic plasmas are computed using the same theoretical techniques as the above-mentioned calculations. Hence, our measurements call into question all theoretical Dn=0 DR rates used for ionization balance calculations of cosmic plasmas. At temperatures where the Fe XVIII and Fe XIX fractional abundances are predicted to peak in photoionized gases of cosmic abundances, the theoretical rates underestimate the Fe XVIII DR rate by a factor of ~2 and overestimate the Fe XIX DR rate by a factor of ~1.6. We have carried out new multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock and multiconfiguration Breit-Pauli calculations which agree with our measured resonance strengths and rate coefficients to within typically better than <~30%. We provide a fit to our inferred rate coefficients for use in plasma modeling. Using our DR measurements, we infer a factor of ~2 error in the Fe XX through Fe XXIV Dn=0 DR rates. We investigate the effects of this estimated error for the well-known thermal instability of photoionized gas. We find that errors in these rates cannot remove the instability, but they do dramatically affect the range in parameter space over which it forms.