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Sako, T. K.

Normalized to: Sako, T.

78 article(s) in total. 790 co-authors, from 1 to 49 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 25,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.07312  [pdf] - 2126811
Evidence for a Supergalactic Structure of Magnetic Deflection Multiplets of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays
Telescope Array Collaboration; Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; di Matteo, A.; Fujii, T.; Fujisue, K.; Fujita, K.; Fujiwara, R.; Fukushima, M.; Furlich, G.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Higuchi, R.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inadomi, T.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Iwakura, H.; Jeong, H. M.; Jeong, S.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kasami, S.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, S. W.; Kishigami, S.; Kuzmin, V.; Kuznetsov, M.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, K. H.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Matsumiya, H.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Mayta, R.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagataki, S.; Nakai, K.; Nakamura, R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nonaka, T.; Oda, H.; Ogio, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oku, Y.; Okuda, T.; Omura, Y.; Ono, M.; Onogi, R.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Remington, J.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sahara, R.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sako, T.; Sakurai, N.; Sano, K.; Seki, T.; Sekino, K.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Sone, N.; Stokes, B. T.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takagi, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Takamura, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tanoue, Y.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Uehama, T.; Urban, F.; Wong, T.; Yada, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yosei, M.; Zhezher, Y.; Zundel, Z.
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-05-14, last modified: 2020-07-02
Evidence for a large-scale supergalactic cosmic ray multiplet (arrival directions correlated with energy) structure is reported for ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) energies above 10$^{19}$ eV using seven years of data from the Telescope Array (TA) surface detector and updated to 10 years. Previous energy-position correlation studies have made assumptions regarding magnetic field shapes and strength, and UHECR composition. Here the assumption tested is that, since the supergalactic plane is a fit to the average matter density of the local Large Scale Structure (LSS), UHECR sources and intervening extragalactic magnetic fields are correlated with this plane. This supergalactic deflection hypothesis is tested by the entire field-of-view (FOV) behavior of the strength of intermediate-scale energy-angle correlations. These multiplets are measured in spherical cap section bins (wedges) of the FOV to account for coherent and random magnetic fields. The structure found is consistent with supergalactic deflection, the previously published energy spectrum anisotropy results of TA (the hotspot and coldspot), and toy-model simulations of a supergalactic magnetic sheet. The seven year data post-trial significance of this supergalactic structure of multiplets appearing by chance, on an isotropic sky, is found by Monte Carlo simulation to be 4.2$\sigma$. The ten years of data post-trial significance is 4.1$\sigma$. Furthermore, the starburst galaxy M82 is shown to be a possible source of the TA Hotspot, and an estimate of the supergalactic magnetic field using UHECR measurements is presented.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2007.00023  [pdf] - 2126323
Search for a large-scale anisotropy on arrival directions of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays observed with the Telescope Array Experiment
Telescope Array Collaboration; Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; di Matteo, A.; Fujii, T.; Fujisue, K.; Fujita, K.; Fujiwara, R.; Fukushima, M.; Furlich, G.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Higuchi, R.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inadomi, T.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Iwakura, H.; Jeong, H. M.; Jeong, S.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kasami, S.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, S. W.; Kishigami, S.; Kuzmin, V.; Kuznetsov, M.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, K. H.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Matsumiya, H.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Mayta, R.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagataki, S.; Nakai, K.; Nakamura, R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Nonaka, T.; Oda, H.; Ogio, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oku, Y.; Okuda, T.; Omura, Y.; Ono, M.; Onogi, R.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Remington, J.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sahara, R.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sako, T.; Sakurai, N.; Sano, K.; Seki, T.; Sekino, K.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Sone, N.; Stokes, B. T.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takagi, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tanoue, Y.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Uehama, T.; Urban, F.; Wong, T.; Yada, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yosei, M.; Zhezher, Y.; Zundel, Z.
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, 1 table, Accepted for publication in ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2020-06-30
Motivated by the detection of a significant dipole structure in the arrival directions of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays above 8 EeV reported by the Pierre Auger Observatory (Auger), we search for a large-scale anisotropy using data collected with the surface detector array of the Telescope Array Experiment (TA). With 11 years of TA data, a dipole structure in a projection of the right ascension is fitted with an amplitude of 3.3+- 1.9% and a phase of 131 +- 33 degrees. The corresponding 99% confidence-level upper limit on the amplitude is 7.3%. At the current level of statistics, the fitted result is compatible with both an isotropic distribution and the dipole structure reported by Auger.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.05012  [pdf] - 2112068
Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section with Telescope Array's Black Rock Mesa and Long Ridge Fluorescence Detectors, and Surface Array in Hybrid Mode
Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; di Matteo, A.; Fujii, T.; Fujisue, K.; Fujita, K.; Fujiwara, R.; Fukushima, M.; Furlich, G.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Higuchi, R.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inadomi, T.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Iwakura, H.; Jeong, H. M.; Jeong, S.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kasami, S.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, S. W.; Kishigami, S.; Kuzmin, V.; Kuznetsov, M.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, K. H.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Matsumiya, H.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Mayta, R.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagataki, S.; Nakai, K.; Nakamura, R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Nonaka, T.; Oda, H.; Ogio, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oku, Y.; Okuda, T.; Omura, Y.; Ono, M.; Onogi, R.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Remington, J.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sahara, R.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sako, T.; Sakurai, N.; Sano, K.; Seki, T.; Sekino, K.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Sone, N.; Stokes, B. T.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takagi, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tanoue, Y.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Uehama, T.; Urban, F.; Wong, T.; Yada, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yosei, M.; Zhezher, Y.; Zundel, Z.
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-06-08
Ultra high energy cosmic rays provide the highest known energy source in the universe to measure proton cross sections. Though conditions for collecting such data are less controlled than an accelerator environment, current generation cosmic ray observatories have large enough exposures to collect significant statistics for a reliable measurement for energies above what can be attained in the lab. Cosmic ray measurements of cross section use atmospheric calorimetry to measure depth of air shower maximum ($X_{\mathrm{max}}$), which is related to the primary particle's energy and mass. The tail of the $X_{\mathrm{max}}$ distribution is assumed to be dominated by showers generated by protons, allowing measurement of the inelastic proton-air cross section. In this work the proton-air inelastic cross section measurement, $\sigma^{\mathrm{inel}}_{\mathrm{p-air}}$, using data observed by Telescope Array's Black Rock Mesa and Long Ridge fluorescence detectors and surface detector array in hybrid mode is presented. $\sigma^{\mathrm{inel}}_{\mathrm{p-air}}$ is observed to be $520.1 \pm 35.8$[Stat.] $^{+25.0}_{-40}$[Sys.]~mb at $\sqrt{s} = 73$ TeV. The total proton-proton cross section is subsequently inferred from Glauber formalism and is found to be $\sigma^{\mathrm{tot}}_{\mathrm{pp}} = 139.4 ^{+23.4}_{-21.3}$ [Stat.]$ ^{+15.0}_{-24.0}$[Sys.]~mb.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.12594  [pdf] - 2101632
Simulation study on the effects of diffractive collisions on the prediction of the observables in ultra-high-energy cosmic ray experiments
Comments: 26 pages, 15 figures,9 tables
Submitted: 2020-05-26
The mass composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays is important for understanding their origin. Owing to our limited knowledge of the hadronic interaction, the interpretations of the mass composition from observations have several open problems, such as the inconsistent interpretations of $\langle X_{\mathrm{max}}\rangle $ and $\langle X_{\mathrm{max}}^{\mu}\rangle $ and the large difference between the predictions by the hadronic interaction models. Diffractive collision is one of the proposed sources of the uncertainty. In this paper, we discuss the effect of the detailed characteristics of diffractive collisions on the observables of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray experiments by focusing on three detailed characteristics. These are the cross-sectional fractions of different collision types, diffractive-mass spectrum, and diffractive-mass-dependent particle productions. We demonstrated that the current level of the uncertainty in the cross-sectional fraction can affect 8.9$\mathrm{g/cm^2}$ of $\langle X_{\mathrm{max}}\rangle $ and 9.4$\mathrm{g/cm^2}$ of $\langle X_{\mathrm{max}}^{\mu}\rangle $, whereas the other details of the diffractive collisions exhibit relatively minor effects.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.07117  [pdf] - 2095171
Using Deep Learning to Enhance Event Geometry Reconstruction for the Telescope Array Surface Detector
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2020-05-14
The extremely low flux of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) makes their direct observation by orbital experiments practically impossible. For this reason all current and planned UHECR experiments detect cosmic rays indirectly by observing the extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by cosmic ray particles in the atmosphere. The world largest statistics of the ultra-high energy EAS events is recorded by the networks of surface stations. In this paper we consider a novel approach for reconstruction of the arrival direction of the primary particle based on the deep convolutional neural network. The latter is using raw time-resolved signals of the set of the adjacent trigger stations as an input. The Telescope Array Surface Detector is an array of 507 stations, each containing two layers plastic scintillator with an area of $3$ m$^2$. The training of the model is performed with the Monte-Carlo dataset. It is shown that within the Monte-Carlo simulations, the new approach yields better resolution than the traditional reconstruction method based on the fitting of the EAS front. The details of the network architecture and its optimisation for this particular task are discussed.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.03738  [pdf] - 2121984
Search for Ultra-High-Energy Neutrinos with the Telescope Array Surface Detector
Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; di Matteo, A.; Fujii, T.; Fujisue, K.; Fujita, K.; Fujiwara, R.; Fukushima, M.; Furlich, G.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jeong, H. M.; Jeong, S.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kishigami, S.; Kuzmin, V.; Kuznetsov, M.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, K. H.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Mayta, R.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakai, K.; Nakamura, R.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Oda, H.; Ogio, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Okuda, T.; Omura, Y.; Ono, M.; Onogi, R.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Remington, J.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sahara, R.; Saito, K.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sako, T.; Sakurai, N.; Scott, L. M.; Seki, T.; Sekino, K.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takagi, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tanoue, Y.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Wong, T.; Yada, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoshii, H.; Zhezher, Y.; Zundel, Z.
Comments: 10 pages, 4 figures, accepted to JETP
Submitted: 2019-05-09, last modified: 2020-05-12
We present an upper limit on the flux of ultra-high-energy down-going neutrinos for $E > 10^{18}\ \mbox{eV}$ derived with the nine years of data collected by the Telescope Array surface detector (05-11-2008 -- 05-10-2017). The method is based on the multivariate analysis technique, so-called Boosted Decision Trees (BDT). Proton-neutrino classifier is built upon 16 observables related to both the properties of the shower front and the lateral distribution function.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.00300  [pdf] - 2060614
Search for point sources of ultra-high energy photons with the Telescope Array surface detector
Telescope Array Collaboration; Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; diMatteo, A.; Fujii, T.; Fujita, K.; Fujiwara, R.; Fukushima, M.; Furlich, G.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jeong, H. M.; Jeong, S.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kishigami, S.; Kuzmin, V.; Kuznetsov, M.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, K. H.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Mayta, R.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagataki, S.; Nakai, K.; Nakamura, R.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Oda, H.; Ogio, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Okuda, T.; Omura, Y.; Ono, M.; Onogi, R.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Remington, J.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sahara, R.; Saito, K.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sako, T.; Sakurai, N.; Scott, L. M.; Seki, T.; Sekino, K.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takagi, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tanoue, Y.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Wong, T.; Yada, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoshii, H.; Zhezher, Y.; Zundel, Z.
Comments: accepted to MNRAS, 11 pages, 4 figures, 2 tables; results in text-file format are supplemented to paper source
Submitted: 2019-03-30, last modified: 2020-03-09
The surface detector (SD) of the Telescope Array (TA) experiment allows one to indirectly detect photons with energies of order $10^{18}$ eV and higher and to separate photons from the cosmic-ray background. In this paper we present the results of a blind search for point sources of ultra-high energy (UHE) photons in the Northern sky using the TA SD data. The photon-induced extensive air showers (EAS) are separated from the hadron-induced EAS background by means of a multivariate classifier based upon 16 parameters that characterize the air shower events. No significant evidence for the photon point sources is found. The upper limits are set on the flux of photons from each particular direction in the sky within the TA field of view, according to the experiment's angular resolution for photons. Average 95% C.L. upper limits for the point-source flux of photons with energies greater than $10^{18}$, $10^{18.5}$, $10^{19}$, $10^{19.5}$ and $10^{20}$ eV are $0.094$, $0.029$, $0.010$, $0.0073$ and $0.0058$ km$^{-2}$yr$^{-1}$ respectively. For the energies higher than $10^{18.5}$ eV, the photon point-source limits are set for the first time. Numerical results for each given direction in each energy range are provided as a supplement to this paper.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.07737  [pdf] - 1919466
The Southern Wide-Field Gamma-Ray Observatory (SWGO): A Next-Generation Ground-Based Survey Instrument for VHE Gamma-Ray Astronomy
Comments: Astro2020 APC White Paper
Submitted: 2019-07-17
We describe plans for the development of the Southern Wide-field Gamma-ray Observatory (SWGO), a next-generation instrument with sensitivity to the very-high-energy (VHE) band to be constructed in the Southern Hemisphere. SWGO will provide wide-field coverage of a large portion of the southern sky, effectively complementing current and future instruments in the global multi-messenger effort to understand extreme astrophysical phenomena throughout the universe. A detailed description of science topics addressed by SWGO is available in the science case white paper [1]. The development of SWGO will draw on extensive experience within the community in designing, constructing, and successfully operating wide-field instruments using observations of extensive air showers. The detector will consist of a compact inner array of particle detection units surrounded by a sparser outer array. A key advantage of the design of SWGO is that it can be constructed using current, already proven technology. We estimate a construction cost of 54M USD and a cost of 7.5M USD for 5 years of operation, with an anticipated US contribution of 20M USD ensuring that the US will be a driving force for the SWGO effort. The recently formed SWGO collaboration will conduct site selection and detector optimization studies prior to construction, with full operations foreseen to begin in 2026. Throughout this document, references to science white papers submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey with particular relevance to the key science goals of SWGO, which include unveiling Galactic particle accelerators [2-10], exploring the dynamic universe [11-21], and probing physics beyond the Standard Model [22-25], are highlighted in red boldface.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.05521  [pdf] - 1928119
First Detection of Photons with Energy Beyond 100 TeV from an Astrophysical Source
Comments: April 4, 2019; Submitted to the Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2019-06-13
We report on the highest energy photons from the Crab Nebula observed by the Tibet air shower array with the underground water-Cherenkov-type muon detector array. Based on the criterion of muon number measured in an air shower, we successfully suppress 99.92% of the cosmic-ray background events with energies $E>100$ TeV. As a result, we observed 24 photon-like events with $E>100$ TeV against 5.5 background events, which corresponds to 5.6$\sigma$ statistical significance. This is the first detection of photons with $E>100$ TeV from an astrophysical source.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.08429  [pdf] - 1836634
Science Case for a Wide Field-of-View Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Observatory in the Southern Hemisphere
Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Ashkar, H.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Arceo, R.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Bretz, T.; Brisbois, C. A.; Brown, A. M.; Brun, F.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carosi, A.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Cotter, G.; De León, S. Coutiño; Cristofari, P.; Dasso, S.; de la Fuente, E.; Dingus, B. L.; Desiati, P.; Salles, F. de O.; de Souza, V.; Dorner, D.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; García-González, J. A.; DuVernois, M. A.; Di Sciascio, G.; Engel, K.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; Funk, S.; Glicenstein, J-F.; Gonzalez, J.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Harding, J. P.; Haungs, A.; Hinton, J.; Hona, B.; Hoyos, D.; Huentemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Kawata, K.; Kunwar, S.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lenain, J. -P.; Link, K.; López-Coto, R.; Marandon, V.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Wilhelmi, E. de Oña; Parsons, R. D.; Patricelli, B.; Pichel, A.; Piel, Q.; Prandini, E.; Pueschel, E.; Procureur, S.; Reisenegger, A.; Rivière, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Rovero, A. C.; Rowell, G.; Ruiz-Velasco, E. L.; Sandoval, A.; Santander, M.; Sako, T.; Sako, T. K.; Satalecka, K.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schüssler, F.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Smith, A. J.; Spencer, S.; Surajbali, P.; Tabachnick, E.; Taylor, A. M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, I.; Vallage, B.; Viana, A.; Watson, J. J.; Weisgarber, T.; Werner, F.; White, R.; Wischnewski, R.; Yang, R.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-02-22
We outline the science motivation for SGSO, the Southern Gamma-Ray Survey Observatory. SGSO will be a next-generation wide field-of-view gamma-ray survey instrument, sensitive to gamma-rays in the energy range from 100 GeV to hundreds of TeV. Its science topics include unveiling galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, monitoring the transient sky at very high energies, probing particle physics beyond the Standard Model, and the characterization of the cosmic ray flux. SGSO will consist of an air shower detector array, located in South America. Due to its location and large field of view, SGSO will be complementary to other current and planned gamma-ray observatories such as HAWC, LHAASO, and CTA.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.08429  [pdf] - 1836634
Science Case for a Wide Field-of-View Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Observatory in the Southern Hemisphere
Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Ashkar, H.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Arceo, R.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Bretz, T.; Brisbois, C. A.; Brown, A. M.; Brun, F.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carosi, A.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Cotter, G.; De León, S. Coutiño; Cristofari, P.; Dasso, S.; de la Fuente, E.; Dingus, B. L.; Desiati, P.; Salles, F. de O.; de Souza, V.; Dorner, D.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; García-González, J. A.; DuVernois, M. A.; Di Sciascio, G.; Engel, K.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; Funk, S.; Glicenstein, J-F.; Gonzalez, J.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Harding, J. P.; Haungs, A.; Hinton, J.; Hona, B.; Hoyos, D.; Huentemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Kawata, K.; Kunwar, S.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lenain, J. -P.; Link, K.; López-Coto, R.; Marandon, V.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Wilhelmi, E. de Oña; Parsons, R. D.; Patricelli, B.; Pichel, A.; Piel, Q.; Prandini, E.; Pueschel, E.; Procureur, S.; Reisenegger, A.; Rivière, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Rovero, A. C.; Rowell, G.; Ruiz-Velasco, E. L.; Sandoval, A.; Santander, M.; Sako, T.; Sako, T. K.; Satalecka, K.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schüssler, F.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Smith, A. J.; Spencer, S.; Surajbali, P.; Tabachnick, E.; Taylor, A. M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, I.; Vallage, B.; Viana, A.; Watson, J. J.; Weisgarber, T.; Werner, F.; White, R.; Wischnewski, R.; Yang, R.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-02-22
We outline the science motivation for SGSO, the Southern Gamma-Ray Survey Observatory. SGSO will be a next-generation wide field-of-view gamma-ray survey instrument, sensitive to gamma-rays in the energy range from 100 GeV to hundreds of TeV. Its science topics include unveiling galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, monitoring the transient sky at very high energies, probing particle physics beyond the Standard Model, and the characterization of the cosmic ray flux. SGSO will consist of an air shower detector array, located in South America. Due to its location and large field of view, SGSO will be complementary to other current and planned gamma-ray observatories such as HAWC, LHAASO, and CTA.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.08124  [pdf] - 1897937
Report on Tests and Measurements of Hadronic Interaction Properties with Air Showers
Comments: Submitted to the Proceedings of UHECR2018
Submitted: 2019-02-21
We present a summary of recent tests and measurements of hadronic interaction properties with air showers. This report has a special focus on muon density measurements. Several experiments reported deviations between simulated and recorded muon densities in extensive air showers, while others reported no discrepancies. We combine data from eight leading air shower experiments to cover shower energies from PeV to tens of EeV. Data are combined using the z-scale, a unified reference scale based on simulated air showers. Energy-scales of experiments are cross-calibrated. Above 10 PeV, we find a muon deficit in simulated air showers for each of the six considered hadronic interaction models. The deficit is increasing with shower energy. For the models EPOS-LHC and QGSJet-II.04, the slope is found significant at 8 sigma.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.03387  [pdf] - 1701643
Influence of Earth-Directed Coronal Mass Ejections on the Sun's Shadow Observed by the Tibet-III Air Shower Array
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in the ApJ
Submitted: 2018-06-08
We examine the possible influence of Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (ECMEs) on the Sun's shadow in the 3~TeV cosmic-ray intensity observed by the Tibet-III air shower (AS) array. We confirm a clear solar-cycle variation of the intensity deficit in the Sun's shadow during ten years between 2000 and 2009. This solar-cycle variation is overall reproduced by our Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the Sun's shadow based on the potential field model of the solar magnetic field averaged over each solar rotation period. We find, however, that the magnitude of the observed intensity deficit in the Sun's shadow is significantly less than that predicted by MC simulations, particularly during the period around solar maximum when a significant number of ECMEs is recorded. The $\chi^2$ tests of the agreement between the observations and the MC simulations show that the difference is larger during the periods when the ECMEs occur, and the difference is reduced if the periods of ECMEs are excluded from the analysis. This suggests the first experimental evidence of the ECMEs affecting the Sun's shadow observed in the 3~TeV cosmic-ray intensity.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.06942  [pdf] - 1621586
Evaluation of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength Using the Cosmic-Ray Shadow of the Sun
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2018-01-21
We analyze the Sun's shadow observed with the Tibet-III air shower array and find that the shadow's center deviates northward (southward) from the optical solar disc center in the "Away" ("Toward") IMF sector. By comparing with numerical simulations based on the solar magnetic field model, we find that the average IMF strength in the "Away" ("Toward") sector is $1.54 \pm 0.21_{\rm stat} \pm 0.20_{\rm syst}$ ($1.62 \pm 0.15_{\rm stat} \pm 0.22_{\rm syst}$) times larger than the model prediction. These demonstrate that the observed Sun's shadow is a useful tool for the quantitative evaluation of the average solar magnetic field.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.09082  [pdf] - 1585235
Analysis of solar gamma rays and solar neutrons detected on March 7th and September 25th of 2011 by Ground Level Neutron Telescopes, SEDA-FIB and FERMI-LAT
Comments: 15 pages
Submitted: 2017-06-27
At the 33rd ICRC, we reported the possible detection of solar gamma rays by a ground level detector and later re-examined this event. On March 7, 2011, the solar neutron telescope (SNT) located at Mt. Sierra Negra, Mexico (4,600 m) observed enhancements of the counting rate from 19:49 to 20:02 UT and from 20:50 to 21:01 UT. The statistical significance was 9.7sigma and 8.5sigma, respectively. This paper discusses the possibility of using this mountain detector to detect solar gamma rays. In association with this event, the solar neutron detector SEDA-FIB onboard the International Space Station has also detected solar neutrons with a statistical significance of 7.5sigma. The FERMI-LAT detector also observed high-energy gamma rays from this flare with a statistical significance of 6.7sigma. We thus attempted to make a unified model to explain this data. In this paper, we report on another candidate for solar gamma rays detected on September 25th, 2011 by the SNT located in Tibet (4,300 m) from 04:37 to 04:47 UT with a statistical significance of 8.0sigma (by the Li-Ma method).
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.04923  [pdf] - 1523749
Simultaneous Observation of Solar Neutrons from the ISS and High Mountain Observatories in association with a flare on July 8, 2014
Comments: 8 pages, 7 figures, and 2 Tables. Proceeding of the 34th International Cosmic Ray Conference in Hague in August, 2015
Submitted: 2015-08-20
An M6.5-class flare was observed at N12E56 of the solar surface at 16:06 UT on July 8, 2014. In association with this flare, solar neutron detectors located on two high mountains, Mt. Sierra Negra and Chacaltaya and at the space station observed enhancements in the neutral channel. The authors analysed these data and a possible scenario of enhancements produced by high-energy protons and neutrons is proposed, using the data from continuous observation of a solar surface by the ultraviolet telescope onboard the Solar Dynamical Observatory (SDO).
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.5125  [pdf] - 695664
A Possible Detection of Solar Gamma-Rays by the Ground Level Detector
Comments: 7 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2013-07-19
On March 7, 2011 from 19:48:00 to 20:03:00 UT, the solar neutron telescope located at Mt. Sierra Negra, Mexico (4,600m) observed a 8.8sigma enhancement. In this paper, we would like to try to explain this enhancement by a hypothesis that a few GeV gamma-rays arrived at the top of the mountain produced by the Sun. We postulate that protons were accelerated at the shock front. They precipitate at the solar surface and produced those gamma-rays. If hypothesis is confirmed, this enhancement is the first sample of GeV gamma-rays observed by a ground level detector.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.3009  [pdf] - 1172000
Probe of the Solar Magnetic Field Using the "Cosmic-Ray Shadow" of the Sun
Comments: 11 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2013-06-12, last modified: 2013-07-02
We report on a clear solar-cycle variation of the Sun's shadow in the 10 TeV cosmic-ray flux observed by the Tibet air shower array during a full solar cycle from 1996 to 2009. In order to clarify the physical implications of the observed solar cycle variation, we develop numerical simulations of the Sun's shadow, using the Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model and the Current Sheet Source Surface (CSSS) model for the coronal magnetic field. We find that the intensity deficit in the simulated Sun's shadow is very sensitive to the coronal magnetic field structure, and the observed variation of the Sun's shadow is better reproduced by the CSSS model. This is the first successful attempt to evaluate the coronal magnetic field models by using the Sun's shadow observed in the TeV cosmic-ray flux.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.6090  [pdf] - 1943138
Air Shower Simulation and Hadronic Interactions
Comments: Working Group report given at UHECR 2012 Symposium, CERN, Feb. 2012. Published in EPJ Web of Conferences 53, 01007 (2013)
Submitted: 2013-06-25
The aim of this report of the Working Group on Hadronic Interactions and Air Shower Simulation is to give an overview of the status of the field, emphasizing open questions and a comparison of relevant results of the different experiments. It is shown that an approximate overall understanding of extensive air showers and the corresponding hadronic interactions has been reached. The simulations provide a qualitative description of the bulk of the air shower observables. Discrepancies are however found when the correlation between measurements of the longitudinal shower profile are compared to that of the lateral particle distributions at ground. The report concludes with a list of important problems that should be addressed to make progress in understanding hadronic interactions and, hence, improve the reliability of air shower simulations.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.2919  [pdf] - 637852
A Monte Carlo study to measure the energy spectra of the primary cosmic-ray components at the knee using a new Tibet AS core detector array
Comments: 4 pages,7 figures,In Proc 32nd Int. Cosmic Ray Conf. Vol.1,157 (2011)
Submitted: 2013-03-12
A new hybrid experiment has been started by AS{\gamma} experiment at Tibet, China, since August 2011, which consists of a low threshold burst-detector-grid (YAC-II, Yangbajing Air shower Core array), the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and a large underground water Cherenkov muon detector (MD). In this paper, the capability of the measurement of the chemical components (proton, helium and iron) with use of the (Tibet-III+YAC-II) is investigated by means of an extensive Monte Carlo simulation in which the secondary particles are propagated through the (Tibet-III+YAC-II) array and an artificial neural network (ANN) method is applied for the primary mass separation. Our simulation shows that the new installation is powerful to study the chemical compositions, in particular, to obtain the primary energy spectrum of the major component at the knee.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.1244  [pdf] - 1124613
A possible binary system of a stellar remnant in the high magnification gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2007-BLG-514
Comments: 31 pages, 6 figures, 7 tables, accepted in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-07-05
We report the extremely high magnification (A > 1000) binary microlensing event OGLE-2007-BLG-514. We obtained good coverage around the double peak structure in the light curve via follow-up observations from different observatories. The binary lens model that includes the effects of parallax (known orbital motion of the Earth) and orbital motion of the lens yields a binary lens mass ratio of q = 0.321 +/- 0.007 and a projected separation of s = 0.072 +/- 0.001$ in units of the Einstein radius. The parallax parameters allow us to determine the lens distance D_L = 3.11 +/- 0.39 kpc and total mass M_L=1.40 +/- 0.18 M_sun; this leads to the primary and secondary components having masses of M_1 = 1.06 +/- 0.13 M_sun and M_2 = 0.34 +/- 0.04 M_sun, respectively. The parallax model indicates that the binary lens system is likely constructed by the main sequence stars. On the other hand, we used a Bayesian analysis to estimate probability distributions by the model that includes the effects of xallarap (possible orbital motion of the source around a companion) and parallax (q = 0.270 +/- 0.005, s = 0.083 +/- 0.001). The primary component of the binary lens is relatively massive with M_1 = 0.9_{-0.3}^{+4.6} M_sun and it is at a distance of D_L = 2.6_{-0.9}^{+3.8} kpc. Given the secure mass ratio measurement, the companion mass is therefore M_2 = 0.2_{-0.1}^{+1.2} M_sun. The xallarap model implies that the primary lens is likely a stellar remnant, such as a white dwarf, a neutron star or a black hole.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.0344  [pdf] - 1034636
OGLE-2005-BLG-153: Microlensing Discovery and Characterization of A Very Low Mass Binary
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2010-09-02, last modified: 2012-04-25
The mass function and statistics of binaries provide important diagnostics of the star formation process. Despite this importance, the mass function at low masses remains poorly known due to observational difficulties caused by the faintness of the objects. Here we report the microlensing discovery and characterization of a binary lens composed of very low-mass stars just above the hydrogen-burning limit. From the combined measurements of the Einstein radius and microlens parallax, we measure the masses of the binary components of $0.10\pm 0.01\ M_\odot$ and $0.09\pm 0.01\ M_\odot$. This discovery demonstrates that microlensing will provide a method to measure the mass function of all Galactic populations of very low mass binaries that is independent of the biases caused by the luminosity of the population.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.2529  [pdf] - 475837
Balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope with nuclear emulsion : overview and status
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, talk given at PSB1-0023-1018 in 38th COSPAR Scientific Assembly, 25 July 2010, Bremen, Germany
Submitted: 2012-02-12
Detecting the first electron pairs with nuclear emulsion allows a precise measurement of the direction of incident gamma-rays as well as their polarization. With recent innovations in emulsion scanning, emulsion analyzing capability is becoming increasingly powerful. Presently, we are developing a balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope using nuclear emulsion. An overview and a status of our telescope is given.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.3544  [pdf] - 966812
Unbound or Distant Planetary Mass Population Detected by Gravitational Microlensing
Comments: 46 pages, 14 figures, include Supplementary Information, published in Nature
Submitted: 2011-05-18
Since 1995, more than 500 exoplanets have been detected using different techniques, of which 11 were detected with gravitational microlensing. Most of these are gravitationally bound to their host stars. There is some evidence of free-floating planetary mass objects in young star-forming regions, but these objects are limited to massive objects of 3 to 15 Jupiter masses with large uncertainties in photometric mass estimates and their abundance. Here, we report the discovery of a population of unbound or distant Jupiter-mass objects, which are almost twice (1.8_{-0.8}^{+1.7}) as common as main-sequence stars, based on two years of gravitational microlensing survey observations toward the Galactic Bulge. These planetary-mass objects have no host stars that can be detected within about ten astronomical units by gravitational microlensing. However a comparison with constraints from direct imaging suggests that most of these planetary-mass objects are not bound to any host star. An abrupt change in the mass function at about a Jupiter mass favours the idea that their formation process is different from that of stars and brown dwarfs. They may have formed in proto-planetary disks and subsequently scattered into unbound or very distant orbits.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.5091  [pdf] - 1076253
OGLE-2009-BLG-023/MOA-2009-BLG-028: Characterization of a Binary Microlensing Event Based on Survey Data
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2011-04-27
We report the result of the analysis of the light curve of a caustic-crossing binary-lens microlensing event OGLE-2009-BLG-023/MOA-2009-BLG-028. Even though the event was observed solely by survey experiments, we could uniquely determine the mass of the lens and distance to it by simultaneously measuring the Einstein radius and lens parallax. From this, we find that the lens system is composed of M-type dwarfs with masses $(0.50\pm 0.07) \ M_\odot$ and $(0.15\pm 0.02)\ M_\odot$ located in the Galactic disk with a distance of $\sim 1.8$ kpc toward the Galactic bulge direction. The event demonstrates that physical lens parameters of binary-lens events can be routinely determined from future high-cadence lensing surveys and thus microlensing can provide a new way to study Galactic binaries.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.1396  [pdf] - 1032970
Determining the Physical Lens Parameters of the Binary Gravitational Microlensing Event MOA-2009-BLG-016
Comments: 7 pages, 2 tables, and 5 figures
Submitted: 2010-06-07
We report the result of the analysis of the light curve of the microlensing event MOA-2009-BLG-016. The light curve is characterized by a short-duration anomaly near the peak and an overall asymmetry. We find that the peak anomaly is due to a binary companion to the primary lens and the asymmetry of the light curve is explained by the parallax effect caused by the acceleration of the observer over the course of the event due to the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we detect evidence for the effect of the finite size of the source near the peak of the event, which allows us to measure the angular Einstein radius of the lens system. The Einstein radius combined with the microlens parallax allows us to determine the total mass of the lens and the distance to the lens. We identify three distinct classes of degenerate solutions for the binary lens parameters, where two are manifestations of the previously identified degeneracies of close/wide binaries and positive/negative impact parameters, while the third class is caused by the symmetric cycloid shape of the caustic. We find that, for the best-fit solution, the estimated mass of the lower-mass component of the binary is (0.04 +- 0.01) M_sun, implying a brown-dwarf companion. However, there exists a solution that is worse only by \Delta\chi^2 ~ 3 for which the mass of the secondary is above the hydrogen-burning limit. Unfortunately, resolving these two degenerate solutions will be difficult as the relative lens-source proper motions for both are similar and small (~ 1 mas/yr) and thus the lens will remain blended with the source for the next several decades.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.2706  [pdf] - 902424
Masses and Orbital Constraints for the OGLE-2006-BLG-109Lb,c Jupiter/Saturn Analog Planetary System
Comments: 48 pages including 10 figures, to be published in ApJ
Submitted: 2009-11-15, last modified: 2010-06-02
We present a new analysis of the Jupiter+Saturn analog system, OGLE-2006-BLG-109Lb,c, which was the first double planet system discovered with the gravitational microlensing method. This is the only multi-planet system discovered by any method with measured masses for the star and both planets. In addition to the signatures of two planets, this event also exhibits a microlensing parallax signature and finite source effects that provide a direct measure of the masses of the star and planets, and the expected brightness of the host star is confirmed by Keck AO imaging, yielding masses of M_* = 0.51(+0.05-0.04) M_sun, M_b = 231+-19 M_earth, M_c = 86+-7 M_earth. The Saturn-analog planet in this system had a planetary light curve deviation that lasted for 11 days, and as a result, the effects of the orbital motion are visible in the microlensing light curve. We find that four of the six orbital parameters are tightly constrained and that a fifth parameter, the orbital acceleration, is weakly constrained. No orbital information is available for the Jupiter-analog planet, but its presence helps to constrain the orbital motion of the Saturn-analog planet. Assuming co-planar orbits, we find an orbital eccentricity of eccentricity = 0.15 (+0.17-0.10) and an orbital inclination of i = 64 (+4-7) deg. The 95% confidence level lower limit on the inclination of i > 49 deg. implies that this planetary system can be detected and studied via radial velocity measurements using a telescope of >30m aperture.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.0966  [pdf] - 1026693
OGLE 2008--BLG--290: An accurate measurement of the limb darkening of a Galactic Bulge K Giant spatially resolved by microlensing
Fouque, P.; Heyrovsky, D.; Dong, S.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Novati, S. Calchi; Cassan, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominik, M.; Prester, D. Dominis; Greenhill, J.; Horne, K.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kozlowski, S.; Kubas, D.; Lee, C. -H.; Marquette, J. -B.; Mathiasen, M.; Menzies, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nishiyama, S.; Papadakis, I.; Street, R.; Sumi, T.; Williams, A.; Yee, J. C.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cole, A.; Cook, K. H.; Donatowicz, J.; Kains, N.; Kane, S. R.; Martin, R.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Tsapras, Y.; Wambsganss, J.; Zub, M.; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Lee, C. -U.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Szewczyk, O.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Abe, F.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Gilmore, A. C.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Itow, Y.; ~Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Korpela, A. V.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Perrott, Y.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sako, T.; Sato, S.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D.; Sweatman, W.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.; Allan, A.; Bode, M. F.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Clay, N.; Fraser, S. N.; Hawkins, E.; Kerins, E.; Lister, T. A.; Mottram, C. J.; Saunders, E. S.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wheatley, P. J.; Anguita, T.; Bozza, V.; Harpsoe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Masi, G.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Thone, C. C.; Riffeser, A.; ~Seitz, S.; Bender, R.
Comments: Astronomy & Astrophysics in press
Submitted: 2010-05-06
Gravitational microlensing is not only a successful tool for discovering distant exoplanets, but it also enables characterization of the lens and source stars involved in the lensing event. In high magnification events, the lens caustic may cross over the source disk, which allows a determination of the angular size of the source and additionally a measurement of its limb darkening. When such extended-source effects appear close to maximum magnification, the resulting light curve differs from the characteristic Paczynski point-source curve. The exact shape of the light curve close to the peak depends on the limb darkening of the source. Dense photometric coverage permits measurement of the respective limb-darkening coefficients. In the case of microlensing event OGLE 2008-BLG-290, the K giant source star reached a peak magnification of about 100. Thirteen different telescopes have covered this event in eight different photometric bands. Subsequent light-curve analysis yielded measurements of linear limb-darkening coefficients of the source in six photometric bands. The best-measured coefficients lead to an estimate of the source effective temperature of about 4700 +100-200 K. However, the photometric estimate from colour-magnitude diagrams favours a cooler temperature of 4200 +-100 K. As the limb-darkening measurements, at least in the CTIO/SMARTS2 V and I bands, are among the most accurate obtained, the above disagreement needs to be understood. A solution is proposed, which may apply to previous events where such a discrepancy also appeared.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.1171  [pdf] - 554128
A Cold Neptune-Mass Planet OGLE-2007-BLG-368Lb: Cold Neptunes Are Common
Comments: 39 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2009-12-07, last modified: 2010-01-22
We present the discovery of a Neptune-mass planet OGLE-2007-BLG-368Lb with a planet-star mass ratio of q=[9.5 +/- 2.1] x 10^{-5} via gravitational microlensing. The planetary deviation was detected in real-time thanks to the high cadence of the MOA survey, real-time light curve monitoring and intensive follow-up observations. A Bayesian analysis returns the stellar mass and distance at M_l = 0.64_{-0.26}^{+0.21} M_\sun and D_l = 5.9_{-1.4}^{+0.9} kpc, respectively, so the mass and separation of the planet are M_p = 20_{-8}^{+7} M_\oplus and a = 3.3_{-0.8}^{+1.4} AU, respectively. This discovery adds another cold Neptune-mass planet to the planetary sample discovered by microlensing, which now comprise four cold Neptune/Super-Earths, five gas giant planets, and another sub-Saturn mass planet whose nature is unclear. The discovery of these ten cold exoplanets by the microlensing method implies that the mass ratio function of cold exoplanets scales as dN_{\rm pl}/d\log q \propto q^{-0.7 +/- 0.2} with a 95% confidence level upper limit of n < -0.35 (where dN_{\rm pl}/d\log q \propto q^n). As microlensing is most sensitive to planets beyond the snow-line, this implies that Neptune-mass planets are at least three times more common than Jupiters in this region at the 95% confidence level.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.2646  [pdf] - 1024641
On Temporal Variations of the Multi-TeV Cosmic Ray Anisotropy using the Tibet III Air Shower Array
Comments: 18 pages, 2 figures, accepted by The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2010-01-15
We analyze the large-scale two-dimensional sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV cosmic rays by Tibet Air Shower Array, with the data taken from 1999 November to 2008 December. To explore temporal variations of the anisotropy, the data set is divided into nine intervals, each in a time span of about one year. The sidereal anisotropy of magnitude about 0.1% appears fairly stable from year to year over the entire observation period of nine years. This indicates that the anisotropy of TeV Galactic cosmic rays remains insensitive to solar activities since the observation period covers more than a half of the 23rd solar cycle.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.0386  [pdf] - 1018596
Observation of TeV Gamma Rays from the Fermi Bright Galactic Sources with the Tibet Air Shower Array
Comments: 17 pages, 2 figures, 1 table, Accepted for publication in ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2009-12-02
Using the Tibet-III air shower array, we search for TeV gamma-rays from 27 potential Galactic sources in the early list of bright sources obtained by the Fermi Large Area Telescope at energies above 100 MeV. Among them, we observe 7 sources instead of the expected 0.61 sources at a significance of 2 sigma or more excess. The chance probability from Poisson statistics would be estimated to be 3.8 x 10^-6. If the excess distribution observed by the Tibet-III array has a density gradient toward the Galactic plane, the expected number of sources may be enhanced in chance association. Then, the chance probability rises slightly, to 1.2 x 10^-5, based on a simple Monte Carlo simulation. These low chance probabilities clearly show that the Fermi bright Galactic sources have statistically significant correlations with TeV gamma-ray excesses. We also find that all 7 sources are associated with pulsars, and 6 of them are coincident with sources detected by the Milagro experiment at a significance of 3 sigma or more at the representative energy of 35 TeV. The significance maps observed by the Tibet-III air shower array around the Fermi sources, which are coincident with the Milagro >=3sigma sources, are consistent with the Milagro observations. This is the first result of the northern sky survey of the Fermi bright Galactic sources in the TeV region.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.5581  [pdf] - 1018549
Interpretation of Strong Short-Term Central Perturbations in the Light Curves of Moderate-Magnification Microlensing Events
Comments: 17 pages, 4 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2009-11-30
To improve the planet detection efficiency, current planetary microlensing experiments are focused on high-magnification events searching for planetary signals near the peak of lensing light curves. However, it is known that central perturbations can also be produced by binary companions and thus it is important to distinguish planetary signals from those induced by binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of microlensing events OGLE-2007-BLG-137/MOA-2007-BLG-091, OGLE-2007-BLG-355/MOA-2007-BLG-278, and MOA-2007-BLG-199/OGLE-2007-BLG-419, for all of which exhibit short-term perturbations near the peaks of the light curves. From detailed modeling of the light curves, we find that the perturbations of the events are caused by binary companions rather than planets. From close examination of the light curves combined with the underlying physical geometry of the lens system obtained from modeling, we find that the short time-scale caustic-crossing feature occurring at a low or a moderate base magnification with an additional secondary perturbation is a typical feature of binary-lens events and thus can be used for the discrimination between the binary and planetary interpretations.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.1026  [pdf] - 28037
Large-scale sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV galactic cosmic rays and the heliosphere
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure, 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference (Lodz, Poland), 2009
Submitted: 2009-09-05
We develop a model anisotropy best-fitting to the two-dimensional sky-map of multi-TeV galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity observed with the Tibet III air shower (AS) array. By incorporating a pair of intensity excesses in the hydrogen deflection plane (HDP) suggested by Gurnett et al., together with the uni-directional and bi-directional flows for reproducing the observed global feature, this model successfully reproduces the observed sky-map including the "skewed" feature of the excess intensity from the heliotail direction, whose physical origin has long remained unknown. These additional excesses are modeled by a pair of the northern and southern Gaussian distributions, each placed ~50 degree away from the heliotail direction. The amplitude of the southern excess is as large as ~0.2 %, more than twice the amplitude of the northern excess. This implies that the Tibet AS experiment discovered for the first time a clear evidence of the significant modulation of GCR intensity in the heliotail and the asymmetric heliosphere.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.4589  [pdf] - 1003111
Exploration of a 100 TeV gamma-ray northern sky using the Tibet air-shower array combined with an underground water-Cherenkov muon-detector array
Comments: Accepted by Astroparticle Physics
Submitted: 2009-07-27
Aiming to observe cosmic gamma rays in the 10 - 1000 TeV energy region, we propose a 10000 m^2 underground water-Cherenkov muon-detector (MD) array that operates in conjunction with the Tibet air-shower (AS) array. Significant improvement is expected in the sensitivity of the Tibet AS array towards celestial gamma-ray signals above 10 TeV by utilizing the fact that gamma-ray-induced air showers contain far fewer muons compared with cosmic-ray-induced ones. We carried out detailed Monte Carlo simulations to assess the attainable sensitivity of the Tibet AS+MD array towards celestial TeV gamma-ray signals. Based on the simulation results, the Tibet AS+MD array will be able to reject 99.99% of background events at 100 TeV, with 83% of gamma-ray events remaining. The sensitivity of the Tibet AS+MD array will be ~20 times better than that of the present Tibet AS array around 20 - 100 TeV. The Tibet AS+MD array will measure the directions of the celestial TeV gamma-ray sources and the cutoffs of their energy spectra. Furthermore, the Tibet AS+MD array, along with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes as well as the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and X-ray satellites such as Suzaku and MAXI, will make multiwavelength observations and conduct morphological studies on sources in the quest for evidence of the hadronic nature of the cosmic-ray acceleration mechanism.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.3471  [pdf] - 243158
Mass measurement of a single unseen star and planetary detection efficiency for OGLE 2007-BLG-050
Comments: 20 pages, 23 figures
Submitted: 2009-07-20, last modified: 2009-07-22
We analyze OGLE-2007-BLG-050, a high magnification microlensing event (A ~ 432) whose peak occurred on 2 May, 2007, with pronounced finite-source and parallax effects. We compute planet detection efficiencies for this event in order to determine its sensitivity to the presence of planets around the lens star. Both finite-source and parallax effects permit a measurement of the angular Einstein radius \theta_E = 0.48 +/- 0.01 mas and the parallax \pi_E = 0.12 +/- 0.03, leading to an estimate of the lens mass M = 0.50 +/- 0.14 M_Sun and its distance to the observer D_L = 5.5 +/- 0.4 kpc. This is only the second determination of a reasonably precise (<30%) mass estimate for an isolated unseen object, using any method. This allows us to calculate the planetary detection efficiency in physical units (r_\perp, m_p), where r_\perp is the projected planet-star separation and m_p is the planet mass. When computing planet detection efficiency, we did not find any planetary signature and our detection efficiency results reveal significant sensitivity to Neptune-mass planets, and to a lesser extent Earth-mass planets in some configurations. Indeed, Jupiter and Neptune-mass planets are excluded with a high confidence for a large projected separation range between the planet and the lens star, respectively [0.6 - 10] and [1.4 - 4] AU, and Earth-mass planets are excluded with a 10% confidence in the lensing zone, i.e. [1.8 - 3.1] AU.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.1354  [pdf] - 163047
OGLE-2005-BLG-071Lb, the Most Massive M-Dwarf Planetary Companion?
Comments: 51 pages, 12 figures, 3 tables, Published in ApJ
Submitted: 2008-04-09, last modified: 2009-06-02
We combine all available information to constrain the nature of OGLE-2005-BLG-071Lb, the second planet discovered by microlensing and the first in a high-magnification event. These include photometric and astrometric measurements from Hubble Space Telescope, as well as constraints from higher order effects extracted from the ground-based light curve, such as microlens parallax, planetary orbital motion and finite-source effects. Our primary analysis leads to the conclusion that the host of Jovian planet OGLE-2005-BLG-071Lb is an M dwarf in the foreground disk with mass M= 0.46 +/- 0.04 Msun, distance D_l = 3.3 +/- 0.4 kpc, and thick-disk kinematics v_LSR ~ 103 km/s. From the best-fit model, the planet has mass M_p = 3.8 +/- 0.4 M_Jup, lies at a projected separation r_perp = 3.6 +/- 0.2 AU from its host and so has an equilibrium temperature of T ~ 55 K, i.e., similar to Neptune. A degenerate model less favored by \Delta\chi^2 = 2.1 (or 2.2, depending on the sign of the impact parameter) gives similar planetary mass M_p = 3.4 +/- 0.4 M_Jup with a smaller projected separation, r_\perp = 2.1 +/- 0.1 AU, and higher equilibrium temperature T ~ 71 K. These results from the primary analysis suggest that OGLE-2005-BLG-071Lb is likely to be the most massive planet yet discovered that is hosted by an M dwarf. However, the formation of such high-mass planetary companions in the outer regions of M-dwarf planetary systems is predicted to be unlikely within the core-accretion scenario. There are a number of caveats to this primary analysis, which assumes (based on real but limited evidence) that the unlensed light coincident with the source is actually due to the lens, that is, the planetary host. However, these caveats could mostly be resolved by a single astrometric measurement a few years after the event.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.2997  [pdf] - 315090
Microlensing Event MOA-2007-BLG-400: Exhuming the Buried Signature of a Cool, Jovian-Mass Planet
Comments: 30 pages, 6 figures, Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2008-09-18
We report the detection of the cool, Jovian-mass planet MOA-2007-BLG-400Lb. The planet was detected in a high-magnification microlensing event (with peak magnification A_max = 628) in which the primary lens transited the source, resulting in a dramatic smoothing of the peak of the event. The angular extent of the region of perturbation due to the planet is significantly smaller than the angular size of the source, and as a result the planetary signature is also smoothed out by the finite source size. Thus the deviation from a single-lens fit is broad and relatively weak (~ few percent). Nevertheless, we demonstrate that the planetary nature of the deviation can be unambiguously ascertained from the gross features of the residuals, and detailed analysis yields a fairly precise planet/star mass ratio of q = 0.0026+/-0.0004, in accord with the large significance (\Delta\chi^2=1070) of the detection. The planet/star projected separation is subject to a strong close/wide degeneracy, leading to two indistinguishable solutions that differ in separation by a factor of ~8.5. Upper limits on flux from the lens constrain its mass to be M < 0.75 M_Sun (assuming it is a main-sequence star). A Bayesian analysis that includes all available observational constraints indicates a primary in the Galactic bulge with a mass of ~0.2-0.5 M_Sun and thus a planet mass of ~ 0.5-1.3 M_Jupiter. The separation and equilibrium temperature are ~0.6-1.1AU (~5.3-9.7AU) and ~103K (~34K) for the close (wide) solution. If the primary is a main-sequence star, follow-up observations would enable the detection of its light and so a measurement of its mass and distance.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:0806.0025  [pdf] - 13106
A Low-Mass Planet with a Possible Sub-Stellar-Mass Host in Microlensing Event MOA-2007-BLG-192
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. Scheduled for the Sept. 1, 2008 issue
Submitted: 2008-05-30
We report the detection of an extrasolar planet of mass ratio q ~ 2 x 10^(-4) in microlensing event MOA-2007-BLG-192. The best fit microlensing model shows both the microlensing parallax and finite source effects, and these can be combined to obtain the lens masses of M = 0.060 (+0.028 -0.021) M_sun for the primary and m = 3.3 (+4.9 -1.6) M_earth for the planet. However, the observational coverage of the planetary deviation is sparse and incomplete, and the radius of the source was estimated without the benefit of a source star color measurement. As a result, the 2-sigma limits on the mass ratio and finite source measurements are weak. Nevertheless, the microlensing parallax signal clearly favors a sub-stellar mass planetary host, and the measurement of finite source effects in the light curve supports this conclusion. Adaptive optics images taken with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) NACO instrument are consistent with a lens star that is either a brown dwarf or a star at the bottom of the main sequence. Follow-up VLT and/or Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations will either confirm that the primary is a brown dwarf or detect the low-mass lens star and enable a precise determination of its mass. In either case, the lens star, MOA-2007-BLG-192L, is the lowest mass primary known to have a companion with a planetary mass ratio, and the planet, MOA-2007-BLG-192Lb, is probably the lowest mass exoplanet found to date, aside from the lowest mass pulsar planet.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.0653  [pdf] - 11487
MOA-cam3: a wide-field mosaic CCD camera for a gravitational microlensing survey in New Zealand
Comments: Experimental Astronomy in press
Submitted: 2008-04-04
We have developed a wide-field mosaic CCD camera, MOA-cam3, mounted at the prime focus of the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA) 1.8-m telescope. The camera consists of ten E2V CCD4482 chips, each having 2kx4k pixels, and covers a 2.2 deg^2 field of view with a single exposure. The optical system is well optimized to realize uniform image quality over this wide field. The chips are constantly cooled by a cryocooler at -80C, at which temperature dark current noise is negligible for a typical 1-3 minute exposure. The CCD output charge is converted to a 16-bit digital signal by the GenIII system (Astronomical Research Cameras Inc.) and readout is within 25 seconds. Readout noise of 2--3 ADU (rms) is also negligible. We prepared a wide-band red filter for an effective microlensing survey and also Bessell V, I filters for standard astronomical studies. Microlensing studies have entered into a new era, which requires more statistics, and more rapid alerts to catch exotic light curves. Our new system is a powerful tool to realize both these requirements.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.1920  [pdf] - 10055
Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn Analog with Gravitational Microlensing
Comments: 11 pages, 2 figures, published in the 15 February 2008 issue of Science
Submitted: 2008-02-14, last modified: 2008-03-19
Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of ~0.71 and ~0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of ~2.3 and ~4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary star of mass ~0.50 solar masses at a distance of ~1.5 kiloparsecs. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only six confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:0711.2002  [pdf] - 1943072
New estimation of the spectral index of high-energy cosmic rays as determined by the Compton-Getting anisotropy
Comments: accepted to ApJL
Submitted: 2007-11-13
The amplitude of the Compton-Getting (CG) anisotropy contains the power-law index of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum. Based on this relation and using the Tibet air-shower array data, we measure the cosmic-ray spectral index to be $-3.03 \pm 0.55_{stat} \pm < 0.62_{syst}$ between 6 TeV and 40 TeV, consistent with $-$2.7 from direct energy spectrum measurements. Potentially, this CG anisotropy analysis can be utilized to confirm the astrophysical origin of the ``knee'' against models for non-standard hadronic interactions in the atmosphere.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:0710.2752  [pdf] - 6024
Future plan for observation of cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region with the Tibet air shower array : simulation and sensitivity
Comments: 4 pages, 5 figures, 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference
Submitted: 2007-10-15
The Tibet air shower array, which has an effective area of 37,000 square meters and is located at 4300 m in altitude, has been observing air showers induced by cosmic rays with energies above a few TeV. We have a plan to add a large muon detector array to it for the purpose of increasing its sensitivity to cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region by discriminating them from cosmic-ray hadrons. We have deduced the attainable sensitivity of the muon detector array using our Monte Carlo simulation. We report here on the detailed procedure of our Monte Carlo simulation.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:0710.2757  [pdf] - 6025
Future plan for observation of cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region with the Tibet air shower array : physics goal and overview
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference
Submitted: 2007-10-15
The Tibet air shower array, which has an effective area of 37,000 square meters and is located at 4300 m in altitude, has been observing air showers induced by cosmic rays with energies above a few TeV. We are planning to add a large muon detector array to it for the purpose of increasing its sensitivity to cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV (10 - 1000 TeV) energy region by discriminating them from cosmic-ray hadrons. We report on the possibility of detection of gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region in our field of view, based on the improved sensitivity of our air shower array deduced from the full Monte Carlo simulation.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0608247  [pdf] - 84124
Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and 1ES 1426+428 at 100 GeV with the CELESTE Cherenkov Telescope
Comments: 15 pages, 14 figures, accepted to A&A (July 2006) August 19 -- corrected error in author list
Submitted: 2006-08-11, last modified: 2006-08-19
We have measured the gamma-ray fluxes of the blazars Mrk 421 and Mrk 501 in the energy range between 50 and 350 GeV (1.2 to 8.3 x 10^25 Hz). The detector, called CELESTE, used first 40, then 53 heliostats of the former solar facility "Themis" in the French Pyrenees to collect Cherenkov light generated in atmospheric particle cascades. The signal from Mrk 421 is often strong. We compare its flux with previously published multi-wavelength studies and infer that we are straddling the high energy peak of the spectral energy distribution. The signal from Mrk 501 in 2000 was weak (3.4 sigma). We obtain an upper limit on the flux from 1ES 1426+428 of less than half that of the Crab flux near 100 GeV. The data analysis and understanding of systematic biases have improved compared to previous work, increasing the detector's sensitivity.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0509527  [pdf] - 76108
Solar Neutron Events of October-November 2003
Comments: 35 pages, 21 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2005-09-19
During the period when the Sun was intensely active on October-November 2003, two remarkable solar neutron events were observed by the ground-based neutron monitors. On October 28, 2003, in association with an X17.2 large flare, solar neutrons were detected with high statistical significance (6.4 sigma) by the neutron monitor at Tsumeb, Namibia. On November 4, 2003, in association with an X28 class flare, relativistic solar neutrons were observed by the neutron monitors at Haleakala in Hawaii and Mexico City, and by the solar neutron telescope at Mauna Kea in Hawaii simultaneously. Clear excesses were observed at the same time by these detectors, with the significance calculated as 7.5 sigma for Haleakala, and 5.2 sigma for Mexico City. The detector onboard the INTEGRAL satellite observed a high flux of hard X-rays and gamma-rays at the same time in these events. By using the time profiles of the gamma-ray lines, we can explain the time profile of the neutron monitor. It appears that neutrons were produced at the same time as the gamma-ray emission.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0509420  [pdf] - 76002
The MOA 1.8-metre alt-az wide-field survey telescope and the MOA project
Comments: 2 pages no figs
Submitted: 2005-09-15
A new 1.8-m wide-field alt-az survey telescope was installed at Mt John University Observatory in New Zealand in October 2004. The telescope will be dedicated to the MOA (Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics) project. The instrument is equipped with a large 10-chip mosaic CCD camera with 80 Mpixels covering about 2 square degrees of sky. It is mounted at the f/3 prime focus. The telescope will be used for finding and following microlensing events in the galactic bulge and elsewhere, with an emphasis on the analysis of microlensing light curves for the detection of extrasolar planets. The MOA project is a Japan-New Zealand collaboration, with the participation of Nagoya University and four universities in New Zealand.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0506013  [pdf] - 73413
Determination of stellar shape in microlensing event MOA 2002-BLG-33
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, Accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2005-06-01
We report a measurement of the shape of the source star in microlensing event MOA 2002-BLG-33. The lens for this event was a close binary whose centre-of-mass passed almost directly in front of the source star. At this time, the source star was closely bounded on all sides by a caustic of the lens. This allowed the oblateness of the source star to be constrained. We found that a/b = 1.02^{+0.04}_{-0.02} where a and b are its semi-major and semi-minor axes respectively. The angular resolution of this measurement is approximately 0.04 microarcsec. We also report HST images of the event that confirm a previous identification of the source star as an F8-G2 turn-off main-sequence star.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0501322  [pdf] - 70434
Multiple Outbursts of a Cataclysmic Variable in the Globular Cluster M22
Comments: 12 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication ApJ letters
Submitted: 2005-01-16
We present a 4 year light curve of a cataclysmic variable in M22, based on an analysis of accumulated data from the MOA microlensing survey. The position of the star coincides with that of a transient event observed by HST in 1999, originally attributed to microlensing but later suspected to be a dwarf nova outburst. Two outburst episodes, one in 2002 and one in 2003, with $\Delta I\sim3$ are seen in the MOA data thus confirming that the HST event was a dwarf nova outburst. The MOA and HST data show that this dwarf nova underwent at least three outburst episodes during 1999--2004. Further close monitoring of this event is encouraged as future outburst episodes are expected.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0409043  [pdf] - 67124
Search for Low-Mass Exoplanets by Gravitational Microlensing at High Magnification
Comments:
Submitted: 2004-09-02
Observations of the gravitational microlensing event MOA 2003-BLG-32/OGLE 2003-BLG-219 are presented for which the peak magnification was over 500, the highest yet reported. Continuous observations around the peak enabled a sensitive search for planets orbiting the lens star. No planets were detected. Planets 1.3 times heavier than Earth were excluded from more than 50 % of the projected annular region from approximately 2.3 to 3.6 astronomical units surrounding the lens star, Uranus-mass planets from 0.9 to 8.7 astronomical units, and planets 1.3 times heavier than Saturn from 0.2 to 60 astronomical units. These are the largest regions of sensitivity yet achieved in searches for extrasolar planets orbiting any star.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0404309  [pdf] - 64217
OGLE 2003-BLG-235/MOA 2003-BLG-53: A planetary microlensing event
Comments: 13 pages, 3 colour figures. To appear in Astrophysical Journal Letters (May 2004)
Submitted: 2004-04-15
We present observations of the unusual microlensing event OGLE 2003-BLG-235/MOA 2003-BLG-53. In this event a short duration (~7 days) low amplitude deviation in the light curve due a single lens profile was observed in both the MOA and OGLE survey observations. We find that the observed features of the light curve can only be reproduced using a binary microlensing model with an extreme (planetary) mass ratio of 0.0039 +/- (11, 07) for the lensing system. If the lens system comprises a main sequence primary, we infer that the secondary is a planet of about 1.5 Jupiter masses with an orbital radius of ~3 AU.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0401250  [pdf] - 62120
MOA 2003-BLG-37: A Bulge Jerk-Parallax Microlens Degeneracy
Comments: 19 pages, 3 figures, 1 table, ApJ, in press, 1 July 2004
Submitted: 2004-01-13, last modified: 2004-03-13
We analyze the Galactic bulge microlensing event MOA-2003-BLG-37. Although the Einstein timescale is relatively short, t_e=43 days, the lightcurve displays deviations consistent with parallax effects due to the Earth's accelerated motion. We show that the chi^2 surface has four distinct local minima that are induced by the ``jerk-parallax'' degeneracy, with pairs of solutions having projected Einstein radii, \tilde r_e = 1.76 AU and 1.28 AU, respectively. This is the second event displaying such a degeneracy and the first toward the Galactic bulge. For both events, the jerk-parallax formalism accurately describes the offsets between the different solutions, giving hope that when extra solutions exist in future events, they can easily be found. However, the morphologies of the chi^2 surfaces for the two events are quite different, implying that much remains to be understood about this degeneracy.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0310410  [pdf] - 60073
Probing the atmosphere of a solar-like star by galactic microlensing at high magnification
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A Letters. 5 pages, 2 embedded colour ps figures plus 1 jpg figure. Version with all figures embedded available from: http://www.roe.ac.uk/~iab/moa33paper/
Submitted: 2003-10-15
We report a measurement of limb darkening of a solar-like star in the very high magnification microlensing event MOA 2002-BLG-33. A 15 hour deviation from the light curve profile expected for a single lens was monitored intensively in V and I passbands by five telescopes spanning the globe. Our modelling of the light curve showed the lens to be a close binary system whose centre-of-mass passed almost directly in front of the source star. The source star was identified as an F8-G2 main sequence turn-off star. The measured stellar profiles agree with current stellar atmosphere theory to within ~4% in two passbands. The effective angular resolution of the measurements is <1 micro-arcsec. These are the first limb darkening measurements obtained by microlensing for a Solar-like star.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0304067  [pdf] - 55975
Solar Neutron Event in Association with a Large Solar Flare on November 24, 2000
Comments: 20 pages, 12 figures. accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2003-04-03
Solar neutrons have been detected using the neutron monitor located at Mt. Chacaltaya, Bolivia, in association with a large solar flare on November 24, 2000. This is the first detection of solar neutrons by the neutron monitor that have been reported so far in solar cycle 23. The statistical significance of the detection is 5.5 sigma. In this flare, the intense emission of hard X-rays and gamma-rays has been observed by the Yohkoh Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT) and Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), respectively. The production time of solar neutrons is better correlated with those of hard X-rays and gamma-rays than with the production time of soft X-rays. The observations of the solar neutrons on the ground have been limited to solar flares with soft X-ray class greater than X8 in former solar cycles. In this cycle, however, neutrons were detected associated with an X2.3 solar flare on November 24, 2000. This is the first report of the detection of solar neutrons on the ground associated with a solar flare with its X-ray class smaller than X8.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0111041  [pdf] - 45807
Improving the Prospects for Detecting Extrasolar Planets in Gravitational Microlensing in 2002
Comments: 11 pages, 3 embedded ps figures including 2 colour, revised version accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2001-11-02, last modified: 2002-02-01
Gravitational microlensing events of high magnification have been shown to be promising targets for detecting extrasolar planets. However, only a few events of high magnification have been found using conventional survey techniques. Here we demonstrate that high magnification events can be readily found in microlensing surveys using a strategy that combines high frequency sampling of target fields with online difference imaging analysis. We present 10 microlensing events with peak magnifications greater than 40 that were detected in real-time towards the Galactic Bulge during 2001 by MOA. We show that Earth mass planets can be detected in future events such as these through intensive follow-up observations around the event peaks. We report this result with urgency as a similar number of such events are expected in 2002.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0107301  [pdf] - 880535
Measurement of the Crab Flux Above 60 GeV with the CELESTE Cherenkov Telescope
Comments: 34 pages, accepted by the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2001-07-17, last modified: 2001-12-05
We have converted the former solar electrical plant THEMIS (French Pyrenees) into an atmospheric Cherenkov detector called CELESTE, which records gamma rays above 30 GeV (7E24 Hz). Here we present the first sub-100 GeV detection by a ground based telescope of a gamma ray source, the Crab nebula, in the energy region between satellite measurements and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. At our analysis threshold energy of 60 +/- 20 GeV we measure a gamma ray rate of 6.1 +/- 0.8 per minute. Allowing for 30% systematic uncertainties and a 30% error on the energy scale yields an integral gamma ray flux of I(E>60 GeV) = 6.2^{+5.3}_{-2.3} E-6 photons m^-2 s^-1. The analysis methods used to obtain the gamma ray signal from the raw data are detailed. In addition, we determine the upper limit for pulsed emission to be <12% of the Crab flux at the 99% confidence level, in the same energy range. Our result indicates that if the power law observed by EGRET is attenuated by a cutoff of form e^{-E/E_0} then E_0 < 26 GeV. This is the lowest energy probed by a Cherenkov detector and leaves only a narrow range unexplored beyond the energy range studied by EGRET.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0004280  [pdf] - 1943519
Observations of the supernova remnant W28 at TeV energies
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures. Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2000-04-19
The atmospheric Cerenkov imaging technique has been used to search for point-like and diffuse TeV gamma-ray emission from the southern supernova remnant, W28, and surrounding region. The search, made with the CANGAROO 3.8m telescope, encompasses a number of interesting features, the supernova remnant itself, the EGRET source 3EG J1800-2338, the pulsar PSR J1801-23, strong 1720 MHz OH masers and molecular clouds on the north and east boundaries of the remnant. An analysis tailored to extended and off-axis point sources was used, and no evidence for TeV gamma-ray emission from any of the features described above was found in data taken over the 1994 and 1995 seasons. Our upper limit (E>1.5 TeV) for a diffuse source of radius 0.25deg encompassing both molecular clouds was calculated at 6.64e-12 photons cm^-2 s^-1 (from 1994 data), and interpreted within the framework of a model predicting TeV gamma-rays from shocked-accelerated hadrons. Our upper limit suggests the need for some cutoff in the parent spectrum of accelerated hadrons and/or slightly steeper parent spectra than that used here (-2.1). As to the nature of 3EG J1800-2338, it possibly does not result entirely from pi-zero decay, a conclusion also consistent with its location in relation to W28.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0002252  [pdf] - 34595
Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of PSR B1509-58 with the CANGAROO 3.8m Telescope
Comments: Accepted to publication in Astrophys. Journal, 25 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2000-02-11
The gamma-ray pulsar PSR B1509-58 and its surrounding nebulae have been observed with the CANGAROO 3.8m imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope. The observations were performed from 1996 to 1998 in Woomera, South Australia, under different instrumental conditions with estimated threshold energies of 4.5 TeV (1996), 1.9 TeV (1997) and 2.5 TeV (1998) at zenith angles of ~30 deg. Although no strong evidence of the gamma-ray emission was found, the lowest energy threshold data of 1997 showed a marginal excess of gamma-ray--like events at the 4.1 sigma significance level. The corresponding gamma-ray flux is calculated to be (2.9 +/- 0.7) * 10^{-12}cm^{-2}s^{-1} above 1.9 TeV. The observations of 1996 and 1998 yielded only upper limits (99.5% confidence level) of 1.9 * 10^{-12}cm^{-2}s^{-1} above 4.5 TeV and 2.0 * 10^{-12}cm^{-2}s^{-1} above 2.5 TeV, respectively. Assuming that the 1997 excess is due to Very High-Energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from the pulsar nebula, our result, when combined with the X-ray observations, leads to a value of the magnetic field strength ~5 micro G. This is consistent with the equipartition value previously estimated in the X-ray nebula surrounding the pulsar. No significant periodicity at the 150ms pulsar period has been found in any of the three years' data. The flux upper limits set from our observations are one order of magnitude below previously reported detections of pulsed TeV emission.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0001047  [pdf] - 33844
Evidence for TeV gamma-ray emission from the shell type SNR RXJ1713.7-3946
Comments: Accepted for publication by Astronomy and Astrophysics (5 pages, 2 figures)
Submitted: 2000-01-05
We report the results of TeV gamma-ray observations of the shell type SNR RXJ1713.7-3946 (G347.3-0.5). The discovery of strong non-thermal X-ray emission from the northwest part of the remnant strongly suggests the existence of electrons with energies up to 100 TeV in the remnant, making the SNR a good candidate TeV gamma-ray source. We observed RXJ1713.7-3946 from May to August 1998 with the CANGAROO 3.8m atmospheric imaging Cerenkov telescope and obtained evidence for TeV gamma-ray emission from the NW rim of the remnant with the significance of 5.6 sigma. The observed TeV gamma-ray flux from the NW rim region was estimated to be (5.3 +/- 0.9[statistical] +/- 1.6[systematic]) * 10^{-12} photons cm^{-2} s^{-1} at energies >= 1.8 +/- 0.9 TeV. The data indicate that the emitting region is much broader than the point spread function of our telescope. The extent of the emission is consistent with that of hard X-rays observed by ASCA. This TeV gamma-ray emission can be attributed to the Inverse Compton scattering of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation by shock accelerated ultra-relativistic electrons. Under this assumption, a rather low magnetic field of 11 micro gauss is deduced for the remnant from our observation.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9911510  [pdf] - 109638
Initial Performance of CANGAROO-II 7m telescope
Comments: 5 pages, 7 figures, to appear in the proceedings of the GeV-TeV Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Workshop, "Towards a Major Atmospheric Cherenkov Detector VI" (Snowbird, Utah, August 13-16, 1999)
Submitted: 1999-11-30
CANGAROO group constructed an imaging air Cherenkov telescope (CANGAROO-II) in March 1999 atWoomera, South Australia to observe celestial gamma-rays in hundreds GeV region. It has a 7m parabolic mirror consisting of 60 small plastic spherical mirrors, and the prime focus is equipped with a multi-pixel camera of 512 PMTs covering the field of view of 3 degrees. We report initial performance of the telescope.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9911511  [pdf] - 109639
The SNR W28 at TeV Energies
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures, to appear in the proceedings of the GeV-TeV Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Workshop, "Towards a Major Atmospheric Cherenkov Detector VI" (Snowbird, Utah, August 13-16, 1999)
Submitted: 1999-11-30
The southern supernova remnant (SNR)W28 was observed in 1994 and 1995 by the CANGAROO 3.8m telescope in a search formulti-TeV gamma ray emission, using the Cerenkov imaging technique. We obtained upper limits for a variety of point-like and extended features within a +-1 degree-region and briefly discuss these results, together with that of EGRET within the framework of a shock acceleration model of the W28 SNR.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9911512  [pdf] - 1943641
The Cangaroo-III Project
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, to appear in the proceedings of the GeV-TeV Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Workshop, "Towards a Major Atmospheric Cherenkov Detector VI" (Snowbird, Utah, August 13-16, 1999)
Submitted: 1999-11-30
The CANGAROO-III project,which consists of an array of four 10 m imaging Cherenkov telescopes,has just started being constructed in Woomera, South Australia,in a collaboration between Australia and Japan. The first stereoscopic observation of celestial high-energy gamma-rays in the 100 GeV region with two telescopes will start in 2002,and the four telescope array will be completed in 2004. The concept of the project and the expected performance are discussed.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9906077  [pdf] - 106798
Search for TeV Gamma Rays from the SNR RXJ1713.7-3946
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, to appear in Proc. 26th ICRC (Salt Lake City), OG 2.2.20
Submitted: 1999-06-04
The shell type SNR RXJ1713.7-3946 is a new SNR discovered by the ROSAT all sky survey. Recently, strong non-thermal X-ray emission from the northwest part of the remnant was detected by the ASCA satellite. This synchrotron X-ray emission strongly suggests the existence of electrons with energies up to hundreds of TeV in the remnant. This SNR is, therefore, a good candidate TeV gamma ray source, due to the Inverse Compton scattering of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation by the shock accelerated ultra-relativistic electrons, as seen in SN1006. In this paper, we report a preliminary result of TeV gamma-ray observations of the SNR RXJ1713.7-3946 by the CANGAROO 3.8m telescope at Woomera, South Australia.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9906076  [pdf] - 106797
Data Acquisition System of the CANGAROO-II Telescope
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, to appear in Proc. 26th ICRC (Salt Lake City), OG 4.3.31
Submitted: 1999-06-04
The data acquisition system for the new CANGAROO-II 7m telescope is described.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9906078  [pdf] - 106799
Construction of New 7m Imaging Air \v{C}erenkov Telescope of CANGAROO
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures, to appear in Proc. 26th ICRC (Salt Lake City), OG 4.3.04
Submitted: 1999-06-04
CANGAROO group has constructed the new large imaging Air \v Cerenkov telescope to exploit hundred GeV region gamma-ray astronomy in March 1999 at Woomera, South Australia. It has a 7m parabolic mirror consisting of 60 small plastic spherical mirrors, and a fine imaging camera with 512 PMTs covering the field of view of 3 degree. Observation will start from July 1999.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9906075  [pdf] - 106796
An Optical Reflector for the CANGAROO-II Telescope
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, to appear in Proc. 26th ICRC (Salt Lake City), OG 4.3.05
Submitted: 1999-06-04
We have been successful in developing light and durable mirrors made of CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) laminates for the reflector of the new CANGAROO-II 7 m telescope. The reflector has a parabolic shape (F/1.1) with a 30 m^2 effective area which consists of 60 small spherical mirrors of CFRP laminates. The orientation of each mirror can be remotely adjusted by stepping motors. After the first adjustment work, the reflector offers a point image of about $0.^\circ 14$ (FWHM) on the optic axis.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9901316  [pdf] - 339140
TeV observations of Centaurus A
Comments: 4 pages. Astroparticle Physics, accepted for publication. Some upper limits overestimated by factor 2-4 in original version astro-ph/9901316. Now corrected
Submitted: 1999-01-22, last modified: 1999-03-24
We have searched for TeV gamma-rays from Centaurus A and surrounding region out to +/- 1.0 deg using the CANGAROO 3.8m telescope. No evidence for TeV gamma-ray emission was observed from the search region, which includes a number of interesting features located away from the tracking centre of our data. The 3 sigma upper limit to the flux of gamma-rays above 1.5 TeV from an extended source of radius 14' centred on Centaurus A is 1.28e-11 photons cm^-2 s^-1.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9902008  [pdf] - 1469746
TeV gamma-ray observations of three X-ray selected BL Lacs
Comments: 7 pages + 3 figures. Accepted by Astron. and Astrophys
Submitted: 1999-01-31
Despite extensive surveys of extragalactic TeV gamma-ray candidates only 3 sources have so far been detected. All three are northern hemisphere objects and all three are low-redshift X-ray selected BL Lacs (XBLs). In this paper we present the results of observations of the three nearest southern hemisphere XBLs (PKS0548-322, PKS2005-489 and PKS2155-304) with the CANGAROO 3.8m imaging telescope. During the period of observation we estimate that the threshold of the 3.8m telescope was around 1.5TeV. Searches for both steady and short timescale emission have been performed for each source. Additionally, we are able to monitor the X-ray state of each source on a daily basis and we have made contemporaneous measurements of optical activity for PKS0548-322 and PKS2155-304.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9811260  [pdf] - 339139
TeV gamma-ray observations of southern BL Lacs with the CANGAROO 3.8m Imaging Telescope
Comments: 6 pages including 2 figures
Submitted: 1998-11-16
Observational and theoretical results indicate that low-redshift BL Lacertae objects are the most likely extragalactic sources to be detectable at TeV energies. In this paper we present the results of observations of 4 BL Lacertae objects (PKS0521-365, EXO0423.4-0840, PKS2005-489 and PKS2316-423) made between 1993 and 1996 with the CANGAROO 3.8m imaging Cherenkov telescope. During the period of these observations the gamma-ray energy threshold of the 3.8m telescope was ~2TeV. Searches for steady long-term emission have been made, and, inspired by the TeV flares detected from Mkn421 and Mkn501, a search on a night-by-night timescale has also been performed for each source. Comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations are used to estimate upper limits for both steady and short timescale emission.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9801275  [pdf] - 339137
Discovery of TeV Gamma Rays from SN1006: Further Evidence for the SNR Origin of Cosmic Rays
Comments: 17 pages, 3 figures, LaTeX2.09 with AASTeX 4.0 maros, to appear in Astrophys. J. Lett
Submitted: 1998-01-28
This paper reports the first discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission from a supernova remnant made with the CANGAROO 3.8 m Telescope. TeV gamma rays were detected at the sky position and extension coincident with the north-east (NE) rim of shell-type Supernova remnant (SNR) SN1006 (Type Ia). SN1006 has been a most likely candidate for an extended TeV Gamma-ray source, since the clear synchrotron X-ray emission from the rims was recently observed by ASCA (Koyama et al. 1995), which is a strong evidence of the existence of very high energy electrons up to hundreds of TeV in the SNR. The observed TeV gamma-ray flux was $(2.4\pm 0.5(statistical) \pm 0.7(systematic)) \times 10^{-12}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ ($\ge 3.0\pm 0.9$ TeV) and $ (4.6\pm 0.6 \pm 1.4) \times 10^{-12}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ ($\ge 1.7\pm 0.5$ TeV) from the 1996 and 1997 observations, respectively. Also we set an upper limit on the TeV gamma-ray emission from the SW rim, estimated to be $ 1.1 \times 10^{-12}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ ($\ge 1.7\pm 0.5$ TeV, 95% CL) in the 1997 data. The TeV gamma rays can be attributed to the 2.7 K cosmic background photons up-scattered by electrons of energies up to about 10$^{14}$ eV by the inverse Compton (IC) process. The observed flux of the TeV gamma rays, together with that of the non-thermal X-rays, gives firm constraints on the acceleration process in the SNR shell; a magnetic field of $6.5\pm2$ $\mu$G is inferred from both the synchrotron X-rays and inverse Compton TeV gamma-rays, which gives entirely consistent mechanisms that electrons of energies up to 10$^{14}$ eV are produced via the shock acceleration in SN1006.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9710272  [pdf] - 268372
Detection of Gamma Rays of Up to 50 TeV From the Crab Nebula
Comments: 19 pages, 4 figures, LaTeX2.09 with AASTeX 4.0 maros, to appear in Astrophys. J. Lett
Submitted: 1997-10-24
Gamma rays with energies greater than 7 TeV from the Crab pulsar/nebula have been observed at large zenith angles, using the Imaging Atmospheric Technique from Woomera, South Australia. CANGAROO data taken in 1992, 1993 and 1995 indicate that the energy spectrum extends up to at least 50 TeV, without a change of the index of the power law spectrum. The observed differential spectrum is \noindent $(2.01\pm 0.36)\times 10^{-13}(E/{7 TeV})^{-2.53 \pm 0.18} TeV^{-1}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ between 7 TeV and 50 TeV. There is no apparent cut-off. The spectrum for photon energies above $\sim$10 TeV allows the maximum particle acceleration energy to be inferred, and implies that this unpulsed emission does not originate near the light cylinder of the pulsar, but in the nebula where the magnetic field is not strong enough to allow pair creation from the TeV photons. The hard gamma-ray energy spectrum above 10 TeV also provides information about the varying role of seed photons for the inverse Compton process at these high energies, as well as a possible contribution of $\pi ^{\circ}$-gamma rays from proton collisions.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9707203  [pdf] - 339135
Very High Energy Gamma Rays from the Vela Pulsar Direction
Comments: 18 pages, 3 figures, LaTeX with AASTeX, accepted for publication in ApJ Letters
Submitted: 1997-07-17
We have observed the Vela pulsar region at TeV energies using the 3.8 m imaging Cherenkov telescope near Woomera, South Australia between January 1993 and March 1995. Evidence of an unpulsed gamma-ray signal has been detected at the 5.8 sigma level. The detected gamma-ray flux is (2.9 +/- 0.5 +/- 0.4) x 10^-12 photons cm^-2 sec^-1 above 2.5 +/- 1.0 TeV and the signal is consistent with steady emission over the two years. The gamma-ray emission region is offset from the Vela pulsar position to the southeast by about 0.13 deg. No pulsed emission modulated with the pulsar period has been detected and the 95 % confidence flux upper limit to the pulsed emission from the pulsar is (3.7 +/- 0.7) x 10^-13 photons cm^-2 sec^-1 above 2.5 +/- 1.0 TeV.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9707002  [pdf] - 1943593
Observation of Spectrum of TeV Gamma Rays up to 60 TeV from the Crab at the Large Zenith Angles
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, LaTeX 2.09 with epsfig.sty, to appear in proceedings of the 25th ICRC, Durban, 1997
Submitted: 1997-07-01
The CANGAROO experiment has observed gamma-ray above 7TeV from the Crab pulsar/nebula at large zenith angle in Woomera, South Australia. We report the CANGAROO data taken in 1992, 1993 and 1995, from which it appears that the energy spectrum extends at least up to 50 TeV. The observed integral spectrum is (8.4+-1.0) x 10^{-13}(E/7 TeV)^(-1.53+-0.15)cm^{-2}s^{-1} between 7 TeV and 50 TeV. In November 1996, the 3.8m mirror was recoated in Australia, and its reflectivity was improved to be about 90% as twice as before. Due to this recoating, the threshold energy of ~4 TeV for gamma rays has been attained in the observation of the Crab at large zenith angle. Here we also report the preliminary result taken in 1996.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9707012  [pdf] - 97836
Observations of Pulsars, PSR 1509-58 and PSR 1259-63, by CANGAROO 3.8 m Telescope
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure, LaTeX 2.09 with epsfig.sty, wrapfig.sty to appear in proceedings of the 25th ICRC, Durban, 1997
Submitted: 1997-07-01
The data for VHE (~TeV) gamma rays from young gamma-ray pulsar PSR1509-58 observed in 1996 with the CANGAROO 3.8m Cerenkov imaging telescope are presented, as well as the additional data from March to June of 1997. The high spin-down luminosity of the pulsar and the plerionic feature around the pulsar observed with radio and X-rays suggest that VHE gamma-ray emission is quite likely above the sensitivity of the CANGAROO telescope. The CANGAROO results on other pulsars, such as PSR1259-63, are also presented. PSR1259-63 is a highly eccentric X-ray binary system, which includes a high mass Be companion star, and a preliminary analysis on the data taken 4 months after the periastron in 1994 suggests emission of VHE gamma rays.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9707001  [pdf] - 97825
TeV Gamma Ray Emission from Southern Sky Objects and CANGAROO Project
Comments: 5 pages, 1 figure, LaTeX 2.09 with aipproc.sty & epsfig.sty, to appear in proceedings of the 4th Compton Symposium, Williamsburg, 1997
Submitted: 1997-07-01
We report recent results of the CANGAROO Collaboration on very high energy gamma ray emission from pulsars, their nebulae, SNR and AGN in the southern sky. Observations are made in South Australia using the imaging technique of detecting atmospheric Cerenkov light from gamma rays higher than about 1 TeV. The detected gamma rays are most likely produced by the inverse Compton process by electrons which also radiate synchrotron X-rays. Together with information from longer wavelengths, our results can be used to infer the strength of magnetic field in the emission region of gamma rays as well as the energy of the progenitor electrons. A description of the CANGAROO project is also given, as well as details of the new telescope of 7 m diameter which is scheduled to be in operation within two years.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9707013  [pdf] - 97837
Very High Energy Gamma Rays from the Vela Pulsar/Nebula
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figure, LaTeX2.09 with epsfig.sty, to appear in proceedings of the 25th ICRC, Durban, 1997
Submitted: 1997-07-01
We have observed the Vela pulsar region at TeV energies using the 3.8 m imaging Cherenkov telescope near Woomera, South Australia every year since 1992. This is the first concerted search for pulsed and unpulsed emission from the Vela region, and the imaging technique also allows the location of the emission within the field of view to be examined. A significant excess of gamma-ray-like events is found offset from the Vela pulsar to the southeast by about 0.13deg. The excess shows the behavior expected of gamma-ray images when the asymmetry cut is applied to the data. There is no evidence for the emission being modulated with the pulsar period -- in contrast to earlier claims of signals from the Vela pulsar direction.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9707014  [pdf] - 97838
TeV Gamma-ray Observations of Southern AGN with the CANGAROO 3.8m Telescople
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure, LaTeX 2e with epsfig.sty, wrapfig.sty to appear in proceedings of the 25th ICRC, Durban, 1997
Submitted: 1997-07-01
Since 1992 the CANGAROO 3.8m imaging telescope has been used to search for sources of TeV gamma-rays. Results are presented here for observations of four Southern Hemisphere BL-Lacs - PKS0521-365, PKS2316-423, PKS2005-489 and EXO0423-084. In addition to testing for steady DC emission, a night by night burst excess search has been performed for each source.