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Sakai, Satoshi

Normalized to: Sakai, S.

76 article(s) in total. 696 co-authors, from 1 to 22 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 9,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.11567  [pdf] - 2055858
Search for a Variation of the Fine Structure around the Supermassive Black Hole in Our Galactic Center
Comments: 7 pages + 10 pages appendix, 3 figures, version accepted for publication
Submitted: 2020-02-26
Searching for space-time variations of the constants of Nature is a promising way to search for new physics beyond General Relativity and the standard model motivated by unification theories and models of dark matter and dark energy. We propose a new way to search for a variation of the fine-structure constant using measurements of late-type evolved giant stars from the S-star cluster orbiting the supermassive black hole in our Galactic Center. A measurement of the difference between distinct absorption lines (with different sensitivity to the fine structure constant) from a star leads to a direct estimate of a variation of the fine structure constant between the star's location and Earth. Using spectroscopic measurements of 5 stars, we obtain a constraint on the relative variation of the fine structure constant below $10^{-5}$. This is the first time a varying constant of Nature is searched for around a black hole and in a high gravitational potential. This analysis shows new ways the monitoring of stars in the Galactic Center can be used to probe fundamental physics.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.01777  [pdf] - 1971335
Unprecedented variability of Sgr A* in NIR
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, accepted to ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2019-08-05
The electromagnetic counterpart to the Galactic center supermassive black hole, Sgr A*, has been observed in the near-infrared for over 20 years and is known to be highly variable. We report new Keck Telescope observations showing that Sgr A* reached much brighter flux levels in 2019 than ever measured at near-infrared wavelengths. In the K$^\prime$ band, Sgr A* reached flux levels of $\sim6$ mJy, twice the level of the previously observed peak flux from $>13,000$ measurements over 130 nights with the VLT and Keck Telescopes. We also observe a factor of 75 change in flux over a 2-hour time span with no obvious color changes between 1.6 $\mu$m and 2.1 $\mu$m. The distribution of flux variations observed this year is also significantly different than the historical distribution. Using the most comprehensive statistical model published, the probability of a single night exhibiting peak flux levels observed this year, given historical Keck observations, is less than $0.3\%$. The probability to observe the flux levels similar to all 4 nights of data in 2019 is less than $0.05\%$. This increase in brightness and variability may indicate a period of heightened activity from Sgr A* or a change in its accretion state. It may also indicate that the current model is not sufficient to model Sgr A* at high flux levels and should be updated. Potential physical origins of Sgr A*'s unprecedented brightness may be from changes in the accretion-flow as a result of the star S0-2's closest passage to the black hole in 2018 or from a delayed reaction to the approach of the dusty object G2 in 2014. Additional multi-wavelength observations will be necessary to both monitor Sgr A* for potential state changes and to constrain the physical processes responsible for its current variability.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.10731  [pdf] - 1953676
Relativistic redshift of the star S0-2 orbiting the Galactic center supermassive black hole
Comments: 78 pages, 21 figures, accepted to Science, astrometry and radial velocity measurements, and posterior chains available here, http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~ghezgroup/gc/gr/data.zip
Submitted: 2019-07-24
General Relativity predicts that a star passing close to a supermassive black hole should exhibit a relativistic redshift. We test this using observations of the Galactic center star S0-2. We combine existing spectroscopic and astrometric measurements from 1995-2017, which cover S0-2's 16-year orbit, with measurements in 2018 March to September which cover three events during its closest approach to the black hole. We detect the combination of special relativistic- and gravitational-redshift, quantified using a redshift parameter, $\Upsilon$. Our result, $\Upsilon=0.88 \pm 0.17$, is consistent with General Relativity ($\Upsilon=1$) and excludes a Newtonian model ($\Upsilon=0$ ) with a statistical significance of 5 $\sigma$.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.05490  [pdf] - 1897846
Improving Orbit Estimates for Incomplete Orbits with a New Approach to Priors -- with Applications from Black Holes to Planets
Comments: Published in AJ. 23 pages, 14 figures. Monte Carlo chains are available in the published article, or are available upon request
Submitted: 2018-09-14, last modified: 2019-06-10
We propose a new approach to Bayesian prior probability distributions (priors) that can improve orbital solutions for low-phase-coverage orbits, where data cover less than approximately 40% of an orbit. In instances of low phase coverage such as with stellar orbits in the Galactic center or with directly-imaged exoplanets, data have low constraining power and thus priors can bias parameter estimates and produce under-estimated confidence intervals. Uniform priors, which are commonly assumed in orbit fitting, are notorious for this. We propose a new observable-based prior paradigm that is based on uniformity in observables. We compare performance of this observable-based prior and of commonly assumed uniform priors using Galactic center and directly-imaged exoplanet (HR 8799) data. The observable-based prior can reduce biases in model parameters by a factor of two and helps avoid under-estimation of confidence intervals for simulations with less than about 40% phase coverage. Above this threshold, orbital solutions for objects with sufficient phase coverage such as S0-2, a short-period star at the Galactic center with full phase coverage, are consistent with previously published results. Below this threshold, the observable-based prior limits prior influence in regions of prior dominance and increases data influence. Using the observable-based prior, HR 8799 orbital analyses favor lower eccentricity orbits and provide stronger evidence that the four planets have a consistent inclination around 30 degrees to within 1-sigma. This analysis also allows for the possibility of coplanarity. We present metrics to quantify improvements in orbital estimates with different priors so that observable-based prior frameworks can be tested and implemented for other low-phase-coverage orbits.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.05293  [pdf] - 1848654
Envisioning the next decade of Galactic Center science: a laboratory for the study of the physics and astrophysics of supermassive black holes
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, submitted for Astro2020 White Paper
Submitted: 2019-03-12
As the closest example of a galactic nucleus, the Galactic center (GC) presents an exquisite laboratory for learning about supermassive black holes (SMBH) and their environment. We describe several exciting new research directions that, over the next 10 years, hold the potential to answer some of the biggest scientific questions raised in recent decades: Is General Relativity (GR) the correct description for supermassive black holes? What is the nature of star formation in extreme environments? How do stars and compact objects dynamically interact with the supermassive black hole? What physical processes drive gas accretion in low-luminosity black holes? We describe how the high sensitivity, angular resolution, and astrometric precision offered by the next generation of large ground-based telescopes with adaptive optics will help us answer these questions. First, it will be possible to obtain precision measurements of stellar orbits in the Galaxy's central potential, providing both tests of GR in the unexplored regime near a SMBH and measurements of the extended dark matter distribution that is predicted to exist at the GC. Second, we will probe stellar populations at the GC to significantly lower masses than are possible today, down to brown dwarfs. Their structure and dynamics will provide an unprecedented view of the stellar cusp around the SMBH and will distinguish between models of star formation in this extreme environment. This increase in depth will also allow us to measure the currently unknown population of compact remnants at the GC by observing their effects on luminous sources. Third, uncertainties on the mass of and distance to the SMBH can be improved by a factor of $\sim$10. Finally, we can also study the near-infrared accretion onto the black hole at unprecedented sensitivity and time resolution, which can reveal the underlying physics of black hole accretion.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.02491  [pdf] - 1842529
The Galactic Center: Improved Relative Astrometry for Velocities, Accelerations, and Orbits near the Supermassive Black Hole
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-02-07
We present improved relative astrometry for stars within the central half parsec of our Galactic Center based on data obtained with the 10 m W. M. Keck Observatory from 1995 to 2017. The new methods used to improve the astrometric precision and accuracy include correcting for local astrometric distortions, applying a magnitude dependent additive error, and more carefully removing instances of stellar confusion. Additionally, we adopt jackknife methods to calculate velocity and acceleration uncertainties. The resulting median proper motion uncertainty is 0.05 mas/yr for our complete sample of 1184 stars in the central 10'' (0.4 pc). We have detected 24 accelerating sources, 2.6 times more than the number of previously published accelerating sources, which extend out to 4'' (0.16 pc) from the black hole. Based on S0-2's orbit, our new astrometric analysis has reduced the systematic error of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) by a factor of 2. The linear drift in our astrometric reference frame is also reduced in the North-South direction by a factor of 4. We also find the first potential astrometric binary candidate S0-27 in the Galactic center. These astrometric improvements provide a foundation for future studies of the origin and dynamics of the young stars around the SMBH, the structure and dynamics of the old nuclear star cluster, the SMBH's properties derived from orbits, and tests of General Relativity (GR) in a strong gravitational field.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.08685  [pdf] - 1846893
The Galactic Center: An Improved Astrometric Reference Frame for Stellar Orbits around the Supermassive Black Hole
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2019-01-24
Precision measurements of the stars in short-period orbits around the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center are now being used to constrain general relativistic effects, such as the gravitational redshift and periapse precession. One of the largest systematic uncertainties in the measured orbits has been errors in the astrometric reference frame, which is derived from seven infrared-bright stars associated with SiO masers that have extremely accurate radio positions, measured in the Sgr A*-rest frame. We have improved the astrometric reference frame within 14'' of the Galactic Center by a factor of 2.5 in position and a factor of 5 in proper motion. In the new reference frame, Sgr A* is localized to within a position of 0.645 mas and proper motion of 0.03 mas/yr. We have removed a substantial rotation (2.25 degrees per decade), that was present in the previous less-accurate reference frame used to measure stellar orbits in the field. With our improved methods and continued monitoring of the masers, we predict that orbital precession predicted by General Relativity will become detectable in the next ~5 years.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.04898  [pdf] - 1820640
An Adaptive Optics Survey of Stellar Variability at the Galactic Center
Comments: 69 pages, 28 figures, 12 tables. Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2018-11-12
We present a $\approx 11.5$ year adaptive optics (AO) study of stellar variability and search for eclipsing binaries in the central $\sim 0.4$ pc ($\sim 10''$) of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster. We measure the photometry of 563 stars using the Keck II NIRC2 imager ($K'$-band, $\lambda_0 = 2.124 \text{ } \mu \text{m}$). We achieve a photometric uncertainty floor of $\Delta m_{K'} \sim 0.03$ ($\approx 3\%$), comparable to the highest precision achieved in other AO studies. Approximately half of our sample ($50 \pm 2 \%$) shows variability. $52 \pm 5\%$ of known early-type young stars and $43 \pm 4 \%$ of known late-type giants are variable. These variability fractions are higher than those of other young, massive star populations or late-type giants in globular clusters, and can be largely explained by two factors. First, our experiment time baseline is sensitive to long-term intrinsic stellar variability. Second, the proper motion of stars behind spatial inhomogeneities in the foreground extinction screen can lead to variability. We recover the two known Galactic center eclipsing binary systems: IRS 16SW and S4-258 (E60). We constrain the Galactic center eclipsing binary fraction of known early-type stars to be at least $2.4 \pm 1.7\%$. We find no evidence of an eclipsing binary among the young S-stars nor among the young stellar disk members. These results are consistent with the local OB eclipsing binary fraction. We identify a new periodic variable, S2-36, with a 39.43 day period. Further observations are necessary to determine the nature of this source.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.06987  [pdf] - 1698011
The LiteBIRD Satellite Mission - Sub-Kelvin Instrument
Suzuki, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Alonso, D.; Arnold, K.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barron, D.; Basak, S.; Beckman, S.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Calabrese, E.; Chinone, Y.; Cho, H-M.; Cukierman, A.; Curtis, D. W.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Dominjon, A.; Dotani, T.; Duband, L.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Duval, J. M.; Elleflot, T.; Eriksen, H. K.; Errard, J.; Fischer, J.; Fujino, T.; Funaki, T.; Fuskeland, U.; Ganga, K.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Grain, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Hamada, T.; Hasebe, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hattori, M.; Hayes, L.; Hazumi, M.; Hidehira, N.; Hill, C. A.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Iida, T.; Imada, H.; Inoue, M.; Inoue, Y.; D., K.; Ishino, H.; Jeong, O.; Kanai, H.; Kaneko, D.; Kashima, S.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Keskitalo, R.; Kibayashi, A.; Kida, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kisner, T.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Komatsu, K.; Kuo, C. L.; Kurinsky, N. A.; Kusaka, A.; Lazarian, A.; Lee, A. T.; Li, D.; Linder, E.; Maffei, B.; Mangilli, A.; Maki, M.; Matsumura, T.; Matsuura, S.; Meilhan, D.; Mima, S.; Minami, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Montier, L.; Nagai, M.; Nagasaki, T.; Nagata, R.; Nakajima, M.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Naruse, M.; Nishino, H.; Nitta, T.; Noguchi, T.; Ogawa, H.; Oguri, S.; Okada, N.; Okamoto, A.; Okamura, T.; Otani, C.; Patanchon, G.; Pisano, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Remazeilles, M.; Richards, P. L.; Sakai, S.; Sakurai, Y.; Sato, Y.; Sato, N.; Sawada, M.; Segawa, Y.; Sekimoto, Y.; Seljak, U.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shimizu, T.; Shinozaki, K.; Stompor, R.; Sugai, H.; Sugita, H.; Suzuki, J.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takaku, R.; Takakura, S.; Takatori, S.; Tanabe, D.; Taylor, E.; Thompson, K. L.; Thorne, B.; Tomaru, T.; Tomida, T.; Tomita, N.; Tristram, M.; Tucker, C.; Turin, P.; Tsujimoto, M.; Uozumi, S.; Utsunomiya, S.; Uzawa, Y.; Vansyngel, F.; Wehus, I. K.; Westbrook, B.; Willer, M.; Whitehorn, N.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, R.; Yamasaki, N.; Yamashita, T.; Yoshida, M.
Comments: 7 pages 2 figures Journal of Low Temperature Physics - Special edition - LTD17 Proceeding
Submitted: 2018-01-22, last modified: 2018-03-15
Inflation is the leading theory of the first instant of the universe. Inflation, which postulates that the universe underwent a period of rapid expansion an instant after its birth, provides convincing explanation for cosmological observations. Recent advancements in detector technology have opened opportunities to explore primordial gravitational waves generated by the inflation through B-mode (divergent-free) polarization pattern embedded in the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies. If detected, these signals would provide strong evidence for inflation, point to the correct model for inflation, and open a window to physics at ultra-high energies. LiteBIRD is a satellite mission with a goal of detecting degree-and-larger-angular-scale B-mode polarization. LiteBIRD will observe at the second Lagrange point with a 400 mm diameter telescope and 2,622 detectors. It will survey the entire sky with 15 frequency bands from 40 to 400 GHz to measure and subtract foregrounds. The U.S. LiteBIRD team is proposing to deliver sub-Kelvin instruments that include detectors and readout electronics. A lenslet-coupled sinuous antenna array will cover low-frequency bands (40 GHz to 235 GHz) with four frequency arrangements of trichroic pixels. An orthomode-transducer-coupled corrugated horn array will cover high-frequency bands (280 GHz to 402 GHz) with three types of single frequency detectors. The detectors will be made with Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers cooled to a 100 milli-Kelvin base temperature by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.The TES bolometers will be read out using digital frequency multiplexing with Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) amplifiers. Up to 78 bolometers will be multiplexed with a single SQUID amplidier. We report on the sub-Kelvin instrument design and ongoing developments for the LiteBIRD mission.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.04890  [pdf] - 1632407
Investigating the Binarity of S0-2: Implications for its Origins and Robustness as a Probe of the Laws of Gravity around a Supermassive Black Hole
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2017-09-14, last modified: 2017-12-18
The star S0-2, which orbits the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in our Galaxy with a period of 16 years, provides the strongest constraint on both the mass of the SMBH and the distance to the Galactic center. S0-2 will soon provide the first measurement of relativistic effects near a SMBH. We report the first limits on the binarity of S0-2 from radial velocity monitoring, which has implications for both understanding its origin and robustness as a probe of the central gravitational field. With 87 radial velocity measurements, which include 12 new observations presented, we have the data set to look for radial velocity variations from S0-2's orbital model. Using a Lomb-Scargle analysis and orbit fitting for potential binaries, we detect no radial velocity variation beyond S0-2's orbital motion and do not find any significant periodic signal. The lack of a binary companion does not currently distinguish between different formation scenarios for S0-2. The upper limit on the mass of a companion star ($M_{\text{comp}}$) still allowed by our results has a median upper limit of $M_{\text{comp}}$ $\sin i \leq$ 1.6 M$_{\odot}$ for periods between 1 and 150 days, the longest period to avoid tidal break up of the binary. We also investigate the impact of the remaining allowed binary system on the measurement of the relativistic redshift at S0-2's closest approach in 2018. While binary star systems are important to consider for this experiment, we find plausible binaries for S0-2 will not alter a 5$\sigma$ detection of the relativistic redshift.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.10792  [pdf] - 1584049
Testing the gravitational theory with short-period stars around our Galactic Center
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, proceedings of the 52nd Rencontres de Moriond, Gravitation Session
Submitted: 2017-05-30
Motion of short-period stars orbiting the supermassive black hole in our Galactic Center has been monitored for more than 20 years. These observations are currently offering a new way to test the gravitational theory in an unexplored regime: in a strong gravitational field, around a supermassive black hole. In this proceeding, we present three results: (i) a constraint on a hypothetical fifth force obtained by using 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars S0-2 and S0-38 ; (ii) an upper limit on the secular advance of the argument of the periastron for the star S0-2 ; (iii) a sensitivity analysis showing that the relativistic redshift of S0-2 will be measured after its closest approach to the black hole in 2018.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.07902  [pdf] - 1583728
Testing General Relativity with stellar orbits around the supermassive black hole in our Galactic center
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures, version accepted for publication in Phys. Rev. Letters. Original title "Seeking a fifth force with..." changed upon request of the PRL editors
Submitted: 2017-05-22
In this Letter, we demonstrate that short-period stars orbiting around the supermassive black hole in our Galactic Center can successfully be used to probe the gravitational theory in a strong regime. We use 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars orbiting our Galactic Center to constrain a hypothetical fifth force that arises in various scenarios motivated by the development of a unification theory or in some models of dark matter and dark energy. No deviation from General Relativity is reported and the fifth force strength is restricted to an upper 95% confidence limit of $\left|\alpha\right| < 0.016$ at a length scale of $\lambda=$ 150 astronomical units. We also derive a 95% confidence upper limit on a linear drift of the argument of periastron of the short-period star S0-2 of $\left|\dot \omega_\textrm{S0-2} \right|< 1.6 \times 10^{-3}$ rad/yr, which can be used to constrain various gravitational and astrophysical theories. This analysis provides the first fully self-consistent test of the gravitational theory using orbital dynamic in a strong gravitational regime, that of a supermassive black hole. A sensitivity analysis for future measurements is also presented.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.02441  [pdf] - 1531951
Constraining the Variability and Binary Fraction of Galactic Center Young Stars
Comments: Accepted for publication in Proceedings of IAU Symposium 322: The Multi-Messenger Astrophysics of the Galactic Centre, 2 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2016-10-07
We present constraints on the variability and binarity of young stars in the central 10 arcseconds (~0.4 pc) of the Milky Way Galactic Center (GC) using Keck Adaptive Optics data over a 12 year baseline. Given our experiment's photometric uncertainties, at least 36% of our sample's known early-type stars are variable. We identified eclipsing binary systems by searching for periodic variability. In our sample of spectroscopically confirmed and likely early-type stars, we detected the two previously discovered GC eclipsing binary systems. We derived the likely binary fraction of main sequence, early-type stars at the GC via Monte Carlo simulations of eclipsing binary systems, and find that it is at least 32% with 90% confidence.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.1356  [pdf] - 1223459
The ASTRO-H X-ray Astronomy Satellite
Takahashi, Tadayuki; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Asai, Makoto; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Azzarello, Philipp; Baluta, Chris; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Marshall; Bialas, Thomas; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brenneman, Laura; Brown, Greg; Cackett, Edward; Canavan, Edgar; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Doty, John; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi; Gandhi, Poshak; Gilmore, Kirk; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haas, Daniel; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harayama, Atsushi; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Iyomoto, Naoko; Jewell, Chris; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Katsuta, Junichiro; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawano, Taro; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangulyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kimball, Mark; Kimura, Masashi; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Konami, Saori; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Koujelev, Alex; Koyama, Katsuji; Krimm, Hans; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; LaMassa, Stephanie; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Franccois; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Masters, Candace; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; Mcguinness, Daniel; McNamara, Brian; Miko, Joseph; Miller, Jon; Miller, Eric; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Koji; Mori, Hideyuki; Moroso, Franco; Muench, Theodore; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Toshio; Mushotzky, Richard; Nagano, Housei; Nagino, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Natsukari, Chikara; Nishioka, Yusuke; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, St'ephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Pohl, Martin; Pontius, James; Porter, F. Scott; Pottschmidt, Katja; Ramsey, Brian; Reis, Rubens; Reynolds, Christopher; Ricci, Claudio; Russell, Helen; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sato, Goro; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sawada, Makoto; Serlemitsos, Peter; Seta, Hiromi; Shibano, Yasuko; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Simionescu, Aurora; Simmons, Cynthia; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Takeda, Shin-ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor; Wada, Atsushi; Watanabe, Shin; Watanabe, Tomomi; Werner, Norbert; White, Nicholas; Wilkins, Dan; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yuasa, Takayuki; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; ZuHone, John
Comments: 24 pages, 18 figures, Proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Instrumentation "Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray"
Submitted: 2014-12-03
The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions developed by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), with a planned launch in 2015. The ASTRO-H mission is equipped with a suite of sensitive instruments with the highest energy resolution ever achieved at E > 3 keV and a wide energy range spanning four decades in energy from soft X-rays to gamma-rays. The simultaneous broad band pass, coupled with the high spectral resolution of Delta E < 7 eV of the micro-calorimeter, will enable a wide variety of important science themes to be pursued. ASTRO-H is expected to provide breakthrough results in scientific areas as diverse as the large-scale structure of the Universe and its evolution, the behavior of matter in the gravitational strong field regime, the physical conditions in sites of cosmic-ray acceleration, and the distribution of dark matter in galaxy clusters at different redshifts.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.2847  [pdf] - 855791
Mission design of LiteBIRD
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2013-11-12
LiteBIRD is a next-generation satellite mission to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. On large angular scales the B-mode polarization of the CMB carries the imprint of primordial gravitational waves, and its precise measurement would provide a powerful probe of the epoch of inflation. The goal of LiteBIRD is to achieve a measurement of the characterizing tensor to scalar ratio $r$ to an uncertainty of $\delta r=0.001$. In order to achieve this goal we will employ a kilo-pixel superconducting detector array on a cryogenically cooled sub-Kelvin focal plane with an optical system at a temperature of 4~K. We are currently considering two detector array options; transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers and microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID). In this paper we give an overview of LiteBIRD and describe a TES-based polarimeter designed to achieve the target sensitivity of 2~$\mu$K$\cdot$arcmin over the frequency range 50 to 320~GHz.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.4378  [pdf] - 1152176
The ASTRO-H X-ray Observatory
Takahashi, Tadayuki; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Henri AartsFelix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Asai, Makoto; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Azzarello, Philipp; Baluta, Chris; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Mark; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brown, Greg; Cackett, Ed; Chernyakova, Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Doty, John; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi; Gandhi, Poshak; Gendreau, Keith; Gilmore, Kirk; Haas, Daniel; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawahara, Hajime; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangaluyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kimura, Masashi; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Koujelev, Alex; Koyama, Katsuji; Krimm, Hans; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; LaMassa, Stephanie; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Marchand, Genevieve; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian; Miller, Jon; Miller, Eric; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard; Nagano, Housei; Nagino, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Natsukari, Chikara; Nishioka, Yusuke; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F. Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Reis, Rubens; Reynolds, Christopher; Russell, Helen; Safi-Harb, Samar; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sanders, Jeremy; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Kosuke; Sawada, Makoto; Serlemitsos, Peter; Seta, Hiromi; Shibano, Yasuko; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Simionescu, Aurora; Simmons, Cynthia; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takeda, Shin-ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor; Wada, Atsushi; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; White, Nicholas; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yuasa, Takayuki
Comments: 22 pages, 17 figures, Proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Instrumentation "Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2012: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray"
Submitted: 2012-10-16
The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe via a suite of four instruments, covering a very wide energy range, from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. These instruments include a high-resolution, high-throughput spectrometer sensitive over 0.3-2 keV with high spectral resolution of Delta E < 7 eV, enabled by a micro-calorimeter array located in the focal plane of thin-foil X-ray optics; hard X-ray imaging spectrometers covering 5-80 keV, located in the focal plane of multilayer-coated, focusing hard X-ray mirrors; a wide-field imaging spectrometer sensitive over 0.4-12 keV, with an X-ray CCD camera in the focal plane of a soft X-ray telescope; and a non-focusing Compton-camera type soft gamma-ray detector, sensitive in the 40-600 keV band. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution, will enable the pursuit of a wide variety of important science themes.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1108.3157  [pdf] - 398626
The SPICA coronagraphic instrument (SCI) for the study of exoplanets
Comments: 22 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2011-08-16
We present the SPICA Coronagraphic Instrument (SCI), which has been designed for a concentrated study of extra-solar planets (exoplanets). SPICA mission provides us with a unique opportunity to make high contrast observations because of its large telescope aperture, the simple pupil shape, and the capability for making infrared observations from space. The primary objectives for the SCI are the direct coronagraphic detection and spectroscopy of Jovian exoplanets in infrared, while the monitoring of transiting planets is another important target. The specification and an overview of the design of the instrument are shown. In the SCI, coronagraphic and non-coronagraphic modes are applicable for both an imaging and a spectroscopy. The core wavelength range and the goal contrast of the coronagraphic mode are 3.5--27$\mu$m, and 10$^{-6}$, respectively. Two complemental designs of binary shaped pupil mask coronagraph are presented. The SCI has capability of simultaneous observations of one target using two channels, a short channel with an InSb detector and a long wavelength channel with a Si:As detector. We also give a report on the current progress in the development of key technologies for the SCI.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.4705  [pdf] - 1040801
A GALEX Ultraviolet Imaging Survey of Galaxies in the Local Volume
Comments: submitted to ApJS, revised per referee's comments; accepted Oct. 30 w/o further revision; 37 pages; figure 6 omitted due to size; figure available from http://users.obs.carnegiescience.edu/jlee/papers
Submitted: 2010-09-23, last modified: 2010-11-09
We present results from a GALEX ultraviolet (UV) survey of a complete sample of 390 galaxies within ~11 Mpc of the Milky Way. The UV data are a key component of the composite Local Volume Legacy (LVL), an ultraviolet-to-infrared imaging program designed to provide an inventory of dust and star formation in nearby spiral and irregular galaxies. The ensemble dataset is an especially valuable resource for studying star formation in dwarf galaxies, which comprise over 80% of the sample. We describe the GALEX survey programs which obtained the data and provide a catalog of far-UV (~1500 Angstroms) and near-UV (~2200 Angstroms) integrated photometry. General UV properties of the sample are briefly discussed. We compute two measures of the global star formation efficiency, the SFR per unit HI gas mass and the SFR per unit stellar mass, to illustrate the significant differences that can arise in our understanding of dwarf galaxies when the FUV is used to measure the SFR instead of H-alpha. We find that dwarf galaxies may not be as drastically inefficient in coverting gas into stars as suggested by prior H-alpha studies. In this context, we also examine the UV properties of late-type dwarf galaxies that appear to be devoid of star formation because they were not detected in previous H-alpha narrowband observations. Nearly all such galaxies in our sample are detected in the FUV, and have FUV SFRs that fall below the limit where the H-alpha flux is robust to Poisson fluctuations in the formation of massive stars. The UV colors and star formation efficiencies of H-alpha-undetected, UV-bright dwarf irregulars appear to be relatively unremarkable with respect to those exhibited by the general population of star-forming galaxies.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.4972  [pdf] - 1041498
The ASTRO-H Mission
Takahashi, Tadayuki; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Felix; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Mark; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brown, Greg; Chernyakova, Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; Cottam, Jean; Crow, John; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gandhi, Poshak; Gendreau, Keith; Gilmore, Kirk; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Naoki; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Katagiri, Hideaki; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangaluyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Kotani, Taro; Koyama, Katsuji; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; Miller, Jon; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Koji; Mori, Hideyuki; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Toshio; Mushotzky, Richard; Nakagawa, Yujin; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Parmer, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Porter, Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Reynolds, Christopher; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sambruna, Rita; Sato, Goro; Sato, Yoichi; Serlemitsos, Peter; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tozuka, Miyako; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Watanabe, Shin; White, Nicholas; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa
Comments: 18 pages, 12 figures, Proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Instrumentation "Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2010: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray"
Submitted: 2010-10-24
The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe by performing high-resolution, high-throughput spectroscopy with moderate angular resolution. ASTRO-H covers very wide energy range from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. ASTRO-H allows a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (5-80 keV) provided by multilayer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3-12 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry an X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope (0.4-12 keV) and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector (40-600 keV) . The micro-calorimeter system is developed by an international collaboration led by ISAS/JAXA and NASA. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution of Delta E ~7 eV provided by the micro-calorimeter will enable a wide variety of important science themes to be pursued.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1003.0961  [pdf] - 1025530
The Calibration of Monochromatic Far-Infrared Star Formation Rate Indicators
Comments: 69 pages, 19 figures, 2 tables; accepted for publication on ApJ
Submitted: 2010-03-03
(Abridged) Spitzer data at 24, 70, and 160 micron and ground-based H-alpha images are analyzed for a sample of 189 nearby star-forming and starburst galaxies to investigate whether reliable star formation rate (SFR) indicators can be defined using the monochromatic infrared dust emission centered at 70 and 160 micron. We compare recently published recipes for SFR measures using combinations of the 24 micron and observed H-alpha luminosities with those using 24 micron luminosity alone. From these comparisons, we derive a reference SFR indicator for use in our analysis. Linear correlations between SFR and the 70 and 160 micron luminosity are found for L(70)>=1.4x10^{42} erg/s and L(160)>=2x10^{42} erg/s, corresponding to SFR>=0.1-0.3 M_sun/yr. Below those two luminosity limits, the relation between SFR and 70 micron (160 micron) luminosity is non-linear and SFR calibrations become problematic. The dispersion of the data around the mean trend increases for increasing wavelength, becoming about 25% (factor ~2) larger at 70 (160) micron than at 24 micron. The increasing dispersion is likely an effect of the increasing contribution to the infrared emission of dust heated by stellar populations not associated with the current star formation. The non-linear relation between SFR and the 70 and 160 micron emission at faint galaxy luminosities suggests that the increasing transparency of the interstellar medium, decreasing effective dust temperature, and decreasing filling factor of star forming regions across the galaxy become important factors for decreasing luminosity. The SFR calibrations are provided for galaxies with oxygen abundance 12+Log(O/H)>8.1. At lower metallicity the infrared luminosity no longer reliably traces the SFR because galaxies are less dusty and more transparent.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.5205  [pdf] - 367660
Comparison of H-alpha and UV Star Formation Rates in the Local Volume: Systematic Discrepancies for Dwarf Galaxies
Comments: 29 pages, 10 figures, 2 tables, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2009-09-29
(abridged) Using a complete sample of ~300 star-forming galaxies within 11 Mpc, we evaluate the consistency between star formation rates (SFRs) inferred from the far ultraviolet (FUV) non-ionizing continuum and H-alpha nebular emission, assuming standard conversion recipes in which the SFR scales linearly with luminosity at a given wavelength. Our analysis probes SFRs over 5 orders of magnitude, down to ultra-low activities on the order of ~0.0001 M_sun/yr. The data are drawn from the 11 Mpc H-alpha and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey (11HUGS), which has obtained H-alpha fluxes from ground-based narrowband imaging, and UV fluxes from imaging with GALEX. For normal spiral galaxies (SFR~1 M_sun/yr), our results are consistent with previous work which has shown that FUV SFRs tend to be lower than H-alpha SFRs before accounting for internal dust attenuation, but that there is relative consistency between the two tracers after proper corrections are applied. However, a puzzle is encountered at the faint end of the luminosity function. As lower luminosity dwarf galaxies, roughly less active than the Small Magellanic Cloud, are examined, H-alpha tends to increasingly under-predict the SFR relative to the FUV. Although past studies have suggested similar trends, this is the first time this effect is probed with a statistical sample for galaxies with SFR~<0.1 M_sun/yr. A range of standard explanations does not appear to be able to account for the magnitude of the systematic. Some recent work has argued for an IMF which is deficient in high mass stars in dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies, and we also consider this scenario.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.4722  [pdf] - 1003119
The Spitzer Local Volume Legacy: Survey Description and Infrared Photometry
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ; Figures 1,8,9 provided as jpegs
Submitted: 2009-07-27, last modified: 2009-08-20
The survey description and the near-, mid-, and far-infrared flux properties are presented for the 258 galaxies in the Local Volume Legacy (LVL). LVL is a Spitzer Space Telescope legacy program that surveys the local universe out to 11 Mpc, built upon a foundation of ultraviolet, H-alpha, and HST imaging from 11HUGS (11 Mpc H-alpha and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey) and ANGST (ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury). LVL covers an unbiased, representative, and statistically robust sample of nearby star-forming galaxies, exploiting the highest extragalactic spatial resolution achievable with Spitzer. As a result of its approximately volume-limited nature, LVL augments previous Spitzer observations of present-day galaxies with improved sampling of the low-luminosity galaxy population. The collection of LVL galaxies shows a large spread in mid-infrared colors, likely due to the conspicuous deficiency of 8um PAH emission from low-metallicity, low-luminosity galaxies. Conversely, the far-infrared emission tightly tracks the total infrared emission, with a dispersion in their flux ratio of only 0.1 dex. In terms of the relation between infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio and ultraviolet spectral slope, the LVL sample shows redder colors and/or lower infrared-to-ultraviolet ratios than starburst galaxies, suggesting that reprocessing by dust is less important in the lower mass systems that dominate the LVL sample. Comparisons with theoretical models suggest that the amplitude of deviations from the relation found for starburst galaxies correlates with the age of the stellar populations that dominate the ultraviolet/optical luminosities.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.5132  [pdf] - 133428
Dwarf Galaxy Starburst Statistics in the Local Volume
Comments: Dwarf Galaxy Starburst Statistics in the Local Volume
Submitted: 2008-10-28
An unresolved question in galaxy evolution is whether the star formation histories of low mass systems are preferentially dominated by starbursts or modes that are more quiescent and continuous. Here, we quantify the prevalence of global starbursts in dwarf galaxies at the present epoch, and infer their characteristic durations and amplitudes. The analysis is based on the H-alpha component of the 11 Mpc H-alpha UV Galaxy Survey (11HUGS), which is providing H-alpha and GALEX UV imaging for an approximately volume-limited sample of ~300 star-forming galaxies within 11 Mpc. We first examine the completeness properties of the sample, and then directly tally the number of bursting dwarfs and compute the fraction of star formation that is concentrated in such systems. Our results are consistent with a picture where dwarfs that are currently experiencing massive global bursts are just the ~6% tip of a low-mass galaxy iceberg. Moreover, bursts are only responsible for about a quarter of the total star formation in the overall dwarf population, so the majority of stars in low-mass systems are not formed in this mode today. Spirals and irregulars devoid of H-alpha emission are rare, indicating that the complete cessation of star formation generally does not occur in such galaxies and is not characteristic of the inter-burst state, at least for the more luminous systems with M(B)<-15. The starburst statistics presented here directly constrain the duty cycle and the average burst amplitude under the simplest assumptions where all dwarf irregulars share a common star formation history and undergo similar bursts cycles with equal probability. Uncertainties in such assumptions are discussed in the context of previous work.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.0568  [pdf] - 315051
The Extragalactic Distance Scale without Cepheids
Comments: Accepted by ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2008-09-03
Distances of galaxies in the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project are based on the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. An alternative basis is the tip of the red giant branch. Using archival HST data, we calibrate the infrared Tully-Fisher relation using 14 galaxies with tip of the red giant branch measurements. Compared with the Key Project, a higher value of the Hubble Constant by 10% +/- 7% is inferred. Within the errors the two distance scales are therefore consistent. We describe the additional data required for a conclusive tip of the red giant branch measurement of H_0.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.1151  [pdf] - 1000862
VLBI Astrometry of AGB Variables with VERA -- A Semiregular Variable S Crateris --
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ (Vol.60, No.5, October 25, VERA special issue)
Submitted: 2008-08-08
We present a distance measurement for the semiregular variable S Crateris (S Crt) based on its annual parallax. With the unique dual beam system of the VLBI Exploration for Radio Astrometry (VERA) telescopes, we measured the absolute proper motion of a water maser spot associated with S Crt, referred to the quasar J1147-0724 located at an angular separation of 1.23$^{\circ}$. In observations spanning nearly two years, we have detected the maser spot at the LSR velocity of 34.7 km s$^{-1}$, for which we measured the annual parallax of 2.33$\pm$0.13 mas corresponding to a distance of 430$^{+25}_{-23}$ pc. This measurement has an accuracy one order of magnitude better than the parallax measurements of HIPPARCOS. The angular distribution and three-dimensional velocity field of maser spots indicate a bipolar outflow with the flow axis along northeast-southwest direction. Using the distance and photospheric temperature, we estimate the stellar radius of S Crt and compare it with those of Mira variables.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.0546  [pdf] - 1000852
Astrometry of H$_{2}$O Masers in Nearby Star-Forming Regions with VERA. III. IRAS 22198+6336 in L1204G
Comments: 15 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ (Vol.60, No.5, October 25, VERA special issue)
Submitted: 2008-08-05
We present results of multi-epoch VLBI observations with VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry) of the 22 GHz H$_{2}$O masers associated with a young stellar object (YSO) IRAS 22198+6336 in a dark cloud L1204G. Based on the phase-referencing VLBI astrometry, we derive an annual parallax of IRAS 22198+6336 to be 1.309$\pm$0.047 mas, corresponding to the distance of 764$\pm$27 pc from the Sun. Although the most principal error source of our astrometry is attributed to the internal structure of the maser spots, we successfully reduce the errors in the derived annual parallax by employing the position measurements for all of the 26 detected maser spots. Based on this result, we reanalyze the spectral energy distribution (SED) of IRAS 22198+6336 and find that the bolometric luminosity and total mass of IRAS 22198+6336 are 450$L_{\odot}$ and 7$M_{\odot}$, respectively. These values are consistent with an intermediate-mass YSO deeply embedded in the dense dust core, which has been proposed to be an intermediate-mass counterpart of a low-mass Class 0 source. In addition, we obtain absolute proper motions of the H$_{2}$O masers for the most blue-shifted components. We propose that the collimated jets aligned along the east-west direction are the most plausible explanation for the origin of the detected maser features.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.0641  [pdf] - 1000856
Distance to VY Canis Majoris with VERA
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ, VERA special issue
Submitted: 2008-08-05
We report astrometric observations of H2O masers around the red supergiant VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) carried out with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). Based on astrometric monitoring for 13 months, we successfully measured a trigonometric parallax of 0.88 +/- 0.08 mas, corresponding to a distance of 1.14 +0.11/-0.09 kpc. This is the most accurate distance to VY CMa and the first one based on an annual parallax measurement. The luminosity of VY CMa has been overestimated due to a previously accepted distance. With our result, we re-estimate the luminosity of VY CMa to be (3 +/- 0.5) x 10^5 L_sun using the bolometric flux integrated over optical and IR wavelengths. This improved luminosity value makes location of VY CMa on the Hertzsprung-Russel (HR) diagram much closer to the theoretically allowable zone (i.e. the left side of the Hayashi track) than previous ones, though uncertainty in the effective temperature of the stellar surface still does not permit us to make a final conclusion.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.2035  [pdf] - 14471
An H-alpha Imaging Survey of Galaxies in the Local 11 Mpc Volume
Comments: 74 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series
Submitted: 2008-07-13
As part of a broader effort to characterize the population of star-forming galaxies in the local universe, we have carried out an H-alpha+[NII] imaging survey for an essentially volume-limited sample of galaxies within 11 Mpc of the Milky Way. This paper describes the design of the survey, the observation, data processing, and calibration procedures, and the characteristics of the galaxy sample. The main product of the paper is a catalog of integrated H-alpha fluxes, luminosities, and equivalent widths for the galaxies in the sample. We briefly discuss the completeness properties of the survey and compare the distribution of the sample and its star formation properties to other large H-alpha imaging surveys. These data form the foundation for a series of follow-up studies of the star formation properties of the local volume, and the properties and duty cycles of star formation bursts in dwarf galaxies.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:0806.4635  [pdf] - 1000802
Distance to NGC 281 in a Galactic Fragmenting Superbubble: Parallax Measurements with VERA
Comments: 16 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ, VERA special issue
Submitted: 2008-06-27
We have used the Japanese VLBI array VERA to perform high-precision astrometry of an H2O maser source in the Galactic star-forming region NGC 281 West, which has been considered to be part of a 300-pc superbubble. We successfully detected a trigonometric parallax of 0.355+/-0.030 mas, corresponding to a source distance of 2.82+/-0.24 kpc. Our direct distance determination of NGC 281 has resolved the large distance discrepancy between previous photometric and kinematic studies; likely NGC 281 is in the far side of the Perseus spiral arm. The source distance as well as the absolute proper motions were used to demonstrate the 3D structure and expansion of the NGC 281 superbubble, ~650 pc in size parallel to the Galactic disk and with a shape slightly elongated along the disk or spherical, but not vertically elongated, indicating the superbubble expansion may be confined to the disk. We estimate the expansion velocity of the superbubble as ~20 km/s both perpendicular to and parallel to the Galactic disk with a consistent timescale of ~20 Myr.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:0712.1226  [pdf] - 7881
Photometric properties of Local Volume dwarf galaxies
Comments: 14 pages, 11 figures, 2 tables, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2007-12-07
We present surface photometry and metallicity measurements for 104 nearby dwarf galaxies imaged with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. In addition, we carried out photometry for 26 galaxies of the sample and for Sextans B on images of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our sample comprises dwarf spheroidal, irregular and transition type galaxies located within ~10 Mpc in the field and in nearby groups: M81, Centaurus A, Sculptor, and Canes Venatici I cloud. It is found that the early-type galaxies have on average higher metallicity at a given luminosity in comparison to the late-type objects. Dwarf galaxies with M_B > -12 -- -13 mag deviate toward larger scale lengths from the scale length -- luminosity relation common for spiral galaxies, h \propto L^{0.5}_B. The following correlations between fundamental parameters of the galaxies are consistent with expectations if there is pronounced gas-loss through galactic winds: 1) between the luminosity of early-type dwarf galaxies and the mean metallicity of constituent red giant branch stars, Z ~ L^0.4, 2) between mean surface brightness within the 25 mag/sq.arcsec isophote and the corresponding absolute magnitude in the V and I bands, SB_25 ~ 0.3 M_25, and 3) between the central surface brightness (or effective surface brightness) and integrated absolute magnitude of galaxies in the V and I bands, SB_0 ~ 0.5 M_L, SB_e ~ 0.5 M_e. The knowledge of basic photometric parameters for a large sample of dwarf galaxies is essential for a better understanding of their evolution.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:0711.1390  [pdf] - 6858
The Star Formation Demographics of Galaxies in the Local Volume
Comments: 5 pages, accepted for publication in ApJL pending editing for length
Submitted: 2007-11-08
We examine the connections between the current global star formation activity, luminosity, dynamical mass and morphology of galaxies in the Local Volume, using H-alpha data from the 11 Mpc H-alpha and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey (11HUGS). Taking the equivalent width (EW) of the H-alpha emission line as a tracer of the specific star formation rate, we analyze the distribution of galaxies in the M_B-EW and rotational velocity (V_{max})-EW planes. Star-forming galaxies show two characteristic transitions in these planes. A narrowing of the galaxy locus occurs at M_B~-15 and V_{max}~50 km/s, where the scatter in the logarithmic EWs drops by a factor of two as the luminosities/masses increase, and galaxy morphologies shift from predominately irregular to late-type spiral. Another transition occurs at M_B~-19 and V_{max}~120 km/s, above which the sequence turns off toward lower EWs and becomes mostly populated by intermediate and early-type bulge-prominent spirals. Between these two transitions, the mean logarithmic EW appears to remain constant at 30 A. We comment on how these features reflect established empirical relationships, and provide clues for identifying the large-scale physical processes that both drive and regulate star formation, with emphasis on the low-mass galaxies that dominate our approximately volume-limited sample.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:0709.1626  [pdf] - 1000490
Astrometry of Water Maser Sources in Nearby Molecular Clouds with VERA - II. SVS 13 in NGC 1333
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures. PASJ, in press (2008, Vol. 60, No. 1)
Submitted: 2007-09-11, last modified: 2007-09-12
We report on the results of multi-epoch VLBI observations with VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry) of the 22 GHz H2O masers associated with the young stellar object SVS 13 in the NGC 1333 region. We have carried out phase-referencing VLBI astrometry and measured an annual parallax of the maser features in SVS 13 of 4.25+/-0.32 mas, corresponding to the distance of 235+/-18 pc from the Sun. Our result is consistent with a photometric distance of 220 pc previously reported. Even though the maser features were detectable only for 6 months, the present results provide the distance to NGC 1333 with much higher accuracy than photometric methods. The absolute positions and proper motions have been derived, revealing that the H2O masers with the LSR (local standard of rest) velocities of 7-8 km s-1 are most likely associated with VLA4A, which is a radio counterpart of SVS 13. The origin of the observed proper motions of the maser features are currently difficult to attribute to either the jet or the rotating circumstellar disk associated with VLA4A, which should be investigated through future high-resolution astrometric observations of VLA4A and other radio sources in NGC 1333.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:0709.0820  [pdf] - 1000488
Astrometry of Galactic Star Forming Region Sharpless 269 with VERA : Parallax Measurements and Constraint on Outer Rotation Curve
Comments: 7 pages and 4 figures, Accepted by PASJ (Vol. 59, No. 5, October 25, 2007 issue)
Submitted: 2007-09-06
We have performed high-precision astrometry of H2O maser sources in Galactic star forming region Sharpless 269 (S269) with VERA. We have successfully detected a trigonometric parallax of 189+/-8 micro-arcsec, corresponding to the source distance of 5.28 +0.24/-0.22 kpc. This is the smallest parallax ever measured, and the first one detected beyond 5 kpc. The source distance as well as proper motions are used to constrain the outer rotation curve of the Galaxy, demonstrating that the difference of rotation velocities at the Sun and at S269 (which is 13.1 kpc away from the Galaxy's center) is less than 3%. This gives the strongest constraint on the flatness of the outer rotation curve and provides a direct confirmation on the existence of large amount of dark matter in the Galaxy's outer disk.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:0705.3792  [pdf] - 1000403
Distance to Orion KL Measured with VERA
Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures. PASJ, in press (Vol. 59, No. 5, October 25, 2007 issue)
Submitted: 2007-05-25
We present the initial results of multi-epoch VLBI observations of the 22 GHz H2O masers in the Orion KL region with VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry). With the VERA dual-beam receiving system, we have carried out phase-referencing VLBI astrometry and successfully detected an annual parallax of Orion KL to be 2.29+/-0.10 mas, corresponding to the distance of 437+/-19 pc from the Sun. The distance to Orion KL is determined for the first time with the annual parallax method in these observations. Although this value is consistent with that of the previously reported, 480+/-80 pc, which is estimated from the statistical parallax method using proper motions and radial velocities of the H2O maser features, our new results provide the much more accurate value with an uncertainty of only 4%. In addition to the annual parallax, we have detected an absolute proper motion of the maser feature, suggesting an outflow motion powered by the radio source I along with the systematic motion of source I itself.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:0704.3315  [pdf] - 1000377
Absolute Proper Motions of H2O Masers Away from the Galactic Plane Measured with VERA in the "Superbubble" Region NGC 281
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, PASJ in press (Vol. 59, No. 4; August 25, 2007 issue)
Submitted: 2007-04-25
We report on absolute proper-motion measurements of an H2O maser source in the NGC 281 West molecular cloud, which is located ~320 pc above the Galactic plane and is associated with an HI loop extending from the Galactic plane. We have conducted multi-epoch phase-referencing observations of the maser source with VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry) over a monitoring period of 6 months since May 2006. We find that the H2O maser features in NGC 281 West are systematically moving toward the southwest and further away from the Galactic plane with a vertical velocity of ~20-30 km/s at its estimated distance of 2.2-3.5 kpc. Our new results provide the most direct evidence that the gas in the NGC 281 region on the HI loop was blown out from the Galactic plane, most likely in a superbubble driven by multiple or sequential supernova explosions in the Galactic plane.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0701518  [pdf] - 316766
Tip of the Red Giant Branch Distances. II. Zero-Point Calibration
Comments: accepted for publication into ApJ
Submitted: 2007-01-17, last modified: 2007-02-20
The luminosity of the Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) provides an excellent measure of galaxy distances and is easily determined in the resolved images of nearby galaxies observed with Hubble Space Telescope. There is now a large amount of archival data relevant to the TRGB methodology and which offers comparisons with other distance estimators. Zero-point issues related to the TRGB distance scale are reviewed in this paper. Consideration is given to the metallicity dependence of the TRGB, the transformations between HST flight systems and Johnson-Cousins photometry, the absolute magnitude scale based on Horizontal Branch measurements, and the effects of reddening. The zero-point of the TRGB is established with a statistical accuracy of 1%, modulo the uncertainty in the magnitude of the Horizontal Branch, with a typical rms uncertainty of 3% in individual galaxy distances at high Galactic latitude. The zero-point is consistent with the Cepheids period-luminosity relation scale but invites reconsideration of the claimed metallicity dependence with that method. The maser distance to NGC 4258 is consistent with TRGB but presently has lower accuracy.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603091  [pdf] - 80300
The Hubble flow around the CenA / M83 galaxy complex
Comments: 31 pages including 9 figures and 3 tables. Accepted for publication in Astronomical Journal, 133, N0. 2 (February), 2007
Submitted: 2006-03-03, last modified: 2006-10-20
We present HST/ACS images and color-magnitude diagrams for 24 nearby galaxies in and near the constellation of Centaurus with radial velocities V_LG < 550 km/s. Distances are determined based on the luminosities of stars at the tip of the red giant branch that range from 3.0 Mpc to 6.5 Mpc. The galaxies are concentrated in two spatially separated groups around Cen A (NGC 5128) and M 83 (NGC 5236). The Cen A group itself has a mean distance of 3.76 +/-0.05 Mpc, a velocity dispersion of 136 km/s, a mean harmonic radius of 192 kpc, and an estimated orbital/virial mass of (6.4 - 8.1) x 10^12 M_sun. This elliptical dominated group is found to have a relatively high mass-to-light ratio: M/L_B = 125 M_sun/L_sun. For the M 83 group we derived a mean distance of 4.79 +/-0.10 Mpc, a velocity dispersion of 61 km/s, a mean harmonic radius of 89 kpc, and estimated orbital/virial mass of (0.8 - 0.9) x 10^12 M_sun. This spiral dominated group is found to have a relatively low M/L_B = 34 M_sun/L_sun. The radius of the zero-velocity surface around Cen A lies at R_0 = 1.40 +/-0.11 Mpc, implying a total mass within R_0 of M_T = (6.0 +/-1.4) x 10^12 M_sun. This value is in good agreement with the Cen A virial/orbital mass estimates and provides confirmation of the relatively high M/L_B of this elliptical-dominated group. The centroids of both the groups, as well as surrounding field galaxies, have very small peculiar velocities, < 25 km/s, with respect to the local Hubble flow with H_0 = 68 km/s/Mpc.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603826  [pdf] - 81035
Witnessing galaxy preprocessing in the local Universe: the case of a star-bursting group falling into Abell 1367
Comments: 23 pages, 13 figures, 5 table. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics main journal. Version with high-resolution images available at http://goldmine.mib.infn.it/papers/preprocessing.html
Submitted: 2006-03-30
We present a multiwavelength analysis of a compact group of galaxies infalling at high speed into the dynamically young cluster Abell 1367. Peculiar morphologies and unusually high Halpha emission are associated with two giant galaxies and at least ten dwarfs/extragalactic HII regions, making this group the region with the highest density of star formation activity ever observed in the local clusters. Moreover Halpha imaging observations reveal extraordinary complex trails of ionized gas behind the galaxies, with projected lengths exceeding 150 kpc. These unique cometary trails mark the gaseous trajectory of galaxies, witnessing their dive into the hot cluster intergalactic medium. Under the combined action of tidal forces among group members and the ram-pressure by the cluster ambient medium, the group galaxies were fragmented and the ionized gas was blown out. The properties of this group suggest that environmental effects within infalling groups may have represented a preprocessing step of the galaxy evolution during the high redshift cluster assembly phase.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603380  [pdf] - 80589
Associations of Dwarf Galaxies
Comments: 50 pages, 2 tables, 15 encapsulated figures, 1 (3 part) jpg figure. Submitted to Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2006-03-14
Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Cameras for Surveys has been used to determine accurate distances for 20 galaxies from measurements of the luminosity of the brightest red giant branch stars. Five associations of dwarf galaxies that had originally been identified based on strong correlations on the plane of the sky and in velocity are shown to be equally well correlated in distance. Two more associations with similar properties have been discovered. Another association is identified that is suggested to be unbound through tidal disruption. The associations have the spatial and kinematic properties expected of bound structures with 1 - 10 x 10^11 solar mass. However, these entities have little light with the consequence that mass-to-light ratios are in the range 100 - 1000 in solar units. Within a well surveyed volume extending to 3 Mpc, all but one known galaxy lies within one of the groups or associations that have been identified.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603073  [pdf] - 80282
Tip of the Red Giant Branch Distances. I. Optimization of a Maximum Likelihood Algorithm
Comments: submitted to AJ
Submitted: 2006-03-03
Accurate distances to galaxies can be determined from the luminosities of stars at the Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB). We use a Maximum Likelihood algorithm to locate the TRGB in galaxy color-magnitude diagrams. The algorithm is optimized by introducing reliable photometric errors and a completeness characterization determined with artificial star experiments. The program is extensively tested using Monte-Carlo simulations, artificial galaxies, and a sample of nearby dwarf galaxies observed with HST/WFPC2 and ACS. Our procedure is shown to be reliable, to have good accuracy, and to not introduce any systematic errors. The methodology is especially useful in cases where the TRGB approaches the photometric limit and/or the RGB is poorly populated.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0511648  [pdf] - 78006
ACS imaging of 25 galaxies in nearby groups and in the field
Comments: 17 pages, 8 figures, accepted to AJ
Submitted: 2005-11-22
We present HST/ACS images and color-magnitude diagrams for 25 nearby galaxies with radial velocities V_LG < 500 km/s. Distances are determined based on the luminosities of stars at the tip of the red giant branch that range from 2 Mpc to 12 Mpc. Two of the galaxies, NGC 4163 and IC 4662, are found to be the nearest known representatives of blue compact dwarf (BCD) objects. Using high-quality data on distances and radial velocities of 110 nearby field galaxies, we derive their mean Hubble ratio to be 68 km/(s Mpc) with standard deviation of 15 km/(s Mpc). Peculiar velocities of most of the galaxies, V_pec = V_LG - 68 D, follow a Gaussian distribution with sigma_v = 63 km/s, but with a tail towards high negative values. Our data displays the known correlation between peculiar velocity and galaxy elevation above the Local Supercluster plane. The small observed fraction of galaxies with high peculiar velocities, V_pec < -500 km/s, may be understood as objects associated with nearby groups (Coma I, Eridanus) outside the Local volume.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0505180  [pdf] - 72950
Multi-epoch VERA Observations of H2O masers in OH 43.8-0.1
Comments: 10 pages, 2 figures and 2 tables included, to appear in PASJ (vol. 57, #4, 2005, August)
Submitted: 2005-05-09
We report on the multi-epoch observations of H2O maser emission in star forming region OH 43.8-0.1 carried out with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). The large-scale maser distributions obtained by single-beam VLBI mapping reveal new maser spots scattered in area of 0.7 x 1.0 arcsec, in addition to a `shell-like' structure with a scale of 0.3 x 0.5 arcsec which was previously mapped by Downes et al.(1979). Proper motions are also obtained for 43 spots based on 5-epoch monitoring with a time span of 281 days. The distributions of proper motions show a systematic outflow in the north-south direction with an expansion velocity of ~8 km/s, and overall distributions of maser spots as well as proper motions are better represented by a bipolar flow plus a central maser cluster with a complex structure, rather than a shell with a uniform expansion such as those found in Cep A R5 and W75N VLA2. The distance to OH 43.8-0.1 is also estimated based on the statistical parallax, yielding D = 2.8 +/- 0.5 kpc. This distance is consistent with a near kinematic distance and rules out a far kinematics distance (~9 kpc), and the LSR velocity of OH 43.8-0.1 combined with the distance provides a constraint on the flatness of the galactic rotation curve, that there is no systematic difference in rotation speeds at the Sun and at the position of OH 43.8-0.1, which is located at the galacto-centric radius of ~6.3 kpc.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0405140  [pdf] - 1233364
VERA Observation of the W49N H2O Maser Outburst in 2003 October
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures included, to appear in PASJ letter (Vol.56, #3, 2004 June)
Submitted: 2004-05-07
We report on a strong outburst of the W49N H2O maser observed with VERA. Single-dish monitoring with VERA 20 m telescopes detected a strong outburst of the maser feature at V_LSR = -30.7 km/s in 2003 October. The outburst had a duration of ~100 days and a peak intensity of 7.9 x 10^4 Jy, being one of the strongest outbursts in W49N observed so far. VLBI observations with the VERA array were also carried out near to the maximum phase of the outburst, and the outburst spot was identified in the VLBI map. While the map was in good agreement with previous studies, showing three major concentrations of maser spots, we found a newly formed arc-like structure in the central maser concentration, which may be a shock front powered by a forming star or a star cluster. The outburst spot was found to be located on the arc-like structure, indicating a possible connection of the present outburst to a shock phenomenon.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0402499  [pdf] - 63013
The Effect of Metallicity on Cepheid-Based Distances
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. 56 pages, 16 figures (jpg). Version with embedded figures can be retrieved from http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~shoko/pub.html
Submitted: 2004-02-20
We have used the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain V and I images of seven nearby galaxies. For each, we have measured a distance using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method. By comparing the TRGB distances to published Cepheid distances, we investigate the metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. Our sample is supplemented by 10 additional galaxies for which both TRGB and Cepheid distances are available in the literature, thus providing a uniform coverage in Cepheid abundances between 1/20 and 2 (O/H)solar. We find that the difference between Cepheid and TRGB distances decreases monotonically with increasing Cepheid abundance, consistent with a mean metallicity dependence of the Cepheid distance moduli of (delta(m-M))/(delta[O/H]) = -0.24 +- 0.05 mag/dex.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0306060  [pdf] - 1233152
First Fringe Detection with VERA's Dual-Beam System and its Phase Referencing Capability
Comments: 9 pages, 3 figures included, to appear in PASJ letter (Vol.55, #4, 2003 August)
Submitted: 2003-06-03
We present the results of first dual-beam observations with VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry). The first dual-beam observations of a pair of H2O maser sources W49N and OH43.8-0.1 have been carried out on 2002 May 29 and July 23, and fringes of H2O maser lines at 22 GHz have been successfully detected. While the residual fringe phases of both sources show rapid variations over 360 degree due to the atmospheric fluctuation, the differential phase between the two sources remains constant for 1 hour with r.m.s. of 8 degree, demonstrating that the atmospheric phase fluctuation is removed effectively by the dual-beam phase referencing. The analysis based on Allan standard deviation reveals that the differential phase is mostly dominated by white phase noise, and the coherence function calculated from the differential phase shows that after phase referencing the fringe visibility can be integrated for arbitrarily long time. These results demonstrate VERA's high capability of phase referencing, indicating that VERA is a promising tool for phase referencing VLBI astrometry at 10 microarcsec level accuracy.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0207041  [pdf] - 50184
Discovery of a Group of Star-Forming Dwarf Galaxies in Abell 1367
Comments: 33 pages, 8 figures; Figures 1-7 are in gif format. For a complete postscript version, see http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~shoko/halpha.html. accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2002-07-01
We describe the properties of a remarkable group of actively star-forming dwarf galaxies and HII galaxies in the Abell 1367 cluster, which were discovered in a large-scale H-alpha imaging survey of the cluster. Approximately 30 H-alpha-emitting knots were identified in a region approximately 150 kpc across, in the vicinity of the spiral galaxies NGC 3860, CGCG 97-125 and CGCG 97-114. Follow-up imaging and spectroscopy reveals that some of the knots are associated with previously uncataloged dwarf galaxies (M_B = -15.8 to -16.5), while others appear to be isolated HII galaxies or intergalactic HII regions. Radial velocities obtained for several of the knots show that they are physically associated with a small group or subcluster including CGCG 97-114 and CGCG 97-125. No comparable concentration of emission-line objects has been found elsewhere in any of the eight northern Abell clusters surveyed to date. The strong H-alpha emission in the objects and their high spatial density argue against this being a group of normal, unperturbed dwarf galaxies. Emission-line spectra of several of the knots also show some to be anomalously metal-rich relative to their luminosities. The results suggest that many of these objects were formed or triggered by tidal interactions or mergers involving CGCG 97-125 and other members of the group. A Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope HI map of the region shows direct evidence for tidal interactions in the group. These objects may be related to the tidal dwarf galaxies found in some interacting galaxy pairs, merger remnants, and compact groups. They could also represent evolutionary precursors to the class of isolated ultracompact dwarf galaxies that have been identified in the Fornax cluster.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0112126  [pdf] - 46499
Infrared Spectra of the Subluminous Type Ia Supernova 1999by
Comments: 42 pages including 14 figures, ApJ, accepted
Submitted: 2001-12-05
Near-infrared spectra of the subluminous Type Ia SN1999by are presented which cover the time evolution from about 4 days before to 2 weeks after maximum. Analysis of these data was accomplished through the construction of an extended set of delayed detonation (DD) models. The explosion, light curves and spectra including their evolution with time are calculated consistently leaving the initial WD and the description of the nuclear burning front the free parameters. We cover the entire range of normal to subluminous SNeIa. From this model set, one was selected for SN99by by matching properties of the synthetic & observed optical light curves. We find DD models require a certain amount of burning during the deflagration phase setting a lower limit for the absolute brightness. For SN1999by, a model close to the minimum 56Ni production is required. Without tuning,good agreement has been found between synthetic and observed IR spectra. In contrast to 'normal' SNeIa and prior to maximum, the NIR spectra of SN1999by are dominated by products of explosive carbon burning. Spectra taken after maximum are dominated by products of incomplete Si burning. Pure deflagration scenarios or mergers are unlikely. However,problems for DD models still remain, as the data seem to be at odds with recent predictions from 3-D models which find significant mixing of the inner layers. Possible solutions include the effects of rapid rotation on the propagation of nuclear flames, or extensive burning of carbon just prior to the runaway.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0109101  [pdf] - 44600
Redshifts for 2410 Galaxies in the Century Survey Region
Comments: 18 pages, 9 figures, 3 tables, 2 abbreviated tables. In press, to appear in Astronomical Journal, Dec. 2001 issue
Submitted: 2001-09-06
The `Century Survey' strip covers 102 square degrees within the limits 8.5h \leq \alpha_{1950} \leq 16.5h, 29.0 degrees \leq \delta_{1950} \leq 30.0 degrees. The strip passes through the Corona Borealis supercluster and the outer region of the Coma cluster. Within the Century Survey region, we have measured 2410 redshifts which constitute four overlapping complete redshift surveys: (1) 1728 galaxies with Kron-Cousins R_{phot} \leq 16.13 covering the entire strip, (2) 507 galaxies with R_{phot} \leq 16.4 in the right ascension range 8h 32m \leq \alpha_{1950} \leq 10h 45m, (3) 1251 galaxies with absorption- and K-corrected R_{CCD, corr} \leq 16.2 covering the right ascension range 8.5h \leq \alpha_{1950} \leq 13.5h and (4) 1255 galaxies with absorption- and K-corrected V_{CCD, corr} \leq 16.7 also covering the right ascension range 8.5h \leq \alpha_{1950} \leq 13.5h. All of these redshift samples are more than 98 % complete to the specified magnitude limit.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0103121  [pdf] - 41338
Observation of the Halo of NGC 3077 Near the "Garland" Region Using the Hubble Space Telescope
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures. Accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2001-03-07
We report the detection of upper main sequence stars and red giant branch stars in the halo of an amorphous galaxy, NGC3077. The observations were made using Wide Field Planetary Camera~2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The red giant branch luminosity function in I-band shows a sudden discontinuity at I = 24.0 +- 0.1 mag. Identifying this with the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB), and adopting the calibration provided by Lee, Freedman, & Madore (1993) and the foreground extinction of A_B = 0.21 mag, we obtain a distance modulus of (m-M)_0 = 27.93 +- 0.14(random) +- 0.16(sys). This value agrees well with the distance estimates of four other galaxies in the M81 Group. In addition to the RGB stars, we observe a concentration of upper main sequence stars in the halo of NGC3077, which coincides partially with a feature known as the ``Garland''. Using Padua isochrones, these stars are estimated to be <150 Myrs old. Assuming that the nearest encounter between NGC3077 and M81 occurred 280 Myrs ago as predicted by the numerical simulations (Yun 1997), the observed upper main sequence stars are likely the results of the star formation triggered by the M81-NGC3077 tidal interaction.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0012376  [pdf] - 554514
Final Results from the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project to Measure the Hubble Constant
Comments: Accepted to the Astrophysical Journal, 10 figures
Submitted: 2000-12-18
We present here the final results of the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project to measure the Hubble constant. We summarize our method, the results and the uncertainties, tabulate our revised distances, and give the implications of these results for cosmology. The analysis presented here benefits from a number of recent improvements and refinements, including (1) a larger LMC Cepheid sample to define the fiducial period-luminosity (PL) relations, (2) a more recent HST Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) photometric calibration, (3) a correction for Cepheid metallicity, and (4) a correction for incompleteness bias in the observed Cepheid PL samples. New, revised distances are given for the 18 spiral galaxies for which Cepheids have been discovered as part of the Key Project, as well as for 13 additional galaxies with published Cepheid data. The new calibration results in a Cepheid distance to NGC 4258 in better agreement with the maser distance to this galaxy. Based on these revised Cepheid distances, we find values (in km/sec/Mpc) of H0 = 71 +/- 2 (random) +/- 6 (systematic) (type Ia supernovae), 71 +/- 2 +/- 7 (Tully-Fisher relation), 70 +/- 5 +/- 6 (surface brightness fluctuations), 72 +/- 9 +/- 7 (type II supernovae), and 82 +/- 6 +/- 9 (fundamental plane). We combine these results for the different methods with 3 different weighting schemes, and find good agreement and consistency with H0 = 72 +/- 8. Finally, we compare these results with other, global methods for measuring the Hubble constant.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0009026  [pdf] - 37868
A Deep, Wide-Field H-alpha Survey of Nearby Clusters of Galaxies
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure. To appear in ASP Conference Series, "Galaxy Disks and Disk Galaxies", J.G. Funes S.J. and E.M. Corsini, eds
Submitted: 2000-09-01
We present a progress report on an ongoing H-alpha imaging survey of nearby clusters of galaxies. Four clusters have been surveyed to date: A1367, A1656, A347 and A569. A preliminary comparison of H-alpha luminosity functions obtained from our imaging survey with those from the prism survey reveals a significant level of incompleteness in the latter. This in turn is due to a combination of insensitivity to low-luminosity emission-line galaxies and to brighter galaxies with weak extended H-alpha emission. The survey has also revealed a unique population of clustered dwarf emission-line objects which may be the results of recent tidal encounters between larger gas-rich galaxies.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9912333  [pdf] - 109996
Has Blending Compromised Cepheid-Based Determinations of the Extragalactic Distance Scale?
Comments: 14 pages, 2 figures, 1 table, LaTeX, accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal Letters, also available at http://casa.colorado.edu/~bgibson/publications.html
Submitted: 1999-12-15
We examine the suggestion that half of the HST Key Project- and Sandage/Saha-observed galaxies have had their distances systematically underestimated, by 0.1-0.3 mag in the distance modulus, due to the underappreciated influence of stellar profile blending on the WFC chips. The signature of such an effect would be a systematic trend in (i) the Type Ia supernovae corrected peak luminosity and (ii) the Tully-Fisher residuals, with increasing calibrator distance, and (iii) a differential offset between PC and WFC distance moduli, within the same galaxy. The absence of a trend would be expected if blending were negligible (as has been inherently assumed in the analyses of the aforementioned teams). We adopt a functional form for the predicted influence of blending that is consistent with the models of Mochejska et al. and Stanek & Udalski, and demonstrate that the expected correlation with distance predicted by these studies is not supported by the data. We conclude that the Cepheid-based extragalactic distance scale has not been severely compromised by the neglect of blending.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9911528  [pdf] - 109656
The Tip of the Red Giant Branch Distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud
Comments: 19 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 1999-11-30
We present the I-band luminosity function of the red giant branch stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the data from the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (Zaritsky, Harris & Thompson, 1997). Selecting stars in uncrowded, low-extinction regions, a discontinuity in the luminosity function is observed at I_0 = 14.54 mag. Identifying this feature with the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB), and adopting an absolute TRGB magnitude of -4.05 +- 0.04 mag based on the calibration of Lee, Freedman & Madore (1993), we obtain a distance modulus of 18.59 +- 0.09 (random) +- 0.16 (systematic) mag. If the theoretical TRGB calibration provided by Cassisi & Salaris (1997) is adopted instead, the derived distance would be 4% greater. The LMC distance modulus reported here, 18.59 +- 0.09, is larger by 0.09 mag (1-sigma) than the value that is most commonly used in the extragalactic distance scale calibrated by the period-luminosity relation of the Cepheid variable stars. Our TRGB distance modulus agrees with several RR Lyrae distances to the LMC based on HIPPARCOS parallaxes. Finally, we note that using the same MCPS data, we obtain a distance modulus of 18.29 +- 0.03 mag using the red clump method, which is shorter by 0.3 mag compared to the TRGB estimate.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9910501  [pdf] - 554754
A Database of Cepheid Distance Moduli and TRGB, GCLF, PNLF and SBF Data Useful for Distance Determinations
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series. Because of space limitations, the figures included are low resolution bitmap images. Original figures can be found at http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~laura/pub.htm
Submitted: 1999-10-27
We present a compilation of Cepheid distance moduli and data for four secondary distance indicators that employ stars in the old stellar populations: the planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF), the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF), the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB), and the surface brightness fluctuation (SBF) method. The database includes all data published as of July 15, 1999. The main strength of this compilation resides in all data being on a consistent and homogeneous system: all Cepheid distances are derived using the same calibration of the period-luminosity relation, the treatment of errors is consistent for all indicators, measurements which are not considered reliable are excluded. As such, the database is ideal for inter-comparing any of the distance indicators considered, or for deriving a Cepheid calibration to any secondary distance indicator. Specifically, the database includes: 1) Cepheid distances, extinctions and metallicities; 2) apparent magnitudes of the PNLF cutoff; 3) apparent magnitudes and colors of the turnover of the GCLF (both in the V- and B-bands); 4) apparent magnitudes of the TRGB (in the I-band) and V-I colors at and 0.5 magnitudes fainter than the TRGB; 5) apparent surface brightness fluctuation magnitudes I, K', K_short, and using the F814W filter with the HST/WFPC2. In addition, for every galaxy in the database we give reddening estimates from DIRBE/IRAS as well as HI maps, J2000 coordinates, Hubble and T-type morphological classification, apparent total magnitude in B, and systemic velocity. (Abridged)
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9909260  [pdf] - 108296
The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. XXVIII. Combining the Constraints on the Hubble Constant
Comments:
Submitted: 1999-09-15
Since the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope nine years ago, Cepheid distances to 25 galaxies have been determined for the purpose of calibrating secondary distance indicators. A variety of these can now be calibrated, and the accompanying papers by Sakai, Kelson, Ferrarese, and Gibson employ the full set of 25 galaxies to consider the Tully-Fisher relation, the fundamental plane of elliptical galaxies, Type Ia supernovae, and surface brightness fluctuations. When calibrated with Cepheid distances, each of these methods yields a measurement of the Hubble constant and a corresponding measurement uncertainty. We combine these measurements in this paper, together with a model of the velocity field, to yield the best available estimate of the value of H_0 within the range of these secondary distance indicators and its uncertainty. The result is H_0 = 71 +/- 6 km/sec/Mpc. The largest contributor to the uncertainty of this 67% confidence level result is the distance of the Large Magellanic Cloud, which has been assumed to be 50 +/- 3 kpc.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9909269  [pdf] - 108305
The Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale XXIV: The Calibration of Tully-Fisher Relations and the Value of the Hubble Constant
Comments: 34 pages, 13 figures
Submitted: 1999-09-15
This paper presents the calibration of BVRIH$ Tully-Fisher relations based on Cepheid distances to 21 galaxies within 25 Mpc, and 23 clusters within 10,000 km/s. These relations have been applied to several distant cluster surveys in order to derive a value for the Hubble constant, H0, mainly concentrating on an I-band all-sky survey by Giovanelli and collaborators which consisted of total I magnitudes and 50% linewidth data for ~550 galaxies in 16 clusters. For comparison, we also derive the values of H0 using surveys in B-band and V-band by Bothun and collaborators, and in H-band by Aaronson and collaborators. Careful comparisons with various other databases from literature suggest that the H-band data, whose magnitudes are isophotal magnitudes extrapolated from aperture magnitudes rather than total magnitudes, are subject to systematic uncertainties. Taking a weighted average of the estimates of Hubble constants from four surveys, we obtain H0 = 71 +- 4 (random) +- 7 (systematic) km/s/Mpc. We have also investigated how various systematic uncertainties affect the value of H0 such as the internal extinction correction method used, Tully-Fisher slopes and shapes, a possible metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation and cluster population incompleteness bias.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9909222  [pdf] - 554751
The Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project XXVII. A Derivation of the Hubble Constant Using the Fundamental Plane and Dn-Sigma Relations in Leo I, Virgo, and Fornax
Comments: 21 pages, 3 figures, Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 1999-09-13
Using published photometry and spectroscopy, we construct the fundamental plane and D_n-Sigma relations in Leo I, Virgo and Fornax. The published Cepheid P-L relations to spirals in these clusters fixes the relation between angular size and metric distance for both the fundamental plane and D_n-Sigma relations. Using the locally calibrated fundamental plane, we infer distances to a sample of clusters with a mean redshift of cz \approx 6000 \kms, and derive a value of H_0=78+- 5+- 9 km/s/Mpc (random, systematic) for the local expansion rate. This value includes a correction for depth effects in the Cepheid distances to the nearby clusters, which decreased the deduced value of the expansion rate by 5% +- 5%. If one further adopts the metallicity correction to the Cepheid PL relation, as derived by the Key Project, the value of the Hubble constant would decrease by a further 6%+- 4%. These two sources of systematic error, when combined with a +- 6% error due to the uncertainty in the distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud, a +- 4% error due to uncertainties in the WFPC2 calibration, and several small sources of uncertainty in the fundamental plane analysis, combine to yield a total systematic uncertainty of +- 11%. We find that the values obtained using either the CMB, or a flow-field model, for the reference frame of the distant clusters, agree to within 1%. The Dn-Sigma relation also produces similar results, as expected from the correlated nature of the two scaling relations. A complete discussion of the sources of random and systematic error in this determination of the Hubble constant is also given, in order to facilitate comparison with the other secondary indicators being used by the Key Project.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9909134  [pdf] - 108170
The Hubble Constant from the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale
Comments: To appear in the proceedings of the Cosmic Flows Workshop, Victoria, Canada, July 1999, eds. S. Courteau, M. Strauss & J. Willick, ASP series. 10 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 1999-09-07
The final efforts of the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale are presented. Four distance indicators, the Surface Brightness Fluctuation method, the Fundamental Plane for early-type galaxies, the Tully-Fisher relation and the Type Ia Supernovae, are calibrated using Cepheid distances to galaxies within 25 Mpc. The calibration is then applied to distant samples reaching cz~10000 km/s and (in the case of SNIa) beyond. By combining the constraints imposed on the Hubble constant by the four distance indicators, we obtain H0 = 71+/-6 km/s/Mpc.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9908192  [pdf] - 554750
The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale XXVI. The Calibration of Population II Secondary Distance Indicators and the Value of the Hubble Constant
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. 48 pages (including 13 figures and 4 tables), plus two additional tables in landscape format. Also available at http://astro.caltech.edu/~lff/pub.htm K' SBF magnitudes have been updated
Submitted: 1999-08-17, last modified: 1999-09-01
A Cepheid-based calibration is derived for four distance indicators that utilize stars in the old stellar populations: the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB), the planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF), the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF) and the surface brightness fluctuation method (SBF). The calibration is largely based on the Cepheid distances to 18 spiral galaxies within cz =1500 km/s obtained as part of the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale, but relies also on Cepheid distances from separate HST and ground-based efforts. The newly derived calibration of the SBF method is applied to obtain distances to four Abell clusters in the velocity range between 3800 and 5000 km/s, observed by Lauer et al. (1998) using the HST/WFPC2. Combined with cluster velocities corrected for a cosmological flow model, these distances imply a value of the Hubble constant of H0 = 69 +/- 4 (random) +/- 6 (systematic) km/s/Mpc. This result assumes that the Cepheid PL relation is independent of the metallicity of the variable stars; adopting a metallicity correction as in Kennicutt et al. (1998), would produce a (5 +/- 3)% decrease in H0. Finally, the newly derived calibration allows us to investigate systematics in the Cepheid, PNLF, SBF, GCLF and TRGB distance scales.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9908149  [pdf] - 554749
The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale XXV. A Recalibration of Cepheid Distances to Type Ia Supernovae and the Value of the Hubble Constant
Comments: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal. 62 pages, LaTeX, 9 Postscript figures. Also available at http://casa.colorado.edu/~bgibson/publications.html
Submitted: 1999-08-13
Cepheid-based distances to seven Type Ia supernovae (SNe)-host galaxies have been derived using the standard HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale pipeline. For the first time, this allows for a transparent comparison of data accumulated as part of three different HST projects, the Key Project, the Sandage et al. Type Ia SNe program, and the Tanvir et al. Leo I Group study. Re-analyzing the Tanvir et al. galaxy and six Sandage et al. galaxies we find a mean (weighted) offset in true distance moduli of 0.12+/-0.07 mag -- i.e., 6% in linear distance -- in the sense of reducing the distance scale, or increasing H0. Adopting the reddening-corrected Hubble relations of Suntzeff et al. (1999), tied to a zero point based upon SNe~1990N, 1981B, 1998bu, 1989B, 1972E and 1960F and the photometric calibration of Hill et al. (1998), leads to a Hubble constant of H0=68+/-2(random)+/-5(systematic) km/s/Mpc. Adopting the Kennicutt et al. (1998) Cepheid period-luminosity-metallicity dependency decreases the inferred H0 by 4%. The H0 result from Type Ia SNe is now in good agreement, to within their respective uncertainties, with that from the Tully-Fisher and surface brightness fluctuation relations.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9906484  [pdf] - 107205
Detection of the Red Giant Branch Stars in M82 Using the Hubble Space Telescope
Comments: 8 figures
Submitted: 1999-06-29
We present color-magnitude diagrams and luminosity functions of stars in two halo regions of the irregular galaxy in M82, based on F555W and F814W photometry taken with the Hubble Space Telescope and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The I-band luminosity function shows a sudden jump at I~23.95 mag, which is identified as the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). Adopting the Lee et al. (1993) calibration of the TRGB based on the RR Lyrae distances to Galactic globular clusters, we obtain the distance modulus of (m-M)_0=27.95 +- 0.14 (random) +- 0.16 (systematic) mag. This corresponds to a linear distance of 3.9 +- 0.3 (random) +- 0.3 (systematicf) Mpc, which agrees well with the distance of M81 deteremined from the HST observations of the Cepheid variable stars. In addition, we observe a significant number of stars apparently brighter than the TRGB. However, with the current data, we cannot rule out whether these stars are blends of fainter stars, or are indeed intermediate-age asymptotic giant branch stars.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9906486  [pdf] - 554743
The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. XXII. The Discovery of Cepheids in NGC 1326-A
Comments: 33 pages A gzipped tar file containing 12 figures can be obtained from http://www.ipac.caltech.edu/H0kp/n1326a/n1326a.html
Submitted: 1999-06-29
We report on the detection of Cepheids and the first distance measurement to the spiral galaxy NGC 1326-A, a member of the Fornax cluster of galaxies. We have employed data obtained with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Over a 49 day interval, a total of twelve V-band (F555W) and eight I-band (F814W) epochs of observation were obtained. Two photometric reduction packages, ALLFRAME and DoPHOT, have been employed to obtain photometry measures from the three Wide Field CCDs. Variability analysis yields a total of 17 Cepheids in common with both photometry datasets, with periods ranging between 10 and 50 days. Of these 14 Cepheids with high-quality lightcurves are used to fit the V and I period-luminosity relations and derive apparent distance moduli, assuming a Large Magellanic Cloud distance modulus (m-M) (LMC) = 18.50 +- 0.10 mag and color excess E(B-V) = 0.10 mag. Assuming A(V)/E(V-I) = 2.45, the DoPHOT data yield a true distance modulus to NGC 1326-A of (m-M)_0 = 31.36 +- 0.17 (random) +- 0.13 (systematic) mag, corresponding to a distance of 18.7 \pm 1.5 (random) \pm 1.2 (systematic) Mpc. The derived distance to NGC 1326-A is in good agreement with the distance derived previously to NGC 1365, another spiral galaxy member of the Fornax cluster. However the distances to both galaxies are significantly lower than to NGC 1425, a third Cepheid calibrator in the outer parts of the cluster.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9906487  [pdf] - 107208
The Hubble Space Telescope Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project XXIII. The Discovery of Cepheids In NGC 3319
Comments: 22 pages. A gzipped tar file containing 16 figures can be obtained from http://www.ipac.caltech.edu/H0kp/n3319/n3319.html
Submitted: 1999-06-29
The distance to NGC 3319 has been determined from Cepheid variable stars as part of the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. Thirteen and four epochs of observations, using filters F555W (V) and F814W (I) respectively, were made with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. Thirty-three Cepheid variables between periods of 8 and 47 days were discovered. Adopting a Large Magellanic Cloud distance modulus of 18.50 +- 0.10 mag and extinction of E(V-I)=0.13 mag, a true reddening-corrected distance modulus (based on an analysis employing the ALLFRAME software package) of 30.78 +- 0.14 (random) +- 0.10 (systematic) mag and the extinction of E(V-I) = 0.06 mag were determined for NGC 3319. This galaxy is the last galaxy observed for the HST H0 Key Project.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9901332  [pdf] - 104926
The Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project XVIII. The Discovery of Cepheids and a New Distance to NGC 4535 Using the Hubble Space Telescope
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. 22 pages of text, 22 pages of tables and 11 figures. ASCII tables and PostScript versions of all figures available at http://www.ipac.caltech.edu/H0kp
Submitted: 1999-01-23
We report on the discovery of Cepheids in the Virgo spiral galaxy NGC 4535, based on observations made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. NGC 4535 is one of 18 galaxies observed as a part of The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale which aims to measure the Hubble constant to 10% accuracy. NGC 4535 was observed over 13 epochs using the F555W filter, and over 9 epochs using the F814W filter. The HST F555W and F814W data were transformed to the Johnson V and Kron-Cousins I magnitude systems, respectively. Photometry was performed using two independent programs, DoPHOT and DAOPHOT II/ALLFRAME. Period-luminosity relations in the V and I bands were constructed using 39 high-quality Cepheids present in our set of 50 variable candidates. We obtain a distance modulus of 31.02+/-0.26 mag, corresponding to a distance of 16.0+/-1.9 Mpc. Our distance estimate is based on values of mu = 18.50 +/- 0.10 mag and E(V-I) = 0.13 mag for the distance modulus and reddening of the LMC, respectively.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9812157  [pdf] - 104264
The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. XV. A Cepheid Distance to the Fornax Cluster and Its Implications
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal, Apr. 10 issue 28 pages, 3 tables, 12 figures (Correct figures and abstract)
Submitted: 1998-12-08, last modified: 1998-12-10
Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) 37 long-period Cepheid variables have been discovered in the Fornax Cluster spiral galaxy NGC 1365. The resulting V and I period-luminosity relations yield a true distance modulus of 31.35 +/- 0.07 mag, which corresponds to a distance of 18.6 +/- 0.6 Mpc. This measurement provides several routes for estimating the Hubble Constant. (1) Assuming this distance for the Fornax Cluster as a whole yields a local Hubble Constant of 70 +/-18_{random} [+/-7]_{systematic} km/s/Mpc. (2) Nine Cepheid-based distances to groups of galaxies out to and including the Fornax and Virgo clusters yield Ho = 73 (+/-16)_r [+/-7]_s km/s/Mpc. (3) Recalibrating the I-band Tully-Fisher relation using NGC 1365 and six nearby spiral galaxies, and applying it to 15 galaxy clusters out to 100 Mpc gives Ho = 76 (+/-3)_r [+/-8]_s km/s/Mpc. (4) Using a broad-based set of differential cluster distance moduli ranging from Fornax to Abell 2147 gives Ho = 72 (+/-)_r [+/-6]_s km/s/Mpc. And finally, (5) Assuming the NGC 1365 distance for the two additional Type Ia supernovae in Fornax and adding them to the SnIa calibration (correcting for light curve shape) gives Ho = 67 (+/-6)_r [+/-7]_s km/s/Mpc out to a distance in excess of 500 Mpc. All five of these Ho determinations agree to within their statistical errors. The resulting estimate of the Hubble Constant combining all these determinations is Ho = 72 (+/-5)_r [+/-12]_s km/s/Mpc.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9810003  [pdf] - 554721
The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale XVII. The Cepheid Distance to NGC 4725
Comments: To be published in The Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 512 (1999). 34 pages, LaTeX, 9 jpg figures
Submitted: 1998-10-01
The distance to NGC 4725 has been derived from Cepheid variables, as part of the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. Thirteen F555W (V) and four F814W (I) epochs of cosmic-ray-split Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 observations were obtained. Twenty Cepheids were discovered, with periods ranging from 12 to 49 days. Adopting a Large Magellanic Cloud distance modulus and extinction of 18.50+/-0.10 mag and E(V-I)=0.13 mag, respectively, a true reddening-corrected distance modulus (based on an analysis employing the ALLFRAME software package) of 30.50 +/- 0.16 (random) +/- 0.17 (systematic) mag was determined for NGC 4725. The corresponding of distance of 12.6 +/- 1.0 (random) +/- 1.0 (systematic) Mpc is in excellent agreement with that found with an independent analysis based upon the DoPHOT photometry package. With a foreground reddening of only E(V-I)=0.02, the inferred intrinsic reddening of this field in NGC 4725, E(V-I)=0.19, makes it one of the most highly-reddened, encountered by the HST Key Project, to date.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809059  [pdf] - 102763
A Cepheid Distance to the Fornax Cluster
Comments: Sept. 3 issue of Nature, 11 pages plus 4 figures
Submitted: 1998-09-04
The Hubble Space Telescope is being used to measure accurate Cepheid distances to nearby galaxies with the ultimate aim of determining the Hubble constant, H_0. For the first time, it has become feasible to use Cepheid variables to derive a distance to a galaxy in the southern hemisphere cluster of Fornax. Based on the discovery of 37 Cepheids in the Fornax galaxy NGC 1365, a distance to this galaxy of 18.6 +/- 0.6 Mpc (statistical error only) is obtained. This distance leads to a value of H_0 = 70 +/- 7 (random) +/- 18 (systematic) km/sec/Mpc in good agreement with estimates of the Hubble constant further afield.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809025  [pdf] - 102729
Cepheid and Tip of the Red Giant Branch Distances To the Dwarf Irregular Galaxy IC10
Comments:
Submitted: 1998-09-02
We present color-magnitude diagrams and luminosity functions of stars in the nearby galaxy IC 10, based on VI CCD photometry acquired with the COSMIC prime-focus camera on the Palomar 5m telescope. The apparent I-band luminosity function of stars in the halo of IC 10 shows an identifiable rise at I~21.7 mag. This is interpreted as being the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) at M_V~-4 mag. Since IC 10 is at a very low Galactic latitude, its foreground extinction is expected to be high and the uncertainty associated with that correction is the largest contributor to the error associated with its distance determination. Multi-wavelength observations of Cepheid variable stars in IC 10 give a Population I distance modulus of 24.1 +- 0.2 mag, which corresponds to a linear distance of 660 +- 66 kpc for a total line-of-sight reddening of E(B-V) = 1.16 +- 0.08 mag, derived self-consistently from the Cepheid data alone. Applying this Population I reddening to the Population II halo stars gives a TRGB distance modulus of 23.5 +- 0.2 mag, corresponding to 500 +- 50 kpc. We consider this to be a lower limit on the TRGB distance. Reconciling the Cepheid and TRGB distances would require that the reddening to the halo is $\Delta$E(B-V) = 0.31 mag lower than that into the main body of the galaxy. This then suggests that the Galactic extinction in the direction of IC10 is (B-V) ~ 0.85.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9806017  [pdf] - 554716
The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale XIV. The Cepheids in NGC 1365
Comments: 48 pages, 8 tables, 8 figures, to appear in ApJ
Submitted: 1998-06-01
We report the detection of Cepheid variable stars in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365, located in the Fornax cluster, using the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Twelve V (F555W) and four I (F814W) epochs of observation were obtained. The two photometry packages, ALLFRAME and DoPHOT, were separately used to obtain profile-fitting photometry of all the stars in the HST field. The search for Cepheid variable stars resulted in a sample of 52 variables, with periods between 14 and 60 days, in common with both datasets. ALLFRAME photometry and light curves of the Cepheids are presented. A subset of 34 Cepheids were selected on the basis of period, light curve shape, similar ALLFRAME and DoPHOT periods, color, and relative crowding, to fit the Cepheid period-luminosity relations in V and I for both ALLFRAME and DoPHOT. The measured distance modulus to NGC 1365 from the ALLFRAME photometry is 31.31 +/- 0.20 (random) +/- 0.18 (systematic) mag, corresponding to a distance of 18.3 +/- 1.7 (random) +/- 1.6 (systematic) Mpc. The reddening is measured to be E(V-I) = 0.16 +/- 0.08 mag. These values are in excellent agreement with those obtained using the DoPHOT photometry, namely a distance modulus of 31.26 +/- 0.10 mag, and a reddening of 0.15 +/- 0.10 mag (internal errors only).
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9805365  [pdf] - 554715
The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale XII. The Discovery of Cepheids and a New Distance to NGC 2541
Comments: 58 pages, 14 figures. Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. Figures 1, 4, 5, 8, 9 and 11 have been omitted in the astro-ph version
Submitted: 1998-05-29
We report the detection of Cepheids and a new distance to the spiral galaxy NGC 2541, based on data obtained with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A total of 25 exposures (divided into 13 epochs) are obtained using the F555W filter (transformed to Johnson V), and nine exposures (divided into five epochs) using the F814W filter (transformed to Cousins I). Photometric reduction of the data is performed using two independent packages, DoPHOT and DAOPHOT II/ALLFRAME, which give very good agreement in the measured magnitudes. A total of 34 bona fide Cepheids, with periods ranging from 12 to over 60 days, are identified based on both sets of photometry. By fitting V and I period-luminosity relations, apparent distance moduli are derived assuming a Large Magellanic Cloud distance modulus and mean color excess of 18.50 +/- 0.10 mag and E(B-V) = 0.10 mag respectively. Adopting A(V)/E(V-I)=2.45, we obtain a true distance modulus to NGC 2541 of 30.47 +/- 0.11 (random) +/- 0.12 (systematic) mag (D = 12.4 +/- 0.6 (random) +/- 0.7 (systematic) Mpc), and a total (Galactic plus internal) mean color excess E(B-V) = 0.08 +/- 0.05 (internal error) mag.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9802184  [pdf] - 1536203
The Hubble Space Telescope Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project. X. The Cepheid Distance to NGC 7331
Comments: To be published in The Astrophysical Journal, 1998 July 1, v501 note: Figs 1 and 2 (JPEG files) and Fig 7 (multipage .eps file) need to be viewed/printed separately
Submitted: 1998-02-13
The distance to NGC 7331 has been derived from Cepheid variables observed with HST/WFPC2, as part of the Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project. Multi-epoch exposures in F555W (V) and F814W (I), with photometry derived independently from DoPHOT and DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME programs, were used to detect a total of 13 reliable Cepheids, with periods between 11 and 42 days. The relative distance moduli between NGC 7331 and the LMC, imply an extinction to NGC 7331 of A_V = 0.47+-0.15 mag, and an extinction-corrected distance modulus to NGC 7331 of 30.89+-0.14(random) mag, equivalent to a distance of 15.1 Mpc. There are additional systematic uncertainties in the distance modulus of +-0.12 mag due to the calibration of the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation, and a systematic offset of +0.05+-0.04 mag if we applied the metallicity correction inferred from the M101 results of Kennicutt et al 1998.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9712055  [pdf] - 99544
The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale XIII. The Metallicity Dependence of the Cepheid Distance Scale
Comments: 28 pages, 4 tables, 10 figures, to appear in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 1997-12-03
Uncertainty in the metal abundance dependence of the Cepheid variable period- luminosity (PL) relation remains one of the outstanding sources of systematic error in the extragalactic distance scale and Hubble constant. To test for such a metallicity dependence, we have used the WFPC2 camera on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to observe Cepheids in two fields in the nearby spiral galaxy M101, which span a range in oxygen abundance of 0.7+-0.15 dex. A differential analysis of the PL relations in V and I in the two fields yields a marginally significant change in the inferred distance modulus on metal abundance, with d(m-M)/d[O/H] = -0.24+-0.16 mag/dex. The trend is in the theoretically predicted sense that metal-rich Cepheids appear brighter and closer than metal-poor stars. External comparisons of Cepheid distances with those derived from three other distance indicators, in particular the tip of the red giant branch method, further constrain the magnitude of any Z-dependence of the PL relation at V and I. The overall effects of any metallicity dependence on the distance scale derived with HST will be of the order of a few percent or less for most applications, though distances to individual galaxies at the extremes of the metal abundance range may be affected at the 10% level.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9705259  [pdf] - 97521
The Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project VIII. The Discovery of Cepheids and a New Distance to NGC 3621 Using the Hubble Space Telescope
Comments: 29 pages, 13 tables, 36 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ. LaTeX, uses aasms.sty and apjpt4.sty Key Project archive at http://www.ipac.caltech.edu/H0kp
Submitted: 1997-05-30
We report on the discovery of Cepheids in the field spiral galaxy NGC 3621, based on observations made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). NGC 3621 is one of 18 galaxies observed as a part of The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale, which aims to measure the Hubble constant to 10% accuracy. Sixty-nine Cepheids with periods in the range 9--60 days were observed over 12 epochs using the F555W filter, and 4 epochs using the F814W filter. The HST F555W and F814W data were transformed to the Johnson V and Kron-Cousins I magnitude systems, respectively. Photometry was performed using two independent packages, DAOPHOT II/ALLFRAME and DoPHOT. Period-luminosity relations in the V and I bands were constructed using 36 fairly isolated Cepheids present in our set of 69 variables. Extinction-corrected distance moduli relative to the LMC of 10.63 +/- 0.07 mag and 10.56 +/- 0.10 mag were obtained using the ALLFRAME and DoPHOT data, respectively. True distance moduli of 29.13 +/- 0.18 mag and 29.06 +/- 0.18 mag, corresponding to distances of 6.3 Mpc and 6.1 Mpc, were obtained by assuming values of 18.50 +/- 0.10 mag for the distance modulus of the LMC and E(V-I) = 0.13 mag for the reddening of the LMC.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-lat/9505017  [pdf] - 113406
QCD Phase Transition with Strange Quark in Wilson Formalism for Fermions
Comments: uuencoded compressed tar file, LaTeX, 13 pages, 9 figures, Minor errors for quoting references are corrected and a reference is added
Submitted: 1995-05-24, last modified: 1995-05-25
The nature of QCD phase transition is studied with massless up and down quarks and a light strange quark, using the Wilson formalism for quarks on a lattice with the temporal direction extension $N_t=4$. We find that the phase transition is first order in the cases of both about 150 MeV and 400 MeV for the strange quark mass. These results together with those for three degenerate quarks suggest that QCD phase transition in nature is first order.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9412036  [pdf] - 92135
HI 2334+26: An Extended HI Cloud near Abell 2634
Comments: 12 pages plus 2 tables (AAS LaTeX macro v3.0), 4 figures not included. To appear in the AJ
Submitted: 1994-12-09
We report the serendipitous discovery of a large HI cloud with an associated HI mass of $6(\pm1.5)\times 10^9 h^{-2}$ M$_\odot$ and a heliocentric velocity 8800 \kms, located near the periphery of the cluster of galaxies Abell 2634. Its velocity field appears to be very quiescent, as no gradients in the peak velocity are seen over its extent of 143$ h^{-1}$ by 103$ h^{-1}$ kpc. The distribution of gas is poorly resolved spatially, and it is thus difficult at this time to ascertain the nature of the cloud. At least two relatively small, actively star--forming galaxies appear to be embedded in the HI gas, which may (a) be an extended gaseous envelope surrounding one or both galaxies, (b) have been spread over a large region by a severe episode of tidal disruption or (c) have been affected by the ram pressure resulting from its motion through the intracluster gas of A2634.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-lat/9412012  [pdf] - 113403
Nature of the finite temperature transition in QCD with strange quark
Comments: ps file, 3 pages with 4 figures
Submitted: 1994-12-02
The finite temperature transition in QCD is studied using Wilson quarks for the cases of $N_F=2$, 3 and 2+1. For $N_F=2$ the transition is smooth in the chiral limit on both $\nt=4$ and 6 lattices. For $N_F=3$, clear two state signals are observed for $\beta\leq4.7$ on $8^2\times10 \times4$ and $12^3\times4$ lattices, which implies the transition is first order for $m_q \simm{<} 140$ MeV. For $N_F=2+1$ we study two cases of $m_s \simeq 150$ and 400 MeV with $m_u=m_d \simeq 0$. In contrast to a previous result with staggered quarks, two state signals are clearly observed for both cases, suggesting a first order QCD phase transition in the real world.