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Rogers, M.

Normalized to: Rogers, M.

4 article(s) in total. 8 co-authors, from 1 to 2 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 2,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.1105  [pdf] - 755190
Long-term Variability in the Length of the Solar Cycle
Comments: 10 pages, 6 tables, 8 figures; published in PASP, 121, 797 - 809 (2009)
Submitted: 2013-12-04
The recent paucity of sunspots and the delay in the expected start of Solar Cycle 24 have drawn attention to the challenges involved in predicting solar activity. Traditional models of the solar cycle usually require information about the starting time and rise time as well as the shape and amplitude of the cycle. With this tutorial, we investigate the variations in the length of the sunspot number cycle and examine whether the variability can be explained in terms of a secular pattern. We identified long-term cycles in archival data from 1610 - 2000 using median trace analyses of the cycle length and power spectrum analyses of the (O-C) residuals of the dates of sunspot minima and maxima. Median trace analyses of data spanning 385 years indicate a cycle length with a period of 183 - 243 years, and a power spectrum analysis identifies a period of 188 $\pm$ 38 years. We also find a correspondence between the times of historic minima and the length of the sunspot cycle, such that the cycle length increases during the time when the number of spots is at a minimum. In particular, the cycle length was growing during the Maunder Minimum when almost no sunspots were visible on the Sun. Our study suggests that the length of the sunspot number cycle should increase gradually, on average, over the next $\sim$75 years, accompanied by a gradual decrease in the number of sunspots. This information should be considered in cycle prediction models to provide better estimates of the starting time of each cycle.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.0940  [pdf] - 14248
Ultraviolet Survey of CO and H_2 in Diffuse Molecular Clouds: The Reflection of Two Photochemistry Regimes in Abundance Relationships
Comments: 40 pages in emulateapj style, to appear in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2008-07-07
(Abridged) We carried out a comprehensive far-ultraviolet (UV) survey of ^12CO and H_2 column densities along diffuse molecular Galactic sight lines in order to explore in detail the relationship between CO and H_2. We measured new CO abundances from HST spectra, new H_2 abundances from FUSE data, and new CH, CH^+, and CN abundances from the McDonald and European Southern Observatories. A plot of log N(CO) versus log N(H_2) shows that two power-law relationships are needed for a good fit of the entire sample, with a break located at log N(CO, cm^-2) = 14.1 and log N(H_2) = 20.4, corresponding to a change in production route for CO in higher-density gas. Similar logarithmic plots among all five diatomic molecules allow us to probe their relationships, revealing additional examples of dual slopes in the cases of CO versus CH (break at log N = 14.1, 13.0), CH^+ versus H_2 (13.1, 20.3), and CH^+ versus CO (13.2, 14.1). These breaks are all in excellent agreement with each other, confirming the break in the CO versus H_2 relationship, as well as the one-to-one correspondence between CH and H_2 abundances. Our new sight lines were selected according to detectable amounts of CO in their spectra and they provide information on both lower-density (< 100 cm^-3) and higher-density diffuse clouds. The CO versus H_2 correlation and its intrinsic width are shown to be empirically related to the changing total gas density among the sight lines of the sample. We employ both analytical and numerical chemical schemes in order to derive details of the molecular environments. In the low-density gas, where equilibrium-chemistry studies have failed to reproduce the abundance of CH^+, our numerical analysis shows that nonequilibrium chemistry must be employed for correctly predicting the abundances of both CH^+ and CO.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:0706.3855  [pdf] - 2577
Hubble Space Telescope Survey of Interstellar ^12CO/^13CO in the Solar Neighborhood
Comments: 1-column emulateapj, 23 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2007-06-26
We examine 20 diffuse and translucent Galactic sight lines and extract the column densities of the ^12CO and ^13CO isotopologues from their ultraviolet A--X absorption bands detected in archival Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph data with lambda/Deltalambda geq 46,000. Five more targets with Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph data are added to the sample that more than doubles the number of sight lines with published Hubble Space Telescope observations of ^13CO. Most sight lines have 12-to-13 isotopic ratios that are not significantly different from the local value of 70 for ^12C/^13C, which is based on mm-wave observations of rotational lines in emission from CO and H_2CO inside dense molecular clouds, as well as on results from optical measurements of CH^+. Five of the 25 sight lines are found to be fractionated toward lower 12-to-13 values, while three sight lines in the sample are fractionated toward higher ratios, signaling the predominance of either isotopic charge exchange or selective photodissociation, respectively. There are no obvious trends of the ^12CO-to-^13CO ratio with physical conditions such as gas temperature or density, yet ^12CO/^13CO does vary in a complicated manner with the column density of either CO isotopologue, owing to varying levels of competition between isotopic charge exchange and selective photodissociation in the fractionation of CO. Finally, rotational temperatures of H_2 show that all sight lines with detected amounts of ^13CO pass through gas that is on average colder by 20 K than the gas without ^13CO. This colder gas is also sampled by CN and C_2 molecules, the latter indicating gas kinetic temperatures of only 28 K, enough to facilitate an efficient charge exchange reaction that lowers the value of ^12CO/^13CO.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606426  [pdf] - 82866
Long-term Variability in the Length of the Solar Cycle
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures; bottom panels of Figures 1 and 8 replaced
Submitted: 2006-06-17, last modified: 2006-06-29
Detailed models of the solar cycle require information about the starting time and rise time as well as the shape and amplitude of the cycle. However, none of these models includes a discussion of the variations in the length of the cycle, which has been known to vary from $\sim$7 to 17 years. The focus of our study was to investigate whether this range was associated with a secular pattern in the length of the sunspot cycle. To provide a basis for the analysis of the long-term behavior of the Sun, we analyzed archival data of sunspot numbers from 1700 - 2005 and sunspot areas from 1874 - 2005. The independent techniques of power spectrum analysis and phase dispersion minimization were used to confirm the $\sim$11-year Schwabe Cycle, and to illustrate the large range in the length of this cycle. Long-term cycles were identified in archival data from 1610 -- 2000 using median trace analyses of the length of the cycle, and from power spectrum analyses of the (O-C) residuals of the dates of sunspot minima and maxima. The median trace analysis suggested that the cycle length had a period of 183 - 243 years, while the more precise power spectrum analysis identified a period of 188 $\pm$ 38 years. We found that the 188-year cycle was consistent with the variation of sunspot numbers and seems to be related to the Schwabe Cycle. We found a correlation between the times of historic minima and the length of the sunspot cycle such that the length of the cycle was usually highest when the actual number of sunspots was lowest. The cycle length was growing during the Maunder Minimum when there were almost no sunspots visible on the Sun. This information can now be used to improve the accuracy of the current solar cycle models, to better predict the starting time of a given cycle.