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Rodriguez, Horacio

Normalized to: Rodriguez, H.

7 article(s) in total. 252 co-authors, from 1 to 3 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 47,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.14004  [pdf] - 1994343
Characterization of the Nucleus, Morphology and Activity of Interstellar Comet 2I/Borisov by Optical and Near-Infrared GROWTH, Apache Point, IRTF, ZTF and Keck Observations
Comments: 21 pages, 7 figures, 1 table. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2019-10-30, last modified: 2019-11-05
We present visible and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of interstellar comet 2I/Borisov taken from 2019 September 10 to 2019 November 03 using the GROWTH collaboration, the Apache Point Observatory ARC 3.5 m and the NASA/IRTF 3.0 m combined with post and pre-discovery observations of 2I obtained by the Zwicky Transient Facility from 2019 March 17 to 2019 May 5. Comparison with imaging of distant Solar System comets (Kelly et al. 2013) shows an object very similar to mildly active Solar System comets with an out-gassing rate of $\sim$10$^{27}$ mol/sec. The photometry, taken in filters spanning the visible and NIR range shows a gradual brightening trend of $\sim0.03$ mags/day since 2019 September 10 UTC for a reddish object becoming neutral in the NIR. The lightcurve from recent and pre-discovery data (Ye et al. 2019) reveals a brightness trend suggesting the recent onset of significant H$_2$O sublimation with the comet being active with super volatiles such as CO at heliocentric distances $>$6 au consistent with its extended morphology. Using the advanced capability to significantly reduce the scattered light from the coma enabled by high-resolution NIR images from Keck adaptive optics taken on 2019 October 04, we estimate a diameter of 2I's nucleus of $\lesssim$3 km, though the true size is likely $\sim$2-3 times smaller due to the incomplete removal of dust from the measurement. We use the size estimates of 1I/'Oumuamua and 2I/Borisov to roughly estimate the slope of the interstellar object cumulative size-distribution resulting in a slope of $\gtrsim$-2.9, similar to Solar System comets (Fernandez et al. 2013), though the true slope is likely significantly steeper due to small number statistics and our probable overestimation of the size of 2I.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.01945  [pdf] - 1890352
The Zwicky Transient Facility: Science Objectives
Graham, Matthew J.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bellm, Eric C.; Adams, Scott M.; Barbarino, Cristina; Blagorodnova, Nadejda; Bodewits, Dennis; Bolin, Bryce; Brady, Patrick R.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Chang, Chan-Kao; Coughlin, Michael W.; De, Kishalay; Eadie, Gwendolyn; Farnham, Tony L.; Feindt, Ulrich; Franckowiak, Anna; Fremling, Christoffer; Gal-yam, Avishay; Gezari, Suvi; Ghosh, Shaon; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Golkhou, V. Zach; Goobar, Ariel; Ho, Anna Y. Q.; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, R. Lynne; Juric, Mario; Kaplan, David L.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Kupfer, Thomas; Lee, Chien-De; Lin, Hsing Wen; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Mahabal, Ashish A.; Miller, Adam A.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Nugent, Peter; Ofek, Eran O.; Prince, Thomas A.; Rauch, Ludwig; van Roestel, Jan; Schulze, Steve; Singer, Leo P.; Sollerman, Jesper; Taddia, Francesco; Yan, Lin; Ye, Quan-Zhi; Yu, Po-Chieh; Andreoni, Igor; Barlow, Tom; Bauer, James; Beck, Ron; Belicki, Justin; Biswas, Rahul; Brinnel, Valery; Brooke, Tim; Bue, Brian; Bulla, Mattia; Burdge, Kevin; Burruss, Rick; Connolly, Andrew; Cromer, John; Cunningham, Virginia; Dekany, Richard; Delacroix, Alex; Desai, Vandana; Duev, Dmitry A.; Hacopians, Eugean; Hale, David; Helou, George; Henning, John; Hover, David; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Howell, Justin; Hung, Tiara; Imel, David; Ip, Wing-Huen; Jackson, Edward; Kaspi, Shai; Kaye, Stephen; Kowalski, Marek; Kramer, Emily; Kuhn, Michael; Landry, Walter; Laher, Russ R.; Mao, Peter; Masci, Frank J.; Monkewitz, Serge; Murphy, Patrick; Nordin, Jakob; Patterson, Maria T.; Penprase, Bryan; Porter, Michael; Rebbapragada, Umaa; Reiley, Dan; Riddle, Reed; Rigault, Mickael; Rodriguez, Hector; Rusholme, Ben; van Santen, Jakob; Shupe, David L.; Smith, Roger M.; Soumagnac, Maayane T.; Stein, Robert; Surace, Jason; Szkody, Paula; Terek, Scott; van Sistine, Angela; van Velzen, Sjoert; Vestrand, W. Thomas; Walters, Richard; Ward, Charlotte; Zhang, Chaoran; Zolkower, Jeffry
Comments: 26 pages, 7 figures, Published in PASP Focus Issue on the Zwicky Transient Facility
Submitted: 2019-02-05
The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), a public-private enterprise, is a new time domain survey employing a dedicated camera on the Palomar 48-inch Schmidt telescope with a 47 deg$^2$ field of view and 8 second readout time. It is well positioned in the development of time domain astronomy, offering operations at 10% of the scale and style of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) with a single 1-m class survey telescope. The public surveys will cover the observable northern sky every three nights in g and r filters and the visible Galactic plane every night in g and r. Alerts generated by these surveys are sent in real time to brokers. A consortium of universities which provided funding ("partnership") are undertaking several boutique surveys. The combination of these surveys producing one million alerts per night allows for exploration of transient and variable astrophysical phenomena brighter than r $\sim$ 20.5 on timescales of minutes to years. We describe the primary science objectives driving ZTF including the physics of supernovae and relativistic explosions, multi-messenger astrophysics, supernova cosmology, active galactic nuclei and tidal disruption events, stellar variability, and Solar System objects.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.01932  [pdf] - 1828026
The Zwicky Transient Facility: System Overview, Performance, and First Results
Bellm, Eric C.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Graham, Matthew J.; Dekany, Richard; Smith, Roger M.; Riddle, Reed; Masci, Frank J.; Helou, George; Prince, Thomas A.; Adams, Scott M.; Barbarino, C.; Barlow, Tom; Bauer, James; Beck, Ron; Belicki, Justin; Biswas, Rahul; Blagorodnova, Nadejda; Bodewits, Dennis; Bolin, Bryce; Brinnel, Valery; Brooke, Tim; Bue, Brian; Bulla, Mattia; Burruss, Rick; Cenko, S. Bradley; Chang, Chan-Kao; Connolly, Andrew; Coughlin, Michael; Cromer, John; Cunningham, Virginia; De, Kishalay; Delacroix, Alex; Desai, Vandana; Duev, Dmitry A.; Eadie, Gwendolyn; Farnham, Tony L.; Feeney, Michael; Feindt, Ulrich; Flynn, David; Franckowiak, Anna; Frederick, S.; Fremling, C.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gezari, Suvi; Giomi, Matteo; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Golkhou, V. Zach; Goobar, Ariel; Groom, Steven; Hacopians, Eugean; Hale, David; Henning, John; Ho, Anna Y. Q.; Hover, David; Howell, Justin; Hung, Tiara; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Imel, David; Ip, Wing-Huen; Ivezić, Željko; Jackson, Edward; Jones, Lynne; Juric, Mario; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kaspi, S.; Kaye, Stephen; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Kowalski, Marek; Kramer, Emily; Kupfer, Thomas; Landry, Walter; Laher, Russ R.; Lee, Chien-De; Lin, Hsing Wen; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Giomi, Matteo; Mahabal, Ashish; Mao, Peter; Miller, Adam A.; Monkewitz, Serge; Murphy, Patrick; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Nordin, Jakob; Nugent, Peter; Ofek, Eran; Patterson, Maria T.; Penprase, Bryan; Porter, Michael; Rauch, Ludwig; Rebbapragada, Umaa; Reiley, Dan; Rigault, Mickael; Rodriguez, Hector; van Roestel, Jan; Rusholme, Ben; van Santen, Jakob; Schulze, S.; Shupe, David L.; Singer, Leo P.; Soumagnac, Maayane T.; Stein, Robert; Surace, Jason; Sollerman, Jesper; Szkody, Paula; Taddia, F.; Terek, Scott; Van Sistine, Angela; van Velzen, Sjoert; Vestrand, W. Thomas; Walters, Richard; Ward, Charlotte; Ye, Quan-Zhi; Yu, Po-Chieh; Yan, Lin; Zolkower, Jeffry
Comments: Published in PASP Focus Issue on the Zwicky Transient Facility (https://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1538-3873/aaecbe). 21 Pages, 12 Figures
Submitted: 2019-02-05
The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) is a new optical time-domain survey that uses the Palomar 48-inch Schmidt telescope. A custom-built wide-field camera provides a 47 deg$^2$ field of view and 8 second readout time, yielding more than an order of magnitude improvement in survey speed relative to its predecessor survey, the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We describe the design and implementation of the camera and observing system. The ZTF data system at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center provides near-real-time reduction to identify moving and varying objects. We outline the analysis pipelines, data products, and associated archive. Finally, we present on-sky performance analysis and first scientific results from commissioning and the early survey. ZTF's public alert stream will serve as a useful precursor for that of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.02960  [pdf] - 1812989
TOROS Optical follow-up of the Advanced LIGO-VIRGO O2 second observational campaign
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2019-01-09
We present the results of the optical follow-up, conducted by the TOROS collaboration, of gravitational wave events detected during the Advanced LIGO-Virgo second observing run (Nov 2016 -- Aug 2017). Given the limited field of view ($\sim100\arcmin$) of our observational instrumentation we targeted galaxies within the area of high localization probability that were observable from our sites. We analyzed the observations using difference imaging, followed by a Random Forest algorithm to discriminate between real and bogus transients. For all three events that we respond to, except GW170817, we did not find any bona fide optical transient that was plausibly linked with the observed gravitational wave event. Our observations were conducted using telescopes at Estaci\'{o}n Astrof\'{\i}sica de Bosque Alegre, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, and the Dr. Cristina V. Torres Memorial Astronomical Observatory. Our results are consistent with the LIGO-Virgo detections of a binary black hole merger (GW170104) for which no electromagnetic counterparts were expected, as well as a binary neutron star merger (GW170817) for which an optical transient was found as expected.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.10356  [pdf] - 1751926
The Keck Cosmic Web Imager Integral Field Spectrograph
Comments: 33 pages, 31 figures. Accepted to the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2018-07-26
We report on the design and performance of the Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI), a general purpose optical integral field spectrograph that has been installed at the Nasmyth port of the 10 m Keck II telescope on Mauna Kea, HI. The novel design provides blue-optimized seeing-limited imaging from 350-560 nm with configurable spectral resolution from 1000 - 20000 in a field of view up to 20"x33". Selectable volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings and high performance dielectric, multilayer silver and enhanced aluminum coatings provide end-to-end peak efficiency in excess of 45% while accommodating the future addition of a red channel that will extend wavelength coverage to 1 micron. KCWI takes full advantage of the excellent seeing and dark sky above Mauna Kea with an available nod-and-shuffle observing mode. The instrument is optimized for observations of faint, diffuse objects such as the intergalactic medium or cosmic web. In this paper, a detailed description of the instrument design is provided with measured performance results from the laboratory test program and ten nights of on-sky commissioning during the spring of 2017. The KCWI team is lead by Caltech and JPL (project management, design and implementation) in partnership with the University of California at Santa Cruz (camera optical and mechanical design) and the W. M. Keck Observatory (observatory interfaces).
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.05844  [pdf] - 1589832
Observations of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave source by the TOROS collaboration
Comments: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2017-10-16
We present the results of prompt optical follow-up of the electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational-wave event GW170817 by the Transient Optical Robotic Observatory of the South Collaboration (TOROS). We detected highly significant dimming in the light curves of the counterpart (Delta g=0.17+-0.03 mag, Delta r=0.14+-0.02 mag, Delta i=0.10 +- 0.03 mag) over the course of only 80 minutes of observations obtained ~35 hr after the trigger with the T80-South telescope. A second epoch of observations, obtained ~59 hr after the event with the EABA 1.5m telescope, confirms the fast fading nature of the transient. The observed colors of the counterpart suggest that this event was a "blue kilonova" relatively free of lanthanides.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.07850  [pdf] - 1483465
GW150914: First search for the electromagnetic counterpart of a gravitational-wave event by the TOROS collaboration
Comments: ApJ Letters, in press
Submitted: 2016-07-26
We present the results of the optical follow-up conducted by the TOROS collaboration of the first gravitational-wave event GW150914. We conducted unfiltered CCD observations (0.35-1 micron) with the 1.5-m telescope at Bosque Alegre starting ~2.5 days after the alarm. Given our limited field of view (~100 square arcmin), we targeted 14 nearby galaxies that were observable from the site and were located within the area of higher localization probability. We analyzed the observations using two independent implementations of difference-imaging algorithms, followed by a Random-Forest-based algorithm to discriminate between real and bogus transients. We did not find any bona fide transient event in the surveyed area down to a 5-sigma limiting magnitude of r=21.7 mag (AB). Our result is consistent with the LIGO detection of a binary black hole merger, for which no electromagnetic counterparts are expected, and with the expected rates of other astrophysical transients.