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Rephaeli, Y.

Normalized to: Rephaeli, Y.

103 article(s) in total. 830 co-authors, from 1 to 25 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 2,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.02027  [pdf] - 2026493
Non-thermal emission in lobes of radio galaxies: III. 3C 98, Pictor A, DA 240, Cygnus A, 3C 326, and 3C 236
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures; a few typos corrected; several missing references added
Submitted: 2019-12-04, last modified: 2020-01-03
Recent analyses of the broad spectral energy distributions (SED) of extensive lobes of local radio-galaxies have confirmed the leptonic origin of their Fermi/LAT gamma-ray emission, significantly constraining the level of hadronic contribution. SED of distant (D > 125 Mpc) radio-galaxy lobes are currently limited to the radio and X-ray bands, hence give no information on the presence of non-thermal (NT) protons but are adequate to describe the properties of NT electrons. Modeling lobe radio and X-ray emission in 3C 98, Pictor A, DA 240, Cygnus A, 3C 326, and 3C 236, we fully determine the properties of intra-lobe NT electrons and estimate the level of the related gamma-ray emission from Compton scattering of the electrons off the superposed Cosmic Microwave Background, Extragalactic Background Light, and source-specific radiation fields.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.02819  [pdf] - 1967066
Non-thermal emission in radio galaxy lobes: II. Centaurus A, Centaurus B, and NGC 6251
Comments: MNRAS, in press. 10 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2019-09-06
Radio and $\gamma$-ray measurements of large lobes of several radio galaxies provide adequate basis for determining whether emission in these widely separated spectral regions is largely by energetic electrons. This is very much of interest as there is of yet no unequivocal evidence for a significant energetic proton component to account for $\gamma$-ray emission by neutral pion decay. A quantitative assessment of the proton spectral distribution necessitates full accounting of the local and background radiation fields in the lobes; indeed, doing so in our recent analysis of the spectral energy distribution of the Fornax A lobes considerably weakened previous conclusions on the hadronic origin of the emission measured by the Fermi satellite. We present the results of similar analyses of the measured radio, X-ray and $\gamma$-ray emission from the lobes of Centaurus A, Centaurus B, and NGC 6251. The results indicate that the measured $\gamma$-ray emission from these lobes can be accounted for by Compton scattering of the radio-emitting electrons off the superposed radiation fields in the lobes; consequently, we set upper bounds on the energetic proton contents of the lobes.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.10954  [pdf] - 2036791
Constraints on gamma-ray and neutrino emission from NGC 1068 with the MAGIC telescopes
MAGIC Collaboration; Acciari, V. A.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Engels, A. Arbet; Baack, D.; Babić, A.; Banerjee, B.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J. A.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Bellizzi, L.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Besenrieder, J.; Bhattacharyya, W.; Bigongiari, C.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnoli, G.; Bošnjak, Ž.; Busetto, G.; Carosi, R.; Ceribella, G.; Chai, Y.; Chilingaryan, A.; Cikota, S.; Colak, S. M.; Colin, U.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; Delfino, M.; Delgado, J.; Depaoli, D.; Di Pierro, F.; Di Venere, L.; Espiñeira, E. Do Souto; Prester, D. Dominis; Donini, A.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Ramazani, V. Fallah; Fattorini, A.; Ferrara, G.; Fidalgo, D.; Foffano, L.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Fukami, S.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Gasparyan, S.; Gaug, M.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Godinović, N.; Green, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Herrera, J.; Hoang, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hütten, M.; Inada, T.; Inoue, S.; Ishio, K.; Iwamura, Y.; Jouvin, L.; Kerszberg, D.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Lamastra, A.; Lelas, D.; Leone, F.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Loporchio, S.; Fraga, B. Machado de Oliveira; Maggio, C.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Mićanović, S.; Miceli, D.; Minev, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Molina, E.; Moralejo, A.; Morcuende, D.; Moreno, V.; Moretti, E.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Neustroev, V.; Nigro, C.; Nilsson, K.; Ninci, D.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Nozaki, S.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Peñil, P.; Peresano, M.; Persic, M.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Righi, C.; Rugliancich, A.; Saha, L.; Sahakyan, N.; Saito, T.; Sakurai, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schmidt, K.; Schweizer, T.; Sitarek, J.; Šnidarić, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Somero, A.; Stamerra, A.; Strom, D.; Strzys, M.; Suda, Y.; Surić, T.; Takahashi, M.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Teshima, M.; Torres-Albà, N.; Tosti, L.; Vagelli, V.; van Scherpenberg, J.; Vanzo, G.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Vigorito, C. F.; Vitale, V.; Vovk, I.; Will, M.; Zarić, D.; Fiore, F.; Feruglio, C.; Rephaeli, Y.
Comments: 11 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2019-06-26, last modified: 2019-08-12
Starburst galaxies and star-forming active galactic nuclei (AGN) are among the candidate sources thought to contribute appreciably to the extragalactic gamma-ray and neutrino backgrounds. NGC 1068 is the brightest of the star-forming galaxies found to emit gamma rays from 0.1 to 50 GeV. Precise measurements of the high-energy spectrum are crucial to study the particle accelerators and probe the dominant emission mechanisms. We have carried out 125 hours of observations of NGC 1068 with the MAGIC telescopes in order to search for gamma-ray emission in the very high energy band. We did not detect significant gamma-ray emission, and set upper limits at 95\% confidence level to the gamma-ray flux above 200 GeV f<5.1x10^{-13} cm^{-2} s ^{-1} . This limit improves previous constraints by about an order of magnitude and allows us to put tight constraints on the theoretical models for the gamma-ray emission. By combining the MAGIC observations with the Fermi-LAT spectrum we limit the parameter space (spectral slope, maximum energy) of the cosmic ray protons predicted by hadronuclear models for the gamma-ray emission, while we find that a model postulating leptonic emission from a semi-relativistic jet is fully consistent with the limits. We provide predictions for IceCube detection of the neutrino signal foreseen in the hadronic scenario. We predict a maximal IceCube neutrino event rate of 0.07 yr^{-1}.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.08284  [pdf] - 1976842
The Simons Observatory: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Adachi, Shunsuke; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Atkins, Zachary; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Lizancos, Anton Baleato; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bhandarkar, Tanay; Bhimani, Sanah; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bolliet, Boris; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Carl, Fred. M; Cayuso, Juan; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Clark, Susan; Clarke, Philip; Contaldi, Carlo; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Coulton, Will; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Bouhargani, Hamza El; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Fergusson, James; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Halpern, Mark; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hensley, Brandon; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hoang, Thuong D.; Hoh, Jonathan; Hotinli, Selim C.; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Johnson, Matthew; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Kofman, Anna; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kusaka, Akito; LaPlante, Phil; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Liu, Jia; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McCarrick, Heather; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Mertens, James; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Moore, Jenna; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Murata, Masaaki; Naess, Sigurd; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Nicola, Andrina; Niemack, Mike; Nishino, Haruki; Nishinomiya, Yume; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Pagano, Luca; Partridge, Bruce; Perrotta, Francesca; Phakathi, Phumlani; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Rotti, Aditya; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Saunders, Lauren; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Shellard, Paul; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sifon, Cristobal; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Smith, Kendrick; Sohn, Wuhyun; Sonka, Rita; Spergel, David; Spisak, Jacob; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Treu, Jesse; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Wang, Yuhan; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Young, Edward; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zannoni, Mario; Zhang, Hezi; Zheng, Kaiwen; Zhu, Ningfeng; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1808.07445
Submitted: 2019-07-16
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment sited on Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert in Chile that promises to provide breakthrough discoveries in fundamental physics, cosmology, and astrophysics. Supported by the Simons Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and with contributions from collaborating institutions, SO will see first light in 2021 and start a five year survey in 2022. SO has 287 collaborators from 12 countries and 53 institutions, including 85 students and 90 postdocs. The SO experiment in its currently funded form ('SO-Nominal') consists of three 0.4 m Small Aperture Telescopes (SATs) and one 6 m Large Aperture Telescope (LAT). Optimized for minimizing systematic errors in polarization measurements at large angular scales, the SATs will perform a deep, degree-scale survey of 10% of the sky to search for the signature of primordial gravitational waves. The LAT will survey 40% of the sky with arc-minute resolution. These observations will measure (or limit) the sum of neutrino masses, search for light relics, measure the early behavior of Dark Energy, and refine our understanding of the intergalactic medium, clusters and the role of feedback in galaxy formation. With up to ten times the sensitivity and five times the angular resolution of the Planck satellite, and roughly an order of magnitude increase in mapping speed over currently operating ("Stage 3") experiments, SO will measure the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations to exquisite precision in six frequency bands from 27 to 280 GHz. SO will rapidly advance CMB science while informing the design of future observatories such as CMB-S4.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.01997  [pdf] - 1868199
Energetic Particles in Halos of Star Forming Galaxies
Comments: 12 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2019-04-03
Quantitative modeling of the spectro-spatial distributions of energetic electrons and protons in galactic halos is needed in order to determine their interactions with the local plasma and radiation fields, and also to estimate their residual spectral densities in intracluster and intergalactic environments. We develop a semi-analytic approach for calculating the particle distributions in the halo based on a detailed diffusion model for particle propagation from acceleration sites and interactions in the galactic disk. Important overall normalization of our models is based on results from detailed modeling in the Galactic disk with the GALPROP code. This provides the essential input for determining particle distributions in the outer disk, which are used as source terms for calculating the distributions in the extensive halo for a range of values of key parameters affecting energy losses and propagation mode. Our modeling approach is applied to the two edge-on star-forming galaxies NGC 4631 and NGC 4666, for which recent mapping of radio emission in the inner halo provides the required overall normalization. We predict the levels and spatial profiles of radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission in the halos of these galaxies. Our quantitative modeling enables us to estimate the total calorimetric efficiencies of electrons and protons in star-forming galaxies, and to predict their residual spectral distributions in the outer halo and intergalactic space.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.05797  [pdf] - 1853607
Nonthermal emission in the lobes of Fornax A
Comments: Corrected typos; added reference; revised figure; result unchanged
Submitted: 2019-02-15, last modified: 2019-03-21
Current measurements of the spectral energy distribution in radio, X-and-gamma-ray provide a sufficiently wide basis for determining basic properties of energetic electrons and protons in the extended lobes of the radio galaxy Fornax A. Of particular interest is establishing observationally, for the first time, the level of contribution of energetic protons to the extended emission observed by the Fermi satellite. Two recent studies concluded that the observed gamma-ray emission is unlikely to result from Compton scattering of energetic electrons off the optical radiation field in the lobes, and therefore that the emission originates from decays of neutral pions produced in interactions of energetic protons with protons in the lobe plasma, implying an uncomfortably high proton energy density. However, our exact calculation of the emission by energetic electrons in the magnetized lobe plasma leads to the conclusion that all the observed emission can, in fact, be accounted for by energetic electrons scattering off the ambient optical radiation field, whose energy density (which, based on recent observations, is dominated by emission from the central galaxy NGC 1316) we calculate to be higher than previously estimated.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.07445  [pdf] - 1841339
The Simons Observatory: Science goals and forecasts
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Dusatko, John; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Fuzia, Brittany; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; He, Yizhou; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Howe, Logan; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Kernasovskiy, Sarah S.; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kuenstner, Stephen E.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Kusaka, Akito; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Leon, David; Leung, Jason S. -Y.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lowry, Lindsay; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Niemack, Michael; Nishino, Haruki; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Page, Lyman; Partridge, Bruce; Peloton, Julien; Perrotta, Francesca; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Siritanasak, Praween; Smith, Kendrick; Smith, Stephen R.; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward J.; Xu, Zhilei; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zhang, Hezi; Zhu, Ningfeng
Comments: This paper presents an overview of the Simons Observatory science goals, details about the instrument will be presented in a companion paper. The author contribution to this paper is available at https://simonsobservatory.org/publications.php (Abstract abridged) -- matching version published in JCAP
Submitted: 2018-08-22, last modified: 2019-03-01
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a new cosmic microwave background experiment being built on Cerro Toco in Chile, due to begin observations in the early 2020s. We describe the scientific goals of the experiment, motivate the design, and forecast its performance. SO will measure the temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background in six frequency bands: 27, 39, 93, 145, 225 and 280 GHz. The initial configuration of SO will have three small-aperture 0.5-m telescopes (SATs) and one large-aperture 6-m telescope (LAT), with a total of 60,000 cryogenic bolometers. Our key science goals are to characterize the primordial perturbations, measure the number of relativistic species and the mass of neutrinos, test for deviations from a cosmological constant, improve our understanding of galaxy evolution, and constrain the duration of reionization. The SATs will target the largest angular scales observable from Chile, mapping ~10% of the sky to a white noise level of 2 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, to measure the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, at a target level of $\sigma(r)=0.003$. The LAT will map ~40% of the sky at arcminute angular resolution to an expected white noise level of 6 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, overlapping with the majority of the LSST sky region and partially with DESI. With up to an order of magnitude lower polarization noise than maps from the Planck satellite, the high-resolution sky maps will constrain cosmological parameters derived from the damping tail, gravitational lensing of the microwave background, the primordial bispectrum, and the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects, and will aid in delensing the large-angle polarization signal to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio. The survey will also provide a legacy catalog of 16,000 galaxy clusters and more than 20,000 extragalactic sources.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.01265  [pdf] - 1774557
Science with e-ASTROGAM (A space mission for MeV-GeV gamma-ray astrophysics)
De Angelis, A.; Tatischeff, V.; Grenier, I. A.; McEnery, J.; Mallamaci, M.; Tavani, M.; Oberlack, U.; Hanlon, L.; Walter, R.; Argan, A.; Von Ballmoos, P.; Bulgarelli, A.; Bykov, A.; Hernanz, M.; Kanbach, G.; Kuvvetli, I.; Pearce, M.; Zdziarski, A.; Conrad, J.; Ghisellini, G.; Harding, A.; Isern, J.; Leising, M.; Longo, F.; Madejski, G.; Martinez, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Paredes, J. M.; Pohl, M.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Aboudan, A.; Ackermann, M.; Addazi, A.; Ajello, M.; Albertus, C.; Alvarez, J. M.; Ambrosi, G.; Anton, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Babic, A.; Baibussinov, B.; Balbo, M.; Baldini, L.; Balman, S.; Bambi, C.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J. A.; Bartels, R.; Bastieri, D.; Bednarek, W.; Bernard, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernasconi, T.; Bertucci, B.; Biland, A.; Bissaldi, E.; Boettcher, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Ramon, V. Bosch; Bottacini, E.; Bozhilov, V.; Bretz, T.; Branchesi, M.; Brdar, V.; Bringmann, T.; Brogna, A.; Jorgensen, C. Budtz; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Busso, M.; Caccianiga, A.; Camera, S.; Campana, R.; Caraveo, P.; Cardillo, M.; Carlson, P.; Celestin, S.; Cermeno, M.; Chen, A.; Cheung, C. C; Churazov, E.; Ciprini, S.; Coc, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Coleiro, A.; Collmar, W.; Coppi, P.; da Silva, R. Curado; Cutini, S.; DAmmando, F.; De Lotto, B.; de Martino, D.; De Rosa, A.; Del Santo, M.; Delgado, L.; Diehl, R.; Dietrich, S.; Dolgov, A. D.; Dominguez, A.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donnarumma, I.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Dutra, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Fabrizio, M.; FernandezBarral, A.; Fioretti, V.; Foffano, L.; Formato, V.; Fornengo, N.; Foschini, L.; Franceschini, A.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fuschino, F.; Gaggero, D.; Galanti, G.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrz, R.; Giammaria, P.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Ghirlanda, G.; Godinovic, N.; Gouiffes, C.; Grove, J. E.; Hamadache, C.; Hartmann, D. H.; Hayashida, M.; Hryczuk, A.; Jean, P.; Johnson, T.; Jose, J.; Kaufmann, S.; Khelifi, B.; Kiener, J.; Knodlseder, J.; Kole, M.; Kopp, J.; Kozhuharov, V.; Labanti, C.; Lalkovski, S.; Laurent, P.; Limousin, O.; Linares, M.; Lindfors, E.; Lindner, M.; Liu, J.; Lombardi, S.; Loparco, F.; LopezCoto, R.; Moya, M. Lopez; Lott, B.; Lubrano, P.; Malyshev, D.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Marcha, M. J.; Marciano, A.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Marisaldi, M.; McBreen, S.; Mereghetti, S.; Merle, A.; Mignani, R.; Minervini, G.; Moiseev, A.; Morselli, A.; Moura, F.; Nakazawa, K.; Nava, L.; Nieto, D.; Orienti, M.; Orio, M.; Orlando, E.; Orleanski, P.; Paiano, S.; Paoletti, R.; Papitto, A.; Pasquato, M.; Patricelli, B.; PerezGarcia, M. A.; Persic, M.; Piano, G.; Pichel, A.; Pimenta, M.; Pittori, C.; Porter, T.; Poutanen, J.; Prandini, E.; Prantzos, N.; Produit, N.; Profumo, S.; Queiroz, F. S.; Raino, S.; Raklev, A.; Regis, M.; Reichardt, I.; Rephaeli, Y.; Rico, J.; Rodejohann, W.; Fernandez, G. Rodriguez; Roncadelli, M.; Roso, L.; Rovero, A.; Ruffini, R.; Sala, G.; SanchezConde, M. A.; Santangelo, A.; Parkinson, P. Saz; Sbarrato, T.; Shearer, A.; Shellard, R.; Short, K.; Siegert, T.; Siqueira, C.; Spinelli, P.; Stamerra, A.; Starrfield, S.; Strong, A.; Strumke, I.; Tavecchio, F.; Taverna, R.; Terzic, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Turolla, R.; Ulyanov, A.; Ursi, A.; Vacchi, A.; Abeele, J. Van den; Kirilovai, G. Vankova; Venter, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Vincent, P.; Wang, X.; Weniger, C.; Wu, X.; Zaharijas, G.; Zampieri, L.; Zane, S.; Zimmer, S.; Zoglauer, A.; collaboration, the eASTROGAM
Comments: Published on Journal of High Energy Astrophysics (Elsevier)
Submitted: 2017-11-03, last modified: 2018-08-08
e-ASTROGAM (enhanced ASTROGAM) is a breakthrough Observatory space mission, with a detector composed by a Silicon tracker, a calorimeter, and an anticoincidence system, dedicated to the study of the non-thermal Universe in the photon energy range from 0.3 MeV to 3 GeV - the lower energy limit can be pushed to energies as low as 150 keV for the tracker, and to 30 keV for calorimetric detection. The mission is based on an advanced space-proven detector technology, with unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution, combined with polarimetric capability. Thanks to its performance in the MeV-GeV domain, substantially improving its predecessors, e-ASTROGAM will open a new window on the non-thermal Universe, making pioneering observations of the most powerful Galactic and extragalactic sources, elucidating the nature of their relativistic outflows and their effects on the surroundings. With a line sensitivity in the MeV energy range one to two orders of magnitude better than previous generation instruments, e-ASTROGAM will determine the origin of key isotopes fundamental for the understanding of supernova explosion and the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. The mission will provide unique data of significant interest to a broad astronomical community, complementary to powerful observatories such as LIGO-Virgo-GEO600-KAGRA, SKA, ALMA, E-ELT, TMT, LSST, JWST, Athena, CTA, IceCube, KM3NeT, and LISA.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.03079  [pdf] - 1590963
Detection Feasibility of Cluster-Induced CMB Polarization
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-11-08
Galaxy clusters can potentially induce sub-$\mu$K polarization signals in the CMB with characteristic scales of a few arcminutes in nearby clusters. We explore four such polarization signals induced in a rich nearby cluster and calculate the likelihood for their detection by the currently operational SPTpol, advanced ACTpol, and the upcoming Simons Array. In our feasibility analysis we include instrumental noise, primordial CMB anisotropy, statistical thermal SZ cluster signal, and point source confusion, assuming a few percent of the nominal telescope observation time of each of the three projects. Our analysis indicates that the thermal SZ intensity can be easily mapped in rich nearby clusters, and that the kinematic SZ intensity can be measured with high statistical significance toward a fast moving nearby cluster. The detection of polarized SZ signals will be quite challenging, but could still be feasible towards several very rich nearby clusters with exceptionally high SZ intensity. The polarized SZ signal from a sample of $\sim 20$ clusters can be statistically detected at $S/N \sim 3$, if observed for several months.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.04461  [pdf] - 1415229
Galactic Energetic Particles and Their Radiative Yields in Clusters
Comments: 6 pages; Rapid Communication, Physical Review D
Submitted: 2016-05-14
As energetic particles diffuse out of radio and star-forming galaxies (SFGs), their intracluster density builds up to a level that could account for a substantial part or all the emission from a radio halo. We calculate the particle time-dependent, spectro-spatial distributions from a solution of a diffusion equation with radio galaxies as sources of electrons, and SFGs as sources of both electrons and protons. Whereas strong radio galaxies are typically found in the cluster (e.g., Coma) core, the fraction of SFGs increases with distance from the cluster center. Scaling particle escape rates from their sources to the reasonably well determined Galactic rates, and for realistic gas density and magnetic field spatial profiles, we find that predicted spectra and spatial profiles of radio emission from primary and secondary electrons are roughly consistent with those deduced from current measurements of the Coma halo (after subtraction of emission from the relic Coma A). Nonthermal X-ray emission is predicted to be mostly by Compton scattering of electrons from radio galaxies off the CMB, whereas $\gamma$-ray emission is primarily from the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of protons from SFGs with protons in intracluster gas.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.08995  [pdf] - 1371564
Search for gamma-ray emission from the Coma Cluster with six years of Fermi-LAT data
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, 2 tables, minor revised version accepted for publication; corresponding authors: S. Zimmer, J. Conrad, O. Reimer & Y. Rephaeli
Submitted: 2015-07-31, last modified: 2016-02-23
We present results from {\gamma}-ray observations of the Coma cluster incorporating 6 years of Fermi-LAT data and the newly released {\emph{Pass 8}} event-level analysis. Our analysis of the region reveals low-significance residual structures within the virial radius of the cluster that are too faint for a detailed investigation with the current data. Using a likelihood approach that is free of assumptions on the spectral shape we derive upper limits on the {\gamma}-ray flux that is expected from energetic particle interactions in the cluster. We also consider a benchmark spatial and spectral template motivated by models in which the observed radio halo is mostly emission by secondary electrons. In this case, the median expected and observed upper limits for the flux above 100 MeV are $1.7\times10^{-9}\,\mathrm{ph\,cm^{-2}\,s^{-1}}$ and $5.2\times10^{-9}\,\mathrm{ph\,cm^{-2}\,s^{-1}}$ respectively (the latter corresponds to residual emission at the level of 1.8{\sigma}). These bounds are comparable to or higher than predicted levels of hadronic gamma-ray emission in cosmic-ray models with or without reacceleration of secondary electrons, although direct comparisons are sensitive to assumptions regarding the origin and propagation mode of cosmic rays and magnetic field properties. The minimal expected {\gamma}-ray flux from radio and star-forming galaxies within the Coma cluster is roughly an order of magnitude below the median sensitivity of our analysis.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.08336  [pdf] - 1095641
Synchrotron and Compton Spectra from a Steady-State Electron Distribution
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2015-03-28
Energy densities of relativistic electrons and protons in extended galactic and intracluster regions are commonly determined from spectral radio and (rarely) $\gamma$-ray measurements. The time-independent particle spectral density distributions are commonly assumed to have a power-law (PL) form over the relevant energy range. A theoretical relation between energy densities of electrons and protons is usually adopted, and energy equipartition is invoked to determine the mean magnetic field strength in the emitting region. We show that for typical conditions, in both star-forming and starburst galaxies, these estimates need to be scaled down substantially due to significant energy losses that (effectively) flatten the electron spectral density distribution, resulting in a much lower energy density than deduced when the distribution is assumed to have a PL form. The steady-state electron distribution in the nuclear regions of starburst galaxies is calculated by accounting for Coulomb, bremsstrahlung, Compton, and synchrotron losses; the corresponding emission spectra of the latter two processes are calculated and compared to the respective PL spectra. We also determine the proton steady-state distribution by taking into account Coulomb and pion production losses, and briefly discuss implications of our steady-state particle spectra for estimates of proton energy densities and magnetic fields.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.3709  [pdf] - 1214961
Evolution of the gas mass fraction in galaxy clusters
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, updated to match MNRAS accepted version
Submitted: 2014-06-14, last modified: 2015-03-25
The mass fraction of hot gas in clusters is a basic quantity whose level and dependence on the cluster mass and redshift are intimately linked to all cluster X-ray and SZ measures. Modeling the evolution of the gas fraction is clearly a necessary ingredient in the description of the hierarchical growth of clusters through mergers of subclumps and mass accretion on the one hand, and the dispersal of gas from the cluster galaxies by tidal interactions, galactic winds, and ram pressure stripping on the other hand. A reasonably complete description of this evolution can only be given by very detailed hydrodynamical simulations, which are, however, resource-intensive, and difficult to implement in the mapping of parameter space. A much more practical approach is the use of semi-analytic modeling that can be easily implemented to explore a wide range of parameters. We present first results from a simple model that describes the build up of the gas mass fraction in clusters by following the overall impact of the above processes during the merger and accretion history of each cluster in the ensemble. Acceptable ranges for model parameters are deduced through comparison with results of X-ray observations. Basic implications of our work for modeling cluster statistical properties, and the use of these properties in joint cosmological data analyses, are discussed.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.0369  [pdf] - 862288
Estimates of relativistic electron and proton energy densities in starburst galactic nuclei from radio measurements
Comments: Published in: A&A, 567, A101 (2014) - 7 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2012-01-01, last modified: 2014-07-28
The energy density of energetic protons, U_p, in several nearby starburst nuclei (SBNs) has been directly deduced from gamma-ray measurements of the radiative decay of neutral pions produced in interactions with ambient protons. Lack of sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution makes this direct deduction unrealistic in the foreseeable future for even moderately distant SBNs. A more viable indirect method for determining U_p in star-forming galaxies is to use its theoretically based scaling to the energy density of energetic electrons, U_e, which can be directly deduced from radio synchrotron and possibly also nonthermal hard X-ray emission. In order to improve the quantitative basis and diagnostic power of this leptonic method we reformulate and clarify its main aspects. Doing so we obtain a basic expression for the ratio U_p/U_e in terms of the proton and electron masses and the power-law indices that characterize the particle spectral distributions in regions where the total particle energy density is at equipartition with that of the mean magnetic field. We also express the field strength and the particle energy density in the equipartition region in terms of the region's size, mean gas density, IR and radio fluxes, and distance from the observer, and determine values of U_p in a sample of nine nearby and local SBNs.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.2026  [pdf] - 1210016
Neutrino Mass from SZ Surveys
Comments: 8 pages, Proceedings of the 13th Marcel Grossmann Meeting
Submitted: 2014-06-08
The expected sensitivity of cluster SZ number counts to neutrino mass in the sub-eV range is assessed. We find that from the ongoing {\it Planck}/SZ measurements the (total) neutrino mass can be determined at a (1-sigma) precision of 0.06 eV, if the mass is in the range 0.1-0.3 eV, and the survey detection limit is set at the 5-sigma significance level. The mass uncertainty is predicted to be lower by a factor ~2/3, if a similar survey is conducted by a cosmic-variance-limited experiment, a level comparable to that projected if CMB lensing extraction is accomplished with the same experiment. At present, the main uncertainty in modeling cluster statistical measures reflects the difficulty in determining the mass function at the high-mass end.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.3107  [pdf] - 1209503
Cosmic-Ray Proton to Electron Ratios
Comments: 4 pages; to be published in Proc. of MGM13 (13th Marcel Grossmann Meeting -- Stockholm July 1-7, 2012)
Submitted: 2014-05-13
A basic quantity in the characterization of relativistic particles is the proton-to-electron (p/e) energy density ratio. We derive a simple approximate expression suitable to estimate this quantity, U_p/U_e = (m_p/m_e)^(3-q)/2, valid when a nonthermal `gas' of these particles is electrically neutral and the particles' power-law spectral indices are equal -- e.g., at injection. This relation partners the well-known p/e number density ratio at 1 GeV, i.e. N_p/N_e = (m_p/m_e)^{(q-1)/2}.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.0982  [pdf] - 1172463
Tangential Velocity of the Dark Matter in the Bullet Cluster from Precise Lensed Image Redshifts
Comments: 12 pages, 6 Figures and 2 Tables, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2013-07-03
We show that the fast moving component of the "bullet cluster" (1E0657-56) can induce potentially resolvable redshift differences between multiply-lensed images of background galaxies. The moving cluster effect can be expressed as the scalar product of the lensing deflection angle with the tangential velocity of the mass components, and it is maximal for clusters colliding in the plane of the sky with velocities boosted by their mutual gravity. The bullet cluster is likely to be the best candidate for the first measurement of this effect due to the large collision velocity and because the lensing deflection and the cluster fields can be calculated in advance. We derive the deflection field using multiply-lensed background galaxies detected with the Hubble Space Telescope. The velocity field is modeled using self-consistent N-body/hydrodynamical simulations constrained by the observed X-ray and gravitational lensing features of this system. We predict that the triply-lensed images of systems "G" and "H" straddling the critical curve of the bullet component will show the largest frequency shifts up to ~0.5 km/sec. This is within the range of the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) for molecular emission, and is near the resolution limit of the new generation high-throughput optical-IR spectrographs. A detection of this effect measures the tangential motion of the subclusters directly, thereby clarifying the tension with LCDM, which is inferred from gas motion less directly. This method may be extended to smaller redshift differences using the Ly-alpha forest towards QSOs lensed by more typical clusters of galaxies. More generally, the tangential component of the peculiar velocities of clusters derived by our method complements the radial component determined by the kinematic SZ effect, providing a full 3-dimensional description of velocities.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.0416  [pdf] - 1165645
Nonthermal Emission from Star-Forming Galaxies
Comments: 17 pages, 5 figures, to be published in Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings
Submitted: 2013-04-01
The detections of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the nearby starburst galaxies M82 & NGC253, and other local group galaxies, broaden our knowledge of star-driven nonthermal processes and phenomena in non-AGN star-forming galaxies. We review basic aspects of the related processes and their modeling in starburst galaxies. Since these processes involve both energetic electrons and protons accelerated by SN shocks, their respective radiative yields can be used to explore the SN-particle-radiation connection. Specifically, the relation between SN activity, energetic particles, and their radiative yields, is assessed through respective measures of the particle energy density in several star-forming galaxies. The deduced energy densities range from O(0.1) eV/cm^3 in very quiet environments to O(100) eV/cm^3 in regions with very high star-formation rates.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.3474  [pdf] - 1164636
Recent developments in astrophysical and cosmological exploitation of microwave surveys
Comments: 38 pages, 9 figures. Accepted for publications on IJMPD. Based on talks presented at the Thirteenth Marcel Grossmann Meeting on General Relativity, Stockholm, July 2012 (Cosmic Background (CB) sessions). It will appear also on corresponding proceedings edited by Kjell Rosquist, Robert T. Jantzen, Remo Ruffini, World Scientific, Singapore, 2013
Submitted: 2013-02-14
In this article we focus on the astrophysical results and the related cosmological implications derived from recent microwave surveys, with emphasis to those coming from the Planck mission. We critically discuss the impact of systematics effects and the role of methods to separate the cosmic microwave background signal from the astrophysical emissions and each different astrophysical component from the others. We then review of the state of the art in diffuse emissions, extragalactic sources, cosmic infrared back- ground, and galaxy clusters, addressing the information they provide to our global view of the cosmic structure evolution and for some crucial physical parameters, as the neutrino mass. Finally, we present three different kinds of scientific perspectives for fundamental physics and cosmology offered by the analysis of on-going and future cosmic microwave background projects at different angular scales dedicated to anisotropies in total intensity and polarization and to absolute temperature.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1212.0797  [pdf] - 1158263
Bias-Limited Extraction of Cosmological Parameters
Comments: 19 pages, revised version accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2012-12-04, last modified: 2013-02-10
It is known that modeling uncertainties and astrophysical foregrounds can potentially introduce appreciable bias in the deduced values of cosmological parameters. While it is commonly assumed that these uncertainties will be accounted for to a sufficient level of precision, the level of bias has not been properly quantified in most cases of interest. We show that the requirement that the bias in derived values of cosmological parameters does not surpass nominal statistical error, translates into a maximal level of overall error $O(N^{-1/2})$ on $|\Delta P(k)|/P(k)$ and $|\Delta C_{l}|/C_{l}$, where $P(k)$, $C_{l}$, and $N$ are the matter power spectrum, angular power spectrum, and number of (independent Fourier) modes at a given scale $l$ or $k$ probed by the cosmological survey, respectively. This required level has important consequences on the precision with which cosmological parameters are hoped to be determined by future surveys: In virtually all ongoing and near future surveys $N$ typically falls in the range $10^{6}-10^{9}$, implying that the required overall theoretical modeling and numerical precision is already very high. Future redshifted-21-cm observations, projected to sample $\sim 10^{14}$ modes, will require knowledge of the matter power spectrum to a fantastic $10^{-7}$ precision level. We conclude that realizing the expected potential of future cosmological surveys, which aim at detecting $10^{6}-10^{14}$ modes, sets the formidable challenge of reducing the overall level of uncertainty to $10^{-3}-10^{-7}$.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1209.5065  [pdf] - 1151580
CMB Anisotropy Due to Filamentary Gas: Power Spectrum and Cosmological Parameter Bias
Comments: 14 pages, 2 figures, accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2012-09-23
Hot gas in filamentary structures induces CMB aniostropy through the SZ effect. Guided by results from N-body simulations, we model the morphology and gas properties of filamentary gas and determine the power spectrum of the anisotropy. Our treatment suggests that power levels can be an appreciable fraction of the cluster contribution at multipoles $\ell\lesssim 1500$. Its spatially irregular morphology and larger characteristic angular scales can help to distinguish this SZ signature from that of clusters. In addition to intrinsic interest in this most extended SZ signal as a probe of filaments, its impact on cosmological parameter estimation should also be assessed. We find that filament `noise' can potentially bias determination of $A_s$, $n_s$, and $w$ (the normalization of the primordial power spectrum, the scalar index, and the dark energy equation of state parameter, respectively) by more than the nominal statistical uncertainty in Planck SZ survey data. More generally, when inferred from future optimal cosmic-variance-limited CMB experiments, we find that virtually all parameters will be biased by more than the nominal statistical uncertainty estimated for these next generation CMB experiments.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.6048  [pdf] - 1077654
Profiles of Dark Matter Velocity Anisotropy in Simulated Clusters
Comments: 12 pages, 17 figures, accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2011-06-29, last modified: 2012-09-13
We report statistical results for dark matter (DM) velocity anisotropy, \beta, from a sample of some 6000 cluster-size halos (at redshift zero) identified in a \Lambda CDM hydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement simulation performed with the Enzo code. These include profiles of \beta\ in clusters with different masses, relaxation states, and at several redshifts, modeled both as spherical and triaxial DM configurations. Specifically, although we find a large scatter in the DM velocity anisotropy profiles of different halos (across elliptical shells extending to at least ~$1.5 r_{vir}$), universal patterns are found when these are averaged over halo mass, redshift, and relaxation stage. These are characterized by a very small velocity anisotropy at the halo center, increasing outward to about 0.27 and leveling off at about $0.2 r_{vir}$. Indirect measurements of the DM velocity anisotropy fall on the upper end of the theoretically expected range. Though measured indirectly, the estimations are derived by using two different surrogate measurements - X-ray and galaxy dynamics. Current estimates of the DM velocity anisotropy are based on very small cluster sample. Increasing this sample will allow testing theoretical predictions, including the speculation that the decay of DM particles results in a large velocity boost. We also find, in accord with previous works, that halos are triaxial and likely to be more prolate when unrelaxed, whereas relaxed halos are more likely to be oblate. Our analysis does not indicate that there is significant correlation (found in some previous studies) between the radial density slope, \gamma, and \beta\ at large radii, $0.3 r_{vir} < r < r_{vir}$.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.1803  [pdf] - 1092811
Constraints on the Neutrino Mass from SZ Surveys
Comments: Replaced with a revised version to match the MNRAS accepted version. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1009.4110
Submitted: 2012-01-09, last modified: 2012-06-24
Statistical measures of galaxy clusters are sensitive to neutrino masses in the sub-eV range. We explore the possibility of using cluster number counts from the ongoing PLANCK/SZ and future cosmic-variance-limited surveys to constrain neutrino masses from CMB data alone. The precision with which the total neutrino mass can be determined from SZ number counts is limited mostly by uncertainties in the cluster mass function and intracluster gas evolution; these are explicitly accounted for in our analysis. We find that projected results from the PLANCK/SZ survey can be used to determine the total neutrino mass with a (1\sigma) uncertainty of 0.06 eV, assuming it is in the range 0.1-0.3 eV, and the survey detection limit is set at the 5\sigma significance level. Our results constitute a significant improvement on the limits expected from PLANCK/CMB lensing measurements, 0.15 eV. Based on expected results from future cosmic-variance-limited (CVL) SZ survey we predict a 1\sigma uncertainty of 0.04 eV, a level comparable to that expected when CMB lensing extraction is carried out with the same experiment. A few percent uncertainty in the mass function parameters could result in up to a factor \sim 2-3 degradation of our PLANCK and CVL forecasts. Our analysis shows that cluster number counts provide a viable complementary cosmological probe to CMB lensing constraints on the total neutrino mass.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.2295  [pdf] - 689526
The Universal Einstein Radius Distribution from 10,000 SDSS Clusters
Comments: 18 pages, 15 figures, 1 table; V2 accepted to MNRAS, includes a significant revision, in particular a new discussion of the results
Submitted: 2011-05-11, last modified: 2012-04-02
We present results from strong-lens modelling of 10,000 SDSS clusters, to establish the universal distribution of Einstein radii. Detailed lensing analyses have shown that the inner mass distribution of clusters can be accurately modelled by assuming light traces mass, successfully uncovering large numbers of multiple-images. Approximate critical curves and the effective Einstein radius of each cluster can therefore be readily calculated, from the distribution of member galaxies and scaled by their luminosities. We use a subsample of 10 well-studied clusters covered by both SDSS and HST to calibrate and test this method, and show that an accurate determination of the Einstein radius and mass can be achieved by this approach "blindly", in an automated way, and without requiring multiple images as input. We present the results of the first 10,000 clusters analysed in the range $0.1<z<0.55$, and compare them to theoretical expectations. We find that for this all-sky representative sample the Einstein radius distribution is log-normal in shape, with $< Log(\theta_{e}\arcsec)>=0.73^{+0.02}_{-0.03}$, $\sigma=0.316^{+0.004}_{-0.002}$, and with higher abundance of large $\theta_{e}$ clusters than predicted by $\Lambda$CDM. We visually inspect each of the clusters with $\theta_{e}>40 \arcsec$ ($z_{s}=2$) and find that $\sim20%$ are boosted by various projection effects detailed here, remaining with $\sim40$ real giant-lens candidates, with a maximum of $\theta_{e}=69\pm12 \arcsec$ ($z_{s}=2$) for the most massive candidate, in agreement with semi-analytic calculations. The results of this work should be verified further when an extended calibration sample is available.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1203.2798  [pdf] - 1117264
Building up the spectrum of cosmic-rays in star-forming regions
Comments: To appear in MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-03-13
The common approach to compute the cosmic-ray distribution in an starburst galaxy or region is equivalent to assume that at any point within that environment, there is an accelerator inputing cosmic rays at a reduced rate. This rate should be compatible with the overall volume-average injection, given by the total number of accelerators that were active during the starburst age. These assumptions seem reasonable, especially under the supposition of an homogeneous and isotropic distribution of accelerators. However, in this approach the temporal evolution of the superposed spectrum is not explicitly derived; rather, it is essentially assumed ab-initio. Here, we test the validity of this approach by following the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the superposed cosmic-ray spectrum and compare our results with those from theoretical models that treat the starburst region as a single source. In the calorimetric limit (with no cosmic-ray advection), homogeneity is reached (typically within 20%) across most of the starburst region. However, values of center-to-edge intensity ratios can amount to a factor of several. Differences between the common homogeneous assumption for the cosmic-ray distribution and our models are larger in the case of two-zone geometries, such as a central nucleus with a surrounding disc. We have also found that the decay of the cosmic-ray density following the duration of the starburst process is slow, and even approximately 1 Myr after the burst ends (for a gas density of 35 cm-3) it may still be within an order of magnitude of its peak value. Based on our simulations, it seems that the detection of a relatively hard spectrum up to the highest gamma-ray energies from nearby starburst galaxies favors a relatively small diffusion coefficient (i.e., long diffusion time) in the region where most of the emission originates.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.1304  [pdf] - 1092763
SZ power spectrum and cluster numbers from an extended merger-tree model
Comments: 8 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-01-05
We have recently developed an extended merger-tree model that efficiently follows hierarchical evolution of galaxy clusters and provides a quantitative description of both their dark matter and gas properties. We employed this diagnostic tool to calculate the thermal SZ power spectrum and cluster number counts, accounting explicitly for uncertainties in the relevant statistical and intrinsic cluster properties, such as the halo mass function and the gas equation of state. Results of these calculations are compared with those obtained from a direct analytic treatment and from hydrodynamical simulations. We show that under certain assumptions on the gas mass fraction our results are consistent with the latest SPT measurement. Our approach can be particularly useful in predicting cluster number counts and their dependence on cluster and cosmological parameters.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1108.4929  [pdf] - 689529
Cluster-Cluster Lensing and the Case of Abell 383
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-08-24
Extensive surveys of galaxy clusters motivate us to assess the likelihood of cluster-cluster lensing (CCL), namely, gravitational-lensing of a background cluster by a foreground cluster. We briefly describe the characteristics of CCLs in optical, X-ray and SZ measurements, and calculate their predicted numbers for $\Lambda$CDM parameters and a viable range of cluster mass functions and their uncertainties. The predicted number of CCLs in the strong-lensing regime varies from several ($<10$) to as high as a few dozen, depending mainly on whether lensing triaxiality bias is accounted for, through the c-M relation. A much larger number is predicted when taking into account also CCL in the weak-lensing regime. In addition to few previously suggested CCLs, we report a detection of a possible CCL in A383, where background candidate high-$z$ structures are magnified, as seen in deep Subaru observations.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1103.0202  [pdf] - 1052422
Triaxiality and non-thermal gas pressure in Abell 1689
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-03-01, last modified: 2011-06-05
Clusters of galaxies are uniquely important cosmological probes of the evolution of the large scale structure, whose diagnostic power depends quite significantly on the ability to reliably determine their masses. Clusters are typically modeled as spherical systems whose intracluster gas is in strict hydrostatic equilibrium (i.e., the equilibrium gas pressure is provided entirely by thermal pressure), with the gravitational field dominated by dark matter, assumptions that are only rough approximations. In fact, numerical simulations indicate that galaxy clusters are typically triaxial, rather than spherical, and that turbulent gas motions (induced during hierarchical merger events) provide an appreciable pressure component. Extending our previous work, we present results of a joint analysis of X-ray, weak and strong lensing measurements of Abell 1689. The quality of the data allows us to determine both the triaxial shape of the cluster and the level of non-thermal pressure that is required if the intracluster gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium. We find that the dark matter axis ratios are 1.24 +/- 0.13 and 2.02 +/- 0.01 on the plane of the sky and along the line of sight, respectively, and that about 20% of the pressure is non-thermal. Our treatment demonstrates that the dynamical properties of clusters can be determined in a (mostly) bias-free way, enhancing the use of clusters as more precise cosmological probes.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.2189  [pdf] - 1053306
Dispersal of Galactic Magnetic Fields into Intracluster Space
Comments:
Submitted: 2011-04-12, last modified: 2011-06-02
Little is known about the origin and basic properties of magnetic fields in clusters of galaxies. High conductivity in magnetized interstellar plasma suggests that galactic magnetic fields are (at least partly) ejected into intracluster (IC) space by the same processes that enrich IC gas with metals. We explore the dispersal of galactic fields by hydrodynamical simulations with our new {\em Enzo-Galcon} code, which is capable of tracking a large number galaxies during cluster assembly, and modeling the processes that disperse their interstellar media. Doing so we are able to describe the evolution of the mean strength of the field and its profile across the cluster. With the known density profile of dispersed gas and an estimated range of coherence scales, we predict the spatial distribution of Faraday rotation measure and find it to be consistent with observational data.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.4404  [pdf] - 294870
High-energy emission from star-forming galaxies
Comments: Invited talk at SciNeGHE2010 (8th Wotkshop on Science with the New Generation of High Energy Gamma-ray Experiments): Gamma-ray Astrophysics in the Multimessenger Context (Trieste, Sept.8-10, 2010)
Submitted: 2011-01-23
Adopting the convection-diffusion model for energetic electron and proton propagation, and accounting for all the relevant hadronic and leptonic processes, the steady-state energy distributions of these particles in the starburst galaxies M82 and NGC253 can be determined with a detailed numerical treatment. The electron distribution is directly normalized by the measured synchrotron radio emission from the central starburst region; a commonly expected theoretical relation is then used to normalize the proton spectrum in this region, and a radial profile is assumed for the magnetic field. The resulting radiative yields of electrons and protons are calculated: the predicted >100MeV and >100GeV fluxes are in agreement with the corresponding quantities measured with the orbiting Fermi telescope and the ground-based VERITAS and HESS Cherenkov telescopes. The cosmic-ray energy densities in central regions of starburst galaxies, as inferred from the radio and gamma-ray measurements of (respectively) non-thermal synchrotron and neutral-pion-decay emission, are U=O(100) eV/cm3, i.e. at least an order of magnitude larger than near the Galactic center and in other non-very-actively star-forming galaxies. These very different energy density levels reflect a similar disparity in the respective supernova rates in the two environments. A L(gamma) ~ SFR^(1.4) relationship is then predicted, in agreement with preliminary observational evidence.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.5714  [pdf] - 1041578
An expanded merger-tree description of cluster evolution
Comments: 11 pages, 9 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-10-27
We model the formation and evolution of galaxy clusters in the framework of an extended dark matter halo merger-tree algorithm that includes baryons and incorporates basic physical considerations. Our modified treatment is employed to calculate the probability density functions of the halo concentration parameter, intracluster gas temperature, and the integrated Comptonization parameter for different cluster masses and observation redshifts. Scaling relations between cluster mass and these observables are deduced that are somewhat different than previous results. Modeling uncertainties in the predicted probability density functions are estimated. Our treatment and the insight gained from the results presented in this paper can simplify the comparison of theoretical predictions with results from ongoing and future cluster surveys.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.4110  [pdf] - 1040736
Neutrino Mass Inference from SZ Surveys
Comments: 14 pages, 1 figure, 6 tables
Submitted: 2010-09-21
The growth of structure in the universe begins at the time of radiation-matter equality, which corresponds to energy scales of $\sim 0.4 eV$. All tracers of dark matter evolution are expected to be sensitive to neutrino masses on this and smaller scales. Here we explore the possibility of using cluster number counts and power spectrum obtained from ongoing SZ surveys to constrain neutrino masses. Specifically, we forecast the capability of ongoing measurements with the PLANCK satellite and the ground-based SPT experiment, as well as measurements with the proposed EPIC satellite, to set interesting bounds on neutrino masses from their respective SZ surveys. We also consider an ACT-like CMB experiment that covers only a few hundred ${\rm deg^{2}}$ also to explore the tradeoff between the survey area and sensitivity and what effect this may have on inferred neutrino masses. We find that for such an experiment a shallow survey is preferable over a deep and low-noise scanning scheme. We also find that projected results from the PLANCK SZ survey can, in principle, be used to determine the total neutrino mass with a ($1\sigma$) uncertainty of $0.28 eV$, if the detection limit of a cluster is set at the $5\sigma$ significance level. This is twice as large as the limits expected from PLANCK CMB lensing measurements. The corresponding limits from the SPT and EPIC surveys are $\sim 0.44 eV$ and $\sim 0.12 eV$, respectively. Mapping an area of 200 deg$^{2}$, ACT measurements are predicted to attain a $1\sigma$ uncertainty of 0.61 eV; expanding the observed area to 4,000 deg$^{2}$ will decrease the uncertainty to 0.36 eV.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.3936  [pdf] - 689525
Strong-Lensing Analysis of MS 1358.4+6245: New Multiple Images and Implications for the Well-Resolved z=4.92 Galaxy
Comments: 11 pages, 1 table, 9 figures; submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-09-20
We present a strong-lensing analysis of the galaxy cluster MS 1358.4+6245 ($z=0.33$), in deep 6-band ACS/HST imaging. In addition to the well-studied system at $z=4.92$, our modelling method uncovers 19 new multiply-lensed images so that a total of 23 images and their redshifts are used to accurately constrain the inner mass distribution. We derive a relatively shallow inner mass profile, $d\log \Sigma/d\log r\simeq -0.33 \pm0.05$ ($r<200$ kpc), with a much higher magnification than estimated previously by models constrained only by the $z=4.92$ system. Using these many new images we can apply a non-parametric adaptive-grid method, which also yields a shallow mass profile without prior assumptions, strengthening our conclusions. The total magnification of the $z_s=4.92$ galaxy is high, about a $\sim100\times$ over its four images, so that the inferred source size, luminosity and star-formation rate are about $\sim5\times$ smaller than previous estimates, corresponding to a dwarf-sized galaxy of radius $\simeq1$ kpc. A detailed image of the interior morphology of the source is generated with a high effective resolution of only $\simeq$50 pc, thanks to the high magnification and to the declining angular diameter distance above $z\sim1.5$ for the standard cosmology, so that this image apparently represents the best resolved object known at high redshift.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1004.4660  [pdf] - 337917
Full Lensing Analysis of Abell 1703: Comparison of Independent Lens-Modelling Techniques
Comments: 12 pages, 17 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in MNRAS. V2 includes minor changes and revised figures
Submitted: 2010-04-26, last modified: 2010-09-06
The inner mass-profile of the relaxed cluster Abell 1703 is analysed by two very different strong-lensing techniques applied to deep ACS and WFC3 imaging. Our parametric method has the accuracy required to reproduce the many sets of multiple images, based on the assumption that mass approximately traces light. We test this assumption with a fully non-parametric, adaptive grid method, with no knowledge of the galaxy distribution. Differences between the methods are seen on fine scales due to member galaxies which must be included in models designed to search for lensed images, but on the larger scale the general distribution of dark matter is in good agreement, with very similar radial mass profiles. We add undiluted weak-lensing measurements from deep multi-colour Subaru imaging to obtain a fully model-independent mass profile out to the virial radius and beyond. Consistency is found in the region of overlap between the weak and strong lensing, and the full mass profile is well-described by an NFW model of a concentration parameter, $c_{\rm vir}\simeq 7.15\pm0.5$ (and $M_{vir}\simeq 1.22\pm0.15 \times 10^{15}M_{\odot}/h$). Abell 1703 lies above the standard $c$--$M$ relation predicted for the standard $\Lambda$CDM model, similar to other massive relaxed clusters with accurately determined lensing-based profiles.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.0521  [pdf] - 689524
Strong-Lensing Analysis of a Complete Sample of 12 MACS Clusters at z>0.5: Mass Models and Einstein Radii
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS, 19 pages, 35 figures, 2 tables. V2 includes several changes, mainly additional discussion of the results. A higher resolution version is available at ftp://wise-ftp.tau.ac.il/pub/adiz/macs12
Submitted: 2010-02-02, last modified: 2010-09-06
We present the results of a strong-lensing analysis of a complete sample of 12 very luminous X-ray clusters at $z>0.5$ using HST/ACS images. Our modelling technique has uncovered some of the largest known critical curves outlined by many accurately-predicted sets of multiple images. The distribution of Einstein radii has a median value of $\simeq28\arcsec$ (for a source redshift of $z_{s}\sim2$), twice as large as other lower-$z$ samples, and extends to $55\arcsec$ for MACS J0717.5+3745, with an impressive enclosed Einstein mass of $7.4\times10^{14} M_{\odot}$. We find that 9 clusters cover a very large area ($>2.5 \sq \arcmin$) of high magnification ($\mu > \times10$) for a source redshift of $z_{s}\sim8$, providing primary targets for accessing the first stars and galaxies. We compare our results with theoretical predictions of the standard $\Lambda$CDM model which we show systematically fall short of our measured Einstein radii by a factor of $\simeq1.4$, after accounting for the effect of lensing projection. Nevertheless, a revised analysis once arc redshifts become available, and similar analyses of larger samples, are needed in order to establish more precisely the level of discrepancy with $\Lambda$CDM predictions.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1008.2758  [pdf] - 1034314
Quantifying the collisionless nature of dark matter and galaxies in A1689
Comments: 8 pages, 6 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2010-08-16
We use extensive measurements of the cluster A1689 to assess the expected similarity in the dynamics of galaxies and dark matter (DM) in their motion as collisionless `particles' in the cluster gravitational potential. To do so we derive the radial profile of the specific kinetic energy of the cluster galaxies from the Jeans equation and observational data. Assuming that the specific kinetic energies of galaxies and DM are roughly equal, we obtain the mean value of the DM velocity anisotropy parameter, and the DM density profile. Since this deduced profile has a scale radius that is higher than inferred from lensing observations, we tested the validity of the assumption by repeating the analysis using results of simulations for the profile of the DM velocity anisotropy. Results of both analyses indicate a significant difference between the kinematics of galaxies and DM within $r \lesssim 0.3r_{\rm vir}$. This finding is reflected also in the shape of the galaxy number density profile, which flattens markedly with respect to the steadily rising DM profile at small radii. Thus, $r \sim 0.3r_{\rm vir}$ seems to be a transition region interior to which collisional effects significantly modify the dynamical properties of the galaxy population with respect to those of DM in A1689
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1004.3839  [pdf] - 1026464
Hydrodynamical Simulations of Galaxy Clusters with Galcons
Comments:
Submitted: 2010-04-22, last modified: 2010-05-11
We present our recently developed {\em galcon} approach to hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters - a subgrid model added to the {\em Enzo} adaptive mesh refinement code - which is capable of tracking galaxies within the cluster potential and following the feedback of their main baryonic processes. Galcons are physically extended galactic constructs within which baryonic processes are modeled analytically. By identifying galaxy halos and initializing galcons at high redshift ($z \sim 3$, well before most clusters virialize), we are able to follow the evolution of star formation, galactic winds, and ram-pressure stripping of interstellar media, along with their associated mass, metals and energy feedback into intracluster (IC) gas, which are deposited through a well-resolved spherical interface layer. Our approach is fully described and all results from initial simulations with the enhanced {\em Enzo-Galcon} code are presented. With a galactic star formation rate derived from the observed cosmic star formation density, our galcon simulation better reproduces the observed properties of IC gas, including the density, temperature, metallicity, and entropy profiles. By following the impact of a large number of galaxies on IC gas we explicitly demonstrate the advantages of this approach in producing a lower stellar fraction, a larger gas core radius, an isothermal temperature profile in the central cluster region, and a flatter metallicity gradient than in a standard simulation.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.4156  [pdf] - 902819
Cosmic rays in galaxies: a probe of star formation
Comments: MNRAS, in press. 9 pages, no figures. Several typos corrected
Submitted: 2009-12-21, last modified: 2010-02-14
Cosmic-ray energy densities in central regions of starburst galaxies, as inferred from radio and gamma-ray measurements of, respectively, non-thermal synchrotron and neutral pion decay emission, are typically U_p = O(100)eV/cm3, i.e. typically at least an order of magnitude larger than near the Galactic center and in other non-very-actively star-forming galaxies. We first show that these very different energy-density levels reflect a similar disparity in the respective supernova rates in the two environments, which is not unexpected given the supernova origin of (Galactic) energetic particles. As a consequence of this correspondence, we then demonstrate that there is partial quantitative evidence that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in starburst nuclei has a low-mass truncation at ~2M_sun, as predicted by theoretical models of turbulent media, in contrast with the much smaller value of 0.1M_sun that characterizes the low-mass cutoff of the stellar IMF in `normal' galactic environments.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:0906.4791  [pdf] - 1002700
Detailed Cluster Mass and Light profiles of A1703, A370 and RXJ1347-11 from Deep Subaru Imaging
Comments: 18 pages, 14 figures, accepted by MNRAS; minor changes made in reply to referee, added evolutionary color tracks for clarity. Conclusions unchanged
Submitted: 2009-06-25, last modified: 2010-02-08
Weak lensing work can be badly compromised by unlensed foreground and cluster members which dilute the true lensing signal. We show how the lensing amplitude in multi-colour space can be harnessed to securely separate cluster members from the foreground and background populations for three massive clusters, A1703 (z=0.258), A370 (z=0.375) and RXJ1347-11 (z=0.451) imaged with Subaru. The luminosity functions of these clusters when corrected for dilution, show similar faint-end slopes, \alpha ~= -1.0, with no marked faint-end upturn to our limit of M_R ~= -15.0, and only a mild radial gradient. In each case, the radial profile of the M/L ratio peaks at intermediate radius, ~=0.2r_{vir}, at a level of 300-500(M/L_R)_\odot, and then falls steadily towards ~100(M/L_R)_{\odot} at the virial radius, similar to the mean field level. This behaviour is likely due to the relative paucity of central late-type galaxies, whereas for the E/S0-sequence only a mild radial decline in M/L is found for each cluster. We discuss this behaviour in the context of detailed simulations where predictions for tidal stripping may now be tested accurately with observations.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.4232  [pdf] - 689522
The Largest Gravitational Lens: MACS J0717.5+3745 (z=0.546)
Comments: 5 pages, 5 figures, accepted to the ApJ Letters; title modified; minor changes
Submitted: 2009-07-24, last modified: 2009-11-23
We identify 13 sets of multiply-lensed galaxies around MACS J0717.5+3745 ($z=0.546$), outlining a very large tangential critical curve of major axis $\sim2.8\arcmin$, filling the field of HST/ACS. The equivalent circular Einstein radius is $\theta_{e}= 55 \pm 3\arcsec$ (at an estimated source redshift of $z_{s}\sim2.5$), corresponding to $r_e\simeq 350\pm 20 kpc$ at the cluster redshift, nearly three times greater than that of A1689 ($r_e\simeq 140 kpc$ for $z_{s}=2.5$). The mass enclosed by this critical curve is very large, $7.4\pm 0.5 \times 10^{14}M_{\odot}$ and only weakly model dependent, with a relatively shallow mass profile within $r<250 kpc$, reflecting the unrelaxed appearance of this cluster. This shallow profile generates a much higher level of magnification than the well known relaxed lensing clusters of higher concentration, so that the area of sky exceeding a magnification of $>10\times$, is $\simeq 3.5\sq\arcmin$ for sources with $z\simeq 8$, making MACS J0717.5+3745 a compelling target for accessing faint objects at high redshift. We calculate that only one such cluster, with $\theta_{e}\ge 55\arcsec$, is predicted within $\sim 10^7$ Universes with $z\ge 0.55$, corresponding to a virial mass $\ge 3\times 10^{15} M_{\odot}$, for the standard $\Lambda CDM$ (WMAP5 parameters with $2\sigma$ uncertainties).
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:0906.1921  [pdf] - 1002515
High Energy Emission from the Starburst Galaxy NGC253
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures; accepted for publication in the MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-06-10, last modified: 2009-09-29
Measurement sensitivity in the energetic gamma-ray region has improved considerably, and is about to increase further in the near future, motivating a detailed calculation of high-energy (>100 MeV) and very-high-energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma-ray emission from the nearby starburst galaxy NGC253. Adopting the convection-diffusion model for energetic electron and proton propagation, and accounting for all the relevant hadronic and leptonic processes, we determine the steady-state energy distributions of these particles by a detailed numerical treatment. The electron distribution is directly normalized by the measured synchrotron radio emission from the central starburst region; a commonly expected theoretical relation is then used to normalize the proton spectrum in this region. Doing so fully specifies the electron spectrum throughout the galactic disk, and with an assumed spatial profile of the magnetic field, the predicted radio emission from the full disk matches well the observed spectrum, confirming the validity of our treatment. The resulting radiative yields of both particles are calculated; the integrated HE and VHE fluxes from the entire disk are predicted to be f(>100 MeV)~2x10^-8 cm^-2 s^-1 and f(>100 GeV)~4x10^-12 cm^-2 s^-1, respectively. We discuss the feasibility of measuring emission at these levels with the space-borne Fermi and the ground-based Cherenkov telescopes.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.3971  [pdf] - 689520
New Multiply-Lensed Galaxies Identified in ACS/NIC3 Observations of Cl0024+1654 Using an Improved Mass Model
Comments: 19 pages, 28 figures, published in MNRAS. A copy with high resolution figures can be found at: ftp://wise-ftp.tau.ac.il/pub/adiz/Cl0024+1654Paper/
Submitted: 2009-02-23, last modified: 2009-09-22
We present an improved strong-lensing analysis of Cl0024+1654 ($z$=0.39) using deep HST/ACS/NIC3 images, based on 33 multiply-lensed images of 11 background galaxies. These are found with a model that assumes mass approximately traces light, with a low order expansion to allow for flexibility on large scales. The model is constrained initially by the well known 5-image system ($z$=1.675) and refined as new multiply-lensed systems are identified using the model. Photometric redshifts of these new systems are then used to constrain better the mass profile by adopting the standard cosmological relation between redshift and lensing distance. Our model requires only 6 free parameters to describe well all positional and redshift data. The resulting inner mass profile has a slope of $d\log M/d\log r\simeq -0.55$, consistent with new weak-lensing measurements where the data overlap, at $r\simeq200$ kpc/$h_{70}$. The combined profile is well fitted by a high concentration NFW mass profile, $C_{\rm vir}\sim 8.6\pm1.6$, similar to other well studied clusters, but larger than predicted with standard $\Lambda$CDM. A well defined radial critical curve is generated by the model and is clearly observed at $r \simeq 12\arcsec$, outlined by elongated images pointing towards the centre of mass. The relative fluxes of the multiply-lensed images are found to agree well with the modelled magnifications, providing an independent consistency check.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.2815  [pdf] - 901732
Redshift Dependence of the CMB Temperature from S-Z Measurements
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2009-09-15
We have determined the CMB temperature, $T(z)$, at redshifts in the range 0.023-0.546, from multi-frequency measurements of the S-Z effect towards 13 clusters. We extract the parameter $\alpha$ in the redshift scaling $T(z)=T_{0}(1+z)^{1-\alpha}$, which contrasts the prediction of the standard model ($\alpha=0$) with that in non-adiabatic evolution conjectured in some alternative cosmological models. The statistical analysis is based on two main approaches: using ratios of the S-Z intensity change, $\Delta I$, thus taking advantage of the weak dependence of the ratios on IC gas properties, and using directly the $\Delta I$ measurements. In the former method dependence on the Thomson optical depth and gas temperature is only second order in these quantities. In the second method we marginalize over these quantities which appear to first order in the intensity change. The marginalization itself is done in two ways - by direct integrations, and by a Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach. Employing these different methods we obtain two sets of results that are consistent with $\alpha=0$, in agreement with the prediction of the standard model.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.3129  [pdf] - 315202
Dynamical Study of A1689 from Wide-Field VLT/VIMOS Spectroscopy: Mass Profile, Concentration Parameter, and Velocity Anisotropy
Comments: 12 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2008-10-17, last modified: 2009-07-14
We examine the dynamics structure of the rich cluster A1689, combining VLT/VIMOS spectroscopy with Subaru/Suprime-Cam imaging. The radial velocity distribution of $\sim 500$ cluster members is bounded by a pair of clearly defined velocity caustics, with a maximum amplitude of $\sim|4000|$ km/s at $\simeq$ 300 h$^{-1}$ kpc, beyond which the amplitude steadily declines, approaching zero velocity at a limiting radius of $\sim$ 2 h$^{-1}$ Mpc. We derive the 3D velocity anisotropy and galaxy number density profiles using a model-independent method to solve the Jeans equation, simultaneously incorporating the observed velocity dispersion profile, the galaxy counts from deep Subaru imaging, and our previously derived cluster mass profile from a joint lensing and X-ray analysis. The velocity anisotropy is found to be predominantly radial at large radius, becoming increasingly tangential towards the center, in accord with expectations. We also analyze the galaxy data independently of our previous analysis using two different methods: The first is based on a solution of the Jeans equation assuming an NFW form for the mass distribution, whereas in the second method the caustic amplitude is used to determine the escape velocity. The cluster virial mass derived by both of these dynamical methods is in good agreement with results from our earlier lensing and X-ray analysis. We also confirm the high NFW concentration parameter, with results from both methods combined to yield $c_{\rm vir}>13$ (1$\sigma$). The inferred virial radius is consistent with the limiting radius where the caustics approach zero velocity and where the counts of cluster members drop off, suggesting that infall onto A1689 is currently not significant.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.1983  [pdf] - 1001911
Cluster contribution to the X-ray background as a cosmological probe
Comments: 11 pages, 10 figures, 1 table, accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-04-13, last modified: 2009-07-14
Extensive measurements of the X-ray background (XRB) yield a reasonably reliable characterisation of its basic properties. Having resolved most of the cosmic XRB into discrete sources, the levels and spectral shapes of its main components can be used to probe both the source populations and also alternative cosmological and large-scale structure models. Recent observations of clusters seem to provide evidence that clusters formed earlier and are more abundant than predicted in the standard $\Lambda$CDM model. This motivates interest in alternative models that predict enhanced power on cluster scales. We calculate predicted levels and spectra of the superposed emission from groups and clusters of galaxies in $\Lambda$CDM and in two viable alternative non-Gaussian ($\chi^2$) and early dark energy models. The predicted levels of the contribution of clusters to the XRB in the non-Gaussian models exceed the measured level at low energies and levels of the residual XRB in the 2-8 keV band; these particular models are essentially ruled out. Our work demonstrates the diagnostic value of the integrated X-ray emission from clusters, by considering also its dependences on different metallicities, gas and temperature profiles, Galactic absorption, merger scenarios, and on a non-thermal pressure component. We also show that the XRB can be used for a upper limit for the concentration parameter value.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.2244  [pdf] - 1001453
Power Spectra of CMB Polarization by Scattering in Clusters
Comments: 11 pages, 2 figures, submitted
Submitted: 2009-02-12
Mapping CMB polarization is an essential ingredient of current cosmological research. Particularly challenging is the measurement of an extremely weak B-mode polarization that can potentially yield unique insight on inflation. Achieving this objective requires very precise measurements of the secondary polarization components on both large and small angular scales. Scattering of the CMB in galaxy clusters induces several polarization effects whose measurements can probe cluster properties. Perhaps more important are levels of the statistical polarization signals from the population of clusters. Power spectra of five of these polarization components are calculated and compared with the primary polarization spectra. These spectra peak at multipoles $\ell \geq 3000$, and attain levels that are unlikely to appreciably contaminate the primordial polarization signals.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.2617  [pdf] - 314929
Comparison of Cluster Lensing Profiles with Lambda CDM Predictions
Comments: Accepted version in ApJL, minor changes
Submitted: 2008-05-16, last modified: 2008-08-18
We derive lens distortion and magnification profiles of four well known clusters observed with Subaru. Each cluster is very well fitted by the general form predicted for Cold Dark Matter (CDM) dominated halos, with good consistency found between the independent distortion and magnification measurements. The inferred level of mass concentration is surprisingly high, 8<c_{vir}<15 (<c_{vir}> = 10.4 \pm 0.9), compared to the relatively shallow profiles predicted by the Lambda CDM model, c_{vir}=5.1 \pm 1.1 (for <M_{vir}> =1.25\times 10^{15}M_{\odot}/h). This represents a 4sigma discrepancy, and includes the relatively modest effects of projection bias and profile evolution derived from N-body simulations, which oppose each other with little residual effect. In the context of CDM based cosmologies, this discrepancy implies clusters collapse earlier (z\geq 1) than predicted (z<0.5), when the Universe was correspondingly denser.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:0806.1644  [pdf] - 13411
A New Approach for Simulating Galaxy Cluster Properties
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, submitted for publication in ApJL
Submitted: 2008-06-10, last modified: 2008-06-12
We describe a subgrid model for including galaxies into hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster evolution. Each galaxy construct- or galcon- is modeled as a physically extended object within which star formation, galactic winds, and ram pressure stripping of gas are modeled analytically. Galcons are initialized at high redshift (z~3) after galaxy dark matter halos have formed but before the cluster has virialized. Each galcon moves self-consistently within the evolving cluster potential and injects mass, metals, and energy into intracluster (IC) gas through a well-resolved spherical interface layer. We have implemented galcons into the Enzo adaptive mesh refinement code and carried out a simulation of cluster formation in a LambdaCDM universe. With our approach, we are able to economically follow the impact of a large number of galaxies on IC gas. We compare the results of the galcon simulation with a second, more standard simulation where star formation and feedback are treated using a popular heuristic prescription. One advantage of the galcon approach is explicit control over the star formation history of cluster galaxies. Using a galactic SFR derived from the cosmic star formation density, we find the galcon simulation produces a lower stellar fraction, a larger gas core radius, a more isothermal temperature profile, and a flatter metallicity gradient than the standard simulation, in better agreement with observations.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.0818  [pdf] - 9816
VHE emission from M82
Comments: A&A, in press. 8 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2008-02-06, last modified: 2008-05-23
Spurred by the improved measurement sensitivity in the very-high-energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma-ray band, we assess the feasibility of detection of the nearby starburst galaxy M82. VHE emission is expected to be predominantly from the decay of neutral pions which are produced in energetic proton interactions with ambient protons. An estimate of VHE emission from this process is obtained by an approximate, semi-quantitative calculation, and also by a detailed numerical treatment based on a convection-diffusion model for energetic electron and proton propagation and energy losses. All relevant hadronic and leptonic processes are considered, gauged by the measured synchrotron radio emission from the inner disk region. We estimate an integrated flux f(>100 GeV) 2E-12 1/(cm^2 s), possibly detectable by the current northern-hemisphere imaging air Cherenkov telescopes, MAGIC and VERITAS, and a good candidate for detection with the upcoming MAGIC II telescope. We also estimate f(>100 MeV) E-8 1/(cm^2 s), a level of emission that can be detected by GLAST/LAT based on the projected sensitivity for a one-year observation.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.0892  [pdf] - 11520
The probability distribution of cluster formation times and implied Einstein Radii
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2008-04-06
We provide a quantitative assessment of the probability distribution function of the concentration parameter of galaxy clusters. We do so by using the probability distribution function of halo formation times, calculated by means of the excursion set formalism, and a formation redshift-concentration scaling derived from results of N-body simulations. Our results suggest that the observed high concentrations of several clusters are quite unlikely in the standard Lambda CDM cosmological model, but that due to various inherent uncertainties, the statistical range of the predicted distribution may be significantly wider than commonly acknowledged. In addition, the probability distribution function of the Einstein radius of A1689 is evaluated, confirming that the observed value of ~45" +/- 5" is very improbable in the currently favoured cosmological model. If, however, a variance of ~20% in the theoretically predicted value of the virial radius is assumed, than the discrepancy is much weaker. The measurement of similarly large Einstein radii in several other clusters would pose a difficulty to the standard model. If so, earlier formation of the large scale structure would be required, in accord with predictions of some quintessence models. We have indeed verified that in a viable early dark energy model large Einstein radii are predicted in as many as a few tens of high-mass clusters.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.3323  [pdf] - 11155
S-Z Power Spectra
Comments: 8 pages, 2 figures, proceedings of CosPA07
Submitted: 2008-03-23
There is some observational evidence for earlier evolution of clusters of galaxies than predicted in the standard LambdaCDM model with a Gaussian primordial density fluctuation field, and a low value for the mass variance parameter sigma_8. Particularly difficult in this model is the interpretation of possible excess CMB anisotropy on cluster scales as due to the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect. We have calculated S-Z power spectra in the standard model, and in two alternative models which predict higher cluster abundance - a model with non-Gaussian PDF, and an early dark energy model. As anticipated, the levels of S-Z power in the latter two models are significantly higher than in the standard model, and in good agreement with current measurements of CMB anisotropy at high multipole values. Our results provide a sufficient basis for testing the viability of the three models by futur high quality measurements of cluster abundance and the anisotropy induced by the S-Z effect.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:0711.3908  [pdf] - 7357
Mass and Gas Profiles in A1689: Joint X-ray and Lensing Analysis
Comments: 18 pages, 20 figures, 7 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS, minor changes to match published version
Submitted: 2007-11-25, last modified: 2008-01-23
We carry out a comprehensive joint analysis of high quality HST/ACS and Chandra measurements of A1689, from which we derive mass, temperature, X-ray emission and abundance profiles. The X-ray emission is smooth and symmetric, and the lensing mass is centrally concentrated indicating a relaxed cluster. Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium we deduce a 3D mass profile that agrees simultaneously with both the lensing and X-ray measurements. However, the projected temperature profile predicted with this 3D mass profile exceeds the observed temperature by ~30% at all radii, a level of discrepancy comparable to the level found for other relaxed clusters. This result may support recent suggestions from hydrodynamical simulations that denser, more X-ray luminous small-scale structure can bias observed temperature measurements downward at about the same (~30%) level. We determine the gas entropy at 0.1r_{vir} (where r_{vir} is the virial radius) to be ~800 keV cm^2, as expected for a high temperature cluster, but its profile at >0.1r_{vir} has a power-law form with index ~0.8, considerably shallower than the ~1.1 index advocated by theoretical studies and simulations. Moreover, if a constant entropy ''floor'' exists at all, then it is within a small region in the inner core, r<0.02r_{vir}, in accord with previous theoretical studies of massive clusters.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.0985  [pdf] - 8706
Observations of extended radio emission in clusters
Comments: 27 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in Space Science Reviews, special issue "Clusters of galaxies: beyond the thermal view", Editor J.S. Kaastra, Chapter 6; work done by an international team at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI), Bern, organised by J.S. Kaastra, A.M. Bykov, S. Schindler & J.A.M. Bleeker
Submitted: 2008-01-07
We review observations of extended regions of radio emission in clusters; these include diffuse emission in `relics', and the large central regions commonly referred to as `halos'. The spectral observations, as well as Faraday rotation measurements of background and cluster radio sources, provide the main evidence for large-scale intracluster magnetic fields and significant densities of relativistic electrons. Implications from these observations on acceleration mechanisms of these electrons are reviewed, including turbulent and shock acceleration, and also the origin of some of the electrons in collisions of relativistic protons by ambient protons in the (thermal) gas. Improved knowledge of non-thermal phenomena in clusters requires more extensive and detailed radio measurements; we briefly review prospects for future observations.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.0982  [pdf] - 8704
Nonthermal phenomena in clusters of galaxies
Comments: 23 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in Space Science Reviews, special issue "Clusters of galaxies: beyond the thermal view", Editor J.S. Kaastra, Chapter 5; work done by an international team at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI), Bern, organised by J.S. Kaastra, A.M. Bykov, S. Schindler & J.A.M. Bleeker
Submitted: 2008-01-07
Recent observations of high energy (> 20 keV) X-ray emission in a few clusters of galaxies broaden our knowledge of physical phenomena in the intracluster space. This emission is likely to be nonthermal, probably resulting from Compton scattering of relativistic electrons by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. Direct evidence for the presence of relativistic electrons in some 50 clusters comes from measurements of extended radio emission in their central regions. We briefly review the main results from observations of extended regions of radio emission, and Faraday rotation measurements of background and cluster radio sources. The main focus of the review are searches for nonthermal X-ray emission conducted with past and currently operating satellites, which yielded appreciable evidence for nonthermal emission components in the spectra of a few clusters. This evidence is clearly not unequivocal, due to substantial observational and systematic uncertainties, in addition to virtually complete lack of spatial information. If indeed the emission has its origin in Compton scattering of relativistic electrons by the CMB, then the mean magnetic field strength and density of relativistic electrons in the cluster can be directly determined. Knowledge of these basic nonthermal quantities is valuable for the detailed description of processes in intracluster gas and for the origin of magnetic fields.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.1016  [pdf] - 8713
Nonthermal radiation mechanisms
Comments: 17 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in Space Science Reviews, special issue "Clusters of galaxies: beyond the thermal view", Editor J.S. Kaastra, Chapter 10; work done by an international team at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI), Bern, organised by J.S. Kaastra, A.M. Bykov, S. Schindler & J.A.M. Bleeker
Submitted: 2008-01-07
In this paper we review the possible radiation mechanisms for the observed non-thermal emission in clusters of galaxies, with a primary focus on the radio and hard X-ray emission. We show that the difficulty with the non-thermal, non-relativistic Bremsstrahlung model for the hard X-ray emission, first pointed out by Petrosian (2001) using a cold target approximation, is somewhat alleviated when one treats the problem more exactly by including the fact that the background plasma particle energies are on average a factor of 10 below the energy of the non-thermal particles. This increases the lifetime of the non-thermal particles, and as a result decreases the extreme energy requirement, but at most by a factor of three. We then review the synchrotron and so-called inverse Compton emission by relativistic electrons, which when compared with observations can constrain the value of the magnetic field and energy of relativistic electrons. This model requires a low value of the magnetic field which is far from the equipartition value. We briefly review the possibilities of gamma-ray emission and prospects for GLAST observations. We also present a toy model of the non-thermal electron spectra that are produced by the acceleration mechanisms discussed in an accompanying paper.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.0964  [pdf] - 8697
Clusters of galaxies: beyond the thermal view
Comments: 6 pages, 1 figure, accepted for publication in Space Science Reviews, special issue "Clusters of galaxies: beyond the thermal view", Editor J.S. Kaastra, Chapter 1; work done by an international team at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI), Bern, organised by J.S. Kaastra, A.M. Bykov, S. Schindler & J.A.M. Bleeker
Submitted: 2008-01-07
We present the work of an international team at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern that worked together to review the current observational and theoretical status of the non-virialised X-ray emission components in clusters of galaxies. The subject is important for the study of large-scale hierarchical structure formation and to shed light on the "missing baryon" problem. The topics of the team work include thermal emission and absorption from the warm-hot intergalactic medium, non-thermal X-ray emission in clusters of galaxies, physical processes and chemical enrichment of this medium and clusters of galaxies, and the relationship between all these processes. One of the main goals of the team is to write and discuss a series of review papers on this subject. These reviews are intended as introductory text and reference for scientists wishing to work actively in this field. The team consists of sixteen experts in observations, theory and numerical simulations.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:0706.1340  [pdf] - 2062
Cluster abundances and S-Z power spectra: effects of non-Gaussianity and early dark energy
Comments: 12 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2007-06-10
In the standard Lambda CDM cosmological model with a Gaussian primordial density fluctuation field, the relatively low value of the mass variance parameter (sigma_8=0.74{+0.05}{-0.06}, obtained from the WMAP 3-year data) results in a reduced likelihood that the measured level of CMB anisotropy on the scales of clusters is due to the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect. To assess the feasibility of producing higher levels of S-Z power, we explore two alternative models which predict higher cluster abundance. In the first model the primordial density field has a chi^2_1 distribution, whereas in the second an early dark energy component gives rise to the desired higher cluster abundance. We carry out the necessary detailed calculations of the levels of S-Z power spectra, cluster number counts, and angular 2-point correlation function of clusters, and compare (in a self-consistent way) their predicted redshift distributions. Our results provide a sufficient basis upon which the viability of the three models may be tested by future high quality measurements.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0608499  [pdf] - 316493
Using Weak Lensing Dilution to Improve Measurements of the Luminous and Dark Matter in A1689
Comments: 17 pages, 21 figures, revised version in response to referee comments,(added some discussion, references), conclusions unchanged. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2006-08-23, last modified: 2007-02-08
The E/SO sequence of a cluster defines a boundary redward of which a reliable weak lensing signal can be obtained from background galaxies, uncontaminated by cluster members. For bluer colors, both background and cluster members are present, reducing the distortion signal by the proportion of unlensed cluster members. In deep Subaru and HST/ACS images of A1689 the tangential distortion of galaxies with bluer colors falls rapidly toward the cluster center relative to the lensing signal of the red background. We use this dilution effect to derive the cluster light profile and luminosity function to large radius, with the advantage that no subtraction of far-field background counts is required. The light profile declines smoothly to the limit of the data, r<2Mpc/h, with a constant slope, dlog(L)/dlog(r)=-1.12+-0.06, unlike the lensing mass profile which steepens continuously with radius, so that M/L peaks at an intermediate radius, ~100kpc/h. A flatter behavior is found for the more physically meaningful ratio of dark-matter to stellar-matter, when accounting for the color-mass relation of cluster members. The cluster luminosity function has a flat slope, alpha=-1.05+-0.07, independent of radius and with no faint upturn to M_i'<-12. We establish that the very bluest objects are negligibly contaminated by the cluster V-i'<0.2, because their distortion profile rises towards the center following the red background, but offset higher by ~20%. This larger amplitude is consistent with the greater estimated depth of the faint blue galaxies, z~=2.0 compared to z~=0.85 for the red background, a purely geometric effect related to cosmological parameters. Finally, we improve upon our earlier mass profile by combining both the red and blue background populations, clearly excluding low concentration CDM profiles.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610321  [pdf] - 1233911
Galactic star-formation rates gauged by stellar end-products
Comments: A&A, in press (15 pages, 8 figures)
Submitted: 2006-10-11
Young galactic X-ray point sources (XPs) closely trace the ongoing star formation in galaxies. From measured XP number counts we extract the collective 2-10 keV luminosity of young XPs, L_yXP, which we use to gauge the current star-formation rate (SFR) in galaxies. We find that, for a sample of local star-forming galaxies (i.e., normal spirals and mild starbursts), L_yXP correlates linearly with the SFR over three decades in luminosity. A separate, high-SFR sample of starburst ULIRGs can be used to check the calibration of the relation. Using their (presumably SF-related) total 2-10 keV luminosities we find that these sources satisfy the SFR-L_yXP relation, as defined by the weaker sample, and extend it to span about 5 decades in luminosity. The SFR-L_yXP relation is likely to hold also for distant Hubble Deep Field North galaxies, especially so if these high-SFR objects are similar to the (more nearby) ULIRGs. It is argued that the SFR-L_yXP relation provides the most adequate X-ray estimator of instantaneous SFR by the phenomena characterizing massive stars from their birth (FIR emission from placental dust clouds) through their death as compact remnants (emitting X-rays by accreting from a close donor). For local, low/intermediate-SFR galaxies, the simultaneous existence of a correlation of the instantaneous SFR with the total 2-10 keV luminosity, which traces the SFR integrated over (approximately) the last Gyr, suggests that during such epoch the SF in these galaxies has been proceeding at a relatively constant rate.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0609565  [pdf] - 342190
Modeling Integrated Properties and the Polarization of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect
Comments: 22 pages, 25 figures, Proceedings of the Francesco Melchiorri memorial conference, New Astronomy Reviews, in press
Submitted: 2006-09-20
Two little explored aspects of Compton scattering of the CMB in clusters are discussed: The statistical properties of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect in the context of a non-Gaussian density fluctuation field, and the polarization patterns in a hydrodynamcially-simulated cluster. We have calculated and compared the power spectrum and cluster number counts predicted within the framework of two density fields that yield different cluster mass functions at high redshifts. This is done for the usual Press & Schechter mass function, which is based on a Gaussian density fluctuation field, and for a mass function based on a chi^2-distributed density field. We quantify the significant differences in the respective integrated S-Z observables in these two models. S-Z polarization levels and patterns strongly depend on the non-uniform distributions of intracluster gas and on peculiar and internal velocities. We have therefore calculated the patterns of two polarization components that are produced when the CMB is doubly scattered in a simulated cluster. These are found to be very different than the patterns calculated based on spherical clusters with uniform structure and simplified gas distribution.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606097  [pdf] - 82537
Long RXTE Observations of A2163
Comments: 10 pages, 1 figure; accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2006-06-05
A2163 was observed by the RXTE satellite for 530 ks during a 6 month period starting in August 2004. The cluster primary emission is from very hot intracluster gas with kT~15 keV, but this component does not by itself provide the best fitting model. A secondary emission component is quite clearly needed, and while this could also be thermal at a temperature significantly lower than kT~15 keV, the best fit (to the combined PCA and HEXTE datasets) is obtained with a power law secondary spectral component. The deduced parameters of the non-thermal (NT) emission imply a significant fractional flux amounting to ~25% of the integrated 3-50 keV emission. NT emission is expected given the intense level of radio emission, most prominently from a large extended (`halo') central region of the cluster. Interpreting the deduced NT emission as Compton scattering of the radio-emitting relativistic electrons by the CMB, we estimate the volume-averaged value of the magnetic field in the extended radio region to be B=0.4+/-0.2 microG.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603115  [pdf] - 80324
Impact of a non-Gaussian density field on Sunyaev-Zeldovich observables
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-03-05
The main statistical properties of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect - the power spectrum, cluster number counts, and angular correlation function - are calculated and compared within the framework of two density fields which differ in their predictions of the cluster mass function at high redshifts. We do so for the usual Press and Schechter mass function, which is derived on the basis of a Gaussian density fluctuation field, and for a mass function based on a chi^2 distributed density field. These three S-Z observables are found to be very significantly dependent on the choice of the mass function. The different predictions of the Gaussian and non-Gaussian density fields are probed in detail by investigating the behaviour of the three S-Z observables in terms of cluster mass and redshift. The formation time distribution of clusters is also demonstrated to be sensitive to the underlying mass function. A semi-quantitative assessment is given of its impact on the concentration parameter and the temperature of intracluster gas.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0602528  [pdf] - 80104
CMB Polarization due to Scattering in Clusters
Comments: 8 pages, 9 figures. accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-02-23
Scattering of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in clusters of galaxies polarizes the radiation. We explore several polarization components which have their origin in the kinematic quadrupole moments induced by the motion of the scattering electrons, either directed or random. Polarization levels and patterns are determined in a cluster simulated by the hydrodynamical Enzo code. We find that polarization signals can be as high as $\sim 1 \mu$K, a level that may be detectable by upcoming CMB experiments.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0511626  [pdf] - 77984
The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect
Comments: 18 pages, 6 figures; to appear in proceedings of the Enrico Fermi School `Background Microwave Radiation and Intracluster Cosmology', editors: F. Melchiorri and Y. Rephaeli
Submitted: 2005-11-21
This brief, general review the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect includes a description of the calculation of the total intensity change and polarization components, a discussion of the basic properties of the S-Z power spectrum and cluster number counts, and a summary of the main observational results.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0508287  [pdf] - 75176
Intracluster Entropy from Joint X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Observations
Comments: 9 pages, 2 figures, uses REVTeX4 + emulateapj.cls and apjfonts.sty. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2005-08-12
The temperature and density of the hot diffuse medium pervading galaxy groups and clusters combine into one significant quantity, the entropy. Here we express the entropy levels and profiles in model-independent forms by joining two observables, the X-ray luminosity and the change in the CMB intensity due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Thus we present both global scaling relations for the entropy levels from clusters and groups, and a simple expression yielding the entropy profiles in individual clusters from resolved X-ray surface brightness and SZ spatial distributions. We propose that our approach provides two useful tools for comparing large data samples with models, in order to probe the processes that govern the thermal state of the hot intracluster medium. The feasibility of using such a diagnostic for the entropy is quantitatively assessed, based on current X-ray and upcoming SZ measurements.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0507506  [pdf] - 74675
Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster Counts as a Probe of Intra-Supercluster Gas
Comments: 14 pages, 6 figures, draft version
Submitted: 2005-07-21
X-ray background surveys indicate the likely presence of diffuse warm gas in the Local Super Cluster (LSC), in accord with expectations from hydrodynamical simulations. We assess several other manifestations of warm LSC gas; these include anisotropy in the spatial pattern of cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) counts, its impact on the CMB temperature power spectrum at the lowest multipoles, and implications on measurements of the S-Z effect in and around the Virgo cluster.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0505255  [pdf] - 73025
Discovery of Rapid X-ray Oscillations in the Tail of the SGR 1806-20 Hyperflare
Comments: Accepted for publication on ApJ Letters. 4 Pages, 3 figures. emulateapj5 style used
Submitted: 2005-05-12
We have discovered rapid Quasi Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in RXTE/PCA measurements of the pulsating tail of the 27th December 2004 giant flare of SGR 1806-20. QPOs at about 92.5Hz are detected in a 50s interval starting 170s after the onset of the giant flare. These QPOs appear to be associated with increased emission by a relatively hard unpulsed component and are seen only over phases of the 7.56s spin period pulsations away from the main peak. QPOs at about 18 and 30Hz are also detected, 200-300s after the onset of the giant flare. This is the first time that QPOs are unambiguously detected in the flux of a Soft Gamma-ray Repeater, or any other magnetar candidate. We interpret the highest QPOs in terms of the coupling of toroidal seismic modes with Alfven waves propagating along magnetospheric field lines. The lowest frequency QPO might instead provide indirect evidence on the strength of the internal magnetic field of the neutron star.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0406368  [pdf] - 65525
The composite starburst/AGN nature of the superwind galaxy NGC 4666
Comments: A&A, in press (10 pages, 14 figures.) Full gzipped psfile obtainable from http://www.bo.iasf.cnr.it/~malaguti/r_stuff.html
Submitted: 2004-06-16, last modified: 2004-06-22
We report the discovery of a Compton-thick AGN and of intense star-formation activity in the nucleus and disk, respectively, of the nearly edge-on superwind galaxy NGC 4666. Spatially unresolved emission is detected by BeppoSAX only at energies <10 keV, whereas spatially resolved emission from the whole disk is detected by XMM-Newton. A prominent (EW ~ 1-2 keV) emission line at ~6.4 keV is detected by both instruments. From the XMM-Newton data alone the line is spectrally localized at E ~ 6.42 +/- 0.03 keV, and seems to be spatially concentrated in the nuclear region of NGC 4666. This, together with the presence of a flat (Gamma ~ 1.3) continuum in the nuclear region, suggests the existence of a strongly absorbed (i.e., Compton-thick) AGN, whose intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity is estimated to be L_{2-10} > 2 x 10^{41} erg/s. At energies <1 keV the integrated (BeppoSAX) spectrum is dominated by a ~0.25 keV thermal gas component distributed throughout the disk (resolved by XMM-Newton). At energies ~2-10 keV, the integrated spectrum is dominated by a steep (G > 2) power-law (PL) component. The latter emission is likely due to unresolved sources with luminosity L ~ 10^{38} - 10^{39} erg/s that are most likely accreting binaries (with BH masses <8 M_sun). Such binaries, which are known to dominate the X-ray point-source luminosity in nearby star-forming galaxies, have Gamma ~ 2 PL spectra in the relevant energy range. A Gamma ~ 1.8 PL contribution from Compton scattering of (the radio-emitting) relativistic electrons by the ambient FIR photons may add a truly diffuse component to the 2-10 keV emission.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0403548  [pdf] - 63739
2-100 keV Spectrum of an Actively Star Forming Galaxy
Comments: 3 pages, 1 figure, in press on Proc. 5th INTEGRAL Workshop, Munich, Feb.16-20, 2004
Submitted: 2004-03-23, last modified: 2004-05-14
We compute the synthetic 2-100 keV spectrum of an actively star forming galaxy. To this aim we use a luminosity function of point sources appropriate for starbursts (based on Chandra data), as well as the types of stellar sources and their corresponding spectra. Our estimates indicate that a Compton spectral component - resulting from scattering of SN-accelerated electrons by ambient FIR and CMB photons - could possibly be detected, in deep INTEGRAL observations of nearby starburst galaxies, only if there is a break in the spectra of the brightest (L > 2x10^{38} erg/s) point sources.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0402568  [pdf] - 63082
2-10 keV luminosity of high-mass binaries as a gauge of ongoing star-formation rate
Comments: Astronomy & Astrophysics, in press (15 pages, 7 figures, 4 tables)
Submitted: 2004-02-24
Based on recent work on spectral decomposition of the emission of star-forming galaxies, we assess whether the integrated 2-10 keV emission from high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), L_{2-10}^{HMXB}, can be used as a reliable estimator of ongoing star formation rate (SFR). Using a sample of 46 local (z < 0.1) star forming galaxies, and spectral modeling of ASCA, BeppoSAX, and XMM-Newton data, we demonstrate the existence of a linear SFR-L_{2-10}^{HMXB} relation which holds over ~5 decades in X-ray luminosity and SFR. The total 2-10 keV luminosity is not a precise SFR indicator because at low SFR (i.e., in normal and moderately-starbursting galaxies) it is substantially affected by the emission of low-mass X-ray binaries, which do not trace the current SFR due to their long evolution lifetimes, while at very high SFR (i.e., for very luminous FIR-selected galaxies) it is frequently affected by the presence of strongly obscured AGNs. The availability of purely SB-powered galaxies - whose 2-10 keV emission is mainly due to HMXBs - allows us to properly calibrate the SFR-L_{2-10}^{HMXB} relation. The SFR-L_{2-10}^{HMXB} relation holds also for distant (z ~ 1) galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North sample, for which we lack spectral information, but whose SFR can be estimated from deep radio data. If confirmed by more detailed observations, it may be possible to use the deduced relation to identify distant galaxies that are X-ray overluminous for their (independently estimated) SFR, and are therefore likely to hide strongly absorbed AGNs.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0401312  [pdf] - 62182
Spectral Analysis of RXTE Observations of A3667
Comments: 7 pages, 1 figure; ApJ, in press
Submitted: 2004-01-15
X-ray emission from the cluster of galaxies A3667 was measured by the PCA and HEXTE experiments aboard the RXTE satellite during the period December 2001 - July 2002. Analysis of the ~141 ks RXTE observation and lower energy ASCA/GIS data, yields only marginalevidence for a secondary power-law emission component in the spectrum. The 90% confidence upper limit on nonthermal emission in the 15-35 keV band is determined to be 2.6x10^{-12} erg/(cm^{2}s). When combined with the measured radio flux and spectral index of the dominant region of extended radio emission, this upper limit implies a lower limit of ~0.4 microgauss on the mean, volume-averaged intracluster magnetic field in A3667.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0401277  [pdf] - 1510565
Relativistic Electrons & Magnetic Fields in Clusters of Galaxies
Comments: 3 pages, 1 figure, to be published in proceedings of the 10th Marcel Grossmann meeting
Submitted: 2004-01-14
RXTE and BeppoSAX observations have yielded evidence for the presence of a secondary power-law spectral component in the spectra of several clusters of galaxies. This emission in clusters with extended regions of radio emission is likely to be by relativistic electrons that are Compton scattered by the CMB. The radio and non-thermal (NT) X-ray measurements yield the values of the volume-averaged magnetic field and electron energy density in the cluster extragalactic environment. These directly deduced quantities provide a tangible basis for the study of NT phenomena in clusters.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0401033  [pdf] - 61903
S-Z Anisotropy & Cluster Counts: Consistent Selection of sigma_8 and the Temperature-Mass Relation
Comments: 12 pages, 8 figures. Accepted for publication in New Astronomy
Submitted: 2004-01-05
The strong dependence of the mass variance parameter, sigma_8, on the adopted cluster mass-temperature relation is explored. A recently compiled X-ray cluster catalog and various mass-temperature relations are used to derive the corresponding values of sigma_8. Calculations of the power spectrum of the CMB anisotropy induced by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and cluster number counts are carried out in order to assess the need for a consistent choice of the mass-temperature scaling and the parameter sigma_8. We find that the consequences of inconsistent choice of the mass-temperature relation and sigma_8 could be quite substantial, including a considerable mis-estimation of the magnitude of the power spectrum and cluster number counts. Our results can partly explain the large scatter between published estimates of the power spectrum and number counts. We also show that the range of values of the power-law index in the scaling C_l ~ sigma_8^[6-7] deduced in previous studies is likely overestimated; we obtain a more moderate dependence, C_l ~ sigma_8^[4].
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0303587  [pdf] - 55826
Triple Experiment Spectrum of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in the Coma Cluster: H_0
Comments: 11 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2003-03-26, last modified: 2003-12-10
The Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect was previously measured in the Coma cluster by the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and Millimeter and IR Testa Grigia Observatory experiments and recently also with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe satellite. We assess the consistency of these results and their implications on the feasibility of high-frequency SZ work with ground-based telescopes. The unique data set from the combined measurements at six frequency bands is jointly analyzed, resulting in a best-fit value for the Thomson optical depth at the cluster center, tau_{0}=(5.35 \pm 0.67) 10^{-3}. The combined X-ray and SZ determined properties of the gas are used to determine the Hubble constant. For isothermal gas with a \beta density profile we derive H_0 = 84 \pm 26 km/(s\cdot Mpc); the (1\sigma) error includes only observational SZ and X-ray uncertainties.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0309423  [pdf] - 1233220
CMB Comptonization in Clusters: Spectral and Angular Power from Evolving Polytropic Gas
Comments: Accepted for publication in NA
Submitted: 2003-09-16
The angular power spectrum of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect is calculated in the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model with the aim of investigating its detailed dependence on the cluster population, gas morphology, and gas evolution. We calculate the power spectrum for three different mass functions, compute it within the framework of isothermal and polytropic gas distributions, and explore the effect of gas evolution on the magnitude and shape of the power spectrum. We show that it is indeed possible to explain the `excess' power measured by the CBI experiment on small angular scales as originating from the SZ effect without (arbitrary) rescaling the value of $\sigma_8$, the mass variance parameter. The need for a self-consistent choice of the basic parameters characterizing the cluster population is emphasized. In particular, we stress the need for a consistent choice of the value of $\sigma_8$ extracted from fitting theoretical models for the mass function to the observed cluster X-ray temperature function, such that it agrees with the mass-temperature relation used to evaluate the cluster Comptonization parameter. Our treatment includes the explicit spectral dependence of the thermal component of the effect, which we calculate at various frequencies. We find appreciable differences between the non-relativistic and relativistic predictions for the power spectrum even for this superposed contribution from clusters at the full range of gas temperatures.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0309098  [pdf] - 1233213
Quantitative Description of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect: Analytic Approximations
Comments: accepted for publication in New Astronomy
Submitted: 2003-09-03
Various aspects of relativistic calculations of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect are explored and clarified. We first formally show that the main previous approaches to the calculation of the relativistically generalized thermal component of the effect are equivalent. Our detailed description of the full effect results in a somewhat improved formulation. Analytic approximations to the exact calculation of the change of the photon occupation number in the scattering, $\Delta n$, are extended to powers of the gas temperature and cluster velocity that are higher than in similar published treatments. For the purely thermal and purely kinematic components, we obtain identical terms up to the highest common orders in temperature and cluster velocity, and to second order in the Thomson optical depth, as reported in previous treatments, but we get slightly different expressions for the terms that depend on both the gas temperature and cluster velocity. We also obtain an accurate expression for the crossover frequency.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0305354  [pdf] - 56827
RXTE Observations of A2256
Comments: 9 pages, 1 figure; ApJ, in press
Submitted: 2003-05-20
The cluster of galaxies A2256 was observed by the PCA and HEXTE experiments aboard the RXTE satellite during the period July 2001 - January 2002, for a total of 343 ks and 88 ks, respectively. Most of the emission is thermal, but the data analysis yields evidence for two components in the spectrum. Based on statistical likelihood alone, the secondary component can be either thermal or power-law. Inclusion in the analysis of data from ASCA measurements leads to a more definite need for a second component.Joint analysis of the combined RXTE-ASCA data sets yields $kT_1 = 7.9^{+0.5}_{-0.2}$ and $kT_2 = 1.5^{+1.0}_{-0.4}$, when the second component is also thermal, and $kT = 7.7^{+0.3}_{-0.4}$ and $\alpha = 2.2^{+0.9}_{-0.3}$, if the second component is fit by a power-law with (photon) index $\alpha$; all errors are at 90% confidence. Given the observed extended regions of radio emission in A2256, it is reasonable to interpret the deduced power-law secondary emission as due to Compton scattering of the radio producing relativistic electrons by the cosmic microwave background radiation. If so, then the {\it effective, mean volume-averaged} value of the magnetic field in the central 1$^{o}$ region of the cluster -- which contains both the `halo' and `relic' radio sources -- is $B \sim 0.2^{+1.0}_{-0.1}$ $\mu G$.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0301242  [pdf] - 1468481
Dark Matter Profiles in Clusters of Galaxies: a Phenomenological Approach
Comments: 19 pages, 6 figures. Accepted for publication in New Astronomy
Submitted: 2003-01-14
There are some basic differences between the observed properties of galaxies and clusters and the predictions from current hydrodynamical simulations. These are particularly pronounced in the central regions of galaxies and clusters. The popular NFW (Navarro, Frenk, and White) profile, for example, predicts a density cusp at the center, a behavior that (unsurprisingly) has not been observed. While it is not fully clear what are the reasons for this discrepancy, it perhaps reflects (at least partly) insufficient spatial resolution of the simulations. In this paper we explore a purely phenomenological approach to determine dark matter density profiles that are more consistent with observational results. Specifically, we deduce the gas density distribution from measured X-ray brightness profiles, and substitute it in the hydrostatic equilibrium equation in order to derive the form of dark matter profiles. Given some basic theoretical requirements from a dark matter profile, we then consider a number of simple profiles that have the desired asymptotic form. We conclude that a dark matter density profile of the form 1/(1+r/r_a)^3 is most consistent with current observational results.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0211532  [pdf] - 53267
Starburst Galaxies and the X-Ray Background
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures; accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2002-11-25
Integrated X-ray spectra of an evolving population of starburst galaxies (SBGs) are determined based on the observed spectra of local SBGs. In addition to emission from hot gas and binary systems, our model SBG spectrum includes a nonthermal component from Compton scattering of relativistic electrons by the intense ambient far-IR and the (steeply evolving) CMB radiation fields. We use these integrated spectra to calculate the levels of contribution of SBGs to the cosmic X-ray background assuming that their density evolves as (1+z)^q up to a maximal redshift of 5. We find that at energies <10 keV this contribution is at a level of few percent for q up to 3, and in the range of 5%-15% for q ~ 4.5. The Compton component is predicted to be the main SBG emission at high energies, and its relative contribution gets progressively higher for increasing redshift.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0211422  [pdf] - 53157
Cosmology with the S-Z Effect
Comments: 15 pages, 3 figures, invited review, proceedings of NATO ASI, Palermo, September 2002
Submitted: 2002-11-19
Extensive recent work on the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect reflects major progress in observational capabilities of interferometric arrays, the improved quality of multi-frequency measurements with upcoming ground-based and stratospheric bolometer arrays, and the intense theoretical and experimental work on the small scale structure of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. I briefly describe the effect and discuss its significance as a major cosmological probe. Recent results for the gas mass fraction in clusters and the Hubble constant (largely from measurements with the BIMA and OVRO interferometric arrays) are discussed. Also reviewed are results from the first determination of the CMB temperature at the redshifts of two clusters (from measurements with the MITO and SuZIE experiments), and recent work on the CMB anisotropy due to the S-Z effect.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0208027  [pdf] - 50843
Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature at Galaxy Clusters
Comments: 13 pages, 1 figure, ApJL accepted for publication
Submitted: 2002-08-01, last modified: 2002-10-30
We have deduced the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature in the Coma cluster (A1656, $z=0.0231$), and in A2163 ($z=0.203$) from spectral measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect over four passbands at radio and microwave frequencies. The resulting temperatures at these redshifts are $T_{Coma} = 2.789^{+0.080}_{-0.065}$ K and $T_{A2163} = 3.377^{+0.101}_{-0.102}$ K, respectively. These values confirm the expected relation $T(z)=T_{0}(1+z)$, where $T_{0}= 2.725 \pm 0.002$ K is the value measured by the COBE/FIRAS experiment. Alternative scaling relations that are conjectured in non-standard cosmologies can be constrained by the data; for example, if $T(z) = T_{0}(1+z)^{1-a}$ or $T(z)=T_{0}[1+(1+d)z]$, then $a=-0.16^{+0.34}_{-0.32}$ and $d = 0.17 \pm 0.36$ (at 95% confidence). We briefly discuss future prospects for more precise SZ measurements of $T(z)$ at higher redshifts.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0207443  [pdf] - 50586
Results from a Second RXTE Observation of the Coma Cluster
Comments: 10 pages, 1 figure; APJ, in press
Submitted: 2002-07-20
The RXTE satellite observed the Coma cluster for 177 ksec during November and December 2000, a second observation motivated by the intriguing results from the first 87 ksec observation in 1996. Analysis of the new dataset confirms that thermal emission from isothermal gas does not provide a good fit to the spectral distribution of the emission from the inner 1 degree radial region. While the observed spectrum may be fit by emission from gas with a substantial temperature gradient, it is more likely that the emission includes also a secondary non-thermal component. If so, non-thermal emission comprises ~8% of the total 4--20 keV flux. Interpreting this emission as due to Compton scattering of relativistic electrons (which produce the known extended radio emission) by the cosmic microwave background radiation, we determine that the mean, volume-averaged magnetic field in the central region of Coma is B = 0.1-0.3 microgauss.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0203303  [pdf] - 293514
MITO measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in the Coma cluster of galaxies
Comments: Ap.J.Letters accepted, 4 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2002-03-19, last modified: 2002-06-21
We have measured the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect towards the Coma cluster (A1656) with the MITO experiment, a 2.6-m telescope equipped with a 4-channel 17 arcminute (FWHM) photometer. Measurements at frequency bands 143+/-15, 214+/-15, 272+/-16 and 353+/-13 GHz, were made during 120 drift scans of Coma. We describe the observations and data analysis that involved extraction of the S-Z signal by employing a spatial and spectral de-correlation scheme to remove a dominant atmospheric component. The deduced values of the thermal S-Z effect in the first three bands are DT_{0} = -179+/-38,-33+/-81,170+/-35 microKelvin in the cluster center. The corresponding optical depth, tau=(4.1+/-0.9) 10^{-3}, is consistent (within errors) with both the value from a previous low frequency S-Z measurement, and the value predicted from the X-ray deduced gas parameters.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0204451  [pdf] - 48996
Quantification of Uncertainty in the Measurement of Magnetic Fields in Clusters of Galaxies
Comments: 31 pages including 3 figures; accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal as paper #54979
Submitted: 2002-04-26
We assess the principal statistical and physical uncertainties associated with the determination of magnetic field strengths in clusters of galaxies from measurements of Faraday rotation (FR) and Compton-synchrotron emissions. In the former case a basic limitation is noted, that the relative uncertainty in the estimation of the mean-squared FR will generally be at least one third. Even greater uncertainty stems from the crucial dependence of the Faraday-deduced field on the coherence length scale characterizing its random orientation; we further elaborate this dependence, and argue that previous estimates of the field are likely to be too high by a factor of a few. Lack of detailed spatial information on the radio emission--and the recently deduced nonthermal X-ray emission in four clusters--has led to an underestimation of the mean value of the field in cluster cores. We conclude therefore that it is premature to draw definite quantitative conclusions from the previously-claimed seemingly-discrepant values of the field determined by these two methods.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0204429  [pdf] - 48974
RXTE View of the Starburst Galaxies M82 and NGC 253
Comments: 18 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2002-04-25
The two nearby starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253 were observed for 100 ksec over a 10-month period in 1997. An increase of the M82 flux by a factor ~2 was measured during the period July-November, when compared with the flux measured earlier in 1997. The flux measured in the field centered on M82 includes ~38 of the emission from the Seyfert 1 galaxy M81. The best-fitting model for the earlier emission from M82 is thermal with kT = 6.7 +/- 0.1 keV. In the high flux state, the emission additionally includes either an absorbed second thermal component or absorbed power-law component, with the former providing a much better fit. A likely origin for the temporal variability is a single source in M82. The flux of NGC 253, which did not vary significantly during the period of observations, can be well fit by either a thermal spectrum with kT ~ 3.8 +/- 0.3 keV, or by a power law with photon index of 2.7 +/- 0.10. We have also attempted fitting the measurements to more realistic composite models with thermal and power-law components, such as would be expected from a dominant contribution from binary systems, or Compton scattering of (far) IR radiation by radio emitting electrons. However, the addition of any amount of a power-law component, even with cutoff at 20 keV, only increases chi-square. The 90% confidence upper limit for power law emission with (photon) index 1.5 is only 2.4% of the 2 -- 10 keV flux of M82; the corresponding limit for NGC 253, with index 2.0, is 48%.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0204355  [pdf] - 1232875
CMB Comptonization by Energetic Nonthermal Electrons in Clusters of Galaxies
Comments: 15 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2002-04-21
Use of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect as a precise cosmological probe necessitates a realistic assessment of all possible contributions to Comptonization of the cosmic microwave background in clusters of galaxies. We have calculated the additional intensity change due to various possible populations of energetic electrons that have been proposed in order to account for measurements of intracluster radio, nonthermal X-ray and (possibly also) EUV emission. Our properly normalized estimates of (the highly model dependent value of) the predicted intensity change due to these electrons is well below $\sim 6%$ and $\sim 35%$ of the usual Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect due to electrons in the hot gas in Coma and A2199, respectively. These levels constitute high upper limits since they are based on energetic electron populations whose energy densities are {\it comparable} to those of the thermal gas. The main impact of nonthermal Comptonization is a shift of the crossover frequency (where the thermal effect vanishes) to higher values. Such a shift would have important consequences for our ability to measure cluster peculiar velocities from the kinematic component of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0112030  [pdf] - 46403
X-Ray Spectral Components of Starburst Galaxies
Comments: 18 pages, 8 figures, A&A in press
Submitted: 2001-12-03
X-ray emission processes in starburst galaxies (SBGs) are assessed, with the aim of identifying and characterizing the main spectral components. Our survey of spectral properties, complemented with a model for the evolution of galactic stellar populations, leads to the prediction of a complex spectrum. Comparing the predicted spectral properties with current X-ray measurements of the nearby SBGs M82 and N253, we draw the following tentative conclusions: 1) X-ray binaries with accreting NS are the main contributors in the 2-15 keV band, and could be responsible for the yet uninterpreted hard component required to fit the observed 0.5-10 keV spectra of SBGs; 2) diffuse thermal plasma contributes at energies less than about 1 keV; 3) nonthermal emission, from Compton scattering of FIR and CMB radiation field photons off supernova-accelerated relativistic electrons, and AGN-like emission, are likely be the dominant emission at energies >30 keV; 4) supernova remnants make a relatively minor contribution to the X-ray continuum but may contribute appreciably to the Fe-K emission at 6.7 keV.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0110512  [pdf] - 45569
RXTE Spectrum of A2319
Comments: ApJ, in press, 11 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2001-10-23
The cluster of galaxies A2319 was observed in 1999 for 160 ks by the PCA and HEXTE instruments aboard the RXTE satellite. No noticeable variability is seen in the emission measured by either instrument over the 8 week observation. Fitting the RXTE data by a single thermal component we obtain $kT = 8.6 \pm 0.1$ (90% confidence limits), a low iron abundance $Z_{F_e} \sim 0.16 \pm 0.02$, and large positive residuals below 6 keV and between 15 to 30 keV. The quality of the fit is drastically improved if a second component is added. A two-temperature model yields $kT_{1} \simeq 10.1 \pm 0.6$, $kT_{2}\simeq 2.8 \pm 0.6$, and of $Z_{F_e} \sim 0.23 \pm 0.03$. An equally good fit is obtained by a combination of a primary thermal and a secondary nonthermal component, with $kT \simeq 8.9 \pm 0.6$, and power-law index $\alpha \simeq 2.4 \pm 0.3$. We have repeated the analysis by performing joint fits to both these RXTE measurements and archival ASCA data. At most 25% of the RXTE secondary component could be present in the ASCA data. Allowing for this difference, very similar results were obtained, with only somewhat different values for the temperature and power-law index in the latter model. The deduced value of $\alpha$ is consistent with the measured spectrum of extended radio emission. Identifying the power-law emission as Compton scattering of the radio-emitting electrons by the CMB, we obtain $B \sim0.1-0.3$ $\mu G$ for the volume-averaged magnetic field, and $\sim 4 \times 10^{-14}(R/2 Mpc)^{-3}$ erg cm$^{-3}$ for the mean energy density of the emitting electrons in the central region (radius R) of A2319.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0110510  [pdf] - 45567
The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect and Its Cosmological Significance
Comments: Invited review; in proceedings of the Erice NATO/ASI `Astrophysical Sources of High Energy Particles and Radiation'; 11 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2001-10-23
Comptonization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation by hot gas in clusters of galaxies - the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect - is of great astrophysical and cosmological significance. In recent years observations of the effect have improved tremendously; high signal-to-noise images of the effect (at low microwave frequencies) can now be obtained by ground-based interferometric arrays. In the near future, high frequency measurements of the effect will be made with bolomateric arrays during long duration balloon flights. Towards the end of the decade the PLANCK satellite will extensive S-Z surveys over a wide frequency range. Along with the improved observational capabilities, the theoretical description of the effect and its more precise use as a probe have been considerably advanced. I review the current status of theoretical and observational work on the effect, and the main results from its use as a cosmological probe.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0105265  [pdf] - 42494
Nonthermal Phenomena in Clusters of Galaxies
Comments: In proceedings of the Erice NATO/ASI `Astrophysical Sources of High Energy Particles & Radiation'; 8 pages
Submitted: 2001-05-16
Recent observations of high energy (> 20 keV) X-ray emission in a few clusters extend and broaden our knowledge of physical phenomena in the intracluster space. This emission is likely to be nonthermal, probably resulting from Compton scattering of relativistic electrons by the cosmic microwave background radiation. Direct evidence for the presence of relativistic electrons in some 30 clusters comes from measurements of extended radio emission in their central regions. I first review the results from RXTE and BeppoSAX measurements of a small sample of clusters, and then discuss their implications on the mean values of intracluster magnetic fields and relativistic electron energy densities. Implications on the origin of the fields and electrons are briefly considered.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0105192  [pdf] - 1591877
The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect: Current Status and Future Prospects
Comments: Invited review, proceedings of the 9th Marcel Grossmann Meeting; 10 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2001-05-11
The detailed spectral and spatial characteristics of the signature imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation by Compton scattering of the radiation by electrons in the hot gas in clusters of galaxies - the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect - are of great astrophysical and cosmological significance. In recent years observations of the effect have improved tremendously; high signal-to-noise images of the effect (at low microwave frequencies) can now be obtained by interferometric arrays. In the near future, high frequency measurements of the effect will be made with ground based and balloon-borne telescopes equipped with bolometeric arrays. Towards the end of the decade the PLANCK satellite will carry out an extensive S-Z survey over a wide frequency range. Along with the improved observational capabilities, the theoretical description of the effect, and its use as a precise cosmological probe, have been considerably advanced. In this review, I briefly discuss the nature and significance of the effect, its exact theoretical description, the current observational status, and prospects for the near future.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0101363  [pdf] - 40501
High Energy X-Ray Emission in Clusters of Galaxies
Comments: Invited review, proceedings of the Heidelberg Workshop `High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy', 9 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2001-01-21
Observations with the RXTE and SAX satellites have recently led to the measurement of a second component in the spectra of several clusters of galaxies which are known to have regions of extended radio emission. This new component is quite likely nonthermal emission resulting from Compton scattering of relativistic electrons by the cosmic microwave background. The nonthermal X-ray and radio measurements yield the values of the mean intracluster magnetic field, and relativistic electron density, for the first time in extragalactic environments. These results have important consequences on issues such as the origin of cosmic ray electrons and protons, their propagation modes in clusters, and the effects of these particles and magnetic fields on the intracluster gas. The observational results are reviewed, and some of their direct implications are discussed, along with near-future prospects for improved spectral and spatial measurements of nonthermal emission in clusters.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0010084  [pdf] - 293510
The Sunyaev-Zeldovich MITO Project
Comments: To appear in Proceedings of `Understanding our Universe at the close of XXth century', School held Apr 25 - May 6 2000, Cargese, 16 pages LaTeX, 2 figures ps (using elsart.sty & elsart.cls), text minor revision
Submitted: 2000-10-04, last modified: 2000-10-30
Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background radiation by electrons in the hot gas in clusters of galaxies - the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect - has long been recognized as a uniquely important feature, rich in cosmological and astrophysical information. We briefly describe the effect, and emphasize the need for detailed S-Z and X-ray measurements of nearby clusters in order to use the effect as a precise cosmological probe. This is the goal of the MITO project, whose first stage consisted of observations of the S-Z effect in the Coma cluster. We report the results of these observations.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0002224  [pdf] - 1943514
An X-ray and optical study of the cluster A33
Comments: 9 pages, 6 Figures, Latex (using psfig,l-aa), to appear in Astronomy and Astrophysics S. (To get better quality copies of Figs.1-3 send an email to: cola@coma.mporzio.astro.it). A&AS, in press
Submitted: 2000-02-10
We report the first detailed X-ray and optical observations of the medium-distant cluster A33 obtained with the Beppo-SAX satellite and with the UH 2.2m and Keck II telescopes at Mauna Kea. The information deduced from X-ray and optical imaging and spectroscopic data allowed us to identify the X-ray source 1SAXJ0027.2-1930 as the X-ray counterpart of the A33 cluster. The faint, $F_{2-10 keV} \approx 2.4 \times 10^{-13} \ergscm2$, X-ray source 1SAXJ0027.2-1930, $\sim 2$ arcmin away from the optical position of the cluster as given in the Abell catalogue, is identified with the central region of A33. Based on six cluster galaxy redshifts, we determine the redshift of A33, $z=0.2409$; this is lower than the value derived by Leir and Van Den Bergh (1977). The source X-ray luminosity, $L_{2-10 keV} = 7.7 \times 10^{43} \ergs$, and intracluster gas temperature, $T = 2.9$ keV, make this cluster interesting for cosmological studies of the cluster $L_X-T$ relation at intermediate redshifts. Two other X-ray sources in the A33 field are identified. An AGN at z$=$0.2274, and an M-type star, whose emission are blended to form an extended X-ray emission $\sim 4$ arcmin north of the A33 cluster. A third possibly point-like X-ray source detected $\sim 3$ arcmin north-west of A33 lies close to a spiral galaxy at z$=$0.2863 and to an elliptical galaxy at the same redshift as the cluster.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9908312  [pdf] - 107984
Diffuse Thermal Emission from Very Hot Gas in Starburst Galaxies
Comments: 17 Latex pages, 7 figures, uses psfig.sty. Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 1999-08-27
BeppoSAX observations of the nearby archetypical starburst galaxies NGC253 and M82 are presented. Spectral analysis shows that the 2-10 keV spectra of both galaxies, extracted from the central 4' regions, are best fitted by a thermal emission model with kT~6-9 keV and metal abundances ~ 0.1-0.3 solar. The spatial analysis yields clear evidence that this emission is extended in NGC 253, and possibly also in M82. These results clearly rule out a LLAGN as the {\it main} origin of the X-ray emission in NGC 253. For M82, the presence of an Fe-K line at ~ 6.7 keV, and the convex profile of its 2-10 keV continuum, indicate a significant thermal component. Contributions from point sources (e.g. X-ray binaries, supernova remnants, and/or a LLAGN) and Compton emission are also likely. Altogether, BeppoSAX results provide compelling evidence for the existence of a hot interstellar plasma in both galaxies, possibly in the form of superwind outflows from the disks of these galaxies. Order-of-magnitude estimates and some implications, such as the expelled mass and the energetics of the outflowing gas of this superwind scenario, are discussed. These new results also suggest some similarity between the X-ray emission from these galaxies and that from the Galactic Ridge.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9902021  [pdf] - 1943619
Diffuse Thermal Emission from Very Hot Gas in Starburst Galaxies: Spatial Results
Comments: 5 Latex pages, 4 figures, uses psfig.sty. Accepted for publication in Advances in Space Research, in Proceedings of 32nd Sci. Ass. of COSPAR
Submitted: 1999-02-01
New BeppoSAX observations of the nearby prototypical starburst galaxies NGC 253 and M82 are presented. A companion paper (Cappi et al. 1998;astro-ph/9809325) shows that the hard (2-10 keV) spectrum of both galaxies, extracted from the source central regions, is best described by a thermal emission model with kT ~ 6-9 keV and abundances ~ 0.1-0.3 solar. The spatial analysis yields clear evidence that this emission is extended in NGC 253, and possibly also in M82. This quite clearly rules out a LLAGN as the main responsible for their hard X-ray emission. Significant contribution from point-sources (i.e. X-ray binaries (XRBs) and Supernovae Remnants (SNRs)) cannot be excluded; neither can we at present reliably estimate the level of Compton emission. However, we argue that such contributions shouldn't affect our main conclusion, i.e., that the BeppoSAX results show, altogether, compelling evidence for the existence of a very hot, metal-poor interstellar plasma in both galaxies.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809325  [pdf] - 103029
Diffuse Thermal Emission from Very Hot Gas in Starburst Galaxies: Spectral Results
Comments: 4 LateX pages, 4 postscript figures and memsait.sty included, to appear in proceedings of ``Dal nano- al tera-eV: tutti i colori degli AGN'', third Italian conference on AGNs, Roma, Memorie S.A.It
Submitted: 1998-09-25
New BeppoSAX observations of the nearby archetypical starburst galaxies (SBGs) NGC253 and M82 are presented. The main observational result is the unambiguous evidence that the hard (2-10 keV) component is (mostly) produced in both galaxies by thermal emission from a metal-poor (~ 0.1-0.3 solar), hot (kT \~ 6- 9 keV) and extended (see companion paper: Cappi et al. 1998) plasma. Possible origins of this newly discovered component are briefly discussed. A remarkable similarity with the (Milky Way) Galactic Ridge's X-ray emission suggests, nevertheless, a common physical mechanism.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809256  [pdf] - 102960
BeppoSAX detection of the Fe K line in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253
Comments: LaTeX file (6 pages), 2 ps figures, accepted for publications in Astronomy & Astrophysics Letters
Submitted: 1998-09-21
We present BeppoSAX results on the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253. Although extended, a large fraction of the X-ray emission comes from the nuclear region. Preliminary analysis of the LECS/MECS/PDS ~0.2-60 keV data from the central 4' region indicates that the continuum is well fitted by two thermal models: a ``soft'' component with kT ~ 0.9 keV, and a ``hard'' component with kT ~ 6 keV absorbed by a column density of ~ 1.2 x10**22 cm-2. For the first time in this object, the Fe K line at 6.7 keV is detected, with an equivalent width of ~ 300 eV. This detection, together with the shape of the 2--60 keV continuum, implies that most of the hard X-ray emission is thermal in origin, and constrains the iron abundances of this component to be ~0.25 of solar. Other lines clearly detected are Si, S and Fe L/Ne, in agreement with previous ASCA results. We discuss our results in the context of the starburst-driven galactic superwind model.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9801130  [pdf] - 99979
BeppoSAX detection of the Fe K line in the starburst galaxy NGC253
Comments: 4 pages, LateX, 2 figures (included). Uses espcrc2.sty (included) To appear in The Active X-ray Sky: Results from BeppoSAX and Rossi-XTE, Rome, Italy, 21-24 October, 1997. Eds.: L. Scarsi, H. Bradt, P. Giommi and F. Fiore
Submitted: 1998-01-14
Preliminary results obtained from BeppoSAX observation of the starburst galaxy NGC253 are presented. X-ray emission from the object is clearly extended but most of the emission is concentrated on the optical nucleus. Preliminary analysis of the LECS and MECS data obtained using the central 4' region indicates that the continuum is well fitted by two thermal components at 0.9 keV and 7 keV. Fe K line at 6.7 keV is detected for the first time in this galaxy; the line has an equivalent width of ~300eV. The line energy and the shape of the 2-10 keV continuum strongly support thermal origin of the hard X-ray emission of NGC253. From the measurement of the Fe K line the abundances can be unambiguously constrained to ~0.25 the solar value. Other lines clearly detected are Si, S and Fe XVIII/Ne, in agreement with ASCA results.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9703121  [pdf] - 96882
Intracluster Comptonization of the CMB: Mean Spectral Distrortion and Cluster Number Counts
Comments: 23 pages, Latex, 11 PostScript figures, 5 PostScript tables, to appear in ApJ
Submitted: 1997-03-19
The mean sky-averaged Comptonization parameter, y, describing the scattering of the CMB by hot gas in clusters of galaxies is calculated in an array of flat and open cosmological and dark matter models. The models are globally normalized to fit cluster X-ray data, and intracluster gas is assumed to have evolved in a manner consistent with current observations. We predict values of y lower than the COBE/FIRAS upper limit. The corresponding values of the overall optical thickness to Compton scattering are < 10^{-4} for relevant parameter values. Of more practical importance are number counts of clusters across which a net flux (with respect to the CMB) higher than some limiting value can be detected. Such number counts are specifically predicted for the COBRAS/SAMBA and BOOMERANG missions.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9702224  [pdf] - 96743
Measurement of the Hubble Constant from X-ray and 2.1 mm Observations of Abell 2163
Comments: 24 pages, 10 postscript figures, LaTeX(aaspptwo.sty), ApJ(in press)
Submitted: 1997-02-25
We report 2.1 mm observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (S-Z) effect; these observations confirm our previous detection of a decrement in the Cosmic Microwave Background intensity towards the cluster Abell 2163. The S-Z data are analyzed using the relativistically correct expression for the Comptonization. We begin by assuming the intracluster (IC) gas to be isothermal at the emission weighted average temperature determined by a combined analysis of the ASCA and GINGA X-ray satellite observations. Combining the X-ray and S-Z measurements, we determine the Hubble constant to be H_0(q_0=0.5)= 60 +40/-23 km/s/Mpc, where the uncertainty is dominated by the systematic difference in the ASCA and GINGA determined IC gas temperatures. ASCA observations suggest the presence of a significant thermal gradient in the IC gas. We determine $H_0$ as a function of the assumed IC gas thermal structure. Using the ASCA determined thermal structure and keeping the emission weighted average temperature the same as in the isothermal case, we find H_0(q_0=0.5)= 78 +54/-28 km/s/Mpc. Including additional uncertainties due to cluster asphericity, peculiar velocity, IC gas clumping, and astrophysical confusion, we find H_0(q_0=0.5)= 78 +60/-40 km/s/Mpc.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9702223  [pdf] - 1469488
Limits on the Peculiar Velocities of Two Distant Clusters Using the Kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect
Comments: 21 pages, 13 postscript figures, LaTeX(aaspptwo.sty), ApJ(in press)
Submitted: 1997-02-25
We report millimeter-wavelength observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (S-Z) effect in two distant galaxy clusters. A relativistically correct analysis of the S-Z data is combined with the results of X-ray observations to determine the radial peculiar velocities v_r of the clusters. We observed Abell 2163 (z=.201) in three mm-wavelength bands centered at 2.1, 1.4, and 1.1 mm. We report a significant detection of the thermal component of the S-Z effect seen as both a decrement in the brightness of the CMB at 2.1 mm, and as an increment at 1.1 mm. Including uncertainties due to the calibration of the instrument, distribution and temperature of the IC gas, and astrophysical confusion, a simultaneous fit to the data in all three bands gives v_r=+490 +1370/-880 km/s at 68% confidence. We observed Abell 1689 (z=.181) in the 2.1 and 1.4 mm bands. Including the same detailed accounting of uncertainty, a simultaneous fit to the data in both bands gives v_r=+170 +815/-630 km/s. The limits on the peculiar velocities of A2163 and A1689 correspond to deviations from the uniform Hubble flow of <= 2-3%.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9607031  [pdf] - 94973
A Millimeter/Submillimeter Search for the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in the Coma Cluster
Comments: 11 pages, LaTeX+aasms4 package, 1 PostScript figure. Submitted to Ap.J Letters
Submitted: 1996-07-04
Observations from the first flight of the Medium Scale Anisotropy Measurement (MSAM1-92) are analyzed to search for the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect towards the Coma cluster. This balloon-borne instrument uses a $28\arcmin$ FWHM beam and a three position chopping pattern with a throw of $\pm40\arcmin$. With spectral channels at 5.7, 9.3, 16.5, and 22.6~\icm, the observations simultaneously sample the frequency range where the SZ spectral distortion in the intensity transitions from a decrement to an increment and where the fractional intensity change is substantially larger than in the Rayleigh-Jeans region. We set limits on the Comptonization parameter integrated over our antenna pattern, $\Delta y \leq 8.0 \times 10^{-5}$($2 \sigma$). For a spherically symmetric isothermal model, this implies a central Comptonization parameter, $y_o \leq 2.0 \times 10^{-4}$, or a central electron density, $n_o \leq 5.8 \times10^{-3}$cm$^{-3}h_{50}$, a result consistent with central densities implied by X-ray brightness measurements and central Comptonization estimates from lower frequency observations of the SZ effect.