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Reck, Theodore

Normalized to: Reck, T.

4 article(s) in total. 30 co-authors, from 1 to 3 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 15,5.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.04488  [pdf] - 1347622
Low Noise Titanium Nitride KIDs for SuperSpec: A Millimeter-Wave On-Chip Spectrometer
Comments: 8 pages, 4 embedded figures, accepted for publication in the Journal of Low Temperature Physics
Submitted: 2015-11-13
SuperSpec is a novel on-chip spectrometer we are developing for multi-object, moderate resolution (R = 100 - 500), large bandwidth (~1.65:1) submillimeter and millimeter survey spectroscopy of high-redshift galaxies. The spectrometer employs a filter bank architecture, and consists of a series of half-wave resonators formed by lithographically-patterned superconducting transmission lines. The signal power admitted by each resonator is detected by a lumped element titanium nitride (TiN) kinetic inductance detector (KID) operating at 100 - 200 MHz. We have tested a new prototype device that achieves the targeted R = 100 resolving power, and has better detector sensitivity and optical efficiency than previous devices. We employ a new method for measuring photon noise using both coherent and thermal sources of radiation to cleanly separate the contributions of shot and wave noise. We report an upper limit to the detector NEP of $1.4\times10^{-17}$ W Hz$^{-1/2}$, within 10% of the photon noise limited NEP for a ground-based R=100 spectrometer.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.02295  [pdf] - 1223953
Status of SuperSpec: A Broadband, On-Chip Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, Proceedings of the SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2014 Conference, Vol 9153, Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VII
Submitted: 2015-01-09
SuperSpec is a novel on-chip spectrometer we are developing for multi-object, moderate resolution (R = 100 - 500), large bandwidth (~1.65:1) submillimeter and millimeter survey spectroscopy of high-redshift galaxies. The spectrometer employs a filter bank architecture, and consists of a series of half-wave resonators formed by lithographically-patterned superconducting transmission lines. The signal power admitted by each resonator is detected by a lumped element titanium nitride (TiN) kinetic inductance detector (KID) operating at 100-200 MHz. We have tested a new prototype device that is more sensitive than previous devices, and easier to fabricate. We present a characterization of a representative R=282 channel at f = 236 GHz, including measurements of the spectrometer detection efficiency, the detector responsivity over a large range of optical loading, and the full system optical efficiency. We outline future improvements to the current system that we expect will enable construction of a photon-noise-limited R=100 filter bank, appropriate for a line intensity mapping experiment targeting the [CII] 158 micron transition during the Epoch of Reionization
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.1118  [pdf] - 915510
Normal Metal Hot-Electron Nanobolometer with Johnson Noise Thermometry Readout
Comments: 5 pages, 5 figures, presented at the 25th International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology (Moscow, Russia, 27-30 April 2014)
Submitted: 2014-11-04
The sensitivity of a THz hot-electron nanobolometer (nano-HEB) made from a normal metal is analyzed. Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) is employed as a readout technique. In contrast to its superconducting TES counterpart, the normal-metal nano-HEB can operate at any cryogenic temperature depending on the required radiation background limited Noise Equivalent Power (NEP). It does not require bias lines; 100s of nano-HEBs can be read by a single low-noise X-band amplifier via a filter bank channelizer. The modeling predicts that even with the sensitivity penalty due to the amplifier noise, an NEP ~ 10$^{-20}$ - 10$^{-19}$ W/Hz$^{1/2}$ can be expected at 50-100 mK in 10-20 nm thin titanium (Ti) normal metal HEBs with niobium (Nb) contacts. This NEP is fairly constant over a range of readout frequencies ~ 10 GHz. Although materials with weaker electron-phonon coupling (bismuth, graphene) do not improve the minimum achievable NEP, they can be considered if a larger than 10 GHz readout bandwidth is required.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.1652  [pdf] - 587352
MKID development for SuperSpec: an on-chip, mm-wave, filter-bank spectrometer
Comments: As submitted, except that "in prep" references have been updated
Submitted: 2012-11-07
SuperSpec is an ultra-compact spectrometer-on-a-chip for millimeter and submillimeter wavelength astronomy. Its very small size, wide spectral bandwidth, and highly multiplexed readout will enable construction of powerful multibeam spectrometers for high-redshift observations. The spectrometer consists of a horn-coupled microstrip feedline, a bank of narrow-band superconducting resonator filters that provide spectral selectivity, and Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) that detect the power admitted by each filter resonator. The design is realized using thin-film lithographic structures on a silicon wafer. The mm-wave microstrip feedline and spectral filters of the first prototype are designed to operate in the band from 195-310 GHz and are fabricated from niobium with at Tc of 9.2K. The KIDs are designed to operate at hundreds of MHz and are fabricated from titanium nitride with a Tc of 2K. Radiation incident on the horn travels along the mm-wave microstrip, passes through the frequency-selective filter, and is finally absorbed by the corresponding KID where it causes a measurable shift in the resonant frequency. In this proceedings, we present the design of the KIDs employed in SuperSpec and the results of initial laboratory testing of a prototype device. We will also briefly describe the ongoing development of a demonstration instrument that will consist of two 500-channel, R=700 spectrometers, one operating in the 1-mm atmospheric window and the other covering the 650 and 850 micron bands.