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Petrov, L.

Normalized to: Petrov, L.

44 article(s) in total. 143 co-authors, from 1 to 18 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 1,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.09046  [pdf] - 1877849
Microarcsecond VLBI pulsar astrometry with PSR$\pi$ II. parallax distances for 57 pulsars
Comments: updated to version accepted by ApJ: 30 pages, 20 figures, 9 tables
Submitted: 2018-08-27, last modified: 2019-04-15
We present the results of PSR$\pi$, a large astrometric project targeting radio pulsars using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). From our astrometric database of 60 pulsars, we have obtained parallax-based distance measurements for all but 3, with a parallax precision of typically 40 $\mu$as and approaching 10 $\mu$as in the best cases. Our full sample doubles the number of radio pulsars with a reliable ($\gtrsim$5$\sigma$) model-independent distance constraint. Importantly, many of the newly measured pulsars are well outside the solar neighbourhood, and so PSR$\pi$ brings a near-tenfold increase in the number of pulsars with a reliable model-independent distance at $d>2$ kpc. Using our sample along with previously published results, we show that even the most recent models of the Galactic electron density distribution model contain significant shortcomings, particularly at high Galactic latitudes. When comparing our results to pulsar timing, two of the four millisecond pulsars in our sample exhibit significant discrepancies in the estimates of proper motion obtained by at least one pulsar timing array. With additional VLBI observations to improve the absolute positional accuracy of our reference sources and an expansion of the number of millisecond pulsars, we will be able to extend the comparison of proper motion discrepancies to a larger sample of pulsar reference positions, which will provide a much more sensitive test of the applicability of the solar system ephemerides used for pulsar timing. Finally, we use our large sample to estimate the typical accuracy attainable for differential astrometry with the VLBA when observing pulsars, showing that for sufficiently bright targets observed 8 times over 18 months, a parallax uncertainty of 4 $\mu$as per arcminute of separation between the pulsar and calibrator can be expected.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.02916  [pdf] - 1866415
The Second LBA Calibrator Survey of southern compact extragalactic radio sources - LCS2
Comments: 14 pages, 15 figures, 4 online tables and their readme files available from the source of the submission
Submitted: 2018-12-07, last modified: 2019-04-12
We present the second catalogue of accurate positions and correlated flux densities for 1100 compact extragalactic radio sources that were not observed before 2008 at high angular resolution. The catalogue spans the declination range -90 deg, -30 deg and was constructed from nineteen 24-hour VLBI observing sessions with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 8.3 GHz. The catalogue presents the final part of the program that was started in 2008. The goals of that campaign were 1) to extend the number of compact radio sources with precise coordinates and measure their correlated flux densities, which can be used for phase referencing VLBI and ALMA observations, geodetic VLBI, search for sources with significant offsets with respect to Gaia positions, and space navigation; 2) to extend the complete flux-limited sample of compact extragalactic sources to the Southern Hemisphere; and 3) to investigate the parsec-scale properties of sources from the high-frequency AT20G survey. The median uncertainty of the source positions is 3.5 mas. As a result of this VLBI campaign, the number of compact radio sources south of declination -40 deg which have measured VLBI correlated flux densities and positions known to milliarcsecond accuracy has increased by over a factor of 6.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.11145  [pdf] - 1857268
The Next Generation Celestial Reference Frame
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures, Astro2020 White Paper
Submitted: 2019-03-26
Astrometry, the measurement of positions and motions of the stars, is one of the oldest disciplines in Astronomy, extending back at least as far as Hipparchus' discovery of the precession of Earth's axes in 190 BCE by comparing his catalog with those of his predecessors. Astrometry is fundamental to Astronomy, and critical to many aspects of Astrophysics and Geodesy. In order to understand our planet's and solar system's context within their surroundings, we must be able to to define, quantify, study, refine, and maintain an inertial frame of reference relative to which all positions and motions can be unambiguously and self-consistently described. It is only by using this inertial reference frame that we are able to disentangle our observations of the motions of celestial objects from our own complex path around our star, and its path through the galaxy, and the local group. Every aspect of each area outlined in the call for scientific frontiers in astronomy in the era of the 2020-2030 timeframe will depend on the quality of the inertial reference frame. In this white paper, we propose support for development of radio Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) capabilities, including the Next Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA), a radio astronomy observatory that will not only support development of a next generation reference frame of unprecedented accuracy, but that will also serve as a highly capable astronomical instrument in its own right. Much like its predecessors, the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and other VLBI telescopes, the proposed ngVLA will provide the foundation for the next three decades for the fundamental reference frame, benefitting astronomy, astrophysics, and geodesy alike.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.05115  [pdf] - 1822848
Dissecting the AGN disk-jet system with joint VLBI-Gaia analysis
Comments: 7 pages, 6 figures, 1 table; accepted to ApJ; manuscript expanded from letter to article format
Submitted: 2018-08-15, last modified: 2018-12-04
We analyze differences in positions of active galactic nuclei between Gaia data release 2 and VLBI and compare the significant VLBI-to-Gaia offsets in more than 1000 objects with their jet directions. Remarkably at least 3/4 of the significant offsets are confirmed to occur downstream or upstream the jet representing a genuine astrophysical effect. Introducing redshift and Gaia color into analysis can help distinguish between the contribution of the host galaxy, jet, and accretion disk emission. We find that strong optical jet emission at least 20-50pc long is required to explain the Gaia positions located downstream from VLBI ones. Offsets in the upstream direction of up to 2 mas are at least partly due to the dominant impact of the accretion disk on the Gaia coordinates and by the effects of parsec-scale radio jet. The host galaxy was found not to play an important role in the detected offsets. BL Lacertae object and Seyfert 2 galaxies are observationally confirmed to have a relatively weak disk and consequently downstream offsets. The disk emission drives upstream offsets in a significant fraction of quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies when it dominates over the jet in the optical band. The observed behaviour of the different AGN classes is consistent with the unified scheme assuming varying contribution of the obscuring dusty torus and jet beaming.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.05114  [pdf] - 1786944
A quantitative analysis of systematic differences in positions and proper motions of Gaia DR2 with respect to VLBI
Comments: 9 pages, 8 figures; accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-08-15, last modified: 2018-10-14
We have analyzed the differences in positions of 9081 matched sources between the Gaia DR2 and VLBI catalogues. The median position uncertainty of matched sources in the VLBI catalogue is a factor of two larger than the median position uncertainty in the Gaia DR2. There are 9% matched sources with statistically significant offsets between both catalogues. We found that reported positional errors should be re-scaled by a factor of 1.3 for VLBI and 1.06 for Gaia, and in addition, Gaia errors should be multiplied by the square root of chi square per degree of freedom in order to best fit the normalized position differences to the Rayleigh distribution. We have established that the major contributor to statistically significant position offsets is the presence of optical jets. Among the sources for which the jet direction was determined, the position offsets are parallel to the jet directions for 62% of the outliers. Among the matched sources with significant proper motion, the fraction of objects with proper motion directions parallel to jets is a factor of 3 greater than on average. Such sources have systematically higher chi square per degree of freedom. We explain these proper motions as a manifestation of the source position jitter caused by flares that we have predicted earlier. Therefore, the assumption that quasars are fixed points and therefore, differential proper motions determined with respect to quasar photocenters can be regarded as absolute proper motions, should be treated with a great caution.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.05640  [pdf] - 1755890
Radio interferometric observation of an asteroid occultation
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures, to appear in the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2018-04-16, last modified: 2018-09-13
The occultation of the radio galaxy 0141+268 by the asteroid (372) Palma on 2017 May 15 was observed using six antennas of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The shadow of Palma crossed the VLBA station at Brewster, Washington. Owing to the wavelength used, and the size and the distance of the asteroid, a diffraction pattern in the Fraunhofer regime was observed. The measurement retrieves both the amplitude and the phase of the diffracted electromagnetic wave. This is the first astronomical measurement of the phase shift caused by diffraction. The maximum phase shift is sensitive to the effective diameter of the asteroid. The bright spot at the shadow's center, the so called Arago--Poisson spot, is clearly detected in the amplitude time-series, and its strength is a good indicator of the closest angular distance between the center of the asteroid and the radio source. A sample of random shapes constructed using a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm suggests that the silhouette of Palma deviates from a perfect circle by 26+-13%. The best-fitting random shapes resemble each other, and we suggest their average approximates the shape of the silhouette at the time of the occultation. The effective diameter obtained for Palma, 192.1+-4.8 km, is in excellent agreement with recent estimates from thermal modeling of mid-infrared photometry. Finally, our computations show that because of the high positional accuracy, a single radio interferometric occultation measurement can reduce the long-term ephemeris uncertainty by an order of magnitude.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.02198  [pdf] - 1661864
A wide and collimated radio jet in 3C 84 on the scale of a few hundred gravitational radii
Comments: Unedited, revised manuscript of the Letter published as Advance Online Publication (AOP) on the Nature Astronomy website on 02 April 2018. 15 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2018-04-06
Understanding the launching, acceleration, and collimation of jets powered by active galactic nuclei remains an outstanding problem in relativistic astrophysics. This is partly because observational tests of jet formation models suffer from the limited angular resolution of ground-based very long baseline interferometry that has thus far been able to probe the transverse jet structure in the acceleration and collimation zone of only two sources. Here we report radio interferometric observations of 3C 84 (NGC 1275), the central galaxy of the Perseus cluster, made with an array including the orbiting radio telescope of the RadioAstron mission. The obtained image transversely resolves the edge-brightened jet in 3C 84 only 30 microarcseconds from the core, which is ten times closer to the central engine than what has been possible in previous ground-based observations, and it allows us to measure the jet collimation profile from ~ 100 to ~10000 gravitational radii from the black hole. The previously found, almost cylindrical jet profile on scales larger than a few thousand r_g is now seen to continue at least down to a few hundred r_g from the black hole and we find a broad jet with a transverse radius larger than about 250 r_g at only 350 r_g from the core. If the bright outer jet layer is launched by the black hole ergosphere, it has to rapidly expand laterally on scales smaller than 100 r_g. If this is not the case, then this jet sheath is likely launched from the accretion disk.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.07365  [pdf] - 1582807
Observational consequences of optical band milliarcsecond-scale structure in active galactic nuclei discovered by Gaia
Comments: Revised in accordance with received comments
Submitted: 2017-04-21, last modified: 2017-08-24
We interpret the recent discovery of a preferable VLBI/Gaia offset direction for radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) along the parsec-scale radio jets as a manifestation of their optical structure on scales of 1 to 100 milliarcseconds. The extended jet structure affects the Gaia position stronger than the VLBI position due to the difference in observing techniques. Gaia detects total power while VLBI measures the correlated quantity, visibility, and therefore, sensitive to compact structures. The synergy of VLBI that is sensitive to the position of the most compact source component, usually associated with the opaque radio core, and Gaia that is sensitive to the centroid of optical emission, opens a window of opportunity to study optical jets at milliarcsecond resolution, two orders of magnitude finer than the resolution of most existing optical instruments. We demonstrate that strong variability of optical jets is able to cause a jitter comparable to the VLBI/Gaia offsets at a quiet state, i.e. several milliarcseconds. We show that the VLBI/Gaia position jitter correlation with the AGN optical light curve may help to locate the region where the flare occurred, estimate its distance from the super-massive black hole and the ratio of the flux density in the flaring region to the total flux density.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.07287  [pdf] - 1581271
VLBI ecliptic plane survey: VEPS-1
Comments: 12 pages, 5 figures, 5 tables, accepted by The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (ApJS)
Submitted: 2017-01-25, last modified: 2017-06-09
We present here the results of the first part of the VLBI Ecliptic Plane Survey (VEPS) program. The goal of the program is to find all compact sources within $7.5^\circ$ of the ecliptic plane which are suitable as calibrators for anticipated phase referencing observations of spacecraft and determine their positions with accuracy at the 1.5~nrad level. We run the program in two modes: the search mode and the refining mode. In the search mode, a complete sample of all sources brighter than 50 mJy at 5 GHz listed in the Parkes-MIT-NRAO (PMN) and Green Bank 6~cm (GB6) catalogs, except those previously detected with VLBI, is observed. In the refining mode, the positions of all ecliptic plane sources, including those found in the search mode, are improved. By October 2016, thirteen 24-hr sessions that targeted all sources brighter than 100~mJy have been observed and analyzed. Among 3320 observed target sources, 555 objects have been detected. We also conducted a number of follow-up VLBI experiments in the refining mode and improved the positions of 249 ecliptic plane sources.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.07036  [pdf] - 1561176
Radio Follow-up on all Unassociated Gamma-ray Sources from the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalog
Comments: 14 pages, 9 figures, 6 tables, 5 machine readable tables, accepted for publication in ApJS
Submitted: 2017-02-22
The third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) $\gamma$-ray source catalog (3FGL) contains over 1000 objects for which there is no known counterpart at other wavelengths. The physical origin of the $\gamma$-ray emission of those objects is unknown. Such objects are commonly referred to as unassociated and mostly do not exhibit significant $\gamma$-ray flux variability. We performed a survey of all unassociated $\gamma$-ray sources found in 3FGL using the Australia Telescope Compact Array and Very Large Array in the range of 4.0-10.0 GHz. We found 2097 radio candidates for association with $\gamma$-ray sources. The follow-up with very long baseline interferometry for a subset of those candidates yielded 142 new AGN associations with $\gamma$-ray sources, provided alternative associations for 7 objects, and improved positions for another 144 known associations to the milliarcsecond level of accuracy. In addition, for 245 unassociated $\gamma$-ray sources we did not find a single compact radio source above 2 mJy within 3$\sigma$ of their $\gamma$-ray localization. A significant fraction of these empty fields, 39%, are located away from the galactic plane. We also found 36 extended radio sources that are candidates for association with a corresponding $\gamma$-ray object, 19 of which are most likely supernova remnants or HII regions, whereas 17 could be radio galaxies.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.07036  [pdf] - 1530735
Progress on VLBI Ecliptic Plane Survey
Comments: 5 pages, 5 figures. IVS 2016 General Meeting Proceedings "New Horizons with VGOS", edited by Dirk Behrend, Karen D. Baver, and Kyla L. Armstrong, NASA/CP-2016-219016, p351-355, 2016
Submitted: 2016-05-23, last modified: 2017-01-25
We launched the VLBI Ecliptic Plane Survey program in 2015. The goal of this program is to find all compact sources within 7.5 degrees of the ecliptic plane which are suitable as phase calibrators for anticipated phase referencing observations of spacecrafts. We planned to observe a complete sample of the sources brighter than 50 mJy at 5 GHz listed in the PMN and GB6 catalogues that have not yet been observed with VLBI. By April 2016, eight 24-hour sessions have been performed and processed. Among 2227 observed sources, 435 sources were detected in three or more observations. We have also run three 8-hour segments with VLBA for improving positions of 71 ecliptic sources.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.02630  [pdf] - 1532505
On significance of VLBI/Gaia position offsets
Comments: 6 pages, 6 figures, 3 tables; accepted by MNRAS Letters; full electronic versions of 2 tables are available from the preprint source; text and tables are updated, a figure added
Submitted: 2016-11-08, last modified: 2017-01-08
We have cross matched the Gaia Data Release 1 secondary dataset that contains positions of 1.14 billion objects against the most complete to date catalogue of VLBI positions of 11.4 thousand sources, almost exclusively active galactic nuclei. We found 6,064 matches, i.e. 53% radio objects. The median uncertainty of VLBI positions is a factor of 4 smaller than the median uncertainties of their optical counterparts. Our analysis shows that the distribution of normalized arc lengths significantly deviates from Rayleigh shape with an excess of objects with small normalized arc lengths and with a number of outliers. We found that 6% matches have radio optical offsets significant at 99% confidence level. Therefore, we conclude there exists a population of objects with genuine offsets between centroids of radio and optical emission.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.02632  [pdf] - 1532506
VLBI-Gaia offsets favor parsec-scale jet direction in Active Galactic Nuclei
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures; accepted by A&A Letters; minor language corrections to the text are introduced
Submitted: 2016-11-08, last modified: 2017-01-02
The data release 1 (DR1) of milliarcsecond-scale accurate optical positions of stars and galaxies was recently published by the space mission Gaia. We study the offsets of highly accurate absolute radio (very long baseline interferometry, VLBI) and optical positions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) to see whether or not a signature of wavelength-dependent parsec-scale structure can be seen. We analyzed VLBI and Gaia positions and determined the direction of jets in 2957 AGNs from their VLBI images. We find that there is a statistically significant excess of sources with VLBI-to-Gaia position offset in directions along and opposite to the jet. Offsets along the jet vary from zero to tens of mas. Offsets in the opposite direction do not exceed 3 mas. The presense of strong, extended parsec-scale optical jet structures in many AGNs is required to explain all observed VLBI-Gaia offsets along the jet direction. The offsets in the opposite direction shorter than 1 mas can be explained either by a non-point-like VLBI jet structure or a "core-shift" effect due to synchrotron opacity.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.04067  [pdf] - 1530828
A Nearly Naked Supermassive Black Hole
Comments: 8 pages, 12 figures. Revised version, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-06-13, last modified: 2016-11-01
During a systematic search for supermassive black holes (SMBHs) not in galactic nuclei, we identified the compact symmetric radio source B3 1715+425 with an emission-line galaxy offset ~ 8.5 kpc from the nucleus of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the redshift $z = 0.1754$ cluster ZwCl 8193. B3 1715+425 is too bright (brightness temperature $\sim 3 \times 10^{10}$ K at observing frequency 7.6 GHz) and too luminous (1.4 GHz luminosity $\sim 10^{25}$ W/Hz) to be powered by anything but a SMBH, but its host galaxy is much smaller ($\sim 0.9$ kpc $\times$ 0.6 kpc full width between half-maximum points) and optically fainter (R-band absolute magnitude $\sim -18.2$) than any other radio galaxy. Its high radial velocity $\sim 1860$ km/s relative to the BCG, continuous ionized wake extending back to the BCG nucleus, and surrounding debris indicate that the radio galaxy was tidally shredded passing through the BCG core, leaving a nearly naked supermassive black hole fleeing from the BCG with space velocity $> 2000$ km/s. The radio galaxy has mass $< 6 \times 10^9$ solar masses and infrared luminosity $\sim 3 \times 10^{11}$ solar luminosities close to its dust Eddington limit, so it is vulnerable to further mass loss from radiative feedback.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.04951  [pdf] - 1497644
VLBA Calibrator Survey 9 (VCS-9)
Comments: 4 pages, to appear in the proceedings of 13th European VLBI Network Symposium, held on September 20-23, 2016, in Sankt-Peterburg, Russia
Submitted: 2016-10-16
The goals, current status, and preliminary results of the VLBA Calibration Survey VCS-9 are discussed.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.02367  [pdf] - 1470621
Microarcsecond VLBI pulsar astrometry with PSRPI I. Two binary millisecond pulsars with white dwarf companions
Comments: 14 pages, 9 figures, 6 tables; minor revisions in response to referee comments to match version accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2016-04-08, last modified: 2016-06-20
Model-independent distance constraints to binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are of great value to both the timing observations of the radio pulsars, and multiwavelength observations of their companion stars. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) astrometry can be employed to provide these model-independent distances with very high precision via the detection of annual geometric parallax. Using the Very Long Baseline Array, we have observed two binary millisecond pulsars, PSR J1022+1001 and J2145-0750, over a two-year period and measured their distances to be 700 +14 -10 pc and 613 +16 -14 pc respectively. We use the well-calibrated distance in conjunction with revised analysis of optical photometry to tightly constrain the nature of their massive (M ~ 0.85 Msun) white dwarf companions. Finally, we show that several measurements of their parallax and proper motion of PSR J1022+1001 and PSR J2145-0750 obtained by pulsar timing array projects are incorrect, differing from the more precise VLBI values by up to 5 sigma. We investigate possible causes for the discrepancy, and find that imperfect modeling of the solar wind is a likely candidate for the timing model errors given the low ecliptic latitude of these two pulsars.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.05806  [pdf] - 1374295
RadioAstron Observations of the Quasar 3C273: a Challenge to the Brightness Temperature Limit
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures, 1 table; accepted by the Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2016-01-21, last modified: 2016-03-02
Inverse Compton cooling limits the brightness temperature of the radiating plasma to a maximum of $10^{11.5}$ K. Relativistic boosting can increase its observed value, but apparent brightness temperatures much in excess of $10^{13}$ K are inaccessible using ground-based very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at any wavelength. We present observations of the quasar 3C273, made with the space VLBI mission RadioAstron on baselines up to 171,000 km, which directly reveal the presence of angular structure as small as 26 $\mu$as (2.7 light months) and brightness temperature in excess of $10^{13}$ K. These measurements challenge our understanding of the non-thermal continuum emission in the vicinity of supermassive black holes and require a much higher Doppler factor than what is determined from jet apparent kinematics.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.06802  [pdf] - 977335
First scientific VLBI observations using New Zealand 30 metre radio telescope WARK30M
Comments: Accepted for publication by the Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific on April 8, 2015; 7 pages, 6 figures, 3 tables. Table 3 is machine-readable. It can be found in the source of this submission
Submitted: 2015-02-24, last modified: 2015-04-08
We report the results of a successful 24 hour 6.7 GHz VLBI experiment using the 30 meter radio telescope WARK30M near Warkworth, New Zealand, recently converted from a radio telecommunications antenna, and two radio telescopes located in Australia: Hobart 26-m and Ceduna 30-m. The geocentric position of WARK30M is determined with a 100 mm uncertainty for the vertical component and 10 mm for the horizontal components. We report correlated flux densities at 6.7 GHz of 175 radio sources associated with Fermi gamma-ray sources. A parsec scale emission from the radio source 1031-837 is detected, and its association with the gamma-ray object 2FGL J1032.9-8401 is established with a high likelihood ratio. We conclude that the new Pacific area radio telescope WARK30M is ready to operate for scientific projects.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.05999  [pdf] - 1224525
1FGL J1417.7-4407: A likely gamma-ray bright binary with a massive neutron star and a giant secondary
Comments: ApJL in press
Submitted: 2015-02-20, last modified: 2015-04-08
We present multiwavelength observations of the persistent Fermi-LAT unidentified gamma-ray source 1FGL J1417.7-4407, showing it is likely to be associated with a newly discovered X-ray binary containing a massive neutron star (nearly 2 M_sun) and a ~ 0.35 M_sun giant secondary with a 5.4 day period. SOAR optical spectroscopy at a range of orbital phases reveals variable double-peaked H-alpha emission, consistent with the presence of an accretion disk. The lack of radio emission and evidence for a disk suggests the gamma-ray emission is unlikely to originate in a pulsar magnetosphere, but could instead be associated with a pulsar wind, relativistic jet, or could be due to synchrotron self-Compton at the disk--magnetosphere boundary. Assuming a wind or jet, the high ratio of gamma-ray to X-ray luminosity (~ 20) suggests efficient production of gamma-rays, perhaps due to the giant companion. The system appears to be a low-mass X-ray binary that has not yet completed the pulsar recycling process. This system is a good candidate to monitor for a future transition between accretion-powered and rotational-powered states, but in the context of a giant secondary.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.06678  [pdf] - 939238
Modeling of path delay in the neutral atmosphere: a paradigm shift
Comments: Submitted to the Proceedings of the 12th European VLBI Network Symposium and Users Meeting, 7-10 October 2014 Cagliari, Italy; 6 pages, 3c figures
Submitted: 2015-02-23
Computation of propagation effects in the neutral atmosphere, namely path delay, extinction, and bending angle is a trivial task provided the 4D state of the atmosphere is known. Unfortunately, the mixing ratio of water vapor is highly variable and it cannot be deduced from surface measurements. That fact led to a paradigm that considers path delay and extinction in the atmosphere as a~priori unknown quantities that have to be evaluated from the radio astronomy data themselves. Development of our ability to model the atmosphere and to digest humongous outputs of these models that took place over the course of the 21st century changed the game. Using the publicly available output of operational numerical weather model GEOS run by NASA, we are in a position to compute path delay through the neutral atmosphere for any station and for any epoch from 1979 through now with accuracy of 45 ps * cosec elevation. We are in a position to compute extinction with accuracy better than 10 pro cents. We are in a position to do it routinely, in a similar way how we update apparent star positions for precession and nutation. Moreover, we are in a position to do it now. As a demonstration of current capabilities, I have computed time series of path delays for all radiotelecopes that I was aware of (220 sites) since 1979 with a step 3-6 hours. Results of the validation tests are presented. A new paradigm of data analysis assumes that we know the atmosphere propagation effects a priori with the accuracy higher that one could deduce them from radio astronomy observations.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.6217  [pdf] - 950089
New Associations of Gamma-Ray Sources from the Fermi Second Source Catalog
Comments: accepted for publication by ApJS, 18 pages, 10 figures, 12 tables; full electronic versions of tables 2-8 are available as ancillary files
Submitted: 2014-08-26, last modified: 2015-01-28
We present the results of an all-sky radio survey between 5 and 9 GHz of the fields surrounding all unassociated gamma-ray objects listed in the Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog (2FGL). The goal of these observations is to find all new gamma-ray AGN associations with radio sources >10 mJy at 8 GHz. We observed with the Very Large Array and the Australia Telescope Compact Array the areas around unassociated sources, providing localizations of weak radio point sources found in 2FGL fields at arcmin scales. Then we followed-up a subset of those with the Very Long Baseline and the Long Baseline Arrays to confirm detections of radio emission on parsec-scales. We quantified association probabilities based on known statistics of source counts and assuming a uniform distribution of background sources. In total we found 865 radio sources at arcsec scales as candidates for association and detected 95 of 170 selected for follow-up observations at milliarcsecond resolution. Based on this we obtained firm associations for 76 previously unknown gamma-ray AGN. Comparison of these new AGN associations with the predictions from using the WISE color-color diagram shows that half of the associations are missed. We found that 129 out of 588 observed gamma-ray sources at arcmin scales not a single radio continuum source was detected above our sensitivity limit within the 3-sigma gamma-ray localization. These "empty" fields were found to be particularly concentrated at low Galactic latitudes. The nature of these Galactic gamma-ray emitters is not yet determined.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.2386  [pdf] - 679258
Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of Fermi unassociated sources
Comments: Published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 9 pages, 7 figures, 3 ascii tables. The tables can be found in the tar-ball of this submission. Revised according to reviewers comments. Contents of tables slightly changed after version 1
Submitted: 2013-01-10, last modified: 2013-05-01
We report results of the first phase of observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 5 and 9 GHz of the fields around 411 gamma-ray sources with declinations < +10 deg detected by Fermi but marked as unassociated in the 2FGL catalogue. We have detected 424 sources with flux densities in a range of 2 mJy to 6 Jy that lie within the 99 per cent localisation uncertainty of 283 gamma-ray sources. Of these, 146 objects were detected in both the 5 and 9 GHz bands. We found 84 sources in our sample with a spectral index flatter than -0.5. The majority of detected sources are weaker than 100 mJy and for this reason were not found in previous surveys. Approximately 1/3 of our sample, 128 objects, have the probability of being associated by more than 10 times than the probability of being a background source found in the vicinity of a gamma-ray object by chance. We present the catalogue of positions of these sources, estimates of their flux densities and spectral indices where available.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.5407  [pdf] - 679263
The catalogue of positions of optically bright extragalactic radio sources OBRS-2
Comments: 7 pages, 6 figures, one machine readable table. The manuscript is submitted to the Astronomical Journal. The machine readable table can be found in the source tar-ball of this submission. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1103.2840
Submitted: 2013-01-23
It is anticipated that future space-born missions, such as Gaia, will be able to determine in optical domain positions of more than 100,000 bright quasars with sub-mas accuracies that are comparable to very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) accuracies. Comparisons of coordinate systems from space-born missions and from VLBI will be very important, first for investigation of possible systematic errors, second for investigation of possible shift between centroids of radio and optical emissions in active galaxy nuclea. In order to make such a comparison more robust, a program of densification of the grid of radio sources detectable with both VLBI and Gaia was launched in 2006. In the second observing campaign a set of 290 objects from the list of 398 compact extragalactic radio sources with declinations greater -10 deg was observed with the VLBA+EVN in 2010-2011 with the primary goal of producing their images with milliarcsecond resolution. These sources are brighter than 18 magnitude at V band. In this paper coordinates of observed sources have been derived with milliarcsecond accuracies from analysis of these VLBI observations following the method of absolute astrometry and their images were produced. The catalogue of positions of 295 target sources and estimates of their correlated flux densities at 2.2 and 8.4 GHz is presented. The accuracies of source coordinates are in a range of 2 to 200 mas, with the median 3.2 mas.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.5872  [pdf] - 579348
Early science with Korean VLBI network: the QCAL-1 43GHz calibrator survey
Comments: Accepted for publication by the Astronomical Journal; 6 pages. Machine-readable Table 3 and Table 4 can be accessed by downloading and uncompressing source code of the paper
Submitted: 2012-07-24, last modified: 2012-10-04
This paper presents the catalog of correlated flux densities in three ranges of baseline projection lengths of 637 sources from a 43 GHz (Q-band) survey observed with the Korean VLBI Network. Of them, 623 sources have not been observed before at Q-band with VLBI. The goal of this work in the early science phase of the new VLBI array is twofold: to evaluate the performance of the new instrument that operates in a frequency range of 22-129 GHz and to build a list of objects that can be used as targets and as calibrators. We have observed the list of 799 target sources with declinations down to -40 degrees. Among them, 724 were observed before with VLBI at 22 GHz and had correlated flux densities greater than 200 mJy. The overall detection rate is 78%. The detection limit, defined as the minimum flux density for a source to be detected with 90% probability in a single observation, was in a range of 115-180 mJy depending on declination. However, some sources as weak as 70 mJy have been detected. Of 623 detected sources, 33 objects are detected for the first time in VLBI mode. We determined their coordinates with the median formal uncertainty 20 mas. The results of this work set the basis for future efforts to build the complete flux-limited sample of extragalactic sources at frequencies 22 GHz and higher at 3/4 of the celestial sphere.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.4637  [pdf] - 1118157
VLBI for Gravity Probe B. III. A Limit on the Proper Motion of the "Core" of the Quasar 3C 454.3
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series
Submitted: 2012-04-20
We made VLBI observations at 8.4 GHz between 1997 and 2005 to estimate the coordinates of the "core" component of the superluminal quasar, 3C 454.3, the ultimate reference point in the distant universe for the NASA/Stanford Gyroscope Relativity Mission, Gravity Probe B. These coordinates are determined relative to those of the brightness peaks of two other compact extragalactic sources, B2250+194 and B2252+172, nearby on the sky, and within a celestial reference frame (CRF), defined by a large suite of compact extragalactic radio sources, and nearly identical to the International Celestial Reference Frame 2 (ICRF2). We find that B2250+194 and B2252+172 are stationary relative to each other, and also in the CRF, to within 1-sigma upper limits of 15 and 30 micro-arcsec/yr in RA and decl., respectively. The core of 3C 454.3 appears to jitter in its position along the jet direction over ~0.2 mas, likely due to activity close to the putative supermassive black hole nearby, but on average is stationary in the CRF within 1-sigma upper limits on its proper motion of 39 micro-arcsec/yr (1.0c) and 30 micro-arcsec/yr (0.8c) in RA and decl., respectively, for the period 2002 - 2005. Our corresponding limit over the longer interval, 1998 - 2005, of more importance to GP-B, is 46 and 56 micro-arcsec/yr in RA and decl., respectively. Some of 3C 454.3's jet components show significantly superluminal motion with speeds of up to ~200 micro-arcsec/yr or 5c in the CRF. The core of 3C 454.3 thus provides for Gravity Probe B a sufficiently stable reference in the distant universe.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1107.2463  [pdf] - 541777
The KCAL VERA 22 GHz calibrator survey
Comments: Accepted for publication by the Astronomical Journal. 6 pages, 3 figures, 3 table. The machine readable catalogue file, kcal_cat.txt can be extracted from the source of this submission
Submitted: 2011-07-13, last modified: 2011-11-18
We observed at 22 GHz with the VLBI array VERA a sample of 1536 sources with correlated flux densities brighter than 200 mJy at 8 GHz. One half of target sources has been detected. The detection limit was around 200 mJy. We derived the correlated flux densities of 877 detected sources in three ranges of projected baseline lengths. The objective of these observations was to determine the suitability of given sources as phase calibrators for dual-beam and phase-referencing observations at high frequencies. Preliminary results indicate that the number of compact extragalactic sources at 22 GHz brighter than a given correlated flux density level is twice less than at 8 GHz.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.6252  [pdf] - 431390
VLBA observations of a complete sample of 2MASS galaxies
Comments: 2 pages, 2 figures. To be published in the proceedings of the 11th Asian-Pacific Regional IAU Meeting; NARIT Conference Series (NCS)
Submitted: 2011-10-28
We are using the VLBA at 8 GHz to observe a sample of 834 nearby 2MASS galaxies that are stronger than 100 mJy in the NVSS. The goals of the project are to detect (1) supermassive black holes significantly offset from the IR positions of the host galaxy bulges and (2) binary black holes.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.1979  [pdf] - 424788
PSRPI: A large VLBA pulsar astrometry program
Comments: Corrected error in one reference
Submitted: 2011-10-10, last modified: 2011-10-12
Obtaining pulsar parallaxes via relative astrometry (also known as differential astrometry) yields distances and transverse velocities that can be used to probe properties of the pulsar population and the interstellar medium. Large programs are essential to obtain the sample sizes necessary for these population studies, but they must be efficiently conducted to avoid requiring an infeasible amount of observing time. This paper describes the PSRPI astrometric program, including the use of new features in the DiFX software correlator to efficiently locate calibrator sources, selection and observing strategies for a sample of 60 pulsars, initial results, and likely science outcomes. Potential applications of high-precision relative astrometry to measure source structure evolution in defining sources of the International Celestial Referent Frame are also discussed.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.2382  [pdf] - 440676
Precise absolute astrometry from the VLBA imaging and polarimetry survey at 5 GHz
Comments: Accepted for publication by the Astronomical Journal. 7 pages, 2 tables, 4 figures. Submission contains an ascii file with the catalogue. You can get the catalogue by downloading the source of this paper and extracting file table2.txt
Submitted: 2011-06-13, last modified: 2011-08-01
We present in this paper accurate positions of 857 sources derived from the astrometric analysis of 16 eleven-hour experiments from the Very Long Baseline Array imaging and polarimetry survey at 5 GHz (VIPS). Among observed sources, positions of 430 objects were not determined before at a milliarcsecond level of accuracy. For 95% of the sources the uncertainty of their positions range from 0.3 to 0.9 mas, with the median value of 0.5 mas. This estimate of accuracy is substantiated by the comparison of positions of 386 sources that were previously observed in astrometric programs simultaneously at 2.3/8.6 GHz. Surprisingly, the ionosphere contribution to group delay was adequately modeled with the use of the total electron contents maps derived from GPS observations and only marginally affected estimates of source coordinates.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1103.2840  [pdf] - 440665
The catalogue of positions of optically bright extragalactic radio sources OBRS-1
Comments: 6 pages, 1 figure, accepted by the Astronomical Journal, ID: AJ-10606. Electronic table 2 with the catalogue is available in the source code of this submission
Submitted: 2011-03-15, last modified: 2011-07-28
It is expected that the European Space Agency mission Gaia will make possible to determine coordinates in the optical domain of more than 500000 quasars. In 2006, a radio astrometry project was launched with the overall goal to make comparison of coordinate systems derived from future space-born astrometry instruments with the coordinate system constructed from analysis of the global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) more robust. Investigation of their rotation, zonal errors, and the non-alignment of the radio and optical positions caused by both radio and optical structures are important for validation of both techniques. In order to support these studies, the densification of the list of compact extragalactic objects that are bright in both radio and optical ranges is desirable. A set of 105 objects from the list of 398 compact extragalactic radio sources with declination > -10 deg was observed with the VLBA+EVN with the primary goal of producing their images with milliarcsecond resolution. These sources are brighter than 18 magnitude at V band, and they were previously detected at the European VLBI network. In this paper coordinates of observed sources have been derived with milliarcsecond accuracies from analysis of these VLBI observations following the method of absolute astrometry. The catalogue of positions of 105 target sources is presented. The accuracies of sources coordinates are in the range of 0.3 to 7 mas, with the median 1.1 mas.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.4243  [pdf] - 377723
First geodetic observations using new VLBI stations ASKAP-29 and WARK12M
Comments: 11 pages, 6 flgures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2010-12-20, last modified: 2011-06-25
We report the results of a successful 7 hour 1.4 GHz VLBI experiment using two new stations, ASKAP-29 located in Western Australia and WARK12M located on the North Island of New Zealand. This was the first geodetic VLBI observing session with the participation of these new stations. We have determined the positions of ASKAP-29 and WARK12M. Random errors on position estimates are 150-200 mm for the vertical component and 40-50 mm for the horizontal component. Systematic errors caused by the unmodeled ionosphere path delay may reach 1.3 m for the vertical component.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.1460  [pdf] - 955897
The VLBA Galactic Plane Survey -- VGaPS
Comments: 23 pages, 20 figures, 11 tables; accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal; minor corrections to the text are made; two machine readable tables in electronic form are availanle from the preprint source
Submitted: 2011-01-07, last modified: 2011-06-23
This paper presents accurate absolute positions from a 24 GHz Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) search for compact extragalactic sources in an area where the density of known calibrators with precise coordinates is low. The goals were to identify additional sources suitable for use as phase calibrators for galactic sources, determine their precise positions, and produce radio images. In order to achieve these goals, we developed a new software package, PIMA, for determining group delays from wide-band data with much lower detection limit. With the use of PIMA we have detected 327 sources out of 487 targets observed in three 24 hour VLBA experiments. Among the 327 detected objects, 176 are within 10 degrees of the Galactic plane. This VGaPS catalogue of source positions, plots of correlated flux density versus projected baseline length, contour plots, as well as weighted CLEAN images and calibrated visibility data in FITS format, are available on the Web at http://astrogeo.org/vgaps. Approximately one half of objects from the 24 GHz catalogue were observed at dual band 8.6 GHz and 2.3 GHz experiments. Position differences at 24 GHz versus 8.6/2.3 GHz for all but two objects on average are strictly within reported uncertainties. We found that for two objects with complex structure positions at different frequencies correspond to different components of a source.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.4883  [pdf] - 541775
The EVN Galactic Plane Survey - EGaPS
Comments: Submitted to the Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society; 9 pages, 5 figures, 3 tables. The online table 3 can be retrieved by downloading the source of this manuscript and uncompressing the tar.gz file
Submitted: 2011-06-23
I present a catalogue of positions and correlated flux densities of 109 compact extragalactic radio sources in the Galactic plane determined from analysis of a 48 hour VLBI experiment at 22 GHz with the European VLBI Network. The median position uncertainty is 9 mas. The correlated flux densities of detected sources are in the range of 20 to 300 mJy. In addition to target sources, nine water masers have been detected, two of them new. I derived position of masers with accuracies 30 to 200 mas and determined velocities of maser components and their correlated flux densities. The catalogue and supporting material is available at http://astrogeo.org/egaps.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.2607  [pdf] - 376749
The LBA Calibrator Survey of southern compact extragalactic radio sources - LCS1
Comments: Published Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society; 13 pages; 3 electronic tables can be found in the source of this submission. In order to get the electronic tables, you need to select "Download Other format" option and download tar.gz source code. Version 2 is updated for reviewer comments and corresponds to the printed version
Submitted: 2010-12-12, last modified: 2011-06-23
We present a catalogue of positions and correlated flux densities of 410 flat-spectrum, compact extragalactic radio sources, previously detected in the AT20G survey. The catalogue spans the declination range -90deg, -40deg and was constructed from four 24 hour VLBI observing sessions with the Australian Long Baseline Array made at 8.3 GHz. The detection rate in these experiments is 97%. The median uncertainty of source positions is 2.6 mas, the median correlated flux density at baseline projections lengths longer than 1000 km is 0.14 Jy. The goal of this work is 1) to provide a pool of sources with positions known at the milliarcsecond level of accuracy that are needed for phase referencing observations, for geodetic VLBI, and for space navigation; 2) to extend the complete flux-limited sample of compact extragalactic sources to the southern hemisphere; and 3) to investigate parsec-scale properties of high-frequency selected sources from the AT20G survey. As a result of the campaign, the number of compact radio sources with declinations < -40deg detectable with VLBI with measured correlated flux densities and positions known with the milliarcsec level of accuracies increased by a factor of 3.5. The catalogue and supporting material is available at http://astrogeo.org/lcs1 .
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.3895  [pdf] - 9386
The Sixth VLBA Calibrator Survey: VCS6
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, 5 tables; accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal; minor changes to the text and tables are made; two tables in electronic form can be extracted from the preprint source
Submitted: 2008-01-25, last modified: 2008-07-21
This paper presents the sixth part to the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Calibrator Survey. It contains the positions and maps of 264 sources of which 169 were not previously observed with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). This survey, based on two 24 hour VLBA observing sessions, was focused on 1) improving positions of 95 sources from previous VLBA Calibrator surveys that were observed either with very large a priori position errors or were observed not long enough to get reliable positions and 2) observing remaining new flat-spectrum sources with predicted correlated flux density in the range 100-200 mJy that were not observed in previous surveys. Source positions were derived from astrometric analysis of group delays determined at the 2.3 and 8.6 GHz frequency bands using the Calc/Solve software package. The VCS6 catalogue of source positions, plots of correlated flux density versus projected baseline length, contour plots and fits files of naturally weighted CLEAN images, as well as calibrated visibility function files are available on the Web at http://vlbi.gsfc.nasa.gov/vcs6
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0611781  [pdf] - 87167
The empirical Earth rotation model from VLBI observations
Comments: 15 pages, 10 figures, Published in Astronomy and Astrophysics. For numerical tables see http://vlbi.gsfc.nasa.gov/erm
Submitted: 2006-11-25, last modified: 2007-06-29
AIMS: An alternative to the traditional method for modeling kinematics of the Earth's rotation is proposed. The purpose of developing the new approach is to provide a self-consistent and simple description of the Earth's rotation in a way that can be estimated directly from observations without using intermediate quantities. METHODS: Instead of estimating the time series of pole coordinates, the UT1--TAI angles, their rates, and the daily offsets of nutation, it is proposed to estimate coefficients of the expansion of a small perturbational rotation vector into basis functions. The resulting transformation from the terrestrial coordinate system to the celestial coordinate system is formulated as a product of an a priori matrix of a finite rotation and an empirical vector of a residual perturbational rotation. In the framework of this approach, the specific choice of the a priori matrix is irrelevant, provided the angles of the residual rotation are small enough to neglect their squares. The coefficients of the expansion into the B-spline and Fourier bases, together with estimates of other nuisance parameters, are evaluated directly from observations of time delay or time range in a single least square solution. RESULTS: This approach was successfully implemented in a computer program for processing VLBI observations. The dataset from 1984 through 2006 was analyzed. The new procedure adequately represents the Earth's rotation, including slowly varying changes in UT1--TAI and polar motion, the forced nutations, the free core nutation, and the high frequency variations of polar motion and UT1.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0611782  [pdf] - 277743
Empirical Earth rotation model: a consistent way to evaluate Earth orientation parameters
Comments: To be published in the Proceedings of the Geodetic Reference Frame symposium held in Muenchen in October 2006. 6 pages, 2 tables
Submitted: 2006-11-25
It is customary to perform analysis of the Earth's rotation in two steps: first, to present results of estimation of the Earth orientation parameters in the form of time series based on a simplified model of variations of the Earth's rotation for a short period of time, and then to process this time series of adjustments by applying smoothing, re-sampling and other numerical algorithms. Although this approach saves computational time, it suffers from self-inconsistency: total Earth orientation parameters depend on a subjective choice of the apriori Earth orientation model, cross-correlations between points of time series are lost, and results of an operational analysis per se have a limited use for end users. An alternative approach of direct estimation of the coefficients of expansion of Euler angle perturbations into basis functions is developed. These coefficients describe the Earth's rotation over entire period of observations and are evaluated simultaneously with station positions, source coordinates and other parameters in a single LSQ solution. In the framework of this approach considerably larger errors in apriori EOP model are tolerated. This approach gives a significant conceptual simplification of representation of the Earth's rotation.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0607524  [pdf] - 83727
The Fifth VLBA Calibrator Survey: VCS5
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, 2 tables, accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal; minor changes to the text are made; both tables in electronic form can be extracted from the preprint source
Submitted: 2006-07-23, last modified: 2006-11-21
This paper presents the fifth part of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Calibrator Survey (VCS), containing 569 sources not observed previously with very long baseline interferometry in geodetic or absolute astrometry programs. This campaign has two goals: (i) to observe additional sources which, together with previous survey results, form a complete sample, (ii) to find new strong sources suitable as phase calibrators. This VCS extension was based on three 24-hour VLBA observing sessions in 2005. It detected almost all extragalactic flat-spectrum sources with correlated flux density greater than 200 mJy at 8.6 GHz above declination -30 degrees which were not observed previously. Source positions with milliarcsecond accuracy were derived from astrometric analysis of ionosphere-free combinations of group delays determined from the 2.3 GHz and 8.6 GHz frequency bands. The VCS5 catalog of source positions, plots of correlated flux density versus projected baseline length, contour plots and FITS files of naturally weighted CLEAN images, as well as calibrated visibility function files are available on the Web at http://vlbi.gsfc.nasa.gov/vcs5
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0609557  [pdf] - 85149
VERA 22 GHz fringe search survey
Comments: 8 pages, 11 figures, 4 tables. Submitted to publication in the Astronomical Journal. Table 2 and table 3 in electronic form are added and can be extracted from the preprint source as petrov.tab2.txt and petrov.tab3.txt
Submitted: 2006-09-19
This paper presents results of a survey search for bright compact radio sources at 22 GHz with the VERA radio-interferometer. Each source from a list of 2494 objects was observed in one scan for 2 minutes. The purpose of this survey was to find compact extragalactic sources bright enough at 22 GHz to be useful as phase calibrators. Observed sources were either a) within 6 degrees of the Galactic plane, or b) within 11 degrees from the Galactic center; or c) within 2 degrees from known water masers. Among the observed sources, 549 were detected, including 180 extragalactic objects which were not previously observed with the very long baseline interferometry technique. Estimates of the correlated flux densities of the detected sources are presented.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0508506  [pdf] - 75395
The Fourth VLBA Calibrator Survey - VCS4
Comments: 8 pages, 8 figures, 3 tables, accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal; minor changes to the text are made, table 2 in electronic form is added and can be extracted from the preprint source
Submitted: 2005-08-23, last modified: 2005-10-23
This paper presents the fourth extension to the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Calibrator Survey, containing 258 new sources not previously observed with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). This survey, based on three 24 hour VLBA observing sessions, fills remaining areas on the sky above declination -40 degrees where the calibrator density is less than one source within a 4 degree radius disk at any given direction. The share of these area was reduced from 4.6% to 1.9%. Source positions were derived from astrometric analysis of group delays determined at 2.3 and 8.6 GHz frequency bands using the Calc/Solve software package. The VCS4 catalogue of source positions, plots of correlated flux density versus projected baseline length, contour plots and fits files of naturally weighted CLEAN images, as well as calibrated visibility function files are available on the Web at http://gemini.gsfc.nasa.gov/vcs4 .
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0409698  [pdf] - 386195
The Third VLBA Calibrator Survey
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables, accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal; minor changes to the text are made, table 2 in electronic form is added and can be extracted from the preprint source
Submitted: 2004-09-28, last modified: 2004-10-22
This paper presents the third extension to the Very Large Baseline Array (VLBA) Calibrator Survey, containing 360 new sources not previously observed with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). The survey, based on three 24 hour VLBA observing sessions, fills the areas on the sky above declination -45 degrees where the calibrator density is less than one source within a 4 degrees radius disk at any given direction. The positions were derived from astrometric analysis of the group delays determined at 2.3 and 8.6 GHz frequency bands using the Calc/Solve software package. The VCS3 catalogue of source positions, plots of correlated flux density versus the length of projected baseline, contour plots and fits files of naturally weighted CLEAN images as well as calibrated visibility function files are available on the Web at http://gemini.gsfc.nasa.gov/vcs3
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0309392  [pdf] - 59219
VLBA Calibrator Survey: Astrometric and Image Results
Comments: to be published in the Proceedings of the "Future Directions in High Resolution Astronomy: A Celebration of the 10th Anniversary of the VLBA" meeting in Socorro, held in June 2003
Submitted: 2003-09-15
Positions and maps of 1608 new compact sources were obtained in twelve sessions observed during 1994--2002 at the VLBA network at 8.4/2.3 GHz. These sources are recommended for use as calibrators for phase reference imaging and as geodetic sources for astrometric/geodetic VLBI applications.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0309393  [pdf] - 59220
Contribution of the VLBA Network to Geodynamics
Comments: to be published in the Proceedings of the "Future Directions in High Resolution Astronomy: A Celebration of the 10th Anniversary of the VLBA" meeting in Socorro, held in June 2003
Submitted: 2003-09-15
A decade of observations in geodetic mode with the VLBA network gave valuable results. Approximately 1/5 of all geodetic observations are recorded in VLBA mode and processed at the Socorro correlator. Ten years of observations allowed us to reliably measure slow intra-plate motion of the VLBA stations located on the North-American plate. It also helped us to achieve scientific objectives of geodetic programs: verify models of harmonic and anharmonic site position variations caused by various loadings, improve models of core-mantle boundary, investigate mantle rheology and solve other tasks.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0201414  [pdf] - 142539
The VLBA Calibrator Survey - VCS1
Comments: 25 pages, 5 figures. Accepted to ApJS
Submitted: 2002-01-24
A catalog containing milliarcsecond--accurate positions of 1332 extragalactic radio sources distributed over the northern sky is presented - the Very Long Baseline Array Calibrator Survey (VCS1). The positions have been derived from astrometric analysis of dual-frequency 2.3 and 8.4 GHz VLBA snapshot observations; in a majority of cases, images of the sources are also available. These radio sources are suitable for use in geodetic and astrometric experiments, and as phase-reference calibrators in high-sensitivity astronomical imaging. The VCS1 is the largest high-resolution radio survey ever undertaken, and triples the number of sources available to the radio astronomy community for VLBI applications. In addition to the astrometric role, this survey can be used in active galactic nuclei, Galactic, gravitational lens and cosmological studies. The VCS1 catalog will soon be available at www.nrao.edu/vlba/VCS1 .