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Perger, M.

Normalized to: Perger, M.

33 article(s) in total. 409 co-authors, from 1 to 30 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 10,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2007.00573  [pdf] - 2126366
Correcting for chromatic stellar activity effects in transits with multiband photometric monitoring: Application to WASP-52
Comments: 17 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2020-07-01
The properties of inhomogeneities on the surface of active stars (i.e. dark spots and bright faculae) significantly influence the determination of the parameters of an exoplanet. The chromatic effect they have on transmission spectroscopy could affect the analysis of data from future space missions such as JWST and Ariel. To quantify and mitigate the effects of those surface phenomena, we developed a modelling approach to derive the surface distribution and properties of active regions by modelling simultaneous multi-wavelength time-series observables. By using the StarSim code, now featuring the capability to solve the inverse problem, we analysed $\sim$ 600 days of BVRI multiband photometry from TJO and STELLA telescopes exoplanet host star WASP-52. From the results, we simulated the chromatic contribution of surface phenomena on the observables of its transits. We are able to determine the relevant activity parameters of WASP-52 and reconstruct the time-evolving longitudinal map of active regions. The star shows a heterogeneous surface composed of dark spots with a mean temperature contrast of $575\pm150$ K with filling factors ranging from 3 to 14 %. We studied the chromatic effects on the depths of transits obtained at different epochs with different stellar spot distributions. For WASP-52, with peak-to-peak photometric variations of $\sim$7 % in the visible, the residual effects of dark spots on the measured transit depth, after applying the calculated corrections, are about $10^{-4}$ at 550 nm and $3\times10^{-5}$ at 6$\mu$m. We demonstrate that by using contemporaneous ground-based multiband photometry of an active star, it is possible to reconstruct the parameters and distribution of active regions over time, and thus, quantify the chromatic effects on the planetary radii measured with transit spectroscopy and mitigate them by about an order of magnitude.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.16608  [pdf] - 2125013
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: Convective shift and starspot constraints from chromatic radial velocities
Comments: A&A, in press
Submitted: 2020-06-30
Context. Variability caused by stellar activity represents a challenge to the discovery and characterization of terrestrial exoplanets and complicates the interpretation of atmospheric planetary signals. Aims. We aim to use a detailed modeling tool to reproduce the effect of active regions on radial velocity measurements, which aids the identification of the key parameters that have an impact on the induced variability. Methods. We analyzed the effect of stellar activity on radial velocities as a function of wavelength by simulating the impact of the properties of spots, shifts induced by convective motions, and rotation. We focused our modeling effort on the active star YZ CMi (GJ 285), which was photometrically and spectroscopically monitored with CARMENES and the Telescopi Joan Or\'o. Results. We demonstrate that radial velocity curves at different wavelengths yield determinations of key properties of active regions, including spot filling factor, temperature contrast, and location, thus solving the degeneracy between them. Most notably, our model is also sensitive to convective motions. Results indicate a reduced convective shift for M dwarfs when compared to solar-type stars (in agreement with theoretical extrapolations) and points to a small global convective redshift instead of blueshift. Conclusions. Using a novel approach based on simultaneous chromatic radial velocities and light curves, we can set strong constraints on stellar activity, including an elusive parameter such as the net convective motion effect.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.13052  [pdf] - 2101437
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. A super-Earth planet orbiting HD 79211 (GJ 338 B)
Comments: All the figures were size reduced for arXiv preprint archive. astro-ph.EP astro-ph.SR
Submitted: 2020-03-29
We report on radial velocity time series for two M0.0V stars, GJ338B and GJ338A, using the CARMENES spectrograph, complemented by ground-telescope photometry from Las Cumbres and Sierra Nevada observatories. We aim to explore the presence of small planets in tight orbits using the spectroscopic radial velocity technique. We obtained 159 and 70 radial velocity measurements of GJ338B and A, respectively, with the CARMENES visible channel. We also compiled additional relative radial velocity measurements from the literature and a collection of astrometric data that cover 200 a of observations to solve for the binary orbit. We found dynamical masses of 0.64$\pm$0.07M$_\odot$ for GJ338B and 0.69$\pm$0.07M$_\odot$ for GJ338A. The CARMENES radial velocity periodograms show significant peaks at 16.61$\pm$0.04 d (GJ338B) and 16.3$^{+3.5}_{-1.3}$ d (GJ338A), which have counterparts at the same frequencies in CARMENES activity indicators and photometric light curves. We attribute these to stellar rotation. GJ338B shows two additional, significant signals at 8.27$\pm$0.01 and 24.45$\pm$0.02 d, with no obvious counterparts in the stellar activity indices. The former is likely the first harmonic of the star's rotation, while we ascribe the latter to the existence of a super-Earth planet with a minimum mass of 10.27$^{+1.47}_{-1.38}$$M_{\oplus}$ orbiting GJ338B. GJ338B b lies inside the inner boundary of the habitable zone around its parent star. It is one of the least massive planets ever found around any member of stellar binaries. The masses, spectral types, brightnesses, and even the rotational periods are very similar for both stars, which are likely coeval and formed from the same molecular cloud, yet they differ in the architecture of their planetary systems.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.07471  [pdf] - 2077071
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. Radial velocities and activity indicators from cross-correlation functions with weighted binary masks
Comments: 24 pages, 14 figures. Accepted for publication in A&A. Code available at https://github.com/mlafarga/raccoon
Submitted: 2020-03-16
For years, the standard procedure to measure radial velocities (RVs) of spectral observations consisted in cross-correlating the spectra with a binary mask, that is, a simple stellar template that contains information on the position and strength of stellar absorption lines. The cross-correlation function (CCF) profiles also provide several indicators of stellar activity. We present a methodology to first build weighted binary masks and, second, to compute the CCF of spectral observations with these masks from which we derive radial velocities and activity indicators. These methods are implemented in a python code that is publicly available. To build the masks, we selected a large number of sharp absorption lines based on the profile of the minima present in high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectrum templates built from observations of reference stars. We computed the CCFs of observed spectra and derived RVs and the following three standard activity indicators: full-width-at-half-maximum as well as contrast and bisector inverse slope.We applied our methodology to CARMENES high-resolution spectra and obtain RV and activity indicator time series of more than 300 M dwarf stars observed for the main CARMENES survey. Compared with the standard CARMENES template matching pipeline, in general we obtain more precise RVs in the cases where the template used in the standard pipeline did not have enough S/N. We also show the behaviour of the three activity indicators for the active star YZ CMi and estimate the absolute RV of the M dwarfs analysed using the CCF RVs.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.12174  [pdf] - 1979781
A giant exoplanet orbiting a very low-mass star challenges planet formation models
Morales, J. C.; Mustill, A. J.; Ribas, I.; Davies, M. B.; Reiners, A.; Bauer, F. F.; Kossakowski, D.; Herrero, E.; Rodríguez, E.; López-González, M. J.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Béjar, V. J. S.; González-Cuesta, L.; Luque, R.; Pallé, E.; Perger, M.; Baroch, D.; Johansen, A.; Klahr, H.; Mordasini, C.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Caballero, J. A.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Dreizler, S.; Lafarga, M.; Nagel, E.; Passegger, V. M.; Reffert, S.; Rosich, A.; Schweitzer, A.; Tal-Or, L.; Trifonov, T.; Zechmeister, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Guenther, E. W.; Hagen, H. -J.; Henning, T.; Jeffers, S. V.; Kaminski, A.; Kürster, M.; Montes, D.; Seifert, W.; Abellán, F. J.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, J.; Aceituno, F. J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Antona, R.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Azzaro, M.; Barrado, D.; Becerril-Jarque, S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Bergond, G.; Brinkmöller, M.; del Burgo, C.; Burn, R.; Calvo-Ortega, R.; Cano, J.; Cárdenas, M. C.; Guillén, C. Cardona; Carro, J.; Casal, E.; Casanova, V.; Casasayas-Barris, N.; Chaturvedi, P.; Cifuentes, C.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Czesla, S.; Díez-Alonso, E.; Dorda, R.; Emsenhuber, A.; Fernández, M.; Fernández-Martín, A.; Ferro, I. M.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Cava, I. Gallardo; Vargas, M. L. García; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Gesa, L.; González-Álvarez, E.; Hernández, J. I. González; González-Peinado, R.; Guàrdia, J.; Guijarro, A.; de Guindos, E.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Hermelo, I.; Arabi, R. Hernández; Otero, F. Hernández; Hintz, D.; Holgado, G.; Huber, A.; Huke, P.; Johnson, E. N.; de Juan, E.; Kehr, M.; Kemmer, J.; Kim, M.; Klüter, J.; Klutsch, A.; Labarga, F.; Labiche, N.; Lalitha, S.; Lampón, M.; Lara, L. M.; Launhardt, R.; Lázaro, F. J.; Lizon, J. -L.; Llamas, M.; Lodieu, N.; del Fresno, M. López; Salas, J. F. López; López-Santiago, J.; Madinabeitia, H. Magán; Mall, U.; Mancini, L.; Mandel, H.; Marfil, E.; Molina, J. A. Marín; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Fernández, P.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Martínez-Rodríguez, H.; Marvin, C. J.; Mirabet, E.; Moya, A.; Naranjo, V.; Nelson, R. P.; Nortmann, L.; Nowak, G.; Ofir, A.; Pascual, J.; Pavlov, A.; Pedraz, S.; Medialdea, D. Pérez; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Rabaza, O.; Ballesta, A. Ramón; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Rix, H. -W.; Rodler, F.; Trinidad, A. Rodríguez; Sabotta, S.; Sadegi, S.; Salz, M.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Carrasco, M. A. Sánchez; Sánchez-López, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarkis, P.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schlecker, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schöfer, P.; Solano, E.; Sota, A.; Stahl, O.; Stock, S.; Stuber, T.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tulloch, S. M.; Veredas, G.; Vico-Linares, J. I.; Vilardell, F.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Wolthoff, V.; Yan, F.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero
Comments: Manuscript author version. 41 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2019-09-26
Statistical analyses from exoplanet surveys around low-mass stars indicate that super-Earth and Neptune-mass planets are more frequent than gas giants around such stars, in agreement with core accretion theory of planet formation. Using precise radial velocities derived from visual and near-infrared spectra, we report the discovery of a giant planet with a minimum mass of 0.46 Jupiter masses in an eccentric 204-day orbit around the very low-mass star GJ 3512. Dynamical models show that the high eccentricity of the orbit is most likely explained from planet-planet interactions. The reported planetary system challenges current formation theories and puts stringent constraints on the accretion and migration rates of planet formation and evolution models, indicating that disc instability may be more efficient in forming planets than previously thought.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.07196  [pdf] - 1960956
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. Two temperate Earth-mass planet candidates around Teegarden's Star
Zechmeister, M.; Dreizler, S.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Bauer, F. F.; Béjar, V. J. S.; González-Cuesta, L.; Herrero, E.; Lalitha, S.; López-González, M. J.; Luque, R.; Morales, J. C.; Pallé, E.; Rodríguez, E.; López, C. Rodríguez; Tal-Or, L.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, F. J.; Aceituno, J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Jiménez, R. Antona; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Azzaro, M.; Baroch, D.; Barrado, D.; Becerril, S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Bergond, G.; Bluhm, P.; Brinkmöller, M.; del Burgo, C.; Ortega, R. Calvo; Cano, J.; Guillén, C. Cardona; Carro, J.; Vázquez, M. C. Cárdenas; Casal, E.; Casasayas-Barris, N.; Casanova, V.; Chaturvedi, P.; Cifuentes, C.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Czesla, S.; Díez-Alonso, E.; Dorda, R.; Fernández, M.; Fernández-Martín, A.; Ferro, I. M.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Fukui, A.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Cava, I. Gallardo; de la Fuente, J. Garcia; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Vargas, M. L. García; Gesa, L.; Rueda, J. Góngora; González-Álvarez, E.; Hernández, J. I. González; González-Peinado, R.; Grözinger, U.; Guàrdia, J.; Guijarro, A.; de Guindos, E.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Helmling, J.; Henning, T.; Hermelo, I.; Arabi, R. Hernández; Castaño, L. Hernández; Otero, F. Hernández; Hintz, D.; Huke, P.; Huber, A.; Jeffers, S. V.; Johnson, E. N.; de Juan, E.; Kaminski, A.; Kemmer, J.; Kim, M.; Klahr, H.; Klein, R.; Klüter, J.; Klutsch, A.; Kossakowski, D.; Kürster, M.; Labarga, F.; Lafarga, M.; Llamas, M.; Lampón, M.; Lara, L. M.; Launhardt, R.; Lázaro, F. J.; Lodieu, N.; del Fresno, M. López; López-Comazzi, A.; López-Puertas, M.; Salas, J. F. López; López-Santiago, J.; Madinabeitia, H. Magán; Mall, U.; Mancini, L.; Mandel, H.; Marfil, E.; Molina, J. A. Marín; Fernández, D. Maroto; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Fernández, P.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Marvin, C. J.; Mirabet, E.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.; Montes, D.; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Nagel, E.; Naranjo, V.; Narita, N.; Nortmann, L.; Nowak, G.; Ofir, A.; Oshagh, M.; Panduro, J.; Parviainen, H.; Pascual, J.; Passegger, V. M.; Pavlov, A.; Pedraz, S.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Medialdea, D. Pérez; Perger, M.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Rabaza, O.; Ballesta, A. Ramón; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reffert, S.; Reinhardt, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H. -W.; Rodler, F.; Trinidad, A. Rodríguez; Rosich, A.; Sadegi, S.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Carrasco, M. A. Sánchez; Sánchez-López, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarkis, P.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schöfer, P.; Schweitzer, A.; Seifert, W.; Shulyak, D.; Solano, E.; Sota, A.; Stahl, O.; Stock, S.; Strachan, J. B. P.; Stuber, T.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Tabernero, H. M.; Pinto, M. Tala; Trifonov, T.; Veredas, G.; Linares, J. I. Vico; Vilardell, F.; Wagner, K.; Wolthoff, V.; Xu, W.; Yan, F.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero
Comments: A&A 627, A49. 26 pages, 17 figures, 6 tables. Press release available at http://www.astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de/~zechmeister/teegarden/teegarden.html. v2: two authors and one reference added
Submitted: 2019-06-17, last modified: 2019-09-13
Context. Teegarden's Star is the brightest and one of the nearest ultra-cool dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood. For its late spectral type (M7.0V), the star shows relatively little activity and is a prime target for near-infrared radial velocity surveys such as CARMENES. Aims. As part of the CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs, we obtained more than 200 radial-velocity measurements of Teegarden's Star and analysed them for planetary signals. Methods. We find periodic variability in the radial velocities of Teegarden's Star. We also studied photometric measurements to rule out stellar brightness variations mimicking planetary signals. Results. We find evidence for two planet candidates, each with $1.1M_\oplus$ minimum mass, orbiting at periods of 4.91 and 11.4 d, respectively. No evidence for planetary transits could be found in archival and follow-up photometry. Small photometric variability is suggestive of slow rotation and old age. Conclusions. The two planets are among the lowest-mass planets discovered so far, and they are the first Earth-mass planets around an ultra-cool dwarf for which the masses have been determined using radial velocities.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.06712  [pdf] - 1929702
Stellar activity analysis of Barnard's Star: Very slow rotation and evidence for long-term activity cycle
Comments: 16 pages, 20 figures
Submitted: 2018-12-17, last modified: 2019-08-06
The search for Earth-like planets around late-type stars using ultra-stable spectrographs requires a very precise characterization of the stellar activity and the magnetic cycle of the star, since these phenomena induce radial velocity (RV) signals that can be misinterpreted as planetary signals. Among the nearby stars, we have selected Barnard's Star (Gl 699) to carry out a characterization of these phenomena using a set of spectroscopic data that covers about 14.5 years and comes from seven different spectrographs: HARPS, HARPS-N, CARMENES, HIRES, UVES, APF, and PFS; and a set of photometric data that covers about 15.1 years and comes from four different photometric sources: ASAS, FCAPT-RCT, AAVSO, and SNO. We have measured different chromospheric activity indicators (H$\alpha$, Ca~{\sc II}~HK and Na I D), as well as the FWHM of the cross-correlation function computed for a sub-set of the spectroscopic data. The analysis of Generalized Lomb-Scargle periodograms of the time series of different activity indicators reveals that the rotation period of the star is 145 $\pm$ 15 days, consistent with the expected rotation period according to the low activity level of the star and previous claims. The upper limit of the predicted activity-induced RV signal corresponding to this rotation period is about 1 m/s. We also find evidence of a long-term cycle of 10 $\pm$ 2 years that is consistent with previous estimates of magnetic cycles from photometric time series in other M stars of similar activity levels. The available photometric data of the star also support the detection of both the long-term and the rotation signals.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.09075  [pdf] - 1916916
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs Detection of a mini-Neptune around LSPM J2116+0234 and refinement of orbital parameters of a super-Earth around GJ 686 (BD+18 3421)
Comments: 23 pages, 22 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-05-22
Although M dwarfs are known for high levels of stellar activity, they are ideal targets for the search of low-mass exoplanets with the radial velocity (RV) method. We report the discovery of a planetary-mass companion around LSPM J2116+0234 (M3.0 V) and confirm the existence of a planet orbiting GJ 686 (BD+18 3421; M1.0 V). The discovery of the planet around LSPM J2116+0234 is based on CARMENES RV observations in the visual and near-infrared channels. We confirm the planet orbiting around GJ 686 by analyzing the RV data spanning over two decades of observations from CARMENES VIS, HARPS-N, HARPS, and HIRES. We find planetary signals at 14.44 and 15.53 d in the RV data for LSPM J2116+0234 and GJ 686, respectively. Additionally, the RV, photometric time series, and various spectroscopic indicators show hints of variations of 42 d for LSPM J2116+0234 and 37 d for GJ 686, which we attribute to the stellar rotation periods. The orbital parameters of the planets are modeled with Keplerian fits together with correlated noise from the stellar activity. A mini-Neptune with a minimum mass of 11.8 Me orbits LSPM J2116+0234 producing an RV semi-amplitude of 6.19 m/s, while a super-Earth of mass 6.6 Me orbits GJ 686 and produces an RV semi-amplitude of 3.0 m/s. Both LSPM J2116+0234 and GJ 686 have planetary companions populating the regime of exoplanets with masses lower than 15 Me and orbital periods <20 d.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.11853  [pdf] - 1890413
The HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N at TNG XI. GJ 685 b: a warm super-Earth around an active M dwarf
Comments: 18 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-03-28
Small rocky planets seem to be very abundant around low-mass M-type stars. Their actual planetary population is however not yet precisely understood. Currently several surveys aim to expand the statistics with intensive detection campaigns, both photometric and spectroscopic. We analyse 106 spectroscopic HARPS-N observations of the active M0-type star GJ 685 taken over the past five years. We combine these data with photometric measurements from different observatories to accurately model the stellar rotation and disentangle its signals from genuine Doppler planetary signals in the RV data. We run an MCMC analysis on the RV and activity indexes time series to model the planetary and stellar signals present in the data, applying Gaussian Process regression technique to deal with the stellar activity signals. We identify three periodic signals in the RV time series, with periods of 9, 24, and 18 d. Combining the analyses of the photometry of the star with the activity indexes derived from the HARPS-N spectra, we identify the 18 d and 9 d signals as activity-related, corresponding to the stellar rotation period and its first harmonic respectively. The 24 d signals shows no relations with any activity proxy, so we identify it as a genuine planetary signal. We find the best-fit model describing the Doppler signal of the newly-found planet, GJ 685\,b, corresponding to an orbital period $P_b = 24.160^{+0.061}_{-0.047}$ d and a minimum mass $M_P \sin i = 9.0^{+1.7}_{-1.8}$ M$_\oplus$. We also study a sample of 70 RV-detected M-dwarf planets, and present new statistical evidence of a difference in mass distribution between the populations of single- and multi-planet systems, which can shed new light on the formation mechanisms of low-mass planets around late-type stars.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04808  [pdf] - 1871532
Gliese 49: Activity evolution and detection of a super-Earth
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-03-12, last modified: 2019-03-25
Small planets around low-mass stars often show orbital periods in a range that corresponds to the temperate zones of their host stars which are therefore of prime interest for planet searches. Surface phenomena such as spots and faculae create periodic signals in radial velocities and in observational activity tracers in the same range, so they can mimic or hide true planetary signals. We aim to detect Doppler signals corresponding to planetary companions, determine their most probable orbital configurations, and understand the stellar activity and its impact on different datasets. We analyze 22 years of data of the M1.5V-type star Gl49 (BD+61 195) including HARPS-N and CARMENES spectrographs, complemented by APT2 and SNO photometry. Activity indices are calculated from the observed spectra, and all datasets are analyzed with periodograms and noise models. We investigate how the variation of stellar activity imprints on our datasets. We further test the origin of the signals and investigate phase shifts between the different sets. To search for the best-fit model we maximize the likelihood function in a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach. As a result of this study, we are able to detect the super-Earth Gl49b with a minimum mass of 5.6 Ms. It orbits its host star with a period of 13.85d at a semi-major axis of 0.090 au and we calculate an equilibrium temperature of 350 K and a transit probability of 2.0%. The contribution from the spot-dominated host star to the different datasets is complex, and includes signals from the stellar rotation at 18.86d, evolutionary time-scales of activity phenomena at 40-80d, and a long-term variation of at least four years.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.04868  [pdf] - 1860013
HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N at TNG. X. The non-saturated regime of the stellar activity-rotation relationship for M-Dwarfs
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-02-13
Aims. We aim to extend the relationship between X-ray luminosity (Lx) and rotation period (Prot) found for main-sequence FGK stars and test whether it also holds for early-M dwarfs, especially in the non-saturated regime (Lx {\alpha} P_{rot}^{-2}) which corresponds to slow rotators. Methods. We use the luminosity coronal activity indicator (Lx) of a sample of 78 early-M dwarfs with masses in the range from 0.3 to 0.75 Msun from the HArps-N red Dwarf Exoplanet Survey (HADES) radial velocity (RV) programme collected from ROSAT and XMM-Newton. The determination of the rotation periods (P_{rot}) was done by analysing time-series of high-resolution spectroscopy of the Ca ii H & K and H{\alpha} activity indicators. Our sample principally covers the slow rotation regime with rotation periods from 15 to 60 days. Results. Our work extends to the low mass regime the observed trend for more massive stars showing a continuous shift of the Lx/Lbol vs. Prot power-law towards longer rotation period values and includes the determination, in a more accurate way, of the value of the rotation period at which the saturation occurs (P_{sat}) for M dwarf stars. Conclusions. We conclude that the relations between coronal activity and stellar rotation for FGK stars also hold for early-M dwarfs in the non-saturated regime, indicating that the rotation period is sufficient to determine the ratio Lx/Lbol.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.05338  [pdf] - 1834244
HADES RV program with HARPS-N at TNG. IX. A super-Earth around the M dwarf Gl686
Comments: 21 pages, 17 figures, changed paper numbering from X to IX, added a co-author. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1607.03632
Submitted: 2019-01-16, last modified: 2019-01-31
The HArps-n red Dwarf Exoplanet Survey is providing a major contribution to the widening of the current statistics of low-mass planets, through the in-depth analysis of precise radial velocity measurements in a narrow range of spectral sub-types. As part of that program, we obtained radial velocity measurements of Gl 686, an M1 dwarf at d = 8.2 pc. The analysis of data obtained within an intensive observing campaign demonstrates that the excess dispersion is due to a coherent signal, with a period of 15.53 d. Almost simultaneous photometric observations were carried out within the APACHE and EXORAP programs to characterize the stellar activity and to distinguish periodic variations related to activity from signals due to the presence of planetary companions, complemented also with ASAS photometric data. We took advantage of the available radial velocity measurements for this target from other observing campaigns. The analysis of the radial velocity composite time series from the HIRES, HARPS and HARPS-N spectrographs, consisting of 198 measurements taken over 20 years, enabled us to address the nature of periodic signals and also to characterize stellar physical parameters (mass, temperature, and rotation). We report the discovery of a super-Earth orbiting at a distance of 0.092 AU from the host star Gl 686. Gl 686 b has a minimum mass of 7.1 +/- 0.9 MEarth and an orbital period of 15.532 +/- 0.002 d. The analysis of the activity indexes, correlated noise through a Gaussian process framework and photometry, provides an estimate of the stellar rotation period at 37 d, and highlights the variability of the spot configuration during the long timespan covering 20 yrs. The observed periodicities around 2000 d likely point to the existence of an activity cycle.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.09264  [pdf] - 1803019
The discovery of WASP-134b, WASP-134c, WASP-137b, WASP-143b and WASP-146b: three hot Jupiters and a pair of warm Jupiters orbiting Solar-type stars
Comments: Submitted to AJ. 10 pages, 8 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2018-12-21
We report the discovery by WASP of five planets orbiting moderately bright ($V$ = 11.0-12.9) Solar-type stars. WASP-137b, WASP-143b and WASP-146b are typical hot Jupiters in orbits of 3-4 d and with masses in the range 0.68--1.11 $M_{\rm Jup}$. WASP-134 is a metal-rich ([Fe/H] = +0.40 $\pm$ 0.07]) G4 star orbited by two warm Jupiters: WASP-134b ($M_{\rm pl}$ = 1.41 $M_{\rm Jup}$; $P = 10.1$ d; $e = 0.15 \pm 0.01$; $T_{\rm eql}$ = 950 K) and WASP-134c ($M_{\rm pl} \sin i$ = 0.70 $M_{\rm Jup}$; $P = 70.0$ d; $e = 0.17 \pm 0.09$; $T_{\rm eql}$ = 500 K). From observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect of WASP-134b, we find its orbit to be misaligned with the spin of its star ($\lambda = -44 \pm 10^\circ$). WASP-134 is a rare example of a system with a short-period giant planet and a nearby giant companion. In-situ formation or disc migration seem more likely explanations for such systems than does high-eccentricity migration.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.05955  [pdf] - 1791378
A candidate super-Earth planet orbiting near the snow line of Barnard's star
Comments: 38 pages, 7 figures, 4 tables, author's version of published paper in Nature journal
Submitted: 2018-11-14, last modified: 2018-11-23
At a distance of 1.8 parsecs, Barnard's star (Gl 699) is a red dwarf with the largest apparent motion of any known stellar object. It is the closest single star to the Sun, second only to the alpha Centauri triple stellar system. Barnard's star is also among the least magnetically active red dwarfs known and has an estimated age older than our Solar System. Its properties have made it a prime target for planet searches employing techniques such as radial velocity, astrometry, and direct imaging, all with different sensitivity limits but ultimately leading to disproved or null results. Here we report that the combination of numerous measurements from high-precision radial velocity instruments reveals the presence of a low-amplitude but significant periodic signal at 233 days. Independent photometric and spectroscopic monitoring, as well as the analysis of instrumental systematic effects, show that this signal is best explained as arising from a planetary companion. The candidate planet around Barnard's star is a cold super-Earth with a minimum mass of 3.2 Earth masses orbiting near its snow-line. The combination of all radial velocity datasets spanning 20 years additionally reveals a long-term modulation that could arise from a magnetic activity cycle or from a more distant planetary object. Because of its proximity to the Sun, the proposed planet has a maximum angular separation of 220 milli-arcseconds from Barnard's star, making it an excellent target for complementary direct imaging and astrometric observations.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.06895  [pdf] - 1779612
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: Nine new double-line spectroscopic binary stars
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. 17 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-21
Context. The CARMENES spectrograph is surveying ~300 M dwarf stars in search for exoplanets. Among the target stars, spectroscopic binary systems have been discovered, which can be used to measure fundamental properties of stars. Aims. Using spectroscopic observations, we determine the orbital and physical properties of nine new double-line spectroscopic binary systems by analysing their radial velocity curves. Methods. We use two-dimensional cross-correlation techniques to derive the radial velocities of the targets, which are then employed to determine the orbital properties. Photometric data from the literature are also analysed to search for possible eclipses and to measure stellar variability, which can yield rotation periods. Results. Out of the 342 stars selected for the CARMENES survey, 9 have been found to be double-line spectroscopic binaries, with periods ranging from 1.13 to ~8000 days and orbits with eccentricities up to 0.54. We provide empirical orbital properties and minimum masses for the sample of spectroscopic binaries. Absolute masses are also estimated from mass-luminosity calibrations, ranging between ~0.1 and ~0.6 Msol . Conclusions. These new binary systems increase the number of double-line M dwarf binary systems with known orbital parameters by 15%, and they have lower mass ratios on average.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.01183  [pdf] - 1771637
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. A Neptune-mass planet traversing the habitable zone around HD 180617
Comments: 16 pages, 5 figures, 5 tables; Accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2018-08-03
Despite their activity, low-mass stars are of particular importance for the search of exoplanets by the means of Doppler spectroscopy, as planets with lower masses become detectable. We report on the discovery of a planetary companion around HD 180617, a bright J = 5.58 mag, low-mass M = 0.45 M_{sun} star of spectral type M2.5 V. The star, located at a distance of 5.9 pc, is the primary of the high proper motion binary system containing vB 10, a star with one of the lowest masses known in most of the twentieth century. Our analysis is based on new radial velocity (RV) measurements made at red-optical wavelengths provided by the high-precision spectrograph CARMENES, which was designed to carry out a survey for Earth-like planets around M dwarfs. The available CARMENES data are augmented by archival Doppler measurements from HIRES and HARPS. Altogether, the RVs span more than 16 years. The modeling of the RV variations, with a semi-amplitude of K = 2.85-0.25/+0.16m/s yields a Neptune-like planet with a minimum mass of 12.2-1.4/+1.0 M_{Earth} on a 105.90-0.10/+0.09d circumprimary orbit, which is partly located in the host star's habitable zone. The analysis of time series of common activity indicators does not show any dependence on the detected RV signal. The discovery of HD 180617 b not only adds information to a currently hardly filled region of the mass-period diagram of exoplanets around M dwarfs, but the investigated system becomes the third known binary consisting of M dwarfs and hosting an exoplanet in an S-type configuration. Its proximity makes it an attractive candidate for future studies.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.06052  [pdf] - 1695269
Efficient scheduling of astronomical observations. Application to the CARMENES radial-velocity survey
Comments: 18 pages, 8 figures, 6 tables
Submitted: 2017-07-19, last modified: 2018-06-06
Targeted spectroscopic exoplanet surveys face the challenge of maximizing their planet detection rates by means of careful planning. The number of possible observation combinations for a large exoplanet survey, i.e., the sequence of observations night after night, both in total time and amount of targets, is enormous. Sophisticated scheduling tools and the improved understanding of the exoplanet population are employed to investigate an efficient and optimal way to plan the execution of observations. This is applied to the CARMENES instrument, which is an optical and infrared high-resolution spectrograph that has started a survey of about 300 M-dwarf stars in search for terrestrial exoplanets. We use evolutionary computation techniques to create an automatic scheduler that minimizes the idle periods of the telescope and that distributes the observations among all the targets using configurable criteria. We simulate the case of the CARMENES survey with a realistic sample of targets, and we estimate the efficiency of the planning tool both in terms of telescope operations and planet detection. Our scheduling simulations produce plans that use about 99$\%$ of the available telescope time (including overheads) and optimally distribute the observations among the different targets. Under such conditions, and using current planet statistics, the optimized plan using this tool should allow the CARMENES survey to discover about 65$\%$ of the planets with radial-velocity semi-amplitudes greater than 1$~m\thinspace s^{-1}$ when considering only photon noise. The simulations using our scheduling tool show that it is possible to optimize the survey planning by minimizing idle instrument periods and fulfilling the science objectives in an efficient manner to maximize the scientific return.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.03476  [pdf] - 1755888
The HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N@TNG VIII. Gl15A: A multiple wide planetary system sculpted by binary interaction
Comments: 19 pages, 14 figures, accepted for publication in A\&A
Submitted: 2018-04-10
We present 20 years of radial velocity (RV) measurements of the M1 dwarf Gl15A, combining 5 years of intensive RV monitoring with the HARPS-N spectrograph with 15 years of archival HIRES/Keck RV data. We carry out an MCMC-based analysis of the RV time series, inclusive of Gaussian Process (GP) approach to the description of stellar activity induced RV variations. Our analysis confirms the Keplerian nature and refines the orbital solution for the 11.44-day period super Earth, Gl15A\,b, reducing its amplitude to $1.68^{+0.17}_{-0.18}$ m s$^{-1}$ ($M \sin i = 3.03^{+0.46}_{-0.44}$ M$_\oplus$), and successfully models a long-term trend in the combined RV dataset in terms of a Keplerian orbit with a period around 7600 days and an amplitude of $2.5^{+1.3}_{-1.0}$ m s$^{-1}$, corresponding to a super-Neptune mass ($M \sin i = 36^{+25}_{-18}$ M$_\oplus$) planetary companion. We also discuss the present orbital configuration of Gl15A planetary system in terms of the possible outcomes of Lidov-Kozai interactions with the wide-separation companion Gl15B in a suite of detailed numerical simulations. In order to improve the results of the dynamical analysis, we derive a new orbital solution for the binary system, combining our RV measurements with astrometric data from the WDS catalogue. The eccentric Lidov-Kozai analysis shows the strong influence of Gl15B on the Gl15A planetary system, which can produce orbits compatible with the observed configuration for initial inclinations of the planetary system between $75^\circ$ and $90^\circ$, and can also enhance the eccentricity of the outer planet well above the observed value, even resulting in orbital instability, for inclinations around $0^\circ$ and $15^\circ - 30^\circ$. The Gl15A system is the multi-planet system closest to Earth, at $3.57$ pc, and hosts the longest period RV sub-jovian mass planet discovered so far.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.06576  [pdf] - 1670513
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: High-resolution optical and near-infrared spectroscopy of 324 survey stars
Reiners, A.; Zechmeister, M.; Caballero, J. A.; Ribas, I.; Morales, J. C.; Jeffers, S. V.; Schöfer, P.; Tal-Or, L.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Kaminski, A.; Seifert, W.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Antona, R.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Azzaro, M.; Baroch, D.; Barrado, D.; Bauer, F. F.; Becerril, S.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Bergond, G.; Blümcke, M.; Brinkmöller, M.; del Burgo, C.; Cano, J.; Vázquez, M. C. Cárdenas; Casal, E.; Cifuentes, C.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Czesla, S.; Díez-Alonso, E.; Dreizler, S.; Feiz, C.; Fernández, M.; Ferro, I. M.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Vargas, M. L. García; Gesa, L.; Gómez, V.; Galera; Hernández, J. I. González; González-Peinado, R.; Grözinger, U.; Grohnert, S.; Guàrdia, J.; Guenther, E. W.; Guijarro, A.; de Guindos, E.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Hagen, H. -J.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Helmling, J.; Henning, Th.; Hermelo, I.; Arabí, R. Hernández; Castaño, L. Hernández; Hernando, F. Hernández; Herrero, E.; Huber, A.; Huke, P.; Johnson, E.; de Juan, E.; Kim, M.; Klein, R.; Klüter, J.; Klutsch, A.; Kürster, M.; Lafarga, M.; Lamert, A.; Lampón, M.; Lara, L. M.; Laun, W.; Lemke, U.; Lenzen, R.; Launhardt, R.; del Fresno, M. López; López-González, J.; López-Puertas, M.; Salas, J. F. López; López-Santiago, J.; Luque, R.; Madinabeitia, H. Magán; Mall, U.; Mancini, L.; Mandel, H.; Marfil, E.; Molina, J. A. Marín; Maroto, D.; Fernández; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Marvin, C. J.; Mathar, R. J.; Mirabet, E.; Montes, D.; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Moya, A.; Mundt, R.; Nagel, E.; Naranjo, V.; Nortmann, L.; Nowak, G.; Ofir, A.; Oreiro, R.; Pallé, E.; Panduro, J.; Pascual, J.; Passegger, V. M.; Pavlov, A.; Pedraz, S.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Medialdea, D. Pérez; Perger, M.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Pluto, M.; Rabaza, O.; Ramón, A.; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reffert, S.; Reinhart, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H. -W.; Rodler, F.; Rodríguez, E.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Trinidad, A. Rodríguez; Rohloff, R. -R.; Rosich, A.; Sadegi, S.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Carrasco, M. A. Sánchez; Sánchez-López, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarkis, P.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schiller, J.; Schweitzer, A.; Solano, E.; Stahl, O.; Strachan, J. B. P.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tala, M.; Trifonov, T.; Tulloch, S. M.; Ulbrich, R. G.; Veredas, G.; Linares, J. I. Vico; Vilardell, F.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Wolthoff, V.; Xu, W.; Yan, F.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero
Comments: accepted for publication in A&A, 13 pages plus 40 pages spectral atlas, first 10 atlas pages are reduced in quality to fit arXiv size limit; one CARMENES spectrum for each of the 324 stars is published in electronic format at http://carmenes.cab.inta-csic.es/
Submitted: 2017-11-17, last modified: 2018-02-09
The CARMENES radial velocity (RV) survey is observing 324 M dwarfs to search for any orbiting planets. In this paper, we present the survey sample by publishing one CARMENES spectrum for each M dwarf. These spectra cover the wavelength range 520--1710nm at a resolution of at least $R > 80,000$, and we measure its RV, H$\alpha$ emission, and projected rotation velocity. We present an atlas of high-resolution M-dwarf spectra and compare the spectra to atmospheric models. To quantify the RV precision that can be achieved in low-mass stars over the CARMENES wavelength range, we analyze our empirical information on the RV precision from more than 6500 observations. We compare our high-resolution M-dwarf spectra to atmospheric models where we determine the spectroscopic RV information content, $Q$, and signal-to-noise ratio. We find that for all M-type dwarfs, the highest RV precision can be reached in the wavelength range 700--900nm. Observations at longer wavelengths are equally precise only at the very latest spectral types (M8 and M9). We demonstrate that in this spectroscopic range, the large amount of absorption features compensates for the intrinsic faintness of an M7 star. To reach an RV precision of 1ms$^{-1}$ in very low mass M dwarfs at longer wavelengths likely requires the use of a 10m class telescope. For spectral types M6 and earlier, the combination of a red visual and a near-infrared spectrograph is ideal to search for low-mass planets and to distinguish between planets and stellar variability. At a 4m class telescope, an instrument like CARMENES has the potential to push the RV precision well below the typical jitter level of 3-4ms$^{-1}$.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.01595  [pdf] - 1630202
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. First visual-channel radial-velocity measurements and orbital parameter updates of seven M-dwarf planetary systems
Trifonov, T.; Kürster, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Tal-Or, L.; Caballero, J. A.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Reffert, S.; Dreizler, S.; Hatzes, A. P.; Kaminski, A.; Launhardt, R.; Henning, Th.; Montes, D.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Mundt, R.; Pavlov, A.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Seifert, W.; Morales, J. C.; Nowak, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Rodríguez-López, C.; del Burgo, C.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; López-Santiago, J.; Mathar, R. J.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Guenther, E. W.; Barrado, D.; Hernández, J. I. González; Mancini, L.; Stürmer, J.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Antona, R.; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Azzaro, M.; Baroch, D.; Bauer, F. F.; Becerril, S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Bergond, G.; Blümcke, M.; Brinkmöller, M.; Cano, J.; Vázquez, M. C. Cárdenas; Casal, E.; Cifuentes, C.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Czesla, S.; Díez-Alonso, E.; Feiz, C.; Fernández, M.; Ferro, I. M.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Vargas, M. L. García; Gesa, L.; Galera, V. Gómez; González-Peinado, R.; Grözinger, U.; Grohnert, S.; Guàrdia, J.; Guijarro, A.; de Guindos, E.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Hagen, H. -J.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Helmling, J.; Hermelo, I.; Arabí, R. Hernández; Castaño, L. Hernández; Hernando, F. Hernández; Herrero, E.; Huber, A.; Huke, P.; Johnson, E.; de Juan, E.; Kim, M.; Klein, R.; Klüter, J.; Klutsch, A.; Lafarga, M.; Lampón, M.; Lara, L. M.; Laun, W.; Lemke, U.; Lenzen, R.; del Fresno, M. López; López-González, J.; López-Puertas, M.; Salas, J. F. López; Luque, R.; Madinabeitia, H. Magán; Mall, U.; Mandel, H.; Marfil, E.; Molina, J. A. Marín; Fernández, D. Maroto; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Marvin, C. J.; Mirabet, E.; Moya, A.; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Nagel, E.; Naranjo, V.; Nortmann, L.; Ofir, A.; Oreiro, R.; Pallé, E.; Panduro, J.; Pascual, J.; Passegger, V. M.; Pedraz, S.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Medialdea, D. Pérez; Perger, M.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Pluto, M.; Rabaza, O.; Ramón, A.; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reinhardt, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H. -W.; Rodler, F.; Rodríguez, E.; Trinidad, A. Rodríguez; Rohloff, R. -R.; Rosich, A.; Sadegi, S.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Carrasco, M. A. Sánchez; Sánchez-López, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarkis, P.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schiller, J.; Schöfer, P.; Schweitzer, A.; Solano, E.; Stahl, O.; Strachan, J. B. P.; Suárez, J. C.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tala, M.; Tulloch, S. M.; Veredas, G.; Linares, J. I. Vico; Vilardell, F.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Wolthoff, V.; Xu, W.; Yan, F.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A, 24 pages, 16 figures, 14 tables
Submitted: 2017-10-04, last modified: 2018-01-29
Context: The main goal of the CARMENES survey is to find Earth-mass planets around nearby M-dwarf stars. Seven M-dwarfs included in the CARMENES sample had been observed before with HIRES and HARPS and either were reported to have one short period planetary companion (GJ15A, GJ176, GJ436, GJ536 and GJ1148) or are multiple planetary systems (GJ581 and GJ876). Aims: We aim to report new precise optical radial velocity measurements for these planet hosts and test the overall capabilities of CARMENES. Methods: We combined our CARMENES precise Doppler measurements with those available from HIRES and HARPS and derived new orbital parameters for the systems. Bona-fide single planet systems are fitted with a Keplerian model. The multiple planet systems were analyzed using a self-consistent dynamical model and their best fit orbits were tested for long-term stability. Results: We confirm or provide supportive arguments for planets around all the investigated stars except for GJ15A, for which we find that the post-discovery HIRES data and our CARMENES data do not show a signal at 11.4 days. Although we cannot confirm the super-Earth planet GJ15Ab, we show evidence for a possible long-period ($P_{\rm c}$ = 7025$_{-629}^{+972}$ d) Saturn-mass ($m_{\rm c} \sin i$ = 51.8$_{-5.8}^{+5.5}M_\oplus$) planet around GJ15A. In addition, based on our CARMENES and HIRES data we discover a second planet around GJ1148, for which we estimate a period $P_{\rm c}$ = 532.6$_{-2.5}^{+4.1}$ d, eccentricity $e_{\rm c}$ = 0.34$_{-0.06}^{+0.05}$ and minimum mass $m_{\rm c} \sin i$ = 68.1$_{-2.2}^{+4.9}M_\oplus$. Conclusions: The CARMENES optical radial velocities have similar precision and overall scatter when compared to the Doppler measurements conducted with HARPS and HIRES. We conclude that CARMENES is an instrument that is up to the challenge of discovering rocky planets around low-mass stars.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.07375  [pdf] - 1732559
HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N at TNG. VII. Rotation and activity of M-Dwarfs from time-series high-resolution spectroscopy of chromospheric indicators
Comments: 19 pages, 16 figures, 10 tables
Submitted: 2017-12-20
We aim to investigate the presence of signatures of magnetic cycles and rotation on a sample of 71 early M-dwarfs from the HADES RV programme using high-resolution time-series spectroscopy of the Ca II H & K and Halpha chromospheric activity indicators, the radial velocity series, the parameters of the cross correlation function and the V-band photometry. We used mainly HARPS-N spectra, acquired over four years, and add HARPS spectra from the public ESO database and ASAS photometry light-curves as support data, extending the baseline of the observations of some stars up to 12 years. We provide log(R'hk) measurements for all the stars in the sample, cycle length measurements for 13 stars, rotation periods for 33 stars and we are able to measure the semi-amplitude of the radial velocity signal induced by rotation in 16 stars. We complement our work with previous results and confirm and refine the previously reported relationships between the mean level of chromospheric emission, measured by the log(R'hk), with the rotation period, and with the measured semi-amplitude of the activity induced radial velocity signal for early M-dwarfs. We searched for a possible relation between the measured rotation periods and the lengths of the magnetic cycle, finding a weak correlation between both quantities. Using previous v sin i measurements we estimated the inclinations of the star's poles to the line of sight for all the stars in the sample, and estimate the range of masses of the planets GJ 3998 b and c (2.5 - 4.9 Mearth and 6.3 - 12.5 Mearth), GJ 625 b (2.82 Mearth), GJ 3942 b (7.1 - 10.0 Mearth) and GJ 15A b (3.1 - 3.3 Mearth), assuming their orbits are coplanar with the stellar rotation.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.05797  [pdf] - 1605300
The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs - HD 147379b: A nearby Neptune in the temperate zone of an early-M dwarf
Reiners, A.; Ribas, I.; Zechmeister, M.; Caballero, J. A.; Trifonov, T.; Dreizler, S.; Morales, J. C.; Tal-Or, L.; Lafarga, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Kaminski, A.; Jeffers, S. V.; Aceituno, J.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Guàrdia, J.; Guenther, E. W.; Hagen, H. -J.; Montes, D.; Passegger, V. M.; Seifert, W.; Schweitzer, A.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Abril, M.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Eiff, M. Ammler-von; Antona, R.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Azzaro, M.; Baroch, D.; Barrado, D.; Bauer, F. F.; Becerril, S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Bergond, G.; Blümcke, M.; Brinkmöller, M.; del Burgo, C.; Cano, J.; Vázquez, M. C. Cárdenas; Casal, E.; Cifuentes, C.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Czesla, S.; Díez-Alonso, E.; Feiz, C.; Fernández, M.; Ferro, I. M.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Vargas, M. L. García; Gesa, L.; Galera, V. Gómez; Hernández, J. I. González; González-Peinado, R.; Grözinger, U.; Grohnert, S.; Guijarro, A.; de Guindos, E.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Helmling, J.; Henning, Th.; Hermelo, I.; Arabí, R. Hernández; Castaño, L. Hernández; Hernando, F. Hernández; Herrero, E.; Huber, A.; Huke, P.; Johnson, E. N.; de Juan, E.; Kim, M.; Klein, R.; Klüter, J.; Klutsch, A.; Kürster, M.; Labarga, F.; Lamert, A.; Lampón, M.; Lara, L. M.; Laun, W.; Lemke, U.; Lenzen, R.; Launhardt, R.; del Fresno, M. López; López-González, M. J.; López-Puertas, M.; Salas, J. F. López; López-Santiago, J.; Luque, R.; Madinabeitia, H. Magán; Mall, U.; Mancini, L.; Mandel, H.; Marfil, E.; Molina, J. A. Marín; Fernández, D. Maroto; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Marvin, C. J.; Mathar, R. J.; Mirabet, E.; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Moya, A.; Mundt, R.; Nagel, E.; Naranjo, V.; Nortmann, L.; Nowak, G.; Ofir, A.; Oreiro, R.; Pallé, E.; Panduro, J.; Pascual, J.; Pavlov, A.; Pedraz, S.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Medialdea, D. Pérez; Perger, M.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Pluto, M.; Rabaza, O.; Ramón, A.; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reffert, S.; Reinhart, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H. -W.; Rodler, F.; Rodríguez, E.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Trinidad, A. Rodríguez; Rohloff, R. -R.; Rosich, A.; Sadegi, S.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Carrasco, M. A. Sánchez; Sánchez-López, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarkis, P.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schiller, J.; Schöfer, P.; Solano, E.; Stahl, O.; Strachan, J. B. P.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tala, M.; Tulloch, S. M.; Ulbrich, R. -G.; Veredas, G.; Linares, J. I. Vico; Vilardell, F.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Wolthoff, V.; Xu, W.; Yan, F.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero
Comments: accepted for publication as A&A Letter
Submitted: 2017-12-15
We report on the first star discovered to host a planet detected by radial velocity (RV) observations obtained within the CARMENES survey for exoplanets around M dwarfs. HD 147379 ($V = 8.9$ mag, $M = 0.58 \pm 0.08$ M$_{\odot}$), a bright M0.0V star at a distance of 10.7 pc, is found to undergo periodic RV variations with a semi-amplitude of $K = 5.1\pm0.4$ m s$^{-1}$ and a period of $P = 86.54\pm0.06$ d. The RV signal is found in our CARMENES data, which were taken between 2016 and 2017, and is supported by HIRES/Keck observations that were obtained since 2000. The RV variations are interpreted as resulting from a planet of minimum mass $m_{\rm p}\sin{i} = 25 \pm 2$ M$_{\oplus}$, 1.5 times the mass of Neptune, with an orbital semi-major axis $a = 0.32$ au and low eccentricity ($e < 0.13$). HD 147379b is orbiting inside the temperate zone around the star, where water could exist in liquid form. The RV time-series and various spectroscopic indicators show additional hints of variations at an approximate period of 21.1d (and its first harmonic), which we attribute to the rotation period of the star.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.06851  [pdf] - 1854632
HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N at TNG VI. GJ 3942 b behind dominant activity signals
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-09-20
Short- to mid-term magnetic phenomena on the stellar surface of M-type stars cannot only resemble the effects of planets in radial velocity data, but also may hide them. We analyze 145 spectroscopic HARPS-N observations of GJ 3942 taken over the past five years and additional photometry to disentangle stellar activity effects from genuine Doppler signals as a result of the orbital motion of the star around the common barycenter with its planet. To achieve this, we use the common methods of pre-whitening, and treat the correlated red noise by a first-order moving average term and by Gaussian-process regression following an MCMC analysis. We identify the rotational period of the star at 16.3 days and discover a new super-Earth, GJ 3942 b, with an orbital period of 6.9 days and a minimum mass of 7.1 Me. An additional signal in the periodogram of the residuals is present but we cannot claim it to be related to a second planet with sufficient significance at this point. If confirmed, such planet candidate would have a minimum mass of 6.3 Me and a period of 10.4 days, which might indicate a 3:2 mean-motion resonance with the inner planet.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.06537  [pdf] - 1583582
HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N at TNG: V. A super-Earth on the inner edge of the habitable zone of the nearby M-dwarf GJ 625
Comments: 22 pages, 21 figures, 10 tables -- Metadata corrected
Submitted: 2017-05-18, last modified: 2017-06-13
We report the discovery of a super-Earth orbiting at the inner edge of the habitable zone of the star GJ 625 based on the analysis of the radial-velocity (RV) time series from the HARPS-N spectrograph, consisting in 151 HARPS-N measurements taken over 3.5 yr. GJ 625 b is a planet with a minimum mass M sin $i$ of 2.82 $\pm$ 0.51 M$_{\oplus}$ with an orbital period of 14.628 $\pm$ 0.013 days at a distance of 0.078 AU of its parent star. The host star is the quiet M2 V star GJ 625, located at 6.5 pc from the Sun. We find the presence of a second radial velocity signal in the range 74-85 days that we relate to stellar rotation after analysing the time series of Ca II H\&K and H${\alpha}$ spectroscopic indicators, the variations of the FWHM of the CCF and and the APT2 photometric light curves. We find no evidence linking the short period radial velocity signal to any activity proxy.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.05906  [pdf] - 1532144
The HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N@TNG. III. Flux-flux and activity-rotation relationships of early-M dwarfs
Comments: Accepted for publication by Astronomy & Astrophysics, This version: some typos corrected
Submitted: 2016-10-19, last modified: 2016-10-27
(Abridged) Understanding stellar activity in M dwarfs is crucial for the physics of stellar atmospheres as well as for ongoing radial velocity exoplanet programmes. Despite the increasing interest in M dwarfs, our knowledge of the chromospheres of these stars is far from being complete. We aim to test whether the relations between activity, rotation, and stellar parameters and flux-flux relationships also hold for early-M dwarfs on the main-sequence. We analyse in an homogeneous and coherent way a well defined sample of 71 late-K/early-M dwarfs that are currently being observed in the framework of the HArps-n red Dwarf Exoplanet Survey (HADES). Rotational velocities are derived using the cross-correlation technique while emission flux excesses in the Ca II H & K and Balmer lines from Halpha up to Hepsilon are obtained by using the spectral subtraction technique. The relationships between the emission excesses and the stellar parameters are studied. Relations between pairs of fluxes of different chromospheric lines are also studied. We find that the strength of the chromospheric emission in the Ca II H & K and Balmer lines is roughly constant for stars in the M0-M3 spectral range. Our data suggest that a moderate but significant correlation between activity and rotation might be present as well as a hint of kinematically selected young stars showing higher levels of emission. We find our sample of M dwarfs to be complementary in terms of chromospheric and X-ray fluxes with those of the literature, extending the analysis of the flux-flux relationships to the very low flux domain. Our results agree with previous works suggesting that the activity-rotation-age relationship known to hold for solar-type stars also applies to early-M dwarfs. We also confirm previous findings that the field stars which deviate from the bulk of the empirical flux-flux relationships show evidence of youth.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.08698  [pdf] - 1532283
The HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N@TNG II. Data treatment and simulations
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-10-27
The distribution of exoplanets around low-mass stars is still not well understood. Such stars, however, present an excellent opportunity of reaching down to the rocky and habitable planet domains. The number of current detections used for statistical purposes is still quite modest and different surveys, using both photometry and precise radial velocities, are searching for planets around M dwarfs. Our HARPS-N red dwarf exoplanet survey is aimed at the detection of new planets around a sample of 78 selected stars, together with the subsequent characterization of their activity properties. Here we investigate the survey performance and strategy. From 2700 observed spectra, we compare the radial velocity determinations of the HARPS-N DRS pipeline and the HARPS-TERRA code, we calculate the mean activity jitter level, we evaluate the planet detection expectations, and we address the general question of how to define the strategy of spectroscopic surveys in order to be most efficient in the detection of planets. We find that the HARPS-TERRA radial velocities show less scatter and we calculate a mean activity jitter of 2.3 m/s for our sample. For a general radial velocity survey with limited observing time, the number of observations per star is key for the detection efficiency. In the case of an early M-type target sample, we conclude that approximately 50 observations per star with exposure times of 900 s and precisions of about 1 m/s maximizes the number of planet detections.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.05923  [pdf] - 1580429
The HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N@TNG IV. Time resolved analysis of the Ca ii H&K and H{\alpha} chromospheric emission of low-activity early-type M dwarfs
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-10-19
M dwarfs are prime targets for planet search programs, particularly of those focused on the detection and characterization of rocky planets in the habitable zone. Understanding their magnetic activity is important because it affects our ability to detect small planets, and it plays a key role in the characterization of the stellar environment. We analyze observations of the Ca II H&K and H{\alpha} lines as diagnostics of chromospheric activity for low-activity early-type M dwarfs. We analyze the time series of spectra of 71 early-type M dwarfs collected for the HADES project for planet search purposes. The HARPS-N spectra provide simultaneously the H&K doublet and the H{\alpha} line. We develop a reduction scheme able to correct the HARPS-N spectra for instrumental and atmospheric effects, and to provide flux-calibrated spectra in units of flux at the stellar surface. The H&K and H{\alpha} fluxes are compared with each other, and their variability is analyzed. We find that the H and K flux excesses are strongly correlated with each other, while the H{\alpha} flux excess is generally less correlated with the H&K doublet. We also find that H{\alpha} emission does not increase monotonically with the H&K line flux, showing some absorption before being filled in by chromospheric emission when H&K activity increases. Analyzing the time variability of the emission fluxes, we derive a tentative estimate of the rotation period (of the order of a few tens of days) for some of the program stars, and the typical lifetime of chromospheric active regions (a few stellar rotations). Our results are in good agreement with previous studies. In particular, we find evidence that the chromospheres of early-type M dwarfs could be characterized by different filaments coverage, affecting the formation mechanism of the H{\alpha} line. We also show that chromospheric structure is likely related to spectral type.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.03632  [pdf] - 1490787
The HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N@TNG - GJ 3998: An early M-dwarf hosting a system of Super-Earths
Comments: 19 pages, 14 figures. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-07-13
Context. M dwarfs are considered ideal targets for Doppler radial velocity searches. Nonetheless, the statistics of frequency of low-mass planets hosted by low mass stars remains poorly constrained. Aims. Our M-dwarf radial velocity monitoring with HARPS-N can provide a major contribution to the widening of the current statistics through the in-depth analysis of accurate radial velocity observations in a narrow range of spectral sub-types (79 stars, between dM0 to dM3). Spectral accuracy will enable us to reach the precision needed to detect small planets with a few earth masses. Our survey will bring a contribute to the surveys devoted to the search for planets around M-dwarfs, mainly focused on the M-dwarf population of the northern emisphere, for which we will provide an estimate of the planet occurence. Methods. We present here a long duration radial velocity monitoring of the M1 dwarf star GJ 3998 with HARPS-N to identify periodic signals in the data. Almost simultaneous photometric observations were carried out within the APACHE and EXORAP programs to characterize the stellar activity and to distinguish from the periodic signals those due to activity and to the presence of planetary companions. Results. The radial velocities have a dispersion in excess of their internal errors due to at least four superimposed signals, with periods of 30.7, 13.7, 42.5 and 2.65 days. The analysis of spectral indices based on Ca II H & K and Halpha lines demonstrates that the periods of 30.7 and 42.5 days are due to chromospheric inhomogeneities modulated by stellar rotation and differential rotation. The shorter periods of 13.74 +/- 0.02 d and 2.6498 +/- 0.0008 d are well explained with the presence of two planets, with minimum masses of 6.26 +/- 0.79 MEarth and 2.47 +/- 0.27 MEarth and distances of 0.089 AU and 0.029 AU from the host, respectively.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.01851  [pdf] - 1378892
The K2-ESPRINT Project II: Spectroscopic follow-up of three exoplanet systems from Campaign 1 of K2
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-02-04
We report on Doppler observations of three transiting planet candidates that were detected during Campaign 1 of the K2 mission. The Doppler observations were conducted with FIES, HARPS-N and HARPS. We measure the mass of K2-27b (EPIC 201546283b), and provide constraints and upper limits for EPIC 201295312b and EPIC 201577035b. K2-27b is a warm Neptune orbiting its host star in 6.77 days and has a radius of $4.45^{+0.33}_{-0.33}~\mathrm{R_\oplus}$ and a mass of $29.1^{+7.5}_{-7.4}~\mathrm{M_\oplus}$, which leads to a mean density of $1.80^{+0.70}_{-0.55}~\mathrm{g~cm^{-3}}$. EPIC 201295312b is smaller than Neptune with an orbital period of 5.66 days, radius $2.75^{+0.24}_{-0.22}~\mathrm{R_\oplus}$ and we constrain the mass to be below $12~\mathrm{M_\oplus}$ at 95% confidence. We also find a long-term trend indicative of another body in the system. EPIC 201577035b, previously confirmed as the planet K2-10b, is smaller than Neptune orbiting its host star in 19.3 days, with radius $3.84^{+0.35}_{-0.34}~\mathrm{R_\oplus}$. We determine its mass to be $27^{+17}_{-16}~\mathrm{M_\oplus}$, with a 95% confidence uppler limit at $57~\mathrm{M_\oplus}$, and mean density $2.6^{+2.1}_{-1.6}~{\rm g~cm}^{-3}$. These measurements join the relatively small collection of planets smaller than Neptune with measurements or constraints of the mean density. Our code for performing K2 photometry and detecting planetary transits is now publicly available.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.06717  [pdf] - 1354846
Modelling the photosphere of active stars for planet detection and characterization
Comments: 19 pages, 13 figures
Submitted: 2015-11-20
Stellar activity patterns are responsible for jitter effects that are observed at different timescales and amplitudes. These effects are currently in the focus of many exoplanet search projects, since the lack of a well-defined characterization and correction strategy hampers the detection of the signals associated with small exoplanets. Accurate simulations of the stellar photosphere can provide synthetic time series data. These may help to investigate the relation between activity jitter and stellar parameters when considering different active region patterns. Moreover, jitters can be analysed at different wavelength scales in order to design strategies to remove or minimize them. In this work we present the StarSim tool, which is based on a model for a spotted rotating photosphere built from the integration of the spectral contribution of a fine grid of surface elements. The model includes all significant effects affecting the flux intensities and the wavelength of spectral features produced by active regions and planets. A specific application for the characterization and modelling of the spectral signature of active regions is considered, showing that the chromatic effects of faculae are dominant for low temperature contrasts of spots. Synthetic time series are modelled for HD 189733. Our algorithm reproduces both the photometry and the RVs to good precision, generally better than the studies published to date. We evaluate the RV signature of the activity in HD 189733 by exploring a grid of solutions from the photometry. We find that the use of RV data in the inverse problem could break degeneracies and allow for a better determination of some stellar and activity parameters. In addition, the effects of spots are studied for a set of simulated transit photometry, showing that these can introduce variations which are very similar to the signal of an atmosphere dominated by dust.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.07586  [pdf] - 1450564
First detection of thermal radio jets in a sample of proto-brown dwarf candidates
Comments: 18 pages, 8 figures, 14 tables, accepted by the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2015-05-28
We observed with the JVLA at 3.6 and 1.3 cm a sample of 11 proto-brown dwarf candidates in Taurus in a search for thermal radio jets driven by the most embedded brown dwarfs. We detected for the first time four thermal radio jets in proto-brown dwarf candidates. We compiled data from UKIDSS, 2MASS, Spitzer, WISE and Herschel to build the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of the objects in our sample, which are similar to typical Class~I SEDs of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs). The four proto-brown dwarf candidates driving thermal radio jets also roughly follow the well-known trend of centimeter luminosity against bolometric luminosity determined for YSOs, assuming they belong to Taurus, although they present some excess of radio emission compared to the known relation for YSOs. Nonetheless, we are able to reproduce the flux densities of the radio jets modeling the centimeter emission of the thermal radio jets using the same type of models applied to YSOs, but with corresponding smaller stellar wind velocities and mass-loss rates, and exploring different possible geometries of the wind or outflow from the star. Moreover, we also find that the modeled mass outflow rates for the bolometric luminosities of our objects agree reasonably well with the trends found between the mass outflow rates and bolometric luminosities of YSOs, which indicates that, despite the "excess" centimeter emission, the intrinsic properties of proto-brown dwarfs are consistent with a continuation of those of very low mass stars to a lower mass range. Overall, our study favors the formation of brown dwarfs as a scaled-down version of low-mass stars.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.03010  [pdf] - 1043153
Stellar parameters of early M dwarfs from ratios of spectral features at optical wavelengths
Comments: Accepted for publication by Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2015-03-10
(Abridged) Low-mass stars have been recognised as promising targets in the search for rocky, small planets with the potential of supporting life. Doppler search programmes using high-resolution spectrographs like HARPS or HARPS-N are providing huge quantities of optical spectra of M dwarfs. We aim to calibrate empirical relationships to determine stellar parameters for early M dwarfs (spectral types M0-M4.5) using the same spectra that are used for the radial velocity determinations. Our methodology consists in the use of ratios of pseudo equivalent widths of spectral features as a temperature diagnostic. Stars with effective temperatures obtained from interferometric estimates of their radii are used as calibrators. Empirical calibrations for the spectral type are also provided. Combinations of features and ratios of features are used to derive calibrations for the stellar metallicity. Our methods are then applied to a large sample of M dwarfs that are being observed in the framework of the HARPS search for extrasolar planets.The derived temperatures and metallicities are used together with photometric estimates of mass, radius, and surface gravity to calibrate empirical relationships for these parameters. A total of 112 temperature sensitive ratios have been calibrated over the range 3100-3950 K, providing Teff values with typical uncertainties of the order of 70 K. Eighty-two ratios of pseudo equivalent widths of features were calibrated to derive spectral types. Regarding stellar metallicity, 696 combinations of pseudo equivalent widths of individual features and temperature-sensitive ratios have been calibrated, over the metallicity range from -0.54 to +0.24 dex, with estimated uncertainties in the range of 0.07-0.10 dex. We provide our own empirical calibrations for stellar mass, radius, and surface gravity.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:0712.3125  [pdf] - 8304
Compact mid-IR sources east of galactic center source IRS5
Comments: 9 pages, 8 figures. accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2007-12-19
There are four less prominent compact sources east of IRS5, the natures of which were unclear until now. We present near-infrared K-band long slit spectroscopy of the four sources east of IRS5 obtained with the ISAAC spectrograph at the ESO VLT in July 2005. We interpret the data in combination with high angular resolution NIR and MIR images obtained with ISAAC and NACO at the ESO VLT.