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Paiella, A.

Normalized to: Paiella, A.

26 article(s) in total. 594 co-authors, from 1 to 26 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 87,5.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.14889  [pdf] - 2122751
A chemically etched corrugated feedhorn array for D-band CMB observations
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-06-26
We present the design, manufacturing, and testing of a 37-element array of corrugated feedhorns for Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurements between $140$ and $170$ GHz. The array was designed to be coupled to Kinetic Inductance Detector arrays, either directly (for total power measurements) or through an orthomode transducer (for polarization measurements). We manufactured the array in platelets by chemically etching aluminum plates of $0.3$ mm and $0.4$ mm thickness. The process is fast, low-cost, scalable, and yields high-performance antennas compared to other techniques in the same frequency range. Room temperature electromagnetic measurements show excellent repeatability with an average cross polarization level about $-20$ dB, return loss about $-25$ dB, first sidelobes below $-25$ dB and far sidelobes below $-35$ dB. Our results qualify this process as a valid candidate for state-of-the-art CMB experiments, where large detector arrays with high sensitivity and polarization purity are of paramount importance in the quest for the discovery of CMB polarization $B$-modes.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.01187  [pdf] - 2089273
Progress report on the Large Scale Polarization Explorer
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, Accepted for publication in Journal of Low Temperature Physics
Submitted: 2020-05-03, last modified: 2020-05-05
The Large Scale Polarization Explorer (LSPE) is a cosmology program for the measurement of large scale curl-like features (B-modes) in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. Its goal is to constrain the background of inflationary gravity waves traveling through the universe at the time of matter-radiation decoupling. The two instruments of LSPE are meant to synergically operate by covering a large portion of the northern microwave sky. LSPE/STRIP is a coherent array of receivers planned to be operated from the Teide Observatory in Tenerife, for the control and characterization of the low-frequency polarized signals of galactic origin; LSPE/SWIPE is a balloon-borne bolometric polarimeter based on 330 large throughput multi-moded detectors, designed to measure the CMB polarization at 150 GHz and to monitor the polarized emission by galactic dust above 200 GHz. The combined performance and the expected level of systematics mitigation will allow LSPE to constrain primordial B-modes down to a tensor/scalar ratio of $10^{-2}$. We here report the status of the STRIP pre-commissioning phase and the progress in the characterization of the key subsystems of the SWIPE payload (namely the cryogenic polarization modulation unit and the multi-moded TES pixels) prior to receiver integration.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.03589  [pdf] - 2045578
In-flight performance of the LEKIDs of the OLIMPO experiment
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-02-10
We describe the in-flight performance of the horn-coupled Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detector arrays of the balloon-borne OLIMPO experiment. These arrays have been designed to match the spectral bands of OLIMPO: 150, 250, 350, and 460 GHz, and they have been operated at 0.3 K and at an altitude of 37.8 km during the stratospheric flight of the OLIMPO payload, in Summer 2018. During the first hours of flight, we tuned the detectors and verified their large dynamics under the radiative background variations due to elevation increase of the telescope and to the insertion of the plug-in room-temperature differential Fourier transform spectrometer into the optical chain. We have found that the detector noise equivalent powers are close to be photon-noise limited and lower than those measured on the ground. Moreover, the data contamination due to primary cosmic rays hitting the arrays is less than 3% for all the pixels of all the arrays, and less than 1% for most of the pixels. These results can be considered the first step of KID technology validation in a representative space environment.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.10272  [pdf] - 2065386
QUBIC: the Q & U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology
Battistelli, E. S.; Ade, P.; Alberro, J. G.; Almela, A.; Amico, G.; Arnaldi, L. H.; Auguste, D.; Aumont, J.; Azzoni, S.; Banfi, S.; Battaglia, P.; Baù, A.; Bèlier, B.; Bennett, D.; Bergè, L.; Bernard, J. -Ph.; Bersanelli, M.; Bigot-Sazy, M. -A.; Bleurvacq, N.; Bonaparte, J.; Bonis, J.; Bottani, A.; Bunn, E.; Burke, D.; Buzi, D.; Buzzelli, A.; Cavaliere, F.; Chanial, P.; Chapron, C.; Charlassier, R.; Columbro, F.; Coppi, G.; Coppolecchia, A.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; De Gasperis, G.; De Leo, M.; De Petris, M.; Dheilly, S.; Di Donato, A.; Dumoulin, L.; Etchegoyen, A.; Fasciszewski, A.; Ferreyro, L. P.; Fracchia, D.; Franceschet, C.; Lerena, M. M. Gamboa; Ganga, K.; Garcìa, B.; Redondo, M. E. Garcìa; Gaspard, M.; Gault, A.; Gayer, D.; Gervasi, M.; Giard, M.; Gilles, V.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Berisso, M. Gòmez; Gonzàlez, M.; Gradziel, M.; Grandsire, L.; Hamilton, J. -Ch.; Harari, D.; Haynes, V.; Henrot-Versillè, S.; Hoang, D. T.; Incardona, F.; Jules, E.; Kaplan, J.; Korotkov, A.; Kristukat, C.; Lamagna, L.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, T.; Luterstein, R.; Maffei, B.; Marnieros, S.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mattei, A.; May, A.; McCulloch, M.; Medina, M. C.; Mele, L.; Melhuish, S.; Mennella, A.; Montier, L.; Mousset, L.; Mundo, L. M.; Murphy, J. A.; Murphy, J. D.; Nati, F.; Olivieri, E.; Oriol, C.; O'Sullivan, C.; Paiella, A.; Pajot, F.; Passerini, A.; Pastoriza, H.; Pelosi, A.; Perbost, C.; Perciballi, M.; Pezzotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Piccirillo, L.; Pisano, G.; Platino, M.; Polenta, G.; Prèle, D.; Puddu, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ringegni, P.; Romero, G. E.; Salatino, M.; Salum, J. M.; Schillaci, A.; Scòccola, C.; Scully, S.; Spinelli, S.; Stankowiak, G.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Suarez, F.; Tartari, A.; Thermeau, J. -P.; Timbie, P.; Tomasi, M.; Torchinsky, S.; Tristram, M.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G.; Vanneste, S.; Viganò, D.; Vittorio, N.; Voisin, F.; Watson, B.; Wicek, F.; Zannoni, M.; Zullo, A.
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Journal of Low Temperature Physics
Submitted: 2020-01-28
The Q & U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology, QUBIC, is an innovative experiment designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background and in particular the signature left therein by the inflationary expansion of the Universe. The expected signal is extremely faint, thus extreme sensitivity and systematic control are necessary in order to attempt this measurement. QUBIC addresses these requirements using an innovative approach combining the sensitivity of Transition Edge Sensor cryogenic bolometers, with the deep control of systematics characteristic of interferometers. This makes QUBIC unique with respect to others classical imagers experiments devoted to the CMB polarization. In this contribution we report a description of the QUBIC instrument including recent achievements and the demonstration of the bolometric interferometry performed in lab. QUBIC will be deployed at the observation site in Alto Chorrillos, in Argentina at the end of 2019.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.01724  [pdf] - 2026608
Updated design of the CMB polarization experiment satellite LiteBIRD
Sugai, H.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Alonso, D.; Arnold, K.; Aumont, J.; Austermann, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Barreiro, R. B.; Basak, S.; Beall, J.; Beckman, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Buzzelli, A.; Calabrese, E.; Casas, F. J.; Challinor, A.; Chan, V.; Chinone, Y.; Cliche, J. -F.; Columbro, F.; Cukierman, A.; Curtis, D.; Danto, P.; de Bernardis, P.; de Haan, T.; De Petris, M.; Dickinson, C.; Dobbs, M.; Dotani, T.; Duband, L.; Ducout, A.; Duff, S.; Duivenvoorden, A.; Duval, J. -M.; Ebisawa, K.; Elleflot, T.; Enokida, H.; Eriksen, H. K.; Errard, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Finelli, F.; Flauger, R.; Franceschet, C.; Fuskeland, U.; Ganga, K.; Gao, J. -R.; Génova-Santos, R.; Ghigna, T.; Gomez, A.; Gradziel, M. L.; Grain, J.; Grupp, F.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halverson, N. W.; Hargrave, P.; Hasebe, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, M.; Hazumi, M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herranz, D.; Hill, C.; Hilton, G.; Hirota, Y.; Hivon, E.; Hlozek, R.; Hoang, D. -T.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Iida, T.; Imada, H.; Ishimura, K.; Ishino, H.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jones, M.; Kaga, T.; Kashima, S.; Kataoka, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Keskitalo, R.; Kibayashi, A.; Kikuchi, T.; Kimura, K.; Kisner, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kogiso, N.; Kogut, A.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Komatsu, K.; Konishi, K.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kuo, C. L.; Kurinsky, N.; Kushino, A.; Kuwata-Gonokami, M.; Lamagna, L.; Lattanzi, M.; Lee, A. T.; Linder, E.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Maki, M.; Mangilli, A.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Mathon, R.; Matsumura, T.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Minami, Y.; Mistuda, K.; Molinari, D.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mot, B.; Murata, Y.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagai, M.; Nagata, R.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Natoli, P.; Nerva, S.; Nishibori, T.; Nishino, H.; Nomura, Y.; Noviello, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Ochi, H.; Ogawa, H.; Ogawa, H.; Ohsaki, H.; Ohta, I.; Okada, N.; Okada, N.; Pagano, L.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piacentini, F.; Pisano, G.; Polenta, G.; Poletti, D.; Prouvé, T.; Puglisi, G.; Rambaud, D.; Raum, C.; Realini, S.; Remazeilles, M.; Roudil, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Russell, M.; Sakurai, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Sekimoto, Y.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shinozaki, K.; Shiraishi, M.; Shirron, P.; Signorelli, G.; Smecher, G.; Spizzi, P.; Stever, S. L.; Stompor, R.; Sugiyama, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, J.; Switzer, E.; Takaku, R.; Takakura, H.; Takakura, S.; Takeda, Y.; Taylor, A.; Taylor, E.; Terao, Y.; Thompson, K. L.; Thorne, B.; Tomasi, M.; Tomida, H.; Trappe, N.; Tristram, M.; Tsuji, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Tucker, C.; Ullom, J.; Uozumi, S.; Utsunomiya, S.; Van Lanen, J.; Vermeulen, G.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vissers, M.; Vittorio, N.; Voisin, F.; Walker, I.; Watanabe, N.; Wehus, I.; Weller, J.; Westbrook, B.; Winter, B.; Wollack, E.; Yamamoto, R.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Yanagisawa, M.; Yoshida, T.; Yumoto, J.; Zannoni, M.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Journal of Low Temperature Physics, in press
Submitted: 2020-01-06
Recent developments of transition-edge sensors (TESs), based on extensive experience in ground-based experiments, have been making the sensor techniques mature enough for their application on future satellite CMB polarization experiments. LiteBIRD is in the most advanced phase among such future satellites, targeting its launch in Japanese Fiscal Year 2027 (2027FY) with JAXA's H3 rocket. It will accommodate more than 4000 TESs in focal planes of reflective low-frequency and refractive medium-and-high-frequency telescopes in order to detect a signature imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the primordial gravitational waves predicted in cosmic inflation. The total wide frequency coverage between 34GHz and 448GHz enables us to extract such weak spiral polarization patterns through the precise subtraction of our Galaxy's foreground emission by using spectral differences among CMB and foreground signals. Telescopes are cooled down to 5Kelvin for suppressing thermal noise and contain polarization modulators with transmissive half-wave plates at individual apertures for separating sky polarization signals from artificial polarization and for mitigating from instrumental 1/f noise. Passive cooling by using V-grooves supports active cooling with mechanical coolers as well as adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators. Sky observations from the second Sun-Earth Lagrangian point, L2, are planned for three years. An international collaboration between Japan, USA, Canada, and Europe is sharing various roles. In May 2019, the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA selected LiteBIRD as the strategic large mission No. 2.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.12418  [pdf] - 2011325
QUBIC: using NbSi TESs with a bolometric interferometer to characterize the polarisation of the CMB
Piat, M.; Bélier, B.; Bergé, L.; Bleurvacq, N.; Chapron, C.; Dheilly, S.; Dumoulin, L.; González, M.; Grandsire, L.; Hamilton, J. -Ch.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hoang, D. T.; Marnieros, S.; Marty, W.; Montier, L.; Olivieri, E.; Oriol, C.; Perbost, C.; Prêle, D.; Rambaud, D.; Salatino, M.; Stankowiak, G.; Thermeau, J. -P.; Torchinsky, S.; Voisin, F.; Ade, P.; Alberro, J. G.; Almela, A.; Amico, G.; Arnaldi, L. H.; Auguste, D.; Aumont, J.; Azzoni, S.; Banfi, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battistelli, E. S.; Baù, A.; Bennett, D.; Bernard, J. -Ph.; Bersanelli, M.; Bigot-Sazy, M. -A.; Bonaparte, J.; Bonis, J.; Bottani, A.; Bunn, E.; Burke, D.; Buzi, D.; Buzzelli, A.; Cavaliere, F.; Chanial, P.; Charlassier, R.; Columbro, F.; Coppi, G.; Coppolecchia, A.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; De Gasperis, G.; De Leo, M.; De Petris, M.; Di Donato, A.; Etchegoyen, A.; Fasciszewski, A.; Ferreyro, L. P.; Fracchia, D.; Franceschet, C.; Lerena, M. M. Gamboa; Ganga, K.; García, B.; Redondo, M. E. García; Gaspard, M.; Gault, A.; Gayer, D.; Gervasi, M.; Giard, M.; Gilles, V.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Berisso, M. Gómez; Gradziel, M.; Harari, D.; Haynes, V.; Incardona, F.; Jules, E.; Kaplan, J.; Korotkov, A.; Kristukat, C.; Lamagna, L.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, T.; Luterstein, R.; Maffei, B.; Masi, S.; Mattei, A.; May, A.; McCulloch, M.; Medina, M. C.; Mele, L.; Melhuish, S.; Mennella, A.; Mousset, L.; Mundo, L. M.; Murphy, J. A.; Murphy, J. D.; Nati, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Paiella, A.; Pajot, F.; Passerini, A.; Pastoriza, H.; Pelosi, A.; Perciballi, M.; Pezzotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piccirillo, L.; Pisano, G.; Platino, M.; Polenta, G.; Puddu, R.; Ringegni, P.; Romero, G. E.; Salum, J. M.; Schillaci, A.; Scóccola, C.; Scully, S.; Spinelli, S.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Suarez, F.; Tartari, A.; Timbie, P.; Tomasi, M.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G.; Vanneste, S.; Viganò, D.; Vittorio, N.; Watson, B.; Wicek, F.; Zannoni, M.; Zullo, A.
Comments: Conference proceedings submitted to the Journal of Low Temperature Physics for LTD18
Submitted: 2019-11-27, last modified: 2019-12-09
QUBIC (Q \& U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology) is an international ground-based experiment dedicated in the measurement of the polarized fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). It is based on bolometric interferometry, an original detection technique which combine the immunity to systematic effects of an interferometer with the sensitivity of low temperature incoherent detectors. QUBIC will be deployed in Argentina, at the Alto Chorrillos mountain site near San Antonio de los Cobres, in the Salta province. The QUBIC detection chain consists in 2048 NbSi Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) cooled to 350mK.The voltage-biased TESs are read out with Time Domain Multiplexing based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) at 1 K and a novel SiGe Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) at 60 K allowing to reach an unprecedented multiplexing (MUX) factor equal to 128. The QUBIC experiment is currently being characterized in the lab with a reduced number of detectors before upgrading to the full instrument. I will present the last results of this characterization phase with a focus on the detectors and readout system.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.01891  [pdf] - 1861413
The short wavelength instrument for the polarization explorer balloon-borne experiment: Polarization modulation issues
Comments: Proceeding of IWARA 2018
Submitted: 2019-04-03
In this paper we investigate the impact of using a polarization modulator in the Short Wavelenght Instrument for the Polarization Explorer (SWIPE) of the Large Scale Polarization Explorer (LSPE). The experiment is optimized to measure the linear polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background at large angular scales during a circumpolar long-duration stratospheric balloon mission, and uses multi-mode bolometers cooled at 0.3 K. The 330 detectors cover 3 bands at 140 GHz, 220 GHz and 240 GHz. Polarimetry is achieved by means of a large rotating half-wave plate (HWP) and a single wire-grid polarizer in front of the arrays. The polarization modulator is the first polarization-active component of the optical chain, reducing significantly the effect of instrumental polarization. A trade-off study comparing stepped vs spinning HWPs drives the choice towards the second. Modulating the CMB polarization signal at 4 times the spin frequency moves it away from $1/f$ noise from the detectors and the residual atmosphere. The HWP is cooled at 1.6 K to reduce the background on the detectors. Furthermore its polarized emission combined with the emission of the polarizer produces spurious signals modulated at $2f$ and $4f$. The $4f$ component is synchronous with the signal of interest and has to characterized to be removed from cosmological data.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.00598  [pdf] - 1861309
Kinetic Inductance Detectors for the OLIMPO experiment: design and pre-flight characterization
Comments: Published on JCAP
Submitted: 2018-10-01, last modified: 2019-04-03
We designed, fabricated, and characterized four arrays of horn--coupled, lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs), optimized to work in the spectral bands of the balloon-borne OLIMPO experiment. OLIMPO is a 2.6 m aperture telescope, aimed at spectroscopic measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. OLIMPO will also validate the LEKID technology in a representative space environment. The corrected focal plane is filled with diffraction limited horn-coupled KID arrays, with 19, 37, 23, 41 active pixels respectively at 150, 250, 350, and 460$\:$GHz. Here we report on the full electrical and optical characterization performed on these detector arrays before the flight. In a dark laboratory cryostat, we measured the resonator electrical parameters, such as the quality factors and the electrical responsivities, at a base temperature of 300$\:$mK. The measured average resonator $Q$s are 1.7$\times{10^4}$, 7.0$\times{10^4}$, 1.0$\times{10^4}$, and 1.0$\times{10^4}$ for the 150, 250, 350, and 460$\:$GHz arrays, respectively. The average electrical phase responsivities on resonance are 1.4$\:$rad/pW, 1.5$\:$rad/pW, 2.1$\:$rad/pW, and 2.1$\:$rad/pW; the electrical noise equivalent powers are 45$\:\rm{aW/\sqrt{Hz}}$, 160$\:\rm{aW/\sqrt{Hz}}$, 80$\:\rm{aW/\sqrt{Hz}}$, and 140$\:\rm{aW/\sqrt{Hz}}$, at 12 Hz. In the OLIMPO cryostat, we measured the optical properties, such as the noise equivalent temperatures (NET) and the spectral responses. The measured NET$_{\rm RJ}$s are $200\:\mu\rm{K\sqrt{s}}$, $240\:\mu\rm{K\sqrt{s}}$, $240\:\mu\rm{K\sqrt{s}}$, and $\:340\mu\rm{K\sqrt{s}}$, at 12 Hz; under 78, 88, 92, and 90 mK Rayleigh-Jeans blackbody load changes respectively for the 150, 250, 350, and 460 GHz arrays. The spectral responses were characterized with the OLIMPO differential Fourier transform spectrometer (DFTS) up to THz frequencies, with a resolution of 1.8 GHz.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.01890  [pdf] - 1861412
Kinetic Inductance Detectors and readout electronics for the OLIMPO experiment
Comments: Proceedings of WOLTE13, September 10-13, 2018 Sorrento, Italy
Submitted: 2019-04-03
Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are superconductive low$-$temperature detectors useful for astrophysics and particle physics. We have developed arrays of lumped elements KIDs (LEKIDs) sensitive to microwave photons, optimized for the four horn-coupled focal planes of the OLIMPO balloon-borne telescope, working in the spectral bands centered at 150 GHz, 250 GHz, 350 GHz, and 460 GHz. This is aimed at measuring the spectrum of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect for a number of galaxy clusters, and will validate LEKIDs technology in a space-like environment. Our detectors are optimized for an intermediate background level, due to the presence of residual atmosphere and room--temperature optical system and they operate at a temperature of 0.3 K. The LEKID planar superconducting circuits are designed to resonate between 100 and 600 MHz, and to match the impedance of the feeding waveguides; the measured quality factors of the resonators are in the $10^{4}-10^{5}$ range, and they have been tuned to obtain the needed dynamic range. The readout electronics is composed of a $cold$ $part$, which includes a low noise amplifier, a dc$-$block, coaxial cables, and power attenuators; and a $room-temperature$ $part$, FPGA$-$based, including up and down-conversion microwave components (IQ modulator, IQ demodulator, amplifiers, bias tees, attenuators). In this contribution, we describe the optimization, fabrication, characterization and validation of the OLIMPO detector system.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.08993  [pdf] - 1912750
Kinetic Inductance Detectors for the OLIMPO experiment: in--flight operation and performance
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-02-24
We report on the performance of lumped--elements Kinetic Inductance Detector (KID) arrays for mm and sub--mm wavelengths, operated at 0.3K during the stratospheric flight of the OLIMPO payload, at an altitude of 37.8 km. We find that the detectors can be tuned in-flight, and their performance is robust against radiative background changes due to varying telescope elevation. We also find that the noise equivalent power of the detectors in flight is significantly reduced with respect to the one measured in the laboratory, and close to photon-noise limited performance. The effect of primary cosmic rays crossing the detector is found to be consistent with the expected ionization energy loss with phonon-mediated energy transfer from the ionization sites to the resonators. In the OLIMPO detector arrays, at float, cosmic ray events affect less than 4% of the detector samplings for all the pixels of all the arrays, and less than 1% of the samplings for most of the pixels. These results are also representative of what one can expect from primary cosmic rays in a satellite mission with similar KIDs and instrument environment.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.00785  [pdf] - 1820173
QUBIC: Exploring the primordial Universe with the Q\&U Bolometric Interferometer
Mennella, Aniello; Ade, Peter; Amico, Giorgio; Auguste, Didier; Aumont, Jonathan; Banfi, Stefano; Barbaràn, Gustavo; Battaglia, Paola; Battistelli, Elia; Baù, Alessandro; Bélier, Benoit; Bennett, David G.; Bergé, Laurent; Bernard, Jean Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Sazy, Marie Anne Bigot; Bleurvacq, Nathat; Bonaparte, Juan; Bonis, Julien; Bunn, Emory F.; Burke, David; Buzi, Daniele; Buzzelli, Alessandro; Cavaliere, Francesco; Chanial, Pierre; Chapron, Claude; Charlassier, Romain; Columbro, Fabio; Coppi, Gabriele; Coppolecchia, Alessandro; D'Agostino, Rocco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; De Bernardis, Paolo; De Gasperis, Giancarlo; De Leo, Michele; De Petris, Marco; Di Donato, Andres; Dumoulin, Louis; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Fasciszewski, Adrián; Franceschet, Cristian; Lerena, Martin Miguel Gamboa; Garcia, Beatriz; Garrido, Xavier; Gaspard, Michel; Gault, Amanda; Gayer, Donnacha; Gervasi, Massimo; Giard, Martin; Héraud, Yannick Giraud; Berisso, Mariano Gómez; González, Manuel; Gradziel, Marcin; Grandsire, Laurent; Guerard, Eric; Hamilton, Jean Christophe; Harari, Diego; Haynes, Vic; Versillé, Sophie Henrot; Hoang, Duc Thuong; Holtzer, Nicolas; Incardona, Federico; Jules, Eric; Kaplan, Jean; Korotkov, Andrei; Kristukat, Christian; Lamagna, Luca; Loucatos, Soutiris; Lowitz, Amy; Lukovic, Vladimir; Thibault, Louis; Luterstein, Raùl Horacio; Maffei, Bruno; Marnieros, Stefanos; Masi, Silvia; Mattei, Angelo; May, Andrew; McCulloch, Mark; Medina, Maria C.; Mele, Lorenzo; Melhuish, Simon J.; Montier, Ludovic; Mousset, Louise; Mundo, Luis Mariano; Murphy, John Anthony; Murphy, James; O'Sullivan, Creidhe; Olivieri, Emiliano; Paiella, Alessandro; Pajot, Francois; Passerini, Andrea; Pastoriza, Hernan; Pelosi, Alessandro; Perbost, Camille; Perciballi, Maurizio; Pezzotta, Federico; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Prêle, Damien; Puddu, Roberto; Rambaud, Damien; Ringegni, Pablo; Romero, Gustavo E.; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Scully, Stephen P.; Spinelli, Sebastiano; Stolpovskiy, Michail; Suarez, Federico; Stankowiak, Guillaume; Tartari, Andrea; Thermeau, Jean Pierre; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Torchinsky, Steve A.; Tristram, Mathieu; Tucker, Gregory S.; Tucker, Carole E.; Vanneste, Sylvain; Viganò, Daniele; Vittorio, Nicola; Voisin, Fabrice; Watson, Robert; Wicek, Francois; Zannoni, Mario; Zullo, Antonio
Comments: Proceedings of the 2018 ICNFP conference, Crete. Published by Universe arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1801.03730
Submitted: 2018-11-30, last modified: 2019-01-23
In this paper we describe QUBIC, an experiment that will observe the polarized microwave sky with a novel approach, which combines the sensitivity of state-of-the art bolometric detectors with the systematic effects control typical of interferometers. QUBIC unique features are the so-called "self-calibration", a technique that allows us to clean the measured data from instrumental effects, and its spectral imaging power, i.e. the ability to separate the signal in various sub-bands within each frequency band. QUBIC will observe the sky in two main frequency bands: 150 GHz and 220 GHz. A technological demonstrator is currently under testing and will be deployed in Argentina during 2019, while the final instrument is expected to be installed during 2020.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02296  [pdf] - 1779826
Thermal architecture for the QUBIC cryogenic receiver
May, A. J.; Chapron, C.; Coppi, G.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Melhuish, S.; Piat, M.; Piccirillo, L.; Schillaci, A.; Thermeau, J. -P.; Ade, P.; Amico, G.; Auguste, D.; Aumont, J.; Banfi, S.; Barbara, G.; Battaglia, P.; Battistelli, E.; Bau, A.; Belier, B.; Bennett, D.; Berge, L.; Bernard, J. -Ph.; Bersanelli, M.; Bigot-Sazy, M. -A.; Bleurvacq, N.; Bonaparte, J.; Bonis, J.; Bordier, G.; Breelle, E.; Bunn, E.; Burke, D.; Buzi, D.; Buzzelli, A.; Cavaliere, F.; Chanial, P.; Charlassier, R.; Columbro, F.; Coppolecchia, A.; Couchot, F.; D'Agostino, R.; De Gasperis, G.; De Leo, M.; De Petris, M.; Di Donato, A.; Dumoulin, L.; Etchegoyen, A.; Fasciszewski, A.; Franceschet, C.; Lerena, M. M. Gamboa; Garcia, B.; Garrido, X.; Gaspard, M.; Gault, A.; Gayer, D.; Gervasi, M.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Berisso, M. Gomez; Gonzalez, M.; Gradziel, M.; Grandsire, L.; Guerrard, E.; Hamilton, J. -Ch.; Harari, D.; Haynes, V.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hoang, D. T.; Incardona, F.; Jules, E.; Kaplan, J.; Korotkov, A.; Kristukat, C.; Lamagna, L.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, T.; Lowitz, A.; Lukovic, V.; Luterstein, R.; Maffei, B.; Marnieros, S.; Mattei, A.; McCulloch, M. A.; Medina, M. C.; Mele, L.; Mennella, A.; Montier, L.; Mundo, L. M.; Murphy, J. A.; Murphy, J. D.; O'Sullivan, C.; Olivieri, E.; Paiella, A.; Pajot, F.; Passerini, A.; Pastoriza, H.; Pelosi, A.; Perbost, C.; Perdereau, O.; Pezzotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pisano, G.; Polenta, G.; Prele, D.; Puddu, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ringegni, P.; Romero, G. E.; Salatino, M.; Scoccola, C. G.; Scully, S.; Spinelli, S.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Suarez, F.; Tartari, A.; Timbie, P.; Torchinsky, S. A.; Tristram, M.; Truongcanh, V.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G.; Vanneste, S.; Vigano, D.; Vittorio, N.; Voisin, F.; Watson, B.; Wicek, F.; Zannoni, M.; Zullo, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-11-06
QUBIC, the QU Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology, is a novel forthcoming instrument to measure the B-mode polarization anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background. The detection of the B-mode signal will be extremely challenging; QUBIC has been designed to address this with a novel approach, namely bolometric interferometry. The receiver cryostat is exceptionally large and cools complex optical and detector stages to 40 K, 4 K, 1 K and 350 mK using two pulse tube coolers, a novel 4He sorption cooler and a double-stage 3He/4He sorption cooler. We discuss the thermal and mechanical design of the cryostat, modelling and thermal analysis, and laboratory cryogenic testing.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.05228  [pdf] - 1650121
Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene: optical features at millimeter wavelengths
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-03-14
The next generation of experiments for the measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) requires more and more the use of advanced materials, with specific physical and structural properties. An example is the material used for receiver's cryostat windows and internal lenses. The large throughput of current CMB experiments requires a large diameter (of the order of 0.5m) of these parts, resulting in heavy structural and optical requirements on the material to be used. Ultra High Molecular Weight (UHMW) polyethylene (PE) features high resistance to traction and good transmissivity in the frequency range of interest. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using UHMW PE for windows and lenses in experiments working at millimeter wavelengths, by measuring its optical properties: emissivity, transmission and refraction index. Our measurements show that the material is well suited to this purpose.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.03730  [pdf] - 1616675
QUBIC - The Q&U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology - A novel way to look at the polarized Cosmic Microwave Background
Comments: Presented at the EPS Conference on High Energy Physics, Venice (Italy), 5-12 July 2017 Accepted for publication in conference proceedings
Submitted: 2018-01-11
In this paper we describe QUBIC, an experiment that takes up the challenge posed by the detection of primordial gravitational waves with a novel approach, that combines the sensitivity of state-of-the art bolometric detectors with the systematic effects control typical of interferometers. The so-called "self-calibration" is a technique deeply rooted in the interferometric nature of the instrument and allows us to clean the measured data from instrumental effects. The first module of QUBIC is a dual band instrument (150 GHz and 220 GHz) that will be deployed in Argentina during the Fall 2018.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.05764  [pdf] - 1935353
Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: effects of observer peculiar motion
Burigana, C.; Carvalho, C. S.; Trombetti, T.; Notari, A.; Quartin, M.; De Gasperis, G.; Buzzelli, A.; Vittorio, N.; De Zotti, G.; de Bernardis, P.; Chluba, J.; Bilicki, M.; Danese, L.; Delabrouille, J.; Toffolatti, L.; Lapi, A.; Negrello, M.; Mazzotta, P.; Scott, D.; Contreras, D.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Cabella, P.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Castellano, G.; Challinor, A.; Clesse, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; Diego, J. -M.; Di Marco, A.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 61+5 pages, 17 figures, 25 tables, 8 sections, 5 appendices. In press on JCAP - Version 3 - Minor changes, affiliations fixed, references updated - version in line with corrected proofs
Submitted: 2017-04-19, last modified: 2017-08-30
We discuss the effects on the CMB, CIB, and thermal SZ effect due to the peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame, which induces boosting effects. We investigate the scientific perspectives opened by future CMB space missions, focussing on the CORE proposal. The improvements in sensitivity offered by a mission like CORE, together with its high resolution over a wide frequency range, will provide a more accurate estimate of the CMB dipole. The extension of boosting effects to polarization and cross-correlations will enable a more robust determination of purely velocity-driven effects that are not degenerate with the intrinsic CMB dipole, allowing us to achieve a S/N ratio of 13; this improves on the Planck detection and essentially equals that of an ideal cosmic-variance-limited experiment up to a multipole l of 2000. Precise inter-frequency calibration will offer the opportunity to constrain or even detect CMB spectral distortions, particularly from the cosmological reionization, because of the frequency dependence of the dipole spectrum, without resorting to precise absolute calibration. The expected improvement with respect to COBE-FIRAS in the recovery of distortion parameters (in principle, a factor of several hundred for an ideal experiment with the CORE configuration) ranges from a factor of several up to about 50, depending on the quality of foreground removal and relative calibration. Even for 1% accuracy in both foreground removal and relative calibration at an angular scale of 1 deg, we find that dipole analyses for a mission like CORE will be able to improve the recovery of the CIB spectrum amplitude by a factor of 17 in comparison with current results based on FIRAS. In addition to the scientific potential of a mission like CORE for these analyses, synergies with other planned and ongoing projects are also discussed.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.04224  [pdf] - 1935371
Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: mitigation of systematic effects
Natoli, P.; Ashdown, M.; Banerji, R.; Borrill, J.; Buzzelli, A.; de Gasperis, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Hivon, E.; Molinari, D.; Patanchon, G.; Polastri, L.; Tomasi, M.; Bouchet, F. R.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hoang, D. T.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Lindholm, V.; McCarthy, D.; Piacentini, F.; Perdereau, O.; Polenta, G.; Tristram, M.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Baselmans, J.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. -S.; Castellano, G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. -M.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Gruppuso, A.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Keihänen, E.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Migliaccio, M.; Monfardini, A.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Pagano, L.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rossi, G.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Signorelli, G.; Tartari, A.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Wallis, C.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 54 pages, 26 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2017-07-13
We present an analysis of the main systematic effects that could impact the measurement of CMB polarization with the proposed CORE space mission. We employ timeline-to-map simulations to verify that the CORE instrumental set-up and scanning strategy allow us to measure sky polarization to a level of accuracy adequate to the mission science goals. We also show how the CORE observations can be processed to mitigate the level of contamination by potentially worrying systematics, including intensity-to-polarization leakage due to bandpass mismatch, asymmetric main beams, pointing errors and correlated noise. We use analysis techniques that are well validated on data from current missions such as Planck to demonstrate how the residual contamination of the measurements by these effects can be brought to a level low enough not to hamper the scientific capability of the mission, nor significantly increase the overall error budget. We also present a prototype of the CORE photometric calibration pipeline, based on that used for Planck, and discuss its robustness to systematics, showing how CORE can achieve its calibration requirements. While a fine-grained assessment of the impact of systematics requires a level of knowledge of the system that can only be achieved in a future study phase, the analysis presented here strongly suggests that the main areas of concern for the CORE mission can be addressed using existing knowledge, techniques and algorithms.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.02259  [pdf] - 1935367
Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: gravitational lensing of the CMB
Challinor, Anthony; Allison, Rupert; Carron, Julien; Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen; Kitching, Thomas; Lesgourgues, Julien; Lewis, Antony; Zubeldía, Íñigo; Achucarro, Ana; Ade, Peter; Ashdown, Mark; Ballardini, Mario; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, Ranajoy; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Basak, Soumen; Baumann, Daniel; Bersanelli, Marco; Bonaldi, Anna; Bonato, Matteo; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brinckmann, Thejs; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Buzzelli, Alessandro; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Calvo, Martino; Carvalho, Carla-Sofia; Castellano, Gabriella; Chluba, Jens; Clesse, Sebastien; Colantoni, Ivan; Coppolecchia, Alessandro; Crook, Martin; d'Alessandro, Giuseppe; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Gasperis, Giancarlo; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Diego, Jose-Maria; Fernandez-Cobos, Raul; Ferraro, Simone; Finelli, Fabio; Forastieri, Francesco; Galli, Silvia; Genova-Santos, Ricardo; Gerbino, Martina; González-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grandis, Sebastian; Greenslade, Joshua; Hagstotz, Steffen; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hervías-Caimapo, Carlos; Hills, Matthew; Hivon, Eric; Kiiveri, Kimmo; Kisner, Ted; Kunz, Martin; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Lamagna, Luca; Lasenby, Anthony; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Liguori, Michele; Lindholm, Valtteri; López-Caniego, Marcos; Luzzi, Gemma; Maffei, Bruno; Martinez-González, Enrique; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; McCarthy, Darragh; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Molinari, Diego; Monfardini, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Notari, Alessio; Paiella, Alessandro; Paoletti, Daniela; Patanchon, Guillaume; Piat, Michel; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polastri, Linda; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Poulin, Vivian; Quartin, Miguel; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Roman, Matthieu; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salvati, Laura; Tartari, Andrea; Tomasi, Maurizio; Tramonte, Denis; Trappe, Neil; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucker, Carole; Valiviita, Jussi; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; van Tent, Bartjan; Vennin, Vincent; Vielva, Patricio; Vittorio, Nicola; Young, Karl; Zannoni, Mario
Comments: 44 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2017-07-07
Lensing of the CMB is now a well-developed probe of large-scale clustering over a broad range of redshifts. By exploiting the non-Gaussian imprints of lensing in the polarization of the CMB, the CORE mission can produce a clean map of the lensing deflections over nearly the full-sky. The number of high-S/N modes in this map will exceed current CMB lensing maps by a factor of 40, and the measurement will be sample-variance limited on all scales where linear theory is valid. Here, we summarise this mission product and discuss the science that it will enable. For example, the summed mass of neutrinos will be determined to an accuracy of 17 meV combining CORE lensing and CMB two-point information with contemporaneous BAO measurements, three times smaller than the minimum total mass allowed by neutrino oscillations. In the search for B-mode polarization from primordial gravitational waves with CORE, lens-induced B-modes will dominate over instrument noise, limiting constraints on the gravitational wave power spectrum amplitude. With lensing reconstructed by CORE, one can "delens" the observed polarization internally, reducing the lensing B-mode power by 60%. This improves to 70% by combining lensing and CIB measurements from CORE, reducing the error on the gravitational wave amplitude by 2.5 compared to no delensing (in the null hypothesis). Lensing measurements from CORE will allow calibration of the halo masses of the 40000 galaxy clusters that it will find, with constraints dominated by the clean polarization-based estimators. CORE can accurately remove Galactic emission from CMB maps with its 19 frequency channels. We present initial findings that show that residual Galactic foreground contamination will not be a significant source of bias for lensing power spectrum measurements with CORE. [abridged]
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.04501  [pdf] - 1935352
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: B-mode Component Separation
Remazeilles, M.; Banday, A. J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Basak, S.; Bonaldi, A.; De Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K.; Errard, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Fuskeland, U.; Hervías-Caimapo, C.; López-Caniego, M.; Martinez-González, E.; Roman, M.; Vielva, P.; Wehus, I.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banerji, R.; Bartolo, N.; Bartlett, J.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. -S.; Castellano, G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Diego, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Feeney, S.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melin, J. -B.; Melchiorri, A.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vittorio, N.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 87 pages, 32 figures, 4 tables, expanded abstract. Updated to match version accepted by JCAP
Submitted: 2017-04-14, last modified: 2017-06-19
We demonstrate that, for the baseline design of the CORE satellite mission, the polarized foregrounds can be controlled at the level required to allow the detection of the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) $B$-mode polarization with the desired accuracy at both reionization and recombination scales, for tensor-to-scalar ratio values of ${r\gtrsim 5\times 10^{-3}}$. We consider detailed sky simulations based on state-of-the-art CMB observations that consist of CMB polarization with $\tau=0.055$ and tensor-to-scalar values ranging from $r=10^{-2}$ to $10^{-3}$, Galactic synchrotron, and thermal dust polarization with variable spectral indices over the sky, polarized anomalous microwave emission, polarized infrared and radio sources, and gravitational lensing effects. Using both parametric and blind approaches, we perform full component separation and likelihood analysis of the simulations, allowing us to quantify both uncertainties and biases on the reconstructed primordial $B$-modes. Under the assumption of perfect control of lensing effects, CORE would measure an unbiased estimate of $r=\left(5 \pm 0.4\right)\times 10^{-3}$ after foreground cleaning. In the presence of both gravitational lensing effects and astrophysical foregrounds, the significance of the detection is lowered, with CORE achieving a $4\sigma$-measurement of $r=5\times 10^{-3}$ after foreground cleaning and $60$% delensing. For lower tensor-to-scalar ratios ($r=10^{-3}$) the overall uncertainty on $r$ is dominated by foreground residuals, not by the 40% residual of lensing cosmic variance. Moreover, the residual contribution of unprocessed polarized point-sources can be the dominant foreground contamination to primordial B-modes at this $r$ level, even on relatively large angular scales, $\ell \sim 50$. Finally, we report two sources of potential bias for the detection of the primordial $B$-modes.[abridged]
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.04516  [pdf] - 1935364
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Survey requirements and mission design
Delabrouille, J.; de Bernardis, P.; Bouchet, F. R.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Allison, R.; Arroja, F.; Artal, E.; Ashdown, M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Barbosa, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Basu, K.; Battistelli, E. S.; Battye, R.; Baumann, D.; Benoît, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Bideaud, A.; Biesiada, M.; Bilicki, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cabass, G.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Caputo, A.; Carvalho, C. -S.; Casas, F. J.; Castellano, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Charles, I.; Chluba, J.; Clements, D. L.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Contreras, D.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; D'Amico, G.; da Silva, A.; de Avillez, M.; de Gasperis, G.; De Petris, M.; de Zotti, G.; Danese, L.; Désert, F. -X.; Desjacques, V.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doyle, S.; Durrer, R.; Dvorkin, C.; Eriksen, H. -K.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Franceschet, C.; Fuskeland, U.; Galli, S.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Giusarma, E.; Gomez, A.; González-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Goupy, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hindmarsh, M.; Hivon, E.; Hoang, D. T.; Hooper, D. C.; Hu, B.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamagna, L.; Lapi, A.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Brun, A. M. C. Le; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lizarraga, J.; Luzzi, G.; Macìas-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martin, S.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mennella, A.; Mohr, J.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Montier, L.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Noviello, F.; Oppizzi, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Pagano, L.; Paiella, A.; Pajer, E.; Paoletti, D.; Paradiso, S.; Partridge, R. B.; Patanchon, G.; Patil, S. P.; Perdereau, O.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Ponthieu, N.; Poulin, V.; Prêle, D.; Quartin, M.; Ravenni, A.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ringeval, C.; Roest, D.; Roman, M.; Roukema, B. F.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Scott, D.; Serjeant, S.; Signorelli, G.; Starobinsky, A. A.; Sunyaev, R.; Tan, C. Y.; Tartari, A.; Tasinato, G.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torrado, J.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tucker, C.; Urrestilla, J.; Väliviita, J.; Van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Verde, L.; Vermeulen, G.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Voisin, F.; Wallis, C.; Wandelt, B.; Wehus, I.; Weller, J.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 79 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2017-06-14
Future observations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarisation have the potential to answer some of the most fundamental questions of modern physics and cosmology. In this paper, we list the requirements for a future CMB polarisation survey addressing these scientific objectives, and discuss the design drivers of the CORE space mission proposed to ESA in answer to the "M5" call for a medium-sized mission. The rationale and options, and the methodologies used to assess the mission's performance, are of interest to other future CMB mission design studies. CORE is designed as a near-ultimate CMB polarisation mission which, for optimal complementarity with ground-based observations, will perform the observations that are known to be essential to CMB polarisation scienceand cannot be obtained by any other means than a dedicated space mission.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.02170  [pdf] - 1935357
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: The Instrument
de Bernardis, P.; Ade, P. A. R.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Battistelli, E. S.; Benoit, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Bideaud, A.; Calvo, M.; Casas, F. J.; Castellano, G.; Catalano, A.; Charles, I.; Colantoni, I.; Columbro, F.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; De Petris, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Doyle, S.; Franceschet, C.; Gomez, A.; Goupy, J.; Hanany, S.; Hills, M.; Lamagna, L.; Macias-Perez, J.; Maffei, B.; Martin, S.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Mennella, A.; Monfardini, A.; Noviello, F.; Paiella, A.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Signorelli, G.; Tan, C. Y.; Tartari, A.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tucker, C.; Vermeulen, G.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.; Achúcarro, A.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z. Y.; Carvalho, C. S.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; De Gasperis, G.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Génova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Greenslade, J.; Handley, W.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Luzzi, G.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. B.; Molinari, D.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Salvati, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Trombetti, T.; Väliviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.
Comments: 43 pages
Submitted: 2017-05-05, last modified: 2017-05-22
We describe a space-borne, multi-band, multi-beam polarimeter aiming at a precise and accurate measurement of the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. The instrument is optimized to be compatible with the strict budget requirements of a medium-size space mission within the Cosmic Vision Programme of the European Space Agency. The instrument has no moving parts, and uses arrays of diffraction-limited Kinetic Inductance Detectors to cover the frequency range from 60 GHz to 600 GHz in 19 wide bands, in the focal plane of a 1.2 m aperture telescope cooled at 40 K, allowing for an accurate extraction of the CMB signal from polarized foreground emission. The projected CMB polarization survey sensitivity of this instrument, after foregrounds removal, is 1.7 {\mu}K$\cdot$arcmin. The design is robust enough to allow, if needed, a downscoped version of the instrument covering the 100 GHz to 600 GHz range with a 0.8 m aperture telescope cooled at 85 K, with a projected CMB polarization survey sensitivity of 3.2 {\mu}K$\cdot$arcmin.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.07263  [pdf] - 1935304
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Extragalactic sources in Cosmic Microwave Background maps
De Zotti, G.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Negrello, M.; Greenslade, J.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Delabrouille, J.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Bonato, M.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Biesiada, M.; Bilicki, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. S.; Castellano, M. G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clements, D. L.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Diego, J. M.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S. M.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Grandis, S.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Brun, A. Le; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, R. B.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rossi, G.; Roukema, B. F.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Scott, D.; Serjeant, S.; Tartari, A.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Young, K.
Comments: 40 pages, 9 figures, text expanded, co-authors added, to be submitted to JCAP
Submitted: 2016-09-23, last modified: 2017-05-18
We discuss the potential of a next generation space-borne Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment for studies of extragalactic sources. Our analysis has particular bearing on the definition of the future space project, CORE, that has been submitted in response to ESA's call for a Medium-size mission opportunity as the successor of the Planck satellite. Even though the effective telescope size will be somewhat smaller than that of Planck, CORE will have a considerably better angular resolution at its highest frequencies, since, in contrast with Planck, it will be diffraction limited at all frequencies. The improved resolution implies a considerable decrease of the source confusion, i.e. substantially fainter detection limits. In particular, CORE will detect thousands of strongly lensed high-z galaxies distributed over the full sky. The extreme brightness of these galaxies will make it possible to study them, via follow-up observations, in extraordinary detail. Also, the CORE resolution matches the typical sizes of high-z galaxy proto-clusters much better than the Planck resolution, resulting in a much higher detection efficiency; these objects will be caught in an evolutionary phase beyond the reach of surveys in other wavebands. Furthermore, CORE will provide unique information on the evolution of the star formation in virialized groups and clusters of galaxies up to the highest possible redshifts. Finally, thanks to its very high sensitivity, CORE will detect the polarized emission of thousands of radio sources and, for the first time, of dusty galaxies, at mm and sub-mm wavelengths, respectively.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.04372  [pdf] - 1576378
QUBIC Technical Design Report
Comments: 139 pages ; high resolution version can be found on the qubic website (http://qubic.in2p3.fr/QUBIC/Home.html) minor changes : update author list & affiliations ; correct title
Submitted: 2016-09-14, last modified: 2017-05-11
QUBIC is an instrument aiming at measuring the B mode polarisation anisotropies at medium scales angular scales (30-200 multipoles). The search for the primordial CMB B-mode polarization signal is challenging, because of many difficulties: smallness of the expected signal, instrumental systematics that could possibly induce polarization leakage from the large E signal into B, brighter than anticipated polarized foregrounds (dust) reducing to zero the initial hope of finding sky regions clean enough to have a direct primordial B-modes observation. The QUBIC instrument is designed to address all aspects of this challenge with a novel kind of instrument, a Bolometric Interferometer, combining the background-limited sensitivity of Transition-Edge-Sensors and the control of systematics allowed by the observation of interference fringe patterns, while operating at two frequencies to disentangle polarized foregrounds from primordial B mode polarization. Its characteristics are described in details in this Technological Design Report.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.00021  [pdf] - 1935328
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Cosmological Parameters
Di Valentino, Eleonora; Brinckmann, Thejs; Gerbino, Martina; Poulin, Vivian; Bouchet, François R.; Lesgourgues, Julien; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Chluba, Jens; Clesse, Sebastien; Delabrouille, Jacques; Dvorkin, Cora; Forastieri, Francesco; Galli, Silvia; Hooper, Deanna C.; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Salvati, Laura; Cabass, Giovanni; Caputo, Andrea; Giusarma, Elena; Hivon, Eric; Natoli, Paolo; Pagano, Luca; Paradiso, Simone; Rubino-Martin, Jose Alberto; Achucarro, Ana; Ade, Peter; Allison, Rupert; Arroja, Frederico; Ashdown, Marc; Ballardini, Mario; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, Ranajoy; Bartolo, Nicola; Bartlett, James G.; Basak, Soumen; Baselmans, Jochem; Baumann, Daniel; de Bernardis, Paolo; Bersanelli, Marco; Bonaldi, Anna; Bonato, Matteo; Borrill, Julian; Boulanger, François; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Buzzelli, Alessandro; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Calvo, Martino; Carvalho, Carla Sofia; Castellano, Gabriella; Challinor, Anthony; Charles, Ivan; Colantoni, Ivan; Coppolecchia, Alessandro; Crook, Martin; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; De Petris, Marco; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Diego, Josè Maria; Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen; Fernandez-Cobos, Raul; Ferraro, Simone; Finelli, Fabio; de Gasperis, Giancarlo; Génova-Santos, Ricardo T.; González-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grandis, Sebastian; Greenslade, Josh; Hagstotz, Steffen; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hazra, Dhiraj K.; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hills, Matthew; Kiiveri, Kimmo; Kisner, Ted; Kitching, Thomas; Kunz, Martin; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Lamagna, Luca; Lasenby, Anthony; Lewis, Antony; Liguori, Michele; Lindholm, Valtteri; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Luzzi, Gemma; Maffei, Bruno; Martin, Sylvain; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Masi, Silvia; McCarthy, Darragh; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mohr, Joseph J.; Molinari, Diego; Monfardini, Alessandro; Negrello, Mattia; Notari, Alessio; Paiella, Alessandro; Paoletti, Daniela; Patanchon, Guillaume; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michael; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polastri, Linda; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Quartin, Miguel; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Roman, Matthieu; Ringeval, Christophe; Tartari, Andrea; Tomasi, Maurizio; Tramonte, Denis; Trappe, Neil; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucker, Carole; Väliviita, Jussi; van de Weygaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Vennin, Vincent; Vermeulen, Gérard; Vielva, Patricio; Vittorio, Nicola; Young, Karl; Zannoni, Mario
Comments: 90 pages, 25 Figures. Revised version with new authors list and references
Submitted: 2016-11-30, last modified: 2017-04-05
We forecast the main cosmological parameter constraints achievable with the CORE space mission which is dedicated to mapping the polarisation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). CORE was recently submitted in response to ESA's fifth call for medium-sized mission proposals (M5). Here we report the results from our pre-submission study of the impact of various instrumental options, in particular the telescope size and sensitivity level, and review the great, transformative potential of the mission as proposed. Specifically, we assess the impact on a broad range of fundamental parameters of our Universe as a function of the expected CMB characteristics, with other papers in the series focusing on controlling astrophysical and instrumental residual systematics. In this paper, we assume that only a few central CORE frequency channels are usable for our purpose, all others being devoted to the cleaning of astrophysical contaminants. On the theoretical side, we assume LCDM as our general framework and quantify the improvement provided by CORE over the current constraints from the Planck 2015 release. We also study the joint sensitivity of CORE and of future Baryon Acoustic Oscillation and Large Scale Structure experiments like DESI and Euclid. Specific constraints on the physics of inflation are presented in another paper of the series. In addition to the six parameters of the base LCDM, which describe the matter content of a spatially flat universe with adiabatic and scalar primordial fluctuations from inflation, we derive the precision achievable on parameters like those describing curvature, neutrino physics, extra light relics, primordial helium abundance, dark matter annihilation, recombination physics, variation of fundamental constants, dark energy, modified gravity, reionization and cosmic birefringence. (ABRIDGED)
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.08270  [pdf] - 1670406
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Inflation
CORE Collaboration; Finelli, Fabio; Bucher, Martin; Achúcarro, Ana; Ballardini, Mario; Bartolo, Nicola; Baumann, Daniel; Clesse, Sébastien; Errard, Josquin; Handley, Will; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kiiveri, Kimmo; Kunz, Martin; Lasenby, Anthony; Liguori, Michele; Paoletti, Daniela; Ringeval, Christophe; Väliviita, Jussi; van Tent, Bartjan; Vennin, Vincent; Allison, Rupert; Arroja, Frederico; Ashdown, Marc; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, Ranajoy; Bartlett, James G.; Basak, Soumen; Baselmans, Jochem; de Bernardis, Paolo; Bersanelli, Marco; Bonaldi, Anna; Borril, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Boulanger, François; Brinckmann, Thejs; Burigana, Carlo; Buzzelli, Alessandro; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Calvo, Martino; Carvalho, Carla Sofia; Castellano, Gabriella; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Colantoni, Ivan; Crook, Martin; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; D'Amico, Guido; Delabrouille, Jacques; Desjacques, Vincent; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Diego, Jose Maria; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Feeney, Stephen; Fergusson, James R.; Fernandez-Cobos, Raul; Ferraro, Simone; Forastieri, Francesco; Galli, Silvia; García-Bellido, Juan; de Gasperis, Giancarlo; Génova-Santos, Ricardo T.; Gerbino, Martina; González-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grandis, Sebastian; Greenslade, Josh; Hagstotz, Steffen; Hanany, Shaul; Hazra, Dhiraj K.; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hills, Matthew; Hivon, Eric; Hu, Bin; Kisner, Ted; Kitching, Thomas; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Lesgourgues, Julien; Lewis, Antony; Lindholm, Valtteri; Lizarraga, Joanes; López-Caniego, Marcos; Luzzi, Gemma; Maffei, Bruno; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Martínez-González, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; McCarthy, Darragh; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Molinari, Diego; Monfardini, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Notari, Alessio; Oppizzi, Filippo; Paiella, Alessandro; Pajer, Enrico; Patanchon, Guillaume; Patil, Subodh P.; Piat, Michael; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polastri, Linda; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Poulin, Vivian; Quartin, Miguel; Ravenni, Andrea; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Renzi, Alessandro; Roest, Diederik; Roman, Matthieu; Rubiño-Martin, Jose Alberto; Salvati, Laura; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Tartari, Andrea; Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Tomasi, Maurizio; Torrado, Jesús; Trappe, Neil; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucker, Carole; Tucci, Marco; Urrestilla, Jon; van de Weygaert, Rien; Vielva, Patricio; Vittorio, Nicola; Young, Karl
Comments: Latex 107 pages, revised with updated author list and minor modifications
Submitted: 2016-12-25, last modified: 2017-04-05
We forecast the scientific capabilities to improve our understanding of cosmic inflation of CORE, a proposed CMB space satellite submitted in response to the ESA fifth call for a medium-size mission opportunity. The CORE satellite will map the CMB anisotropies in temperature and polarization in 19 frequency channels spanning the range 60-600 GHz. CORE will have an aggregate noise sensitivity of $1.7 \mu$K$\cdot \,$arcmin and an angular resolution of 5' at 200 GHz. We explore the impact of telescope size and noise sensitivity on the inflation science return by making forecasts for several instrumental configurations. This study assumes that the lower and higher frequency channels suffice to remove foreground contaminations and complements other related studies of component separation and systematic effects, which will be reported in other papers of the series "Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE." We forecast the capability to determine key inflationary parameters, to lower the detection limit for the tensor-to-scalar ratio down to the $10^{-3}$ level, to chart the landscape of single field slow-roll inflationary models, to constrain the epoch of reheating, thus connecting inflation to the standard radiation-matter dominated Big Bang era, to reconstruct the primordial power spectrum, to constrain the contribution from isocurvature perturbations to the $10^{-3}$ level, to improve constraints on the cosmic string tension to a level below the presumptive GUT scale, and to improve the current measurements of primordial non-Gaussianities down to the $f_{NL}^{\rm local} < 1$ level. For all the models explored, CORE alone will improve significantly on the present constraints on the physics of inflation. Its capabilities will be further enhanced by combining with complementary future cosmological observations.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.10456  [pdf] - 1935351
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Cluster Science
Melin, J. -B.; Bonaldi, A.; Remazeilles, M.; Hagstotz, S.; Diego, J. M.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Luzzi, G.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Grandis, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Bartlett, J. G.; Delabrouille, J.; Ferraro, S.; Tramonte, D.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Macìas-Pérez, J. F.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Baselmans, J.; Basu, K.; Battye, R. A.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. S.; Castellano, M. G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; De Petris, M.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S. M.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Greenslade, J.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Brun, A. M. C. Le; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Maffei, B.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Roman, M.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Väliviita, J.; van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Weller, J.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 35 pages, 15 figures, to be submitted to JCAP
Submitted: 2017-03-30
We examine the cosmological constraints that can be achieved with a galaxy cluster survey with the future CORE space mission. Using realistic simulations of the millimeter sky, produced with the latest version of the Planck Sky Model, we characterize the CORE cluster catalogues as a function of the main mission performance parameters. We pay particular attention to telescope size, key to improved angular resolution, and discuss the comparison and the complementarity of CORE with ambitious future ground-based CMB experiments that could be deployed in the next decade. A possible CORE mission concept with a 150 cm diameter primary mirror can detect of the order of 50,000 clusters through the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE). The total yield increases (decreases) by 25% when increasing (decreasing) the mirror diameter by 30 cm. The 150 cm telescope configuration will detect the most massive clusters ($>10^{14}\, M_\odot$) at redshift $z>1.5$ over the whole sky, although the exact number above this redshift is tied to the uncertain evolution of the cluster SZE flux-mass relation; assuming self-similar evolution, CORE will detect $\sim 500$ clusters at redshift $z>1.5$. This changes to 800 (200) when increasing (decreasing) the mirror size by 30 cm. CORE will be able to measure individual cluster halo masses through lensing of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies with a 1-$\sigma$ sensitivity of $4\times10^{14} M_\odot$, for a 120 cm aperture telescope, and $10^{14} M_\odot$ for a 180 cm one. [abridged]
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.01466  [pdf] - 1336950
Development of Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detectors for the W-Band
Comments: 16th International Workshop on Low Temperature Detectors, Grenoble 20-24 July 2015, Journal of Low Temperature Physics, Accepted
Submitted: 2016-01-07
We are developing a Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detector (LEKID) array able to operate in the W-band (75-110 GHz) in order to perform ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and mm-wave astronomical observations. The W-band is close to optimal in terms of contamination of the CMB from Galactic synchrotron, free-free, and thermal interstellar dust. In this band, the atmosphere has very good transparency, allowing interesting ground-based observations with large (>30 m) telescopes, achieving high angular resolution (<0.4 arcmin). In this work we describe the startup measurements devoted to the optimization of a W-band camera/spectrometer prototype for large aperture telescopes like the 64 m SRT (Sardinia Radio Telescope). In the process of selecting the best superconducting film for the LEKID, we characterized a 40 nm thick Aluminum 2-pixel array. We measured the minimum frequency able to break CPs (i.e. $h\nu=2\Delta\left(T_{c}\right)=3.5k_{B}T_{c}$) obtaining $\nu=95.5$ GHz, that corresponds to a critical temperature of 1.31 K. This is not suitable to cover the entire W-band. For an 80 nm layer the minimum frequency decreases to 93.2 GHz, which corresponds to a critical temperature of 1.28 K; this value is still suboptimal for W-band operation. Further increase of the Al film thickness results in bad performance of the detector. We have thus considered a Titanium-Aluminum bi-layer (10 nm thick Ti + 25 nm thick Al, already tested in other laboratories), for which we measured a critical temperature of 820 mK and a cut-on frequency of 65 GHz: so this solution allows operation in the entire W-band.