sort results by

Use logical operators AND, OR, NOT and round brackets to construct complex queries. Whitespace-separated words are treated as ANDed.

Show articles per page in mode

Notari, Alessio

Normalized to: Notari, A.

51 article(s) in total. 263 co-authors, from 1 to 19 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 2,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.07430  [pdf] - 1790936
Hot Axions and the $H_0$ tension
Comments: 14 pages + appendices, 8 figures; v2, minor modifications, version published in JCAP
Submitted: 2018-08-22, last modified: 2018-12-02
Scattering and decay processes of thermal bath particles involving heavy leptons can dump hot axions in the primordial plasma around the QCD phase transition. We compute their relic density, parameterized by an effective number $\Delta N_{\rm eff}$ of additional neutrinos. For couplings allowed by current bounds, production via scattering yields $\Delta N_{\rm eff} \lesssim 0.6$ and $\Delta N_{\rm eff} \lesssim 0.2$ for the cases of muon and tau, respectively. Flavor violating tau decays to a lighter lepton plus an axion give $\Delta N_{\rm eff} \lesssim 0.3$. Such values of $\Delta N_{\rm eff}$ can alleviate the tension between the direct local measurement of the Hubble constant $H_0$ and the inferred value from observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background, assuming $\Lambda$CDM. We analyze present cosmological data from the Planck collaboration and baryon acoustic oscillations with priors given in terms of the axion-lepton couplings. For axions coupled to muons, the tension can be alleviated below the 3$\sigma$ level. Future experiments will measure $\Delta N_{\rm eff}$ with higher precision, providing an axion discovery channel and probing the role of hot axions in the $H_0$ tension.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.05511  [pdf] - 1786278
Natural Inflation with a periodic non-minimal coupling
Comments: Version to match the published version
Submitted: 2018-06-14, last modified: 2018-11-16
Natural inflation is an attractive model for primordial inflation, since the potential for the inflaton is of the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone form, $V(\phi)=\Lambda^4 [1+\cos (\phi/f)]$, and so is protected against radiative corrections. Successful inflation can be achieved if $f \gtrsim {\rm few}\, M_{P}$ and $\Lambda \sim m_{GUT}$ where $\Lambda$ can be seen as the strong coupling scale of a given non-abelian gauge group. However, the latest observational constraints put natural inflation in some tension with data. We show here that a non-minimal coupling to gravity $\gamma^2(\phi) R$, that respects the symmetry $\phi\rightarrow \phi+2 \pi f$ and has a simple form, proportional to the potential, can improve the agreement with cosmological data. Moreover, in certain cases, satisfactory agreement with the Planck 2018 TT, TE, EE and low P data can be achieved even for a periodicity scale of approximately $M_p$.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.06090  [pdf] - 1684581
Observable windows for the QCD axion through $N_\text{eff}$
Comments: 6 pages, 1 figure. Numerical solution of Boltzmann equation included, 1 new plot
Submitted: 2018-01-18, last modified: 2018-05-17
We show that when the QCD axion is directly coupled to quarks with $c_q/f \, \partial_\mu a \, \bar{q} \gamma^\mu \gamma^5 q$, such as in DFSZ models, the dominant production mechanism in the early universe at temperatures $1 \, {\rm GeV}\lesssim T \lesssim 100 \,{\rm GeV}$ is obtained via $q \bar{q} \leftrightarrow g a$ and $q g \leftrightarrow q a$, where $g$ are gluons. Different heavy quarks $q_i$ can produce a thermal axion background that decouples at a temperature $T_i$: (1) top quark at $T_t \lesssim 100 \, {\rm GeV}$ for $f/c_t \lesssim 3\times 10^8 {\rm GeV}$; (2) bottom quark at $T_b \lesssim m_b$, for $f/c_b\lesssim 8\times 10^{7} {\rm GeV}$; (3) charm quark at $T_c \lesssim m_c $ for $f/c_c \lesssim 5\times 10^{7} {\rm GeV}$. Each of these cases corresponds to a contribution to the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom, in the windows given by $0.027 \leq \Delta N_\text{eff}\leq 0.031$, $0.037 \leq \Delta N_\text{eff} \leq 0.039$ and $0.039 \leq \Delta N_\text{eff}$, respectively. These contributions are larger than the one obtained when thermalization happens only above the electroweak phase transition, $\Delta N_{\rm eff}\lesssim 0.027$, and are within reach of future CMB S4 experiments, thus opening an alternative window to detect the axion and to test the early universe at such temperatures.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.07483  [pdf] - 1659598
Thermalized axion inflation: natural and monomial inflation with small $r$
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2017-11-20
A safe way to reheat the universe, in models of natural and quadratic inflation, is through shift symmetric couplings between the inflaton $\phi$ and the Standard Model (SM), since they do not generate loop corrections to the potential $V(\phi)$. We consider such a coupling to SM gauge fields, of the form $\phi F\tilde{F}/f$, with sub-Planckian $f$. In this case gauge fields can be exponentially produced already {\it during inflation} and thermalize via interactions with charged particles, as pointed out in previous work. This can lead to a plasma of temperature $T$ during inflation and the thermal masses $gT$ of the gauge bosons can equilibrate the system. In addition, inflaton perturbations $\delta \phi$ can also have a thermal spectrum if they have sufficiently large cross sections with the plasma. In this case inflationary predictions are strongly modified: (1) scalar perturbations are thermal, and so enhanced over the vacuum, leading to a generic way to {\it suppress} the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$; (2) the spectral index is $n_s-1=\eta-4\epsilon$. After presenting the relevant conditions for thermalization, we show that thermalized natural and monomial models of inflation agree with present observations and have $r\approx 10^{-3} - 10^{-2}$, which is within reach of next generation CMB experiments.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.00373  [pdf] - 1584145
Thermalized Axion Inflation
Comments: 36 pages, 6 figures, Published version
Submitted: 2017-06-01, last modified: 2017-11-15
We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton $\phi$ to gauge fields of the form $\phi F \tilde{F}/f$, as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter $\xi= \dot{\phi}/(2fH)$, which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate $H$, due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature $T$ during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on $\xi$ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at $\xi\gtrsim2.9$, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if $\xi\gtrsim3.4$; however, observations require $\xi\gtrsim6$, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of $T_{eq} \simeq \xi H/\bar{g}$ where $\bar{g}$ is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if $\phi$ is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by $H/(2T)$, if tensors do not thermalize.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.05764  [pdf] - 1935353
Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: effects of observer peculiar motion
Burigana, C.; Carvalho, C. S.; Trombetti, T.; Notari, A.; Quartin, M.; De Gasperis, G.; Buzzelli, A.; Vittorio, N.; De Zotti, G.; de Bernardis, P.; Chluba, J.; Bilicki, M.; Danese, L.; Delabrouille, J.; Toffolatti, L.; Lapi, A.; Negrello, M.; Mazzotta, P.; Scott, D.; Contreras, D.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Cabella, P.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Castellano, G.; Challinor, A.; Clesse, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; Diego, J. -M.; Di Marco, A.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 61+5 pages, 17 figures, 25 tables, 8 sections, 5 appendices. In press on JCAP - Version 3 - Minor changes, affiliations fixed, references updated - version in line with corrected proofs
Submitted: 2017-04-19, last modified: 2017-08-30
We discuss the effects on the CMB, CIB, and thermal SZ effect due to the peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame, which induces boosting effects. We investigate the scientific perspectives opened by future CMB space missions, focussing on the CORE proposal. The improvements in sensitivity offered by a mission like CORE, together with its high resolution over a wide frequency range, will provide a more accurate estimate of the CMB dipole. The extension of boosting effects to polarization and cross-correlations will enable a more robust determination of purely velocity-driven effects that are not degenerate with the intrinsic CMB dipole, allowing us to achieve a S/N ratio of 13; this improves on the Planck detection and essentially equals that of an ideal cosmic-variance-limited experiment up to a multipole l of 2000. Precise inter-frequency calibration will offer the opportunity to constrain or even detect CMB spectral distortions, particularly from the cosmological reionization, because of the frequency dependence of the dipole spectrum, without resorting to precise absolute calibration. The expected improvement with respect to COBE-FIRAS in the recovery of distortion parameters (in principle, a factor of several hundred for an ideal experiment with the CORE configuration) ranges from a factor of several up to about 50, depending on the quality of foreground removal and relative calibration. Even for 1% accuracy in both foreground removal and relative calibration at an angular scale of 1 deg, we find that dipole analyses for a mission like CORE will be able to improve the recovery of the CIB spectrum amplitude by a factor of 17 in comparison with current results based on FIRAS. In addition to the scientific potential of a mission like CORE for these analyses, synergies with other planned and ongoing projects are also discussed.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.04224  [pdf] - 1935371
Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: mitigation of systematic effects
Natoli, P.; Ashdown, M.; Banerji, R.; Borrill, J.; Buzzelli, A.; de Gasperis, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Hivon, E.; Molinari, D.; Patanchon, G.; Polastri, L.; Tomasi, M.; Bouchet, F. R.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hoang, D. T.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Lindholm, V.; McCarthy, D.; Piacentini, F.; Perdereau, O.; Polenta, G.; Tristram, M.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Baselmans, J.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. -S.; Castellano, G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. -M.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Gruppuso, A.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Keihänen, E.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Migliaccio, M.; Monfardini, A.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Pagano, L.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rossi, G.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Signorelli, G.; Tartari, A.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Wallis, C.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 54 pages, 26 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2017-07-13
We present an analysis of the main systematic effects that could impact the measurement of CMB polarization with the proposed CORE space mission. We employ timeline-to-map simulations to verify that the CORE instrumental set-up and scanning strategy allow us to measure sky polarization to a level of accuracy adequate to the mission science goals. We also show how the CORE observations can be processed to mitigate the level of contamination by potentially worrying systematics, including intensity-to-polarization leakage due to bandpass mismatch, asymmetric main beams, pointing errors and correlated noise. We use analysis techniques that are well validated on data from current missions such as Planck to demonstrate how the residual contamination of the measurements by these effects can be brought to a level low enough not to hamper the scientific capability of the mission, nor significantly increase the overall error budget. We also present a prototype of the CORE photometric calibration pipeline, based on that used for Planck, and discuss its robustness to systematics, showing how CORE can achieve its calibration requirements. While a fine-grained assessment of the impact of systematics requires a level of knowledge of the system that can only be achieved in a future study phase, the analysis presented here strongly suggests that the main areas of concern for the CORE mission can be addressed using existing knowledge, techniques and algorithms.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.02259  [pdf] - 1935367
Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: gravitational lensing of the CMB
Challinor, Anthony; Allison, Rupert; Carron, Julien; Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen; Kitching, Thomas; Lesgourgues, Julien; Lewis, Antony; Zubeldía, Íñigo; Achucarro, Ana; Ade, Peter; Ashdown, Mark; Ballardini, Mario; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, Ranajoy; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Basak, Soumen; Baumann, Daniel; Bersanelli, Marco; Bonaldi, Anna; Bonato, Matteo; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brinckmann, Thejs; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Buzzelli, Alessandro; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Calvo, Martino; Carvalho, Carla-Sofia; Castellano, Gabriella; Chluba, Jens; Clesse, Sebastien; Colantoni, Ivan; Coppolecchia, Alessandro; Crook, Martin; d'Alessandro, Giuseppe; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Gasperis, Giancarlo; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Diego, Jose-Maria; Fernandez-Cobos, Raul; Ferraro, Simone; Finelli, Fabio; Forastieri, Francesco; Galli, Silvia; Genova-Santos, Ricardo; Gerbino, Martina; González-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grandis, Sebastian; Greenslade, Joshua; Hagstotz, Steffen; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hervías-Caimapo, Carlos; Hills, Matthew; Hivon, Eric; Kiiveri, Kimmo; Kisner, Ted; Kunz, Martin; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Lamagna, Luca; Lasenby, Anthony; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Liguori, Michele; Lindholm, Valtteri; López-Caniego, Marcos; Luzzi, Gemma; Maffei, Bruno; Martinez-González, Enrique; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; McCarthy, Darragh; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Molinari, Diego; Monfardini, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Notari, Alessio; Paiella, Alessandro; Paoletti, Daniela; Patanchon, Guillaume; Piat, Michel; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polastri, Linda; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Poulin, Vivian; Quartin, Miguel; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Roman, Matthieu; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salvati, Laura; Tartari, Andrea; Tomasi, Maurizio; Tramonte, Denis; Trappe, Neil; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucker, Carole; Valiviita, Jussi; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; van Tent, Bartjan; Vennin, Vincent; Vielva, Patricio; Vittorio, Nicola; Young, Karl; Zannoni, Mario
Comments: 44 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2017-07-07
Lensing of the CMB is now a well-developed probe of large-scale clustering over a broad range of redshifts. By exploiting the non-Gaussian imprints of lensing in the polarization of the CMB, the CORE mission can produce a clean map of the lensing deflections over nearly the full-sky. The number of high-S/N modes in this map will exceed current CMB lensing maps by a factor of 40, and the measurement will be sample-variance limited on all scales where linear theory is valid. Here, we summarise this mission product and discuss the science that it will enable. For example, the summed mass of neutrinos will be determined to an accuracy of 17 meV combining CORE lensing and CMB two-point information with contemporaneous BAO measurements, three times smaller than the minimum total mass allowed by neutrino oscillations. In the search for B-mode polarization from primordial gravitational waves with CORE, lens-induced B-modes will dominate over instrument noise, limiting constraints on the gravitational wave power spectrum amplitude. With lensing reconstructed by CORE, one can "delens" the observed polarization internally, reducing the lensing B-mode power by 60%. This improves to 70% by combining lensing and CIB measurements from CORE, reducing the error on the gravitational wave amplitude by 2.5 compared to no delensing (in the null hypothesis). Lensing measurements from CORE will allow calibration of the halo masses of the 40000 galaxy clusters that it will find, with constraints dominated by the clean polarization-based estimators. CORE can accurately remove Galactic emission from CMB maps with its 19 frequency channels. We present initial findings that show that residual Galactic foreground contamination will not be a significant source of bias for lensing power spectrum measurements with CORE. [abridged]
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.04501  [pdf] - 1935352
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: B-mode Component Separation
Remazeilles, M.; Banday, A. J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Basak, S.; Bonaldi, A.; De Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K.; Errard, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Fuskeland, U.; Hervías-Caimapo, C.; López-Caniego, M.; Martinez-González, E.; Roman, M.; Vielva, P.; Wehus, I.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banerji, R.; Bartolo, N.; Bartlett, J.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. -S.; Castellano, G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Diego, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Feeney, S.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melin, J. -B.; Melchiorri, A.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vittorio, N.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 87 pages, 32 figures, 4 tables, expanded abstract. Updated to match version accepted by JCAP
Submitted: 2017-04-14, last modified: 2017-06-19
We demonstrate that, for the baseline design of the CORE satellite mission, the polarized foregrounds can be controlled at the level required to allow the detection of the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) $B$-mode polarization with the desired accuracy at both reionization and recombination scales, for tensor-to-scalar ratio values of ${r\gtrsim 5\times 10^{-3}}$. We consider detailed sky simulations based on state-of-the-art CMB observations that consist of CMB polarization with $\tau=0.055$ and tensor-to-scalar values ranging from $r=10^{-2}$ to $10^{-3}$, Galactic synchrotron, and thermal dust polarization with variable spectral indices over the sky, polarized anomalous microwave emission, polarized infrared and radio sources, and gravitational lensing effects. Using both parametric and blind approaches, we perform full component separation and likelihood analysis of the simulations, allowing us to quantify both uncertainties and biases on the reconstructed primordial $B$-modes. Under the assumption of perfect control of lensing effects, CORE would measure an unbiased estimate of $r=\left(5 \pm 0.4\right)\times 10^{-3}$ after foreground cleaning. In the presence of both gravitational lensing effects and astrophysical foregrounds, the significance of the detection is lowered, with CORE achieving a $4\sigma$-measurement of $r=5\times 10^{-3}$ after foreground cleaning and $60$% delensing. For lower tensor-to-scalar ratios ($r=10^{-3}$) the overall uncertainty on $r$ is dominated by foreground residuals, not by the 40% residual of lensing cosmic variance. Moreover, the residual contribution of unprocessed polarized point-sources can be the dominant foreground contamination to primordial B-modes at this $r$ level, even on relatively large angular scales, $\ell \sim 50$. Finally, we report two sources of potential bias for the detection of the primordial $B$-modes.[abridged]
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.04516  [pdf] - 1935364
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Survey requirements and mission design
Delabrouille, J.; de Bernardis, P.; Bouchet, F. R.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Allison, R.; Arroja, F.; Artal, E.; Ashdown, M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Barbosa, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Basu, K.; Battistelli, E. S.; Battye, R.; Baumann, D.; Benoît, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Bideaud, A.; Biesiada, M.; Bilicki, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cabass, G.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Caputo, A.; Carvalho, C. -S.; Casas, F. J.; Castellano, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Charles, I.; Chluba, J.; Clements, D. L.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Contreras, D.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; D'Amico, G.; da Silva, A.; de Avillez, M.; de Gasperis, G.; De Petris, M.; de Zotti, G.; Danese, L.; Désert, F. -X.; Desjacques, V.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doyle, S.; Durrer, R.; Dvorkin, C.; Eriksen, H. -K.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Franceschet, C.; Fuskeland, U.; Galli, S.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Giusarma, E.; Gomez, A.; González-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Goupy, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hindmarsh, M.; Hivon, E.; Hoang, D. T.; Hooper, D. C.; Hu, B.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamagna, L.; Lapi, A.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Brun, A. M. C. Le; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lizarraga, J.; Luzzi, G.; Macìas-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martin, S.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mennella, A.; Mohr, J.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Montier, L.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Noviello, F.; Oppizzi, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Pagano, L.; Paiella, A.; Pajer, E.; Paoletti, D.; Paradiso, S.; Partridge, R. B.; Patanchon, G.; Patil, S. P.; Perdereau, O.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Ponthieu, N.; Poulin, V.; Prêle, D.; Quartin, M.; Ravenni, A.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ringeval, C.; Roest, D.; Roman, M.; Roukema, B. F.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Scott, D.; Serjeant, S.; Signorelli, G.; Starobinsky, A. A.; Sunyaev, R.; Tan, C. Y.; Tartari, A.; Tasinato, G.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torrado, J.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tucker, C.; Urrestilla, J.; Väliviita, J.; Van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Verde, L.; Vermeulen, G.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Voisin, F.; Wallis, C.; Wandelt, B.; Wehus, I.; Weller, J.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 79 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2017-06-14
Future observations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarisation have the potential to answer some of the most fundamental questions of modern physics and cosmology. In this paper, we list the requirements for a future CMB polarisation survey addressing these scientific objectives, and discuss the design drivers of the CORE space mission proposed to ESA in answer to the "M5" call for a medium-sized mission. The rationale and options, and the methodologies used to assess the mission's performance, are of interest to other future CMB mission design studies. CORE is designed as a near-ultimate CMB polarisation mission which, for optimal complementarity with ground-based observations, will perform the observations that are known to be essential to CMB polarisation scienceand cannot be obtained by any other means than a dedicated space mission.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.02170  [pdf] - 1935357
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: The Instrument
de Bernardis, P.; Ade, P. A. R.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Battistelli, E. S.; Benoit, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Bideaud, A.; Calvo, M.; Casas, F. J.; Castellano, G.; Catalano, A.; Charles, I.; Colantoni, I.; Columbro, F.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; De Petris, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Doyle, S.; Franceschet, C.; Gomez, A.; Goupy, J.; Hanany, S.; Hills, M.; Lamagna, L.; Macias-Perez, J.; Maffei, B.; Martin, S.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Mennella, A.; Monfardini, A.; Noviello, F.; Paiella, A.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Signorelli, G.; Tan, C. Y.; Tartari, A.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tucker, C.; Vermeulen, G.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.; Achúcarro, A.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z. Y.; Carvalho, C. S.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; De Gasperis, G.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Génova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Greenslade, J.; Handley, W.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Luzzi, G.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. B.; Molinari, D.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Salvati, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Trombetti, T.; Väliviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.
Comments: 43 pages
Submitted: 2017-05-05, last modified: 2017-05-22
We describe a space-borne, multi-band, multi-beam polarimeter aiming at a precise and accurate measurement of the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. The instrument is optimized to be compatible with the strict budget requirements of a medium-size space mission within the Cosmic Vision Programme of the European Space Agency. The instrument has no moving parts, and uses arrays of diffraction-limited Kinetic Inductance Detectors to cover the frequency range from 60 GHz to 600 GHz in 19 wide bands, in the focal plane of a 1.2 m aperture telescope cooled at 40 K, allowing for an accurate extraction of the CMB signal from polarized foreground emission. The projected CMB polarization survey sensitivity of this instrument, after foregrounds removal, is 1.7 {\mu}K$\cdot$arcmin. The design is robust enough to allow, if needed, a downscoped version of the instrument covering the 100 GHz to 600 GHz range with a 0.8 m aperture telescope cooled at 85 K, with a projected CMB polarization survey sensitivity of 3.2 {\mu}K$\cdot$arcmin.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.07263  [pdf] - 1935304
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Extragalactic sources in Cosmic Microwave Background maps
De Zotti, G.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Negrello, M.; Greenslade, J.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Delabrouille, J.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Bonato, M.; Achucarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Biesiada, M.; Bilicki, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. S.; Castellano, M. G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clements, D. L.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Diego, J. M.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S. M.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Genova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Grandis, S.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Brun, A. Le; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, R. B.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rossi, G.; Roukema, B. F.; Rubino-Martin, J. -A.; Salvati, L.; Scott, D.; Serjeant, S.; Tartari, A.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tucker, C.; Valiviita, J.; van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Young, K.
Comments: 40 pages, 9 figures, text expanded, co-authors added, to be submitted to JCAP
Submitted: 2016-09-23, last modified: 2017-05-18
We discuss the potential of a next generation space-borne Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment for studies of extragalactic sources. Our analysis has particular bearing on the definition of the future space project, CORE, that has been submitted in response to ESA's call for a Medium-size mission opportunity as the successor of the Planck satellite. Even though the effective telescope size will be somewhat smaller than that of Planck, CORE will have a considerably better angular resolution at its highest frequencies, since, in contrast with Planck, it will be diffraction limited at all frequencies. The improved resolution implies a considerable decrease of the source confusion, i.e. substantially fainter detection limits. In particular, CORE will detect thousands of strongly lensed high-z galaxies distributed over the full sky. The extreme brightness of these galaxies will make it possible to study them, via follow-up observations, in extraordinary detail. Also, the CORE resolution matches the typical sizes of high-z galaxy proto-clusters much better than the Planck resolution, resulting in a much higher detection efficiency; these objects will be caught in an evolutionary phase beyond the reach of surveys in other wavebands. Furthermore, CORE will provide unique information on the evolution of the star formation in virialized groups and clusters of galaxies up to the highest possible redshifts. Finally, thanks to its very high sensitivity, CORE will detect the polarized emission of thousands of radio sources and, for the first time, of dusty galaxies, at mm and sub-mm wavelengths, respectively.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.08270  [pdf] - 1670406
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Inflation
CORE Collaboration; Finelli, Fabio; Bucher, Martin; Achúcarro, Ana; Ballardini, Mario; Bartolo, Nicola; Baumann, Daniel; Clesse, Sébastien; Errard, Josquin; Handley, Will; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kiiveri, Kimmo; Kunz, Martin; Lasenby, Anthony; Liguori, Michele; Paoletti, Daniela; Ringeval, Christophe; Väliviita, Jussi; van Tent, Bartjan; Vennin, Vincent; Allison, Rupert; Arroja, Frederico; Ashdown, Marc; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, Ranajoy; Bartlett, James G.; Basak, Soumen; Baselmans, Jochem; de Bernardis, Paolo; Bersanelli, Marco; Bonaldi, Anna; Borril, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Boulanger, François; Brinckmann, Thejs; Burigana, Carlo; Buzzelli, Alessandro; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Calvo, Martino; Carvalho, Carla Sofia; Castellano, Gabriella; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Colantoni, Ivan; Crook, Martin; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; D'Amico, Guido; Delabrouille, Jacques; Desjacques, Vincent; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Diego, Jose Maria; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Feeney, Stephen; Fergusson, James R.; Fernandez-Cobos, Raul; Ferraro, Simone; Forastieri, Francesco; Galli, Silvia; García-Bellido, Juan; de Gasperis, Giancarlo; Génova-Santos, Ricardo T.; Gerbino, Martina; González-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grandis, Sebastian; Greenslade, Josh; Hagstotz, Steffen; Hanany, Shaul; Hazra, Dhiraj K.; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hills, Matthew; Hivon, Eric; Hu, Bin; Kisner, Ted; Kitching, Thomas; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Lesgourgues, Julien; Lewis, Antony; Lindholm, Valtteri; Lizarraga, Joanes; López-Caniego, Marcos; Luzzi, Gemma; Maffei, Bruno; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Martínez-González, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; McCarthy, Darragh; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Molinari, Diego; Monfardini, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Notari, Alessio; Oppizzi, Filippo; Paiella, Alessandro; Pajer, Enrico; Patanchon, Guillaume; Patil, Subodh P.; Piat, Michael; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polastri, Linda; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Poulin, Vivian; Quartin, Miguel; Ravenni, Andrea; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Renzi, Alessandro; Roest, Diederik; Roman, Matthieu; Rubiño-Martin, Jose Alberto; Salvati, Laura; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Tartari, Andrea; Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Tomasi, Maurizio; Torrado, Jesús; Trappe, Neil; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucker, Carole; Tucci, Marco; Urrestilla, Jon; van de Weygaert, Rien; Vielva, Patricio; Vittorio, Nicola; Young, Karl
Comments: Latex 107 pages, revised with updated author list and minor modifications
Submitted: 2016-12-25, last modified: 2017-04-05
We forecast the scientific capabilities to improve our understanding of cosmic inflation of CORE, a proposed CMB space satellite submitted in response to the ESA fifth call for a medium-size mission opportunity. The CORE satellite will map the CMB anisotropies in temperature and polarization in 19 frequency channels spanning the range 60-600 GHz. CORE will have an aggregate noise sensitivity of $1.7 \mu$K$\cdot \,$arcmin and an angular resolution of 5' at 200 GHz. We explore the impact of telescope size and noise sensitivity on the inflation science return by making forecasts for several instrumental configurations. This study assumes that the lower and higher frequency channels suffice to remove foreground contaminations and complements other related studies of component separation and systematic effects, which will be reported in other papers of the series "Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE." We forecast the capability to determine key inflationary parameters, to lower the detection limit for the tensor-to-scalar ratio down to the $10^{-3}$ level, to chart the landscape of single field slow-roll inflationary models, to constrain the epoch of reheating, thus connecting inflation to the standard radiation-matter dominated Big Bang era, to reconstruct the primordial power spectrum, to constrain the contribution from isocurvature perturbations to the $10^{-3}$ level, to improve constraints on the cosmic string tension to a level below the presumptive GUT scale, and to improve the current measurements of primordial non-Gaussianities down to the $f_{NL}^{\rm local} < 1$ level. For all the models explored, CORE alone will improve significantly on the present constraints on the physics of inflation. Its capabilities will be further enhanced by combining with complementary future cosmological observations.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.00021  [pdf] - 1935328
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Cosmological Parameters
Di Valentino, Eleonora; Brinckmann, Thejs; Gerbino, Martina; Poulin, Vivian; Bouchet, François R.; Lesgourgues, Julien; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Chluba, Jens; Clesse, Sebastien; Delabrouille, Jacques; Dvorkin, Cora; Forastieri, Francesco; Galli, Silvia; Hooper, Deanna C.; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Salvati, Laura; Cabass, Giovanni; Caputo, Andrea; Giusarma, Elena; Hivon, Eric; Natoli, Paolo; Pagano, Luca; Paradiso, Simone; Rubino-Martin, Jose Alberto; Achucarro, Ana; Ade, Peter; Allison, Rupert; Arroja, Frederico; Ashdown, Marc; Ballardini, Mario; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, Ranajoy; Bartolo, Nicola; Bartlett, James G.; Basak, Soumen; Baselmans, Jochem; Baumann, Daniel; de Bernardis, Paolo; Bersanelli, Marco; Bonaldi, Anna; Bonato, Matteo; Borrill, Julian; Boulanger, François; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Buzzelli, Alessandro; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Calvo, Martino; Carvalho, Carla Sofia; Castellano, Gabriella; Challinor, Anthony; Charles, Ivan; Colantoni, Ivan; Coppolecchia, Alessandro; Crook, Martin; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; De Petris, Marco; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Diego, Josè Maria; Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen; Fernandez-Cobos, Raul; Ferraro, Simone; Finelli, Fabio; de Gasperis, Giancarlo; Génova-Santos, Ricardo T.; González-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grandis, Sebastian; Greenslade, Josh; Hagstotz, Steffen; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hazra, Dhiraj K.; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hills, Matthew; Kiiveri, Kimmo; Kisner, Ted; Kitching, Thomas; Kunz, Martin; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Lamagna, Luca; Lasenby, Anthony; Lewis, Antony; Liguori, Michele; Lindholm, Valtteri; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Luzzi, Gemma; Maffei, Bruno; Martin, Sylvain; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Masi, Silvia; McCarthy, Darragh; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mohr, Joseph J.; Molinari, Diego; Monfardini, Alessandro; Negrello, Mattia; Notari, Alessio; Paiella, Alessandro; Paoletti, Daniela; Patanchon, Guillaume; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michael; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polastri, Linda; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Quartin, Miguel; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Roman, Matthieu; Ringeval, Christophe; Tartari, Andrea; Tomasi, Maurizio; Tramonte, Denis; Trappe, Neil; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucker, Carole; Väliviita, Jussi; van de Weygaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Vennin, Vincent; Vermeulen, Gérard; Vielva, Patricio; Vittorio, Nicola; Young, Karl; Zannoni, Mario
Comments: 90 pages, 25 Figures. Revised version with new authors list and references
Submitted: 2016-11-30, last modified: 2017-04-05
We forecast the main cosmological parameter constraints achievable with the CORE space mission which is dedicated to mapping the polarisation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). CORE was recently submitted in response to ESA's fifth call for medium-sized mission proposals (M5). Here we report the results from our pre-submission study of the impact of various instrumental options, in particular the telescope size and sensitivity level, and review the great, transformative potential of the mission as proposed. Specifically, we assess the impact on a broad range of fundamental parameters of our Universe as a function of the expected CMB characteristics, with other papers in the series focusing on controlling astrophysical and instrumental residual systematics. In this paper, we assume that only a few central CORE frequency channels are usable for our purpose, all others being devoted to the cleaning of astrophysical contaminants. On the theoretical side, we assume LCDM as our general framework and quantify the improvement provided by CORE over the current constraints from the Planck 2015 release. We also study the joint sensitivity of CORE and of future Baryon Acoustic Oscillation and Large Scale Structure experiments like DESI and Euclid. Specific constraints on the physics of inflation are presented in another paper of the series. In addition to the six parameters of the base LCDM, which describe the matter content of a spatially flat universe with adiabatic and scalar primordial fluctuations from inflation, we derive the precision achievable on parameters like those describing curvature, neutrino physics, extra light relics, primordial helium abundance, dark matter annihilation, recombination physics, variation of fundamental constants, dark energy, modified gravity, reionization and cosmic birefringence. (ABRIDGED)
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.10456  [pdf] - 1935351
Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Cluster Science
Melin, J. -B.; Bonaldi, A.; Remazeilles, M.; Hagstotz, S.; Diego, J. M.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Luzzi, G.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Grandis, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Bartlett, J. G.; Delabrouille, J.; Ferraro, S.; Tramonte, D.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Macìas-Pérez, J. F.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Baselmans, J.; Basu, K.; Battye, R. A.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z. -Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. S.; Castellano, M. G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; De Petris, M.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S. M.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Greenslade, J.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Brun, A. M. C. Le; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Maffei, B.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Roman, M.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Väliviita, J.; van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Weller, J.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.
Comments: 35 pages, 15 figures, to be submitted to JCAP
Submitted: 2017-03-30
We examine the cosmological constraints that can be achieved with a galaxy cluster survey with the future CORE space mission. Using realistic simulations of the millimeter sky, produced with the latest version of the Planck Sky Model, we characterize the CORE cluster catalogues as a function of the main mission performance parameters. We pay particular attention to telescope size, key to improved angular resolution, and discuss the comparison and the complementarity of CORE with ambitious future ground-based CMB experiments that could be deployed in the next decade. A possible CORE mission concept with a 150 cm diameter primary mirror can detect of the order of 50,000 clusters through the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE). The total yield increases (decreases) by 25% when increasing (decreasing) the mirror diameter by 30 cm. The 150 cm telescope configuration will detect the most massive clusters ($>10^{14}\, M_\odot$) at redshift $z>1.5$ over the whole sky, although the exact number above this redshift is tied to the uncertain evolution of the cluster SZE flux-mass relation; assuming self-similar evolution, CORE will detect $\sim 500$ clusters at redshift $z>1.5$. This changes to 800 (200) when increasing (decreasing) the mirror size by 30 cm. CORE will be able to measure individual cluster halo masses through lensing of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies with a 1-$\sigma$ sensitivity of $4\times10^{14} M_\odot$, for a 120 cm aperture telescope, and $10^{14} M_\odot$ for a 180 cm one. [abridged]
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.06223  [pdf] - 1531331
Dissipative Axial Inflation
Comments: 22 pages, 27 figures
Submitted: 2016-08-22
We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an axial term $\frac{\phi}{f_\gamma} F \tilde{F}$, such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density $\rho_R$, which which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta $k$ smaller than the cutoff $f_\gamma$, including numerically the backreaction. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if $f_\gamma$ is smaller than the field excursion $\phi_0$ by about a factor of at least ${\cal O} (20)$, there is a friction effect which turns on before that the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of perturbations, scalars and tensors. Such oscillations have a period of 4-5 efolds and an amplitude which is typically less than a few percent and decreases linearly with $f_\gamma$. We also stress that the comoving curvature perturbation on uniform density should be sensitive to slow-roll parameters related to $\rho_R$ rather than $\dot{\phi}^2/2$, although we postpone a calculation of the power spectrum and of non-gaussianity to future work and we simply define and compute suitable slow roll parameters. Finally we stress that this scenario may be realized in the axion case, if the coupling $1/f_\gamma$ to U(1) (photons) is much larger than the coupling $1/f_G$ to non-abelian gauge fields (gluons), since the latter sets the range of the potential and therefore the maximal allowed $\phi_0\sim f_G$.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.08793  [pdf] - 1457124
CMB all-scale blackbody distortions induced by linearizing temperature
Comments: v3: Some corrections and clarifications, including revised S/N of the effect and a new figure. Matches published version. 8 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2015-10-29, last modified: 2016-08-14
Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments, such as WMAP and Planck, measure intensity anisotropies and build maps using a linearized formula for relating them to the temperature blackbody fluctuations. However, this procedure also generates a signal in the maps in the form of y-type distortions which is degenerate with the thermal Sunyaev Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect. These are small effects that arise at second-order in the temperature fluctuations not from primordial physics but from such a limitation of the map-making procedure. They constitute a contaminant for measurements of: our peculiar velocity, the tSZ and primordial y-distortions. They can nevertheless be well-modeled and accounted for. We show that the distortions arise from a leakage of the CMB dipole into the y-channel which couples to all multipoles, mostly affecting the range $\ell$ < ~400. This should be visible in Planck's y-maps with an estimated signal-to-noise ratio of about 12. We note however that such frequency-dependent terms carry no new information on the nature of the CMB dipole. This implies that the real significance of Planck's Doppler coupling measurements is actually lower than reported by the collaboration. Finally, we quantify the level of contamination in tSZ and primordial y-type distortions and show that it is above the sensitivity of proposed next generation CMB experiments.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.02664  [pdf] - 1421414
Interpreting the CMB aberration and Doppler measurements: boost or intrinsic dipole?
Comments: v2: improvements made to the text; matches published version; 31 pages
Submitted: 2016-03-08, last modified: 2016-06-12
The aberration and Doppler coupling effects of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) were recently measured by the Planck satellite. The most straightforward interpretation leads to a direct detection of our peculiar velocity $\beta$, consistent with the measurement of the well-known dipole. In this paper we discuss the assumptions behind such interpretation. We show that Doppler-like couplings appear from two effects: our peculiar velocity and a second order large-scale effect due to the dipolar part of the gravitational potential. We find that the two effects are exactly degenerate but only if we assume second-order initial conditions from single-field Inflation. Thus, detecting a discrepancy in the value of $\beta$ from the dipole and the Doppler couplings implies the presence of a primordial non-Gaussianity. We also show that aberration-like signals likewise arise from two independent effects: our peculiar velocity and lensing due to a first order large-scale dipolar gravitational potential, independently on Gaussianity of the initial conditions. In general such effects are not degenerate and so a discrepancy between the measured $\beta$ from the dipole and aberration could be accounted for by a dipolar gravitational potential. Only through a fine-tuning of the radial profile of the potential it is possible to have a complete degeneracy with a boost effect. Finally we discuss that we also expect other signatures due to integrated second order terms, which may be further used to disentangle this scenario from a simple boost.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.02996  [pdf] - 1460835
CMB all-scale blackbody distortions induced by linearizing temperature
Comments: Withdrawn because it was supposed to be a replacement of arXiv:1510.08793 instead of a new paper altogether. It will then re-appear as arXiv:1510.08793v2
Submitted: 2016-03-09, last modified: 2016-03-10
Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments, such as WMAP and Planck, measure intensity anisotropies and build maps using a \emph{linearized} formula for relating them to the temperature blackbody fluctuations. However such a procedure also generates a signal in the maps in the form of y-type distortions, and thus degenerate with the thermal SZ (tSZ) effect. These are small effects that arise at second-order in the temperature fluctuations not from primordial physics but from such a limitation of the map-making procedure. They constitute a contaminant for measurements of: our peculiar velocity, the tSZ and of primordial y-distortions, but they can nevertheless be well-modelled and accounted for. We show that the largest distortions arises at high ell from a leakage of the CMB dipole into the y-channel which couples to all multipoles, but mostly affects the range ell <~ 400. This should be visible in Planck's y-maps with an estimated signal-to-noise ratio of about 9. We note however that such frequency-dependent terms carry no new information on the nature of the CMB dipole. This implies that the real significance of Planck's Doppler coupling measurements is actually lower than quoted. Finally, we quantify the relevance of the removal of such effects in order improve future measurements of tSZ and of primordial y-type distortions.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.04897  [pdf] - 1279856
Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections
Comments: Discussion improved and references added. Accepted for publication in JCAP. 8 pages
Submitted: 2015-04-19, last modified: 2015-08-17
The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10^(-3), due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.02076  [pdf] - 1239418
On the proper kinetic quadrupole CMB removal and the quadrupole anomalies
Comments: v2: improvements to the text; 2 figures and several references added; results unchanged. [14 pages, 3 tables, 2 figures]
Submitted: 2015-04-08, last modified: 2015-05-22
It has been pointed out recently that the quadrupole-octopole alignment in the CMB data is significantly affected by the so-called kinetic Doppler quadrupole (DQ), which is the temperature quadrupole induced by our proper motion. Assuming our velocity is the dominant contribution to the CMB dipole we have v/c = beta = (1.231 +/- 0.003) * 10^{-3}, which leads to a non-negligible DQ of order beta^2. Here we stress that one should properly take into account that CMB data are usually not presented in true thermodynamic temperature, which induces a frequency dependent boost correction. The DQ must therefore be multiplied by a frequency-averaged factor, which we explicitly compute for several CMB maps finding that it varies between 1.67 and 2.47. This is often neglected in the literature and turns out to cause a small but non-negligible difference in the significance levels of some quadrupole-related statistics. For instance the alignment significance in the SMICA 2013 map goes from 2.3sigma to 3.3sigma, with the frequency dependent DQ, instead of 2.9sigma ignoring the frequency dependence in the DQ. Moreover as a result of a proper DQ removal, the agreement across different map-making techniques is improved.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.5792  [pdf] - 920381
On the significance of power asymmetries in Planck CMB data at all scales
Comments: v2: new section added with improved unbiased analysis and conclusions changed accordingly; v3: minor changes to match published version
Submitted: 2014-08-25, last modified: 2015-01-13
We perform an analysis of the CMB temperature data taken by the Planck satellite investigating if there is any significant deviation from cosmological isotropy. We look for differences in the spectrum between two opposite hemispheres and also for dipolar modulations. We propose a new way to avoid biases due to partial-sky coverage by producing a mask symmetrized in antipodal directions, in addition to the standard smoothing procedure. We also properly take into account both Doppler and aberration effects due to our peculiar velocity and the anisotropy of the noise, since these effects induce a significant hemispherical asymmetry. We are thus able to probe scales all the way to ell = 2000. After such treatment we find no evidence for significant hemispherical anomalies (i.e. deviations are less than 1.5 sigma when summing over all scales). Although among the larger scales there are sometimes higher discrepancies, these are always less than 3 sigma. We also find results on a dipolar modulation of the power spectrum. Along the hemispheres aligned with the most asymmetric direction for 2 <= ell <= 2000 we find a 3.3 sigma discrepancy when comparing to simulations. However, if we do not restrict ourselves to Planck's maximal asymmetry axis, which can only be known a posteriori, and compare Planck data with the modulation of simulations along their respective maximal asymmetry directions, the discrepancy goes down to less than 1 sigma (with, again, almost 3 sigma discrepancies in some low-ell modes). We thus conclude that no significant power asymmetries seem to be present in the full data set. Interestingly, without proper removal of Doppler and aberration effects one would find spurious anomalies at high ell, between 3 sigma and 5 sigma. Even when considering only ell < 600 we find that the boost is non-negligible and alleviates the discrepancy by roughly half-sigma.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.3506  [pdf] - 1239347
CMB Aberration and Doppler Effects as a Source of Hemispherical Asymmetries
Comments: 13 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2013-04-11, last modified: 2014-02-19
Our peculiar motion with respect to the CMB rest frame represents a preferred direction in the observed CMB sky since it induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons (aberration) and a shift in their frequency (Doppler). Both effects distort the multipoles $a_{\ell m}$'s at all $\ell$'s. Such effects are real as it has been recently measured for the first time by Planck according to what was forecast in some recent papers. However, the common lore when estimating a power spectrum from CMB is to consider that Doppler affects only the $\ell=1$ multipole, neglecting any other corrections. In this work we use simulations of the CMB sky in a boosted frame with a peculiar velocity $\beta = v/c = 1.23 \times 10^{-3}$ in order to assess the impact of such effect on power spectrum estimations in different regions of the sky. We show that the boost induces a north-south asymmetry in the power spectrum which is highly significant and non-negligible, of about (0.58 $\pm$ 0.10)% for half-sky cuts when going up to $\ell$ = 2500. We suggest that these effects are relevant and may account for some of the north-south asymmetries seen in the Planck data, being especially important at small scales. Finally we analyze the particular case of the ACT experiment, which observed only a small fraction of the sky and show that it suffers a bias of about 1% on the power spectrum and of similar size on some cosmological parameters: for example the position of the peaks shifts by 0.5% and the overall amplitude of the spectrum is about 0.4% lower than a full-sky case.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.2731  [pdf] - 1151990
Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration
Comments: 17 pages, 4 figures. Corrected a numerical error, main conclusion modified
Submitted: 2012-10-09, last modified: 2013-06-12
The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, {\it i.e.} aberration, and a shift in their frequency, {\it i.e.} Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles $a_{\ell m}$'s via a mixing matrix at {\it any} $\ell$. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the $l=1$ multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we check the validity of this assumption in parameter estimation for a Planck-like angular resolution, both for a full-sky ideal experiment and also when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations with a sky fraction similar to the Planck satellite. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. Although the correction on the power spectrum ${C_\ell}$ is larger than the cosmic variance at $\ell>1000$ and potentially important, we find that the bias on the parameters is negligible for Planck.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.3777  [pdf] - 1159093
Non-Gaussianity and CMB aberration and Doppler
Comments: 13 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2013-01-16
The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces a deflection in the arrival direction of the observed photons (also known as CMB aberration) and a Doppler shift in the measured photon frequencies. As a consequence, aberration and Doppler effects induce non trivial correlations between the harmonic coefficients of the observed CMB temperature maps. In this paper we investigate whether these correlations generate a bias on Non-Gaussianity estimators $f_{NL}$. We perform this analysis simulating a large number of temperature maps with Planck-like resolution (lmax $= 2000$) as different realizations of the same cosmological fiducial model (WMAP7yr). We then add to these maps aberration and Doppler effects employing a modified version of the HEALPix code. We finally evaluate a generalization of the Komatsu, Spergel and Wandelt Non-Gaussianity estimator for all the simulated maps, both when peculiar velocity effects have been considered and when these phenomena have been neglected. Using the value $v/c=1.23 \times 10^{-3}$ for our peculiar velocity, we found that the aberration/Doppler induced Non-Gaussian signal is at most of about half of the cosmic variance $\sigma$ for $f_{NL}$ both in a full-sky and in a cut-sky experimental configuration, for local, equilateral and orthogonal estimators. We conclude therefore that when estimating $f_{NL}$ it is safe to ignore aberration and Doppler effects {\it if} the primordial map is already Gaussian. More work is necessary however to assess whether a map which contains Non-Gaussianity can be significantly distorted by a peculiar velocity.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.4155  [pdf] - 1118093
Inflation from the Higgs field false vacuum with hybrid potential
Comments: v1: 9 pages, 3 figures; v2: 9 pages, 3 figures, improvements in the text, version matching the JCAP published one
Submitted: 2012-04-18, last modified: 2012-11-20
We have recently suggested [1,2] that Inflation could have started in a local minimum of the Higgs potential at field values of about $10^{15}-10^{17}$ GeV, which exists for a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs masses and thus gives rise to a prediction on the Higgs mass to be in the range 123-129 GeV, together with a prediction on the the top mass and the cosmological tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. Inflation can be achieved provided there is an additional degree of freedom which allows the transition to a radiation era. In [1] we had proposed such field to be a Brans-Dicke scalar. Here we present an alternative possibility with an additional subdominant scalar very weakly coupled to the Higgs, realizing an (inverted) hybrid Inflation scenario. Interestingly, we show that such model has an additional constraint $m_H<125.3 \pm 3_{th}$, where $3_{th}$ is the present theoretical uncertainty on the Standard Model RGEs. The tensor-to-scalar ratio has to be within the narrow range $10^{-4}\lesssim r<0.007$, and values of the scalar spectral index compatible with the observed range can be obtained. Moreover, if we impose the model to have subplanckian field excursion, this selects a narrower range $10^{-4} \lesssim r<0.001$ and an upper bound on the Higgs mass of about $m_H <124 \pm 3_{th}$.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.5430  [pdf] - 672951
Standard Model False Vacuum Inflation: Correlating the Tensor-to-Scalar Ratio to the Top Quark and Higgs Boson masses
Comments: v1: 4 pages, 2 figures; v2: 5 pages, 2 figures, improvements in the text; v3: 5 pages, 2 figures, minor improvements in the text, matches PRL version
Submitted: 2011-12-22, last modified: 2012-05-03
For a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs boson masses, the Standard Model Higgs potential develops a false minimum at energies of about $10^{16}$ GeV, where primordial Inflation could have started in a cold metastable state. A graceful exit to a radiation-dominated era is provided, e.g., by scalar-tensor gravity models. We pointed out that if Inflation happened in this false minimum, the Higgs boson mass has to be in the range $126.0 \pm 3.5$ GeV, where ATLAS and CMS subsequently reported excesses of events. Here we show that for these values of the Higgs boson mass, the inflationary gravitational wave background has be discovered with a tensor-to-scalar ratio at hand of future experiments. We suggest that combining cosmological observations with measurements of the top quark and Higgs boson masses represents a further test of the hypothesis that the Standard Model false minimum was the source of Inflation in the Universe.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.2659  [pdf] - 672932
The Higgs mass range from Standard Model false vacuum Inflation in scalar-tensor gravity
Comments: v1: 14 pages, 4 figures; v2: 18 pages, 8 figures, text improved, new section and figures added
Submitted: 2011-12-12, last modified: 2012-03-05
If the Standard Model is valid up to very high energies it is known that the Higgs potential can develop a local minimum at field values around $10^{15}-10^{17}$ GeV, for a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs masses. We show that in a scalar-tensor theory of gravity such Higgs false vacuum can give rise to viable inflation if the potential barrier is very shallow, allowing for tunneling and relaxation into the electroweak scale true vacuum. The amplitude of cosmological density perturbations from inflation is directly linked to the value of the Higgs potential at the false minimum. Requiring the top quark mass, the amplitude and spectral index of density perturbations to be compatible with observations, selects a narrow range of values for the Higgs mass, $m_H=126.0\pm 3.5$ GeV, where the error is mostly due to the theoretical uncertainty of the 2-loop RGE. This prediction could be soon tested at the Large Hadron Collider. Our inflationary scenario could also be further checked by better constraining the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.1400  [pdf] - 480045
Measuring our Peculiar Velocity by "Pre-deboosting" the CMB
Comments: 14 pages, 7 figures. Revised projections for ACTPol, SPTPol and ACBAR; included projections for BICEP2; extended conclusions; typos corrected
Submitted: 2011-12-06, last modified: 2012-02-22
It was recently shown that our peculiar velocity \beta with respect to the CMB induces mixing among multipoles and off-diagonal correlations at all scales which can be used as a measurement of \beta, which is independent of the standard measurement using the CMB temperature dipole. The proposed techniques rely however on a perturbative expansion which breaks down for \ell \gtrsim 1/(\beta) \approx 800. Here we propose a technique which consists of deboosting the CMB temperature in the time-ordered data and show that it extends the validity of the perturbation analysis multipoles up to \ell \sim 10000. We also obtain accurate fitting functions for the mixing between multipoles valid in a full non-linear treatment. Finally we forecast the achievable precision with which these correlations can be measured in a number of current and future CMB missions. We show that Planck could measure the velocity with a precision of around 60 km/s, ACTPol in 4 years around 40 km/s, while proposed future experiments could further shrink this error bar by over a factor of around 2.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1008.1183  [pdf] - 406811
Measuring our peculiar velocity on the CMB with high-multipole off-diagonal correlations
Comments: 20 pages, 4 figures. New appendix; extended analytic analysis for the estimator; corrected expectations for EB and TB correlations
Submitted: 2010-08-06, last modified: 2011-09-06
Our peculiar velocity with respect to the CMB rest frame is known to induce a large dipole in the CMB. However, the motion of an observer has also the effect of distorting the anisotropies at all scales, as shown by Challinor and Van Leeuwen (2002), due to aberration and Doppler effects. We propose to measure independently our local motion by using off-diagonal two-point correlation functions for high multipoles. We study the observability of the signal for temperature and polarization anisotropies. We point out that Planck can measure the velocity $\beta$ with an error of about 30% and the direction with an error of about 20 degrees. This method constitutes a cross-check, which can be useful to verify that our CMB dipole is due mainly to our velocity or to disentangle the velocity from other possible intrinsic sources. Although in this paper we focus on our peculiar velocity, a similar effect would result also from other intrinsic vectorial distortion of the CMB which would induce a dipolar lensing. Measuring the off-diagonal correlation terms is therefore a test for a preferred direction on the CMB sky.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.1015  [pdf] - 958360
Observational constraints on inhomogeneous cosmological models without dark energy
Comments: 27 pages, 7 figures; invited contribution to CQG special issue "Inhomogeneous Cosmological Models and Averaging in Cosmology". Replaced to match the improved version accepted for publication. Appendix B and references added
Submitted: 2011-02-04, last modified: 2011-05-24
It has been proposed that the observed dark energy can be explained away by the effect of large-scale nonlinear inhomogeneities. In the present paper we discuss how observations constrain cosmological models featuring large voids. We start by considering Copernican models, in which the observer is not occupying a special position and homogeneity is preserved on a very large scale. We show how these models, at least in their current realizations, are constrained to give small, but perhaps not negligible in certain contexts, corrections to the cosmological observables. We then examine non-Copernican models, in which the observer is close to the center of a very large void. These models can give large corrections to the observables which mimic an accelerated FLRW model. We carefully discuss the main observables and tests able to exclude them.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.3065  [pdf] - 268101
Testing the Void against Cosmological data: fitting CMB, BAO, SN and H0
Comments: 70 pages, 12 figures, matches version accepted for publication in JCAP. References added, numerical values in tables changed due to minor bug, conclusions unaltered. Numerical module available at http://web.physik.rwth-aachen.de/download/valkenburg/
Submitted: 2010-07-19, last modified: 2010-11-05
In this paper, instead of invoking Dark Energy, we try and fit various cosmological observations with a large Gpc scale under-dense region (Void) which is modeled by a Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric that at large distances becomes a homogeneous FLRW metric. We improve on previous analyses by allowing for nonzero overall curvature, accurately computing the distance to the last-scattering surface and the observed scale of the Baryon Acoustic peaks, and investigating important effects that could arise from having nontrivial Void density profiles. We mainly focus on the WMAP 7-yr data (TT and TE), Supernova data (SDSS SN), Hubble constant measurements (HST) and Baryon Acoustic Oscillation data (SDSS and LRG). We find that the inclusion of a nonzero overall curvature drastically improves the goodness of fit of the Void model, bringing it very close to that of a homogeneous universe containing Dark Energy, while by varying the profile one can increase the value of the local Hubble parameter which has been a challenge for these models. We also try to gauge how well our model can fit the large-scale-structure data, but a comprehensive analysis will require the knowledge of perturbations on LTB metrics. The model is consistent with the CMB dipole if the observer is about 15 Mpc off the centre of the Void. Remarkably, such an off-center position may be able to account for the recent anomalous measurements of a large bulk flow from kSZ data. Finally we provide several analytical approximations in different regimes for the LTB metric, and a numerical module for CosmoMC, thus allowing for a MCMC exploration of the full parameter space.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.0204  [pdf] - 1033448
Detecting the Cold Spot as a Void with the Non-Diagonal Two-Point Function
Comments: v1: 6 pages, 2 figures; v2: 6 pages, 2 figures, text improved, to appear on JCAP
Submitted: 2010-07-01, last modified: 2010-09-03
The anomaly in the Cosmic Microwave Background known as the "Cold Spot" could be due to the existence of an anomalously large spherical (few hundreds Mpc/h radius) underdense region, called a "Void" for short. Such a structure would have an impact on the CMB also at high multipoles l through Lensing. This would then represent a unique signature of a Void. Modeling such an underdensity with an LTB metric, we show that the Lensing effect leads to a large signal in the non-diagonal two-point function, centered in the direction of the Cold Spot, such that the Planck satellite will be able to confirm or rule out the Void explanation for the Cold Spot, for any Void radius with a Signal-to-Noise ratio of at least O(10).
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.1073  [pdf] - 197335
The Cold Spot as a Large Void: Lensing Effect on CMB Two and Three Point Correlation Functions
Comments: v1: 18 pages, 12 figures; v2: 19 pages, 12 figures, calculation of bispectrum improved, reference added, published version; v3: 19 pages, 12 figures, refined eq.(9) and related figures, conclusions strengthened
Submitted: 2009-05-07, last modified: 2010-07-01
The "Cold Spot" in the CMB sky could be due to the presence of an anomalous huge spherical underdense region - a "Void" - of a few hundreds Mpc/h radius. Such a structure would have an impact on the CMB two-point (power spectrum) and three-point (bispectrum) correlation functions not only at low-l, but also at high-l through Lensing, which is a unique signature of a Void. Modeling such an underdensity with an LTB metric, we show that for the power spectrum the effect should be visible already in the WMAP data only if the Void radius is at least L \gtrsim 1 Gpc/h, while it will be visible by the Planck satellite if L \gtrsim 500 Mpc/h. We also speculate that this could be linked to the high-l detection of an hemispherical power asymmetry in the sky. Moreover, there should be non-zero correlations in the non-diagonal two-point function. For the bispectrum, the effect becomes important for squeezed triangles with two very high l's: this signal can be detected by Planck if the Void radius is at least L \gtrsim 300 Mpc/h, while higher resolution experiments should be able to probe the entire parameter space. We have also estimated the contamination of the primordial non-Gaussianity f_NL due to this signal, which turns out to be negligible.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.1811  [pdf] - 15359
The Cold Spot as a Large Void: Rees-Sciama effect on CMB Power Spectrum and Bispectrum
Comments: v1: 17 pages, 8 figures; v2: published version (improvements in the text, comments added), 17 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2008-08-13, last modified: 2009-05-07
The detection of a "Cold Spot" in the CMB sky could be explained by the presence of an anomalously large spherical underdense region (with radius of a few hundreds Mpc/h) located between us and the Last Scattering Surface. Modeling such an underdensity with an LTB metric, we investigate whether it could produce significant signals on the CMB power spectrum and bispectrum, via the Rees-Sciama effect. We find that this leads to a bump on the power spectrum, that corresponds to an O(5%-25%) correction at multipoles 5 < l < 50; in the cosmological fits, this would modify the \chi^2 by an amount of order unity. We also find that the signal should be visible in the bispectrum coefficients with a signal-to-noise S/N ~ O (1-10), localized at 10 < l < 40. Such a signal would lead to an overestimation of the primordial f_{NL} by an amount \Delta f_{NL} ~ 1 for WMAP and by \Delta f_{NL} ~ 0.1 for Planck.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:0712.0370  [pdf] - 7679
Local Void vs Dark Energy: Confrontation with WMAP and Type Ia Supernovae
Comments: Minor numerical errors and typos corrected, references added
Submitted: 2007-12-03, last modified: 2009-03-31
It is now a known fact that if we happen to be living in the middle of a large underdense region, then we will observe an "apparent acceleration", even when any form of dark energy is absent. In this paper, we present a "Minimal Void" scenario, i.e. a "void" with minimal underdensity contrast (of about -0.4) and radius (~ 200-250 Mpc/h) that can, not only explain the supernovae data, but also be consistent with the 3-yr WMAP data. We also discuss consistency of our model with various other measurements such as Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations and local measurements of the Hubble parameter, and also point out possible observable signatures.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0702555  [pdf] - 880955
"Swiss-Cheese" Inhomogeneous Cosmology & the Dark Energy Problem
Comments: 35 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2007-02-20
We study an exact swiss-cheese model of the Universe, where inhomogeneous LTB patches are embedded in a flat FLRW background, in order to see how observations of distant sources are affected. We find negligible integrated effect, suppressed by (L/R_{H})^3 (where L is the size of one patch, and R_{H} is the Hubble radius), both perturbatively and non-perturbatively. We disentangle this effect from the Doppler term (which is much larger and has been used recently \cite{BMN} to try to fit the SN curve without dark energy) by making contact with cosmological perturbation theory.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606703  [pdf] - 880910
Nonlinear Structure Formation and "Apparent" Acceleration: an Investigation
Comments: 57 pages, 13 figures. Formatting errors fixed
Submitted: 2006-06-28, last modified: 2006-07-05
We present an analytically solvable nonlinear model of structure formation in a Universe with only dust. The model is an LTB solution (of General Relativity) and structures are shells of different density. We show that the luminosity distance-redshift relation has significant corrections at low redshift when the density contrast becomes nonlinear. A minimal effect is a correction in apparent magnitudes of order 0.15. We discuss different possibilities that could further enhance this effect and mimick Dark Energy.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0511207  [pdf] - 115180
Can Inflation solve the Hierarchy Problem?
Comments: 7 pages. Replaced version with comparison with WMAP 3-year data
Submitted: 2005-11-16, last modified: 2006-04-07
Inflation with tunneling from a false to a true vacuum becomes viable in the presence of a scalar field that slows down the initial de Sitter phase. As a by-product this field also sets dynamically the value of the Newton constant observed today. This can be very large if the tunneling rate (which is exponentially sensitive to the barrier) is small enough. Therefore along with Inflation we also provide a natural dynamical explanation for why gravity is so weak today. Moreover we predict a spectrum of gravity waves peaked at around 0.1 mHz, that will be detectable by the planned space inteferometer LISA. Finally we discuss interesting predictions on cosmological scalar and tensor fluctuations in the light the WMAP 3-year data.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0511396  [pdf] - 77754
"Graceful" Old Inflation
Comments: 17 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2005-11-14, last modified: 2006-03-29
We show that Inflation in a False Vacuum becomes viable in the presence of a spectator scalar field non minimally coupled to gravity. The field is unstable in this background, it grows exponentially and slows down the pure de Sitter phase itself, allowing then fast tunneling to a true vacuum. We compute the constraint from graceful exit through bubble nucleation and the spectrum of cosmological perturbations.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0410541  [pdf] - 880784
Cosmological influence of super-Hubble perturbations
Comments: Four pages, no figures
Submitted: 2004-10-22, last modified: 2005-09-10
The existence of cosmological perturbations of wavelength larger than the Hubble radius is a generic prediction of the inflationary paradigm. We provide the derivation beyond perturbation theory of a conserved quantity which generalizes the linear comoving curvature perturbation. As a by-product, we show that super-Hubble-radius (super-Hubble) perturbations have no physical influence on local observables e.g., the local expansion rate) if cosmological perturbations are of the adiabatic type.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0503715  [pdf] - 363873
Late time failure of Friedmann equation
Comments: 7 pages, 2 figures. Replaced version contains new sections with discussions and an explicit computation. Some parts rewritten and references added.Submitted to PRD
Submitted: 2005-03-31, last modified: 2005-04-05
It is widely believed that the assumption of homogeneity is a good zero{\it th} order approximation for the expansion of our Universe. We analyze the correction due to subhorizon inhomogeneous gravitational fields. While at early times this contribution (which may act as a negative pressure component) is perturbatively subdominant, we show that the perturbative series is likely to diverge at redshift of order 1, due to the growth of perturbations. So, the homogeneous Friedmann equation can not be trusted at late times. We suggest that the puzzling observations of a present acceleration of the Universe, may just be due to the unjustified use of the Friedmann equation and not to the presence of a Dark Energy component. This would completely solve the coincidence problem.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-th/0503117  [pdf] - 117558
Primordial inflation explains why the universe is accelerating today
Comments: 4 pages, one figure
Submitted: 2005-03-14
We propose an explanation for the present accelerated expansion of the universe that does not invoke dark energy or a modification of gravity and is firmly rooted in inflationary cosmology.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0409038  [pdf] - 418709
Effect of inhomogeneities on the expansion rate of the Universe
Comments: 19 pages, 2 figures Version 2 includes some changes in numerical factors and corrected typos. It is the version accepted for publication in Physical review D
Submitted: 2004-09-03, last modified: 2005-01-20
While the expansion rate of a homogeneous isotropic Universe is simply proportional to the square-root of the energy density, the expansion rate of an inhomogeneous Universe also depends on the nature of the density inhomogeneities. In this paper we calculate to second order in perturbation variables the expansion rate of an inhomogeneous Universe and demonstrate corrections to the evolution of the expansion rate. While we find that the mean correction is small, the variance of the correction on the scale of the Hubble radius is sensitive to the physical significance of the unknown spectrum of density perturbations beyond the Hubble radius.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0412197  [pdf] - 114917
Single Field Baryogenesis and the Scale of Inflation
Comments: 5 pages, LateX
Submitted: 2004-12-14
In the context of inflationary cosmology, we discuss a minimal baryogenesis scenario in which the resulting baryon to entropy ratio is determined by the amplitude of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background. The model involves a new $SU(2)_L$ scalar field which generates a Dirac neutrino mass and which is excited by quantum fluctuations during inflation, yielding a CP-violating phase. During the scalar field decay after inflation, an asymmetry in the left-handed neutrino number is generated, which then converts to a net baryon asymmetry via sphalerons. A lower limit on the expected initial value of the scalar field translates to a lower limit on the baryon to entropy ratio (which also depends on the Dirac neutrino Yukawa coupling). Consistency with the limits on baryonic isocurvature perturbations requires that the spectral index of adiabatic perturbations produced during inflation be very close to unity. In a variant of our scenario in which the scalar is a gauge singlet, the connection between the baryon to entropy ratio and the inflationary scale is lost, although the basic mechanism of baryogenesis remains applicable.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0410687  [pdf] - 68536
Large-scale magnetic fields from density perturbations
Comments: 7 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2004-10-28
We derive the minimal seed magnetic field which unavoidably arises in the radiation and matter eras, prior to recombination, by the rotational velocity of ions and electrons, gravitationally induced by the non-linear evolution of primordial density perturbations. The resulting magnetic field power-spectrum is fully determined by the amplitude and spectral index of density perturbations. The rms amplitude of the seed-field at recombination is B ~ 10^{-23} (\lambda/Mpc)^{-2} G, on comoving scales larger than about 1 Mpc.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0310123  [pdf] - 114573
Towards a complete theory of thermal leptogenesis in the SM and MSSM
Comments: 56 pages, many figures (17) and appendices (20 pages). v2: ref.s added, final version. Results available at http://www.cern.ch/astrumia/Leptogenesis.html
Submitted: 2003-10-10, last modified: 2004-02-12
We perform a thorough study of thermal leptogenesis adding finite temperature effects, RGE corrections, scatterings involving gauge bosons and by properly avoiding overcounting on-shell processes. Assuming hierarchical right-handed neutrinos with arbitrary abundancy, successful leptogenesis can be achieved if left-handed neutrinos are lighter than 0.15 eV and right-handed neutrinos heavier than 2 10^7 GeV (SM case, 3sigma C.L.). MSSM results are similar. Furthermore, we study how reheating after inflation affects thermal leptogenesis. Assuming that the inflaton reheats SM particles but not directly right-handed neutrinos, we derive the lower bound on the reheating temperature to be T_RH > 2 10^9 GeV. This bound conflicts with the cosmological gravitino bound present in supersymmetric theories. We study some scenarios that avoid this conflict: `soft leptogenesis', leptogenesis in presence of a large right-handed (s)neutrino abundancy or of a sneutrino condensate.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0304050  [pdf] - 1474620
The Curvaton as a Pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Boson
Comments: LaTeX file, 22 pages no figures, same as the published version except that JHEP inadvertantly pasted extra paragraphs into Section 5, which should be ignored (JHEP version is corrected by an erratum)
Submitted: 2003-04-04, last modified: 2003-11-14
The field responsible for the cosmological curvature perturbations generated during a stage of primordial inflation might be the ``curvaton'', a field different from the inflaton field. To keep the effective mass of the curvaton small enough compared to the Hubble rate during inflation one may not invoke supersymmetry since the latter is broken by the vacuum energy density. In this paper we propose the idea that the curvaton is a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson (PNGB) so that its potential and mass vanish in the limit of unbroken symmetry. We give a general framework within which PNGB curvaton candidates should be explored. Then we explore various possibilities, including the case where the curvaton can be identified with the extra-component of a gauge field in a compactified five-dimensional theory (a Wilson line), where it comes from a Little-Higgs mechanism, and where it is a string axion so that supersymmetry is essential.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0307241  [pdf] - 114491
On the reheating stage after inflation
Comments: 8 pages, 2 figures. Submitted for publication in Phys. Rev. D
Submitted: 2003-07-18
We point out that inflaton decay products acquire plasma masses during the reheating phase following inflation. The plasma masses may render inflaton decay kinematicaly forbidden, causing the temperature to remain frozen for a period at a plateau value. We show that the final reheating temperature may be uniquely determined by the inflaton mass, and may not depend on its coupling. Our findings have important implications for the thermal production of dangerous relics during reheating (e.g., gravitinos), for extracting bounds on particle physics models of inflation from Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy data, for the production of massive dark matter candidates during reheating, and for models of baryogenesis or leptogensis where massive particles are produced during reheating.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0305074  [pdf] - 1474621
Minimal Theoretical Uncertainties in Inflationary Predictions
Comments: LaTeX file, 35 pages; some typos corrected
Submitted: 2003-05-07, last modified: 2003-06-04
During inflation, primordial energy density fluctuations are created from approximate de Sitter vacuum quantum fluctuations redshifted out of the horizon after which they are frozen as perturbations in the background curvature. In this paper we demonstrate that there exists an intrinsic theoretical uncertainty in the inflationary predictions for the curvature perturbations due to the failure of the well known prescriptions to specify the vacuum uniquely. Specifically, we show that the two often used prescriptions for defining the initial vacuum state -- the Bunch-Davies prescription and the adiabatic vacuum prescription (even if the adiabaticity order to which the vacuum is specified is infinity) -- fail to specify the vacuum uniquely in generic inflationary spacetimes in which the total duration of inflation is finite. This conclusion holds despite the absence of any trans-Planckian effects or effective field theory cutoff related effects. We quantify the uncertainty which is applicable to slow roll inflationary scenarios as well as for general FRW spacetimes and find that the uncertainty is generically small. This uncertainty should be treated as a minimal uncertainty that underlies all curvature perturbation calculations.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-th/0205019  [pdf] - 116928
Isocurvature perturbations in the Ekpyrotic universe
Comments: 15 pages, LaTeX file, some typos corrected
Submitted: 2002-05-02, last modified: 2002-11-14
The Ekpyrotic scenario assumes that our visible Universe is a boundary brane in a five-dimensional bulk and that the hot Big Bang occurs when a nearly supersymmetric five-brane travelling along the fifth dimension collides with our visible brane. We show that the generation of isocurvature perturbations is a generic prediction of the Ekpyrotic Universe. This is due to the interactions in the kinetic terms between the brane modulus parametrizing the position of the five-brane in the bulk and the dilaton and volume moduli. We show how to separate explicitly the adiabatic and isorcuvature modes by performing a rotation in field space. Our results indicate that adiabatic and isocurvature pertubations might be cross-correlated and that curvature perturbations might be entirely seeded by isocurvature perturbations.