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Nishino, H.

Normalized to: Nishino, H.

34 article(s) in total. 989 co-authors, from 1 to 30 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 46,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.06168  [pdf] - 2094669
A measurement of the CMB E-mode angular power spectrum at subdegree scales from 670 square degrees of POLARBEAR data
Comments: 15 pages, 5 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2020-05-13
We report a measurement of the E-mode polarization power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using 150 GHz data taken from July 2014 to December 2016 with the POLARBEAR experiment. We reach an effective polarization map noise level of $32\,\mu\mathrm{K}$-$\mathrm{arcmin}$ across an observation area of 670 square degrees. We measure the EE power spectrum over the angular multipole range $500 \leq \ell <3000$, tracing the third to seventh acoustic peaks with high sensitivity. The statistical uncertainty on E-mode bandpowers is $\sim 2.3 \mu {\rm K}^2$ at $\ell \sim 1000$ with a systematic uncertainty of 0.5$\mu {\rm K}^2$. The data are consistent with the standard $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model with a probability-to-exceed of 0.38. We combine recent CMB E-mode measurements and make inferences about cosmological parameters in $\Lambda$CDM as well as in extensions to $\Lambda$CDM. Adding the ground-based CMB polarization measurements to the Planck dataset reduces the uncertainty on the Hubble constant by a factor of 1.2 to $H_0 = 67.20 \pm 0.57 {\rm km\,s^{-1} \,Mpc^{-1}}$. When allowing the number of relativistic species ($N_{eff}$) to vary, we find $N_{eff} = 2.94 \pm 0.16$, which is in good agreement with the standard value of 3.046. Instead allowing the primordial helium abundance ($Y_{He}$) to vary, the data favor $Y_{He} = 0.248 \pm 0.012$. This is very close to the expectation of 0.2467 from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. When varying both $Y_{He}$ and $N_{eff}$, we find $N_{eff} = 2.70 \pm 0.26$ and $Y_{He} = 0.262 \pm 0.015$.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.13832  [pdf] - 2076660
Internal delensing of Cosmic Microwave Background polarization B-modes with the POLARBEAR experiment
Comments: Matches version published in Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2019-09-30, last modified: 2020-04-01
Using only cosmic microwave background polarization data from the POLARBEAR experiment, we measure $B$-mode polarization delensing on subdegree scales at more than $5\sigma$ significance. We achieve a 14% $B$-mode power variance reduction, the highest to date for internal delensing, and improve this result to 2% by applying for the first time an iterative maximum a posteriori delensing method. Our analysis demonstrates the capability of internal delensing as a means of improving constraints on inflationary models, paving the way for the optimal analysis of next-generation primordial $B$-mode experiments.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.10980  [pdf] - 2085075
Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Lensing Power Spectrum from Two Years of POLARBEAR Data
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-11-25, last modified: 2020-03-06
We present a measurement of the gravitational lensing deflection power spectrum reconstructed with two seasons cosmic microwave background polarization data from the POLARBEAR experiment. Observations were taken at 150 GHz from 2012 to 2014 which survey three patches of sky totaling 30 square degrees. We test the consistency of the lensing spectrum with a Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmology and reject the no-lensing hypothesis at a confidence of 10.9 sigma including statistical and systematic uncertainties. We observe a value of A_L = 1.33 +/- 0.32 (statistical) +/- 0.02 (systematic) +/- 0.07 (foreground) using all polarization lensing estimators, which corresponds to a 24% accurate measurement of the lensing amplitude. Compared to the analysis of the first year data, we have improved the breadth of both the suite of null tests and the error terms included in the estimation of systematic contamination.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.02901  [pdf] - 2037301
The POLARBEAR Fourier Transform Spectrometer Calibrator and Spectroscopic Characterization of the POLARBEAR Instrument
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-04-05, last modified: 2020-01-27
We describe the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) used for in-field testing of the POLARBEAR receiver, an experiment located in the Atacama Desert of Chile which measures the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. The POLARBEAR-FTS (PB-FTS) is a Martin-Puplett interferometer designed to couple to the Huan Tran Telescope (HTT) on which the POLARBEAR receiver is installed. The PB-FTS measured the spectral response of the POLARBEAR receiver with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) $>20$ for $\sim$69% of the focal plane detectors due to three features: a high throughput of 15.1 steradian cm$^{2}$, optimized optical coupling to the POLARBEAR optics using a custom designed output parabolic mirror, and a continuously modulated output polarizer. The PB-FTS parabolic mirror is designed to mimic the shape of the 2.5 m-diameter HTT primary reflector which allows for optimum optical coupling to the POLARBEAR receiver, reducing aberrations and systematics. One polarizing grid is placed at the output of the PB-FTS, and modulated via continuous rotation. This modulation allows for decomposition of the signal into different harmonics that can be used to probe potentially pernicious sources of systematic error in a polarization-sensitive instrument. The high throughput and continuous output polarizer modulation features are unique compared to other FTS calibrators used in the CMB field. In-field characterization of the POLARBEAR receiver was accomplished using the PB-FTS in April 2014. We discuss the design, construction, and operation of the PB-FTS and present the spectral characterization of the POLARBEAR receiver. We introduce future applications for the PB-FTS in the next-generation CMB experiment, the Simons Array.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.07848  [pdf] - 2097303
Small Aperture Telescopes for the Simons Observatory
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-01-21, last modified: 2020-01-23
The Simons Observatory (SO) is an upcoming cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment located on Cerro Toco, Chile, that will map the microwave sky in temperature and polarization in six frequency bands spanning 27 to 285 GHz. SO will consist of one 6-meter Large Aperture Telescope (LAT) fielding $\sim$30,000 detectors and an array of three 0.42-meter Small Aperture Telescopes (SATs) fielding an additional 30,000 detectors. This synergy will allow for the extremely sensitive characterization of the CMB over angular scales ranging from an arcmin to tens of degrees, enabling a wide range of scientific output. Here we focus on the SATs targeting degree angular scales with successive dichroic instruments observing at Mid-Frequency (MF: 93/145 GHz), Ultra-High-Frequency (UHF: 225/285 GHz), and Low-Frequency (LF: 27/39 GHz). The three SATs will be able to map $\sim$10% of the sky to a noise level of 2 $\mu$K-arcmin when combining 93 and 145 GHz. The multiple frequency bands will allow the CMB to be separated from galactic foregrounds (primarily synchrotron and dust), with the primary science goal of characterizing the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, at a target level of $\sigma \left(r\right) \approx 0.003$.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.01724  [pdf] - 2026608
Updated design of the CMB polarization experiment satellite LiteBIRD
Sugai, H.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Alonso, D.; Arnold, K.; Aumont, J.; Austermann, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Barreiro, R. B.; Basak, S.; Beall, J.; Beckman, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Buzzelli, A.; Calabrese, E.; Casas, F. J.; Challinor, A.; Chan, V.; Chinone, Y.; Cliche, J. -F.; Columbro, F.; Cukierman, A.; Curtis, D.; Danto, P.; de Bernardis, P.; de Haan, T.; De Petris, M.; Dickinson, C.; Dobbs, M.; Dotani, T.; Duband, L.; Ducout, A.; Duff, S.; Duivenvoorden, A.; Duval, J. -M.; Ebisawa, K.; Elleflot, T.; Enokida, H.; Eriksen, H. K.; Errard, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Finelli, F.; Flauger, R.; Franceschet, C.; Fuskeland, U.; Ganga, K.; Gao, J. -R.; Génova-Santos, R.; Ghigna, T.; Gomez, A.; Gradziel, M. L.; Grain, J.; Grupp, F.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halverson, N. W.; Hargrave, P.; Hasebe, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, M.; Hazumi, M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herranz, D.; Hill, C.; Hilton, G.; Hirota, Y.; Hivon, E.; Hlozek, R.; Hoang, D. -T.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Iida, T.; Imada, H.; Ishimura, K.; Ishino, H.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jones, M.; Kaga, T.; Kashima, S.; Kataoka, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Keskitalo, R.; Kibayashi, A.; Kikuchi, T.; Kimura, K.; Kisner, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kogiso, N.; Kogut, A.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Komatsu, K.; Konishi, K.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kuo, C. L.; Kurinsky, N.; Kushino, A.; Kuwata-Gonokami, M.; Lamagna, L.; Lattanzi, M.; Lee, A. T.; Linder, E.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Maki, M.; Mangilli, A.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Mathon, R.; Matsumura, T.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Minami, Y.; Mistuda, K.; Molinari, D.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mot, B.; Murata, Y.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagai, M.; Nagata, R.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Natoli, P.; Nerva, S.; Nishibori, T.; Nishino, H.; Nomura, Y.; Noviello, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Ochi, H.; Ogawa, H.; Ogawa, H.; Ohsaki, H.; Ohta, I.; Okada, N.; Okada, N.; Pagano, L.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piacentini, F.; Pisano, G.; Polenta, G.; Poletti, D.; Prouvé, T.; Puglisi, G.; Rambaud, D.; Raum, C.; Realini, S.; Remazeilles, M.; Roudil, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Russell, M.; Sakurai, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Sekimoto, Y.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shinozaki, K.; Shiraishi, M.; Shirron, P.; Signorelli, G.; Smecher, G.; Spizzi, P.; Stever, S. L.; Stompor, R.; Sugiyama, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, J.; Switzer, E.; Takaku, R.; Takakura, H.; Takakura, S.; Takeda, Y.; Taylor, A.; Taylor, E.; Terao, Y.; Thompson, K. L.; Thorne, B.; Tomasi, M.; Tomida, H.; Trappe, N.; Tristram, M.; Tsuji, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Tucker, C.; Ullom, J.; Uozumi, S.; Utsunomiya, S.; Van Lanen, J.; Vermeulen, G.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vissers, M.; Vittorio, N.; Voisin, F.; Walker, I.; Watanabe, N.; Wehus, I.; Weller, J.; Westbrook, B.; Winter, B.; Wollack, E.; Yamamoto, R.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Yanagisawa, M.; Yoshida, T.; Yumoto, J.; Zannoni, M.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Journal of Low Temperature Physics, in press
Submitted: 2020-01-06
Recent developments of transition-edge sensors (TESs), based on extensive experience in ground-based experiments, have been making the sensor techniques mature enough for their application on future satellite CMB polarization experiments. LiteBIRD is in the most advanced phase among such future satellites, targeting its launch in Japanese Fiscal Year 2027 (2027FY) with JAXA's H3 rocket. It will accommodate more than 4000 TESs in focal planes of reflective low-frequency and refractive medium-and-high-frequency telescopes in order to detect a signature imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the primordial gravitational waves predicted in cosmic inflation. The total wide frequency coverage between 34GHz and 448GHz enables us to extract such weak spiral polarization patterns through the precise subtraction of our Galaxy's foreground emission by using spectral differences among CMB and foreground signals. Telescopes are cooled down to 5Kelvin for suppressing thermal noise and contain polarization modulators with transmissive half-wave plates at individual apertures for separating sky polarization signals from artificial polarization and for mitigating from instrumental 1/f noise. Passive cooling by using V-grooves supports active cooling with mechanical coolers as well as adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators. Sky observations from the second Sun-Earth Lagrangian point, L2, are planned for three years. An international collaboration between Japan, USA, Canada, and Europe is sharing various roles. In May 2019, the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA selected LiteBIRD as the strategic large mission No. 2.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.07046  [pdf] - 2000185
Cross-correlation of POLARBEAR CMB Polarization Lensing with High-$z$ Sub-mm Herschel-ATLAS galaxies
Comments: 14 pages, 6 figures, updated to match published version on ApJ
Submitted: 2019-03-17, last modified: 2019-11-18
We report a 4.8$\sigma$ measurement of the cross-correlation signal between the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence reconstructed from measurements of the CMB polarization made by the POLARBEAR experiment and the infrared-selected galaxies of the Herschel-ATLAS survey. This is the first measurement of its kind. We infer a best-fit galaxy bias of $b = 5.76 \pm 1.25$, corresponding to a host halo mass of $\log_{10}(M_h/M_\odot) =13.5^{+0.2}_{-0.3}$ at an effective redshift of $z \sim 2$ from the cross-correlation power spectrum. Residual uncertainties in the redshift distribution of the sub-mm galaxies are subdominant with respect to the statistical precision. We perform a suite of systematic tests, finding that instrumental and astrophysical contaminations are small compared to the statistical error. This cross-correlation measurement only relies on CMB polarization information that, differently from CMB temperature maps, is less contaminated by galactic and extra-galactic foregrounds, providing a clearer view of the projected matter distribution. This result demonstrates the feasibility and robustness of this approach for future high-sensitivity CMB polarization experiments.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.02116  [pdf] - 1977965
Evidence for the Cross-correlation between Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Lensing from POLARBEAR and Cosmic Shear from Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam
Comments: 16 pages, 5 figures, Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-04-03, last modified: 2019-10-11
We present the first measurement of cross-correlation between the lensing potential, reconstructed from cosmic microwave background (CMB) {\it polarization} data, and the cosmic shear field from galaxy shapes. This measurement is made using data from the POLARBEAR CMB experiment and the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey. By analyzing an 11~deg$^2$ overlapping region, we reject the null hypothesis at 3.5$\sigma$\ and constrain the amplitude of the {\bf cross-spectrum} to $\widehat{A}_{\rm lens}=1.70\pm 0.48$, where $\widehat{A}_{\rm lens}$ is the amplitude normalized with respect to the Planck~2018{} prediction, based on the flat $\Lambda$ cold dark matter cosmology. The first measurement of this {\bf cross-spectrum} without relying on CMB temperature measurements is possible due to the deep POLARBEAR map with a noise level of ${\sim}$6\,$\mu$K-arcmin, as well as the deep HSC data with a high galaxy number density of $n_g=23\,{\rm arcmin^{-2}}$. We present a detailed study of the systematics budget to show that residual systematics in our results are negligibly small, which demonstrates the future potential of this cross-correlation technique.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.02608  [pdf] - 1974580
A Measurement of the Degree Scale CMB B-mode Angular Power Spectrum with POLARBEAR
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-10-07
We present a measurement of the $B$-mode polarization power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using taken from July 2014 to December 2016 with the POLARBEAR experiment. The CMB power spectra are measured using observations at 150 GHz with an instantaneous array sensitivity of $\mathrm{NET}_\mathrm{array}=23\, \mu \mathrm{K} \sqrt{\mathrm{s}}$ on a 670 square degree patch of sky centered at (RA, Dec)=($+0^\mathrm{h}12^\mathrm{m}0^\mathrm{s},-59^\circ18^\prime$). A continuously rotating half-wave plate is used to modulate polarization and to suppress low-frequency noise. We achieve $32\,\mu\mathrm{K}$-$\mathrm{arcmin}$ effective polarization map noise with a knee in sensitivity of $\ell = 90$, where the inflationary gravitational wave signal is expected to peak. The measured $B$-mode power spectrum is consistent with a $\Lambda$CDM lensing and single dust component foreground model over a range of multipoles $50 \leq \ell \leq 600$. The data disfavor zero $C_\ell^{BB}$ at $2.2\sigma$ using this $\ell$ range of POLARBEAR data alone. We cross-correlate our data with Planck high frequency maps and find the low-$\ell$ $B$-mode power in the combined dataset to be consistent with thermal dust emission. We place an upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r < 0.90$ at 95% confidence level after marginalizing over foregrounds.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.01062  [pdf] - 1928247
CMB-S4 Decadal Survey APC White Paper
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Amin, Mustafa A.; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bock, James J.; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Project White Paper submitted to the 2020 Decadal Survey, 10 pages plus references. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1907.04473
Submitted: 2019-07-31
We provide an overview of the science case, instrument configuration and project plan for the next-generation ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4, for consideration by the 2020 Decadal Survey.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.08284  [pdf] - 1976842
The Simons Observatory: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Adachi, Shunsuke; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Atkins, Zachary; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Lizancos, Anton Baleato; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bhandarkar, Tanay; Bhimani, Sanah; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bolliet, Boris; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Carl, Fred. M; Cayuso, Juan; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Clark, Susan; Clarke, Philip; Contaldi, Carlo; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Coulton, Will; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Bouhargani, Hamza El; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Fergusson, James; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Halpern, Mark; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hensley, Brandon; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hoang, Thuong D.; Hoh, Jonathan; Hotinli, Selim C.; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Johnson, Matthew; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Kofman, Anna; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kusaka, Akito; LaPlante, Phil; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Liu, Jia; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McCarrick, Heather; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Mertens, James; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Moore, Jenna; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Murata, Masaaki; Naess, Sigurd; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Nicola, Andrina; Niemack, Mike; Nishino, Haruki; Nishinomiya, Yume; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Pagano, Luca; Partridge, Bruce; Perrotta, Francesca; Phakathi, Phumlani; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Rotti, Aditya; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Saunders, Lauren; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Shellard, Paul; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sifon, Cristobal; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Smith, Kendrick; Sohn, Wuhyun; Sonka, Rita; Spergel, David; Spisak, Jacob; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Treu, Jesse; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Wang, Yuhan; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Young, Edward; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zannoni, Mario; Zhang, Hezi; Zheng, Kaiwen; Zhu, Ningfeng; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1808.07445
Submitted: 2019-07-16
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment sited on Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert in Chile that promises to provide breakthrough discoveries in fundamental physics, cosmology, and astrophysics. Supported by the Simons Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and with contributions from collaborating institutions, SO will see first light in 2021 and start a five year survey in 2022. SO has 287 collaborators from 12 countries and 53 institutions, including 85 students and 90 postdocs. The SO experiment in its currently funded form ('SO-Nominal') consists of three 0.4 m Small Aperture Telescopes (SATs) and one 6 m Large Aperture Telescope (LAT). Optimized for minimizing systematic errors in polarization measurements at large angular scales, the SATs will perform a deep, degree-scale survey of 10% of the sky to search for the signature of primordial gravitational waves. The LAT will survey 40% of the sky with arc-minute resolution. These observations will measure (or limit) the sum of neutrino masses, search for light relics, measure the early behavior of Dark Energy, and refine our understanding of the intergalactic medium, clusters and the role of feedback in galaxy formation. With up to ten times the sensitivity and five times the angular resolution of the Planck satellite, and roughly an order of magnitude increase in mapping speed over currently operating ("Stage 3") experiments, SO will measure the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations to exquisite precision in six frequency bands from 27 to 280 GHz. SO will rapidly advance CMB science while informing the design of future observatories such as CMB-S4.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.04473  [pdf] - 1914295
CMB-S4 Science Case, Reference Design, and Project Plan
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; McQuinn, Matthew; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: 287 pages, 82 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-09
We present the science case, reference design, and project plan for the Stage-4 ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.07445  [pdf] - 1841339
The Simons Observatory: Science goals and forecasts
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Dusatko, John; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Fuzia, Brittany; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; He, Yizhou; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Howe, Logan; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Kernasovskiy, Sarah S.; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kuenstner, Stephen E.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Kusaka, Akito; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Leon, David; Leung, Jason S. -Y.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lowry, Lindsay; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Niemack, Michael; Nishino, Haruki; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Page, Lyman; Partridge, Bruce; Peloton, Julien; Perrotta, Francesca; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Siritanasak, Praween; Smith, Kendrick; Smith, Stephen R.; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward J.; Xu, Zhilei; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zhang, Hezi; Zhu, Ningfeng
Comments: This paper presents an overview of the Simons Observatory science goals, details about the instrument will be presented in a companion paper. The author contribution to this paper is available at https://simonsobservatory.org/publications.php (Abstract abridged) -- matching version published in JCAP
Submitted: 2018-08-22, last modified: 2019-03-01
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a new cosmic microwave background experiment being built on Cerro Toco in Chile, due to begin observations in the early 2020s. We describe the scientific goals of the experiment, motivate the design, and forecast its performance. SO will measure the temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background in six frequency bands: 27, 39, 93, 145, 225 and 280 GHz. The initial configuration of SO will have three small-aperture 0.5-m telescopes (SATs) and one large-aperture 6-m telescope (LAT), with a total of 60,000 cryogenic bolometers. Our key science goals are to characterize the primordial perturbations, measure the number of relativistic species and the mass of neutrinos, test for deviations from a cosmological constant, improve our understanding of galaxy evolution, and constrain the duration of reionization. The SATs will target the largest angular scales observable from Chile, mapping ~10% of the sky to a white noise level of 2 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, to measure the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, at a target level of $\sigma(r)=0.003$. The LAT will map ~40% of the sky at arcminute angular resolution to an expected white noise level of 6 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, overlapping with the majority of the LSST sky region and partially with DESI. With up to an order of magnitude lower polarization noise than maps from the Planck satellite, the high-resolution sky maps will constrain cosmological parameters derived from the damping tail, gravitational lensing of the microwave background, the primordial bispectrum, and the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects, and will aid in delensing the large-angle polarization signal to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio. The survey will also provide a legacy catalog of 16,000 galaxy clusters and more than 20,000 extragalactic sources.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.06556  [pdf] - 1818678
Measurements of tropospheric ice clouds with a ground-based CMB polarization experiment, POLARBEAR
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, 1 table, Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2018-09-18
The polarization of the atmosphere has been a long-standing concern for ground-based experiments targeting cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Ice crystals in upper tropospheric clouds scatter thermal radiation from the ground and produce a horizontally-polarized signal. We report the detailed analysis of the cloud signal using a ground-based CMB experiment, POLARBEAR, located at the Atacama desert in Chile and observing at 150 GHz. We observe horizontally-polarized temporal increases of low-frequency fluctuations ("polarized bursts," hereafter) of $\lesssim$0.1 K when clouds appear in a webcam monitoring the telescope and the sky. The hypothesis of no correlation between polarized bursts and clouds is rejected with $>$24$\sigma$ statistical significance using three years of data. We consider many other possibilities including instrumental and environmental effects, and find no other reasons other than clouds that can explain the data better. We also discuss the impact of the cloud polarization on future ground-based CMB polarization experiments.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.2369  [pdf] - 1715860
A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background B-Mode Polarization Power Spectrum at Sub-Degree Scales with POLARBEAR
Comments: 22 pages, 12 figures. v3 is updated to reflect the erratum published in ApJ 2017 848:73, which changed the rejection of the hypothesis of no B-mode polarization power from gravitational lensing from 97.2% to 97.1%
Submitted: 2014-03-10, last modified: 2018-07-16
We report a measurement of the B-mode polarization power spectrum in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the POLARBEAR experiment in Chile. The faint B-mode polarization signature carries information about the Universe's entire history of gravitational structure formation, and the cosmic inflation that may have occurred in the very early Universe. Our measurement covers the angular multipole range 500 < l < 2100 and is based on observations of an effective sky area of 25 square degrees with 3.5 arcmin resolution at 150 GHz. On these angular scales, gravitational lensing of the CMB by intervening structure in the Universe is expected to be the dominant source of B-mode polarization. Including both systematic and statistical uncertainties, the hypothesis of no B-mode polarization power from gravitational lensing is rejected at 97.1% confidence. The band powers are consistent with the standard cosmological model. Fitting a single lensing amplitude parameter A_BB to the measured band powers, A_BB = 1.12 +/- 0.61 (stat) +0.04/-0.12 (sys) +/- 0.07 (multi), where A_BB = 1 is the fiducial WMAP-9 LCDM value. In this expression, "stat" refers to the statistical uncertainty, "sys" to the systematic uncertainty associated with possible biases from the instrument and astrophysical foregrounds, and "multi" to the calibration uncertainties that have a multiplicative effect on the measured amplitude A_BB.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.06987  [pdf] - 1698011
The LiteBIRD Satellite Mission - Sub-Kelvin Instrument
Suzuki, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Alonso, D.; Arnold, K.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barron, D.; Basak, S.; Beckman, S.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Calabrese, E.; Chinone, Y.; Cho, H-M.; Cukierman, A.; Curtis, D. W.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Dominjon, A.; Dotani, T.; Duband, L.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Duval, J. M.; Elleflot, T.; Eriksen, H. K.; Errard, J.; Fischer, J.; Fujino, T.; Funaki, T.; Fuskeland, U.; Ganga, K.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Grain, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Hamada, T.; Hasebe, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hattori, M.; Hayes, L.; Hazumi, M.; Hidehira, N.; Hill, C. A.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Iida, T.; Imada, H.; Inoue, M.; Inoue, Y.; D., K.; Ishino, H.; Jeong, O.; Kanai, H.; Kaneko, D.; Kashima, S.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Keskitalo, R.; Kibayashi, A.; Kida, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kisner, T.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Komatsu, K.; Kuo, C. L.; Kurinsky, N. A.; Kusaka, A.; Lazarian, A.; Lee, A. T.; Li, D.; Linder, E.; Maffei, B.; Mangilli, A.; Maki, M.; Matsumura, T.; Matsuura, S.; Meilhan, D.; Mima, S.; Minami, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Montier, L.; Nagai, M.; Nagasaki, T.; Nagata, R.; Nakajima, M.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Naruse, M.; Nishino, H.; Nitta, T.; Noguchi, T.; Ogawa, H.; Oguri, S.; Okada, N.; Okamoto, A.; Okamura, T.; Otani, C.; Patanchon, G.; Pisano, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Remazeilles, M.; Richards, P. L.; Sakai, S.; Sakurai, Y.; Sato, Y.; Sato, N.; Sawada, M.; Segawa, Y.; Sekimoto, Y.; Seljak, U.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shimizu, T.; Shinozaki, K.; Stompor, R.; Sugai, H.; Sugita, H.; Suzuki, J.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takaku, R.; Takakura, S.; Takatori, S.; Tanabe, D.; Taylor, E.; Thompson, K. L.; Thorne, B.; Tomaru, T.; Tomida, T.; Tomita, N.; Tristram, M.; Tucker, C.; Turin, P.; Tsujimoto, M.; Uozumi, S.; Utsunomiya, S.; Uzawa, Y.; Vansyngel, F.; Wehus, I. K.; Westbrook, B.; Willer, M.; Whitehorn, N.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, R.; Yamasaki, N.; Yamashita, T.; Yoshida, M.
Comments: 7 pages 2 figures Journal of Low Temperature Physics - Special edition - LTD17 Proceeding
Submitted: 2018-01-22, last modified: 2018-03-15
Inflation is the leading theory of the first instant of the universe. Inflation, which postulates that the universe underwent a period of rapid expansion an instant after its birth, provides convincing explanation for cosmological observations. Recent advancements in detector technology have opened opportunities to explore primordial gravitational waves generated by the inflation through B-mode (divergent-free) polarization pattern embedded in the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies. If detected, these signals would provide strong evidence for inflation, point to the correct model for inflation, and open a window to physics at ultra-high energies. LiteBIRD is a satellite mission with a goal of detecting degree-and-larger-angular-scale B-mode polarization. LiteBIRD will observe at the second Lagrange point with a 400 mm diameter telescope and 2,622 detectors. It will survey the entire sky with 15 frequency bands from 40 to 400 GHz to measure and subtract foregrounds. The U.S. LiteBIRD team is proposing to deliver sub-Kelvin instruments that include detectors and readout electronics. A lenslet-coupled sinuous antenna array will cover low-frequency bands (40 GHz to 235 GHz) with four frequency arrangements of trichroic pixels. An orthomode-transducer-coupled corrugated horn array will cover high-frequency bands (280 GHz to 402 GHz) with three types of single frequency detectors. The detectors will be made with Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers cooled to a 100 milli-Kelvin base temperature by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.The TES bolometers will be read out using digital frequency multiplexing with Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) amplifiers. Up to 78 bolometers will be multiplexed with a single SQUID amplidier. We report on the sub-Kelvin instrument design and ongoing developments for the LiteBIRD mission.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.02907  [pdf] - 1583212
A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background $B$-Mode Polarization Power Spectrum at Sub-Degree Scales from 2 years of POLARBEAR Data
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures. Minor changes to match the published version. For data and figures, see http://bolo.berkeley.edu/polarbear/data/polarbear_BB_2017/
Submitted: 2017-05-08, last modified: 2017-10-27
We report an improved measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) $B$-mode polarization power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment at 150 GHz. By adding new data collected during the second season of observations (2013-2014) to re-analyzed data from the first season (2012-2013), we have reduced twofold the band-power uncertainties. The band powers are reported over angular multipoles $500 \leq \ell \leq 2100$, where the dominant $B$-mode signal is expected to be due to the gravitational lensing of $E$-modes. We reject the null hypothesis of no $B$-mode polarization at a confidence of 3.1$\sigma$ including both statistical and systematic uncertainties. We test the consistency of the measured $B$-modes with the $\Lambda$ Cold Dark Matter ($\Lambda$CDM) framework by fitting for a single lensing amplitude parameter $A_L$ relative to the Planck best-fit model prediction. We obtain $A_L = 0.60 ^{+0.26} _{-0.24} ({\rm stat}) ^{+0.00} _{-0.04}({\rm inst}) \pm 0.14 ({\rm foreground}) \pm 0.04 ({\rm multi})$, where $A_{L}=1$ is the fiducial $\Lambda$CDM value, and the details of the reported uncertainties are explained later in the manuscript.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.07111  [pdf] - 1581600
Performance of a continuously rotating half-wave plate on the POLARBEAR telescope
Comments: 27 pages, 5 figures, 3 tables, published version in JCAP. Includes some minor corrections
Submitted: 2017-02-23, last modified: 2017-05-27
A continuously rotating half-wave plate (CRHWP) is a promising tool to improve the sensitivity to large angular scales in cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization measurements. With a CRHWP, single detectors can measure three of the Stokes parameters, $I$, $Q$ and $U$, thereby avoiding the set of systematic errors that can be introduced by mismatches in the properties of orthogonal detector pairs. We focus on the implementation of CRHWPs in large aperture telescopes (i.e. the primary mirror is larger than the current maximum half-wave plate diameter of $\sim$0.5 m), where the CRHWP can be placed between the primary mirror and focal plane. In this configuration, one needs to address the intensity to polarization ($I{\rightarrow}P$) leakage of the optics, which becomes a source of 1/f noise and also causes differential gain systematics that arise from CMB temperature fluctuations. In this paper, we present the performance of a CRHWP installed in the POLARBEAR experiment, which employs a Gregorian telescope with a 2.5 m primary illumination pattern. The CRHWP is placed near the prime focus between the primary and secondary mirrors. We find that the $I{\rightarrow}P$ leakage is larger than the expectation from the physical properties of our primary mirror, resulting in a 1/f knee of 100 mHz. The excess leakage could be due to imperfections in the detector system, i.e. detector non-linearity in the responsivity and time-constant. We demonstrate, however, that by subtracting the leakage correlated with the intensity signal, the 1/f noise knee frequency is reduced to 32 mHz ($\ell \sim$39 for our scan strategy), which is very promising to probe the primordial B-mode signal. We also discuss methods for further noise subtraction in future projects where the precise temperature control of instrumental components and the leakage reduction will play a key role.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.08791  [pdf] - 1510385
RZ Leonis Minoris Bridging between ER Ursae Majoris-Type Dwarf Nova and Novalike System
Comments: 14 pages, 14 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ; includes Supplementary_draft_aph.pdf with somewhat degraded figures
Submitted: 2016-09-28
We observed RZ LMi, which is renowned for the extremely (~19d) short supercycle and is a member of a small, unusual class of cataclysmic variables called ER UMa-type dwarf novae, in 2013 and 2016. In 2016, the supercycles of this object substantially lengthened in comparison to the previous measurements to 35, 32, 60d for three consecutive superoutbursts. We consider that the object virtually experienced a transition to the novalike state (permanent superhumper). This observed behavior extremely well reproduced the prediction of the thermal-tidal instability model. We detected a precursor in the 2016 superoutburst and detected growing (stage A) superhumps with a mean period of 0.0602(1)d in 2016 and in 2013. Combined with the period of superhumps immediately after the superoutburst, the mass ratio is not as small as in WZ Sge-type dwarf novae, having orbital periods similar to RZ LMi. By using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) two-dimensional power spectra, we detected possible negative superhumps with a period of 0.05710(1)d. We estimated the orbital period of 0.05792d, which suggests a mass ratio of 0.105(5). This relatively large mass ratio is even above ordinary SU UMa-type dwarf novae, and it is also possible that the exceptionally high mass-transfer rate in RZ LMi may be a result of a stripped core evolved secondary which are evolving toward an AM CVn-type object.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.03025  [pdf] - 1531238
POLARBEAR-2: an instrument for CMB polarization measurements
Comments: 9pages,8figures
Submitted: 2016-08-09
POLARBEAR-2 (PB-2) is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment that will be located in the Atacama highland in Chile at an altitude of 5200 m. Its science goals are to measure the CMB polarization signals originating from both primordial gravitational waves and weak lensing. PB-2 is designed to measure the tensor to scalar ratio, r, with precision {\sigma}(r) < 0.01, and the sum of neutrino masses, {\Sigma}m{\nu}, with {\sigma}({\Sigma}m{\nu}) < 90 meV. To achieve these goals, PB-2 will employ 7588 transition-edge sensor bolometers at 95 GHz and 150 GHz, which will be operated at the base temperature of 250 mK. Science observations will begin in 2017.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.02461  [pdf] - 1335455
POLARBEAR Constraints on Cosmic Birefringence and Primordial Magnetic Fields
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures. Phys. Rev. D Editors' Suggestion
Submitted: 2015-09-08, last modified: 2016-01-04
We constrain anisotropic cosmic birefringence using four-point correlations of even-parity $E$-mode and odd-parity $B$-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background measurements made by the POLARization of the Background Radiation (POLARBEAR) experiment in its first season of observations. We find that the anisotropic cosmic birefringence signal from any parity-violating processes is consistent with zero. The Faraday rotation from anisotropic cosmic birefringence can be compared with the equivalent quantity generated by primordial magnetic fields if they existed. The POLARBEAR nondetection translates into a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit of 93 nanogauss (nG) on the amplitude of an equivalent primordial magnetic field inclusive of systematic uncertainties. This four-point correlation constraint on Faraday rotation is about 15 times tighter than the upper limit of 1380 nG inferred from constraining the contribution of Faraday rotation to two-point correlations of $B$-modes measured by Planck in 2015. Metric perturbations sourced by primordial magnetic fields would also contribute to the $B$-mode power spectrum. Using the POLARBEAR measurements of the $B$-mode power spectrum (two-point correlation), we set a 95% C.L. upper limit of 3.9 nG on primordial magnetic fields assuming a flat prior on the field amplitude. This limit is comparable to what was found in the Planck 2015 two-point correlation analysis with both temperature and polarization. We perform a set of systematic error tests and find no evidence for contamination. This work marks the first time that anisotropic cosmic birefringence or primordial magnetic fields have been constrained from the ground at subdegree scales.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.07299  [pdf] - 1359106
The POLARBEAR-2 and the Simons Array Experiment
Comments: Accepted to Journal of Low Temperature Physics LTD16 Special Issue, Low Temperature Detector 16 Conference Proceedings, 5 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2015-12-22
We present an overview of the design and status of the \Pb-2 and the Simons Array experiments. \Pb-2 is a Cosmic Microwave Background polarimetry experiment which aims to characterize the arc-minute angular scale B-mode signal from weak gravitational lensing and search for the degree angular scale B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. The receiver has a 365~mm diameter focal plane cooled to 270~milli-Kelvin. The focal plane is filled with 7,588 dichroic lenslet-antenna coupled polarization sensitive Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometric pixels that are sensitive to 95~GHz and 150~GHz bands simultaneously. The TES bolometers are read-out by SQUIDs with 40 channel frequency domain multiplexing. Refractive optical elements are made with high purity alumina to achieve high optical throughput. The receiver is designed to achieve noise equivalent temperature of 5.8~$\mu$K$_{CMB}\sqrt{s}$ in each frequency band. \Pb-2 will deploy in 2016 in the Atacama desert in Chile. The Simons Array is a project to further increase sensitivity by deploying three \Pb-2 type receivers. The Simons Array will cover 95~GHz, 150~GHz and 220~GHz frequency bands for foreground control. The Simons Array will be able to constrain tensor-to-scalar ratio and sum of neutrino masses to $\sigma(r) = 6\times 10^{-3}$ at $r = 0.1$ and $\sum m_\nu (\sigma =1)$ to 40 meV.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.07911  [pdf] - 1309971
Modeling atmospheric emission for CMB ground-based observations
Comments: 20 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2015-01-30, last modified: 2015-11-12
Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.7488  [pdf] - 894214
Development and characterization of the readout system for POLARBEAR-2
Comments: Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VII. Published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9153
Submitted: 2014-10-27, last modified: 2014-11-06
POLARBEAR-2 is a next-generation receiver for precision measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)). Scheduled to deploy in early 2015, it will observe alongside the existing POLARBEAR-1 receiver, on a new telescope in the Simons Array on Cerro Toco in the Atacama desert of Chile. For increased sensitivity, it will feature a larger area focal plane, with a total of 7,588 polarization sensitive antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers, with a design sensitivity of 4.1 uKrt(s). The focal plane will be cooled to 250 milliKelvin, and the bolometers will be read-out with 40x frequency domain multiplexing, with 36 optical bolometers on a single SQUID amplifier, along with 2 dark bolometers and 2 calibration resistors. To increase the multiplexing factor from 8x for POLARBEAR-1 to 40x for POLARBEAR-2 requires additional bandwidth for SQUID readout and well-defined frequency channel spacing. Extending to these higher frequencies requires new components and design for the LC filters which define channel spacing. The LC filters are cold resonant circuits with an inductor and capacitor in series with each bolometer, and stray inductance in the wiring and equivalent series resistance from the capacitors can affect bolometer operation. We present results from characterizing these new readout components. Integration of the readout system is being done first on a small scale, to ensure that the readout system does not affect bolometer sensitivity or stability, and to validate the overall system before expansion into the full receiver. We present the status of readout integration, and the initial results and status of components for the full array.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.6428  [pdf] - 1215204
Survey of Period Variations of Superhumps in SU UMa-Type Dwarf Novae. VI: The Sixth Year (2013-2014)
Kato, Taichi; Dubovsky, Pavol A.; Kudzej, Igor; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Miller, Ian; Ohshima, Tomohito; Nakata, Chikako; Kawabata, Miho; Nishino, Hirochika; Masumoto, Kazunari; Mizoguchi, Sahori; Yamanaka, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Katsura; Sakai, Daisuke; Fukushima, Daiki; Matsuura, Minami; Bouno, Genki; Takenaka, Megumi; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Noguchi, Ryo; Iino, Eriko; Pickard, Roger D.; Maeda, Yutaka; Henden, Arne; Kasai, Kiyoshi; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Akazawa, Hidehiko; Imamura, Kazuyoshi; de Miguel, Enrique; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Monard, Berto; Pavlenko, Elena P.; Antonyuk, Kirill; Pit, Nikolaj; Antonyuk, Oksana I.; Baklanov, Aleksei V.; Ruiz, Javier; Richmond, Michael; Oksanen, Arto; Harlingten, Caisey; Shugarov, Sergey Yu.; Chochol, Drahomir; Masi, Gianluca; Nocentini, Francesca; Schmeer, Patrick; Bolt, Greg; Nelson, Peter; Ulowetz, Joseph; Sabo, Richard; Goff, William N.; Stein, William; Michel, Raul; Dvorak, Shawn; Voloshina, Irina B.; Metlov, Vladimir; Katysheva, Natalia; Neustroev, Vitaly V.; Sjoberg, George; Littlefield, Colin; Debski, Bartlomiej; Sowicka, Paulina; Klimaszewski, Marcin; Curylo, Malgorzata; Morelle, Etienne; Curtis, Ivan A.; Iwamatsu, Hidetoshi; Butterworth, Neil D.; Andreev, Maksim V.; Parakhin, Nikolai; Sklyanov, Aleksandr; Shiokawa, Kazuhiko; Novak, Rudolf; Irsmambetova, Tat'yana R.; Itoh, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshiharu; Hirosawa, Kenji; Denisenko, Denis; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Shappee, Benjamin; Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Prieto, Jose L.; Itagaki, Koh-ichi; Stubbings, Rod; Ripero, Jose; Muyllaert, Eddy; Poyner, Gary
Comments: 73 pages, 88 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2014-06-24
Continuing the project described by Kato et al. (2009, PASJ, 61, S395, arXiv:0905.1757), we collected times of superhump maxima for 56 SU UMa-type dwarf novae mainly observed during the 2013-2014 season and characterized these objects. We detected negative superhumps in VW Hyi and indicated that the low number of normal outbursts in some supercycle can be interpreted as a result of the disk tilt. This finding, combined with the Kepler observation of V1504 Cyg and V344 Lyr, suggests that the disk tilt is responsible for modulating the outburst pattern in SU UMa-type dwarf novae. We also studied the deeply eclipsing WZ Sge-type dwarf nova MASTER OT J005740.99+443101.5 and found evidence of a sharp eclipse during the phase of early superhumps. The profile can be reproduced by a combination of the eclipse of the axisymmetric disk and the uneclipsed light source of early superhumps. This finding confirms the lack of evince of a greatly enhanced hot spot during the early stage of WZ Sge-type outburst. We detected growing (stage A) superhumps in MN Dra and give a suggestion that some of SU UMa-type dwarf novae situated near the critical condition of tidal instability may show long-lasting stage A superhumps. The large negative period derivatives reported in such systems can be understood a result of the combination of stage A and B superhumps. The WZ Sge-type dwarf novae AL Com and ASASSN-13ck showed a long-lasting (plateau-type) rebrightening. In the early phase of the rebrightening, both objects showed a precursor-like outburst, suggesting that the long-lasting rebrightening is triggered by a precursor outburst.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.6646  [pdf] - 851338
Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Lensing Power Spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment
Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures. Matches Physical Review Letters accepted version. Submitted on 11 March 2014; accepted on 25 April 2014. The companion paper (arXiv:1312.6645) describes a measurement of polarization lensing in cross-correlation
Submitted: 2013-12-23, last modified: 2014-04-27
Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale $B$-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity $E$- and $B$-mode polarization mapped over $\sim30$ square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing $B$-modes is found at 4.2$\sigma$ (stat.+sys.) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of $27\%$, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda Cold Dark Matter ($\Lambda$CDM) cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing $B$-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.6645  [pdf] - 812508
Evidence for Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization from Cross-correlation with the Cosmic Infrared Background
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures. v2: replaced with version accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters. The companion paper (arXiv:1312.6646) describes a measurement of the polarization lensing power spectrum
Submitted: 2013-12-23, last modified: 2014-03-07
We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization data taken by the POLARBEAR experiment and cross-correlate it with Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross-spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0$\sigma$ and evidence for the presence of a lensing $B$-mode signal at a significance of 2.3$\sigma$. We demonstrate that our results are not biased by instrumental and astrophysical systematic errors by performing null-tests, checks with simulated and real data, and analytical calculations. This measurement of polarization lensing, made via the robust cross-correlation channel, not only reinforces POLARBEAR auto-correlation measurements, but also represents one of the early steps towards establishing CMB polarization lensing as a powerful new probe of cosmology and astrophysics.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.2847  [pdf] - 855791
Mission design of LiteBIRD
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2013-11-12
LiteBIRD is a next-generation satellite mission to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. On large angular scales the B-mode polarization of the CMB carries the imprint of primordial gravitational waves, and its precise measurement would provide a powerful probe of the epoch of inflation. The goal of LiteBIRD is to achieve a measurement of the characterizing tensor to scalar ratio $r$ to an uncertainty of $\delta r=0.001$. In order to achieve this goal we will employ a kilo-pixel superconducting detector array on a cryogenically cooled sub-Kelvin focal plane with an optical system at a temperature of 4~K. We are currently considering two detector array options; transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers and microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID). In this paper we give an overview of LiteBIRD and describe a TES-based polarimeter designed to achieve the target sensitivity of 2~$\mu$K$\cdot$arcmin over the frequency range 50 to 320~GHz.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.7069  [pdf] - 1392632
Survey of Period Variations of Superhumps in SU UMa-Type Dwarf Novae. V: The Fifth Year (2012-2013)
Kato, Taichi; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Masi, Gianluca; Nocentini, Francesca; Dubovsky, Pavol A.; Kudzej, Igor; Imamura, Kazuyoshi; Ogi, Minako; Tanabe, Kenji; Akazawa, Hidehiko; Krajci, Thomas; Miller, Ian; de Miguel, Enrique; Henden, Arne; Littlefield, Colin; Noguchi, Ryo; Ishibashi, Takehiro; Ono, Rikako; Kawabata, Miho; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Nishino, Hirochika; Furukawa, Hisami; Masumoto, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Katsura; Ohshima, Tomohito; Nakata, Chikako; Honda, Satoshi; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Hashimoto, Osamu; Stein, William; Pickard, Roger D.; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Pavlenko, Elena P.; Antonyuk, Oksana I.; Baklanov, Aleksei V.; Antonyuk, Kirill; Samsonov, Denis; Pit, Nikolaj; Sosnovskij, Aleksei; Oksanen, Arto; Harlingten, Caisey; Tyyska, Jenni; Monard, Berto; Shugarov, Sergey Yu.; Chochol, Drahomir; Kasai, Kiyoshi; Maeda, Yutaka; Hirosawa, Kenji; Itoh, Hiroshi; Sabo, Richard; Ulowetz, Joseph; Morelle, Etienne; Michel, Raul; Suarez, Genaro; James, Nick; Dvorak, Shawn; Voloshina, Irina B.; Richmond, Michael; Staels, Bart; Boyd, David; Andreev, Maksim V.; Parakhin, Nikolai; Katysheva, Natalia; Miyashita, Atsushi; Nakajima, Kazuhiro; Bolt, Greg; Padovan, Stefano; Nelson, Peter; Starkey, Donn R.; Buczynski, Denis; Starr, Peter; Goff, William N.; Denisenko, Denis; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Shappee, Benjamin; Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Prieto, Jose L.; Itagaki, Koh-ichi; Kaneko, Shizuo; Stubbings, Rod; Muyllaert, Eddy; Shears, Jeremy; Schmeer, Patrick; Poyner, Gary; Marco, Miguel Rodriguez
Comments: 83 pages, 95 figures, accepted for publication in PASJ
Submitted: 2013-10-26
Continuing the project described by Kato et al. (2009a, arXiv:0905.1757), we collected times of superhump maxima for SU UMa-type dwarf novae mainly observed during the 2012-2013 season. We found three objects (V444 Peg, CSS J203937 and MASTER J212624) having strongly positive period derivatives despite the long orbital period (Porb). By using the period of growing stage (stage A) superhumps, we obtained mass ratios for six objects. We characterized nine new WZ Sge-type dwarf novae. We made a pilot survey of the decline rate of slowly fading part of SU UMa-type and WZ Sge-type outbursts. The decline time scale was found to generally follow the expected Porb^(1/4) dependence and WZ Sge-type outbursts also generally follow this trend. There are some objects which show slower decline rates, and we consider these objects good candidates for period bouncers. We also studied unusual behavior in some objects, including BK Lyn which made a transition from an ER UMa-type state to the novalike (standstill) state in 2013 and unusually frequent occurrence of superoutbursts in NY Ser and CR Boo. We applied least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) power spectral analysis, which has been proven to be very effective in analyzing the Kepler data, to ground-based photometry of BK Lyn and detected the dramatic disappearance of the signal of negative superhumps in 2013. We suggested that the mass-transfer rates did not vary strongly between the ER UMa-type state and novalike state in BK Lyn, and this transition was less likely caused by a systematic variation of the mass-transfer rate.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.7877  [pdf] - 1152574
The bolometric focal plane array of the Polarbear CMB experiment
Comments:
Submitted: 2012-10-29
The Polarbear Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization experiment is currently observing from the Atacama Desert in Northern Chile. It will characterize the expected B-mode polarization due to gravitational lensing of the CMB, and search for the possible B-mode signature of inflationary gravitational waves. Its 250 mK focal plane detector array consists of 1,274 polarization-sensitive antenna-coupled bolometers, each with an associated lithographed band-defining filter. Each detector's planar antenna structure is coupled to the telescope's optical system through a contacting dielectric lenslet, an architecture unique in current CMB experiments. We present the initial characterization of this focal plane.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.7768  [pdf] - 1152551
The POLARBEAR Experiment
Comments: Presented at SPIE Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VI, July 6, 2012. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 8452
Submitted: 2012-10-29
We present the design and characterization of the POLARBEAR experiment. POLARBEAR will measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on angular scales ranging from the experiment's 3.5 arcminute beam size to several degrees. The experiment utilizes a unique focal plane of 1,274 antenna-coupled, polarization sensitive TES bolometers cooled to 250 milliKelvin. Employing this focal plane along with stringent control over systematic errors, POLARBEAR has the sensitivity to detect the expected small scale B-mode signal due to gravitational lensing and search for the large scale B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. POLARBEAR was assembled for an engineering run in the Inyo Mountains of California in 2010 and was deployed in late 2011 to the Atacama Desert in Chile. An overview of the instrument is presented along with characterization results from observations in Chile.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1108.3384  [pdf] - 1083433
An Indirect Search for WIMPs in the Sun using 3109.6 days of upward-going muons in Super-Kamiokande
Comments: Add journal reference. Also fixed typo and cosmetic things in the old draft
Submitted: 2011-08-16, last modified: 2012-07-31
We present the result of an indirect search for high energy neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun using upward-going muon (upmu) events at Super-Kamiokande. Datasets from SKI-SKIII (3109.6 days) were used for the analysis. We looked for an excess of neutrino signal from the Sun as compared with the expected atmospheric neutrino background in three upmu categories: stopping, non-showering, and showering. No significant excess was observed. The 90% C.L. upper limits of upward-going muon flux induced by WIMPs of 100 GeV/c$^2$ were 6.4$\times10^{-15}$ cm$^{-2}$ sec$^{-1}$ and 4.0$\times10^{-15}$ cm$^{-2}$ sec$^{-1}$ for the soft and hard annihilation channels, respectively. These limits correspond to upper limits of 4.5$\times10^{-39}$ cm$^{-2}$ and 2.7$\times10^{-40}$ cm$^{-2}$ for spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections in the soft and hard annihilation channels, respectively.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.2101  [pdf] - 423233
Ultra High Energy Cosmology with POLARBEAR
Comments: 8 pages, 6 figures, DPF 2011 conference proceedings
Submitted: 2011-10-10
Observations of the temperature anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) lend support to an inflationary origin of the universe, yet no direct evidence verifying inflation exists. Many current experiments are focussing on the CMB's polarization anisotropy, specifically its curl component (called "B-mode" polarization), which remains undetected. The inflationary paradigm predicts the existence of a primordial gravitational wave background that imprints a unique B-mode signature on the CMB's polarization at large angular scales. The CMB B-mode signal also encodes gravitational lensing information at smaller angular scales, bearing the imprint of cosmological large scale structures (LSS) which in turn may elucidate the properties of cosmological neutrinos. The quest for detection of these signals; each of which is orders of magnitude smaller than the CMB temperature anisotropy signal, has motivated the development of background-limited detectors with precise control of systematic effects. The POLARBEAR experiment is designed to perform a deep search for the signature of gravitational waves from inflation and to characterize lensing of the CMB by LSS. POLARBEAR is a 3.5 meter ground-based telescope with 3.8 arcminute angular resolution at 150 GHz. At the heart of the POLARBEAR receiver is an array featuring 1274 antenna-coupled superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers cooled to 0.25 Kelvin. POLARBEAR is designed to reach a tensor-to-scalar ratio of 0.025 after two years of observation -- more than an order of magnitude improvement over the current best results, which would test physics at energies near the GUT scale. POLARBEAR had an engineering run in the Inyo Mountains of Eastern California in 2010 and will begin observations in the Atacama Desert in Chile in 2011.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1011.0763  [pdf] - 348120
The new generation CMB B-mode polarization experiment: POLARBEAR
Comments:
Submitted: 2010-11-02
We describe the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization experiment called Polarbear. This experiment will use the dedicated Huan Tran Telescope equipped with a powerful 1,200-bolometer array receiver to map the CMB polarization with unprecedented accuracy. We summarize the experiment, its goals, and current status.