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Nayerhoda, A.

Normalized to: Nayerhoda, A.

16 article(s) in total. 558 co-authors, from 1 to 16 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 65,5.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.04356  [pdf] - 2049211
Constraining the Local Burst Rate Density of Primordial Black Holes with HAWC
Comments: Corresponding authors: K.L. Engel & A. Peisker. 13 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2019-11-11, last modified: 2020-02-17
Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) may have been created by density fluctuations in the early Universe and could be as massive as $> 10^9$ solar masses or as small as the Planck mass. It has been postulated that a black hole has a temperature inversely-proportional to its mass and will thermally emit all species of fundamental particles via Hawking Radiation. PBHs with initial masses of $\sim 5 \times 10^{14}$ g (approximately one gigaton) should be expiring today with bursts of high-energy gamma radiation in the GeV--TeV energy range. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays with energies of $\sim$300 GeV to past 100 TeV, which corresponds to the high end of the PBH burst spectrum. With its large instantaneous field-of-view of $\sim 2$ sr and a duty cycle over 95%, the HAWC Observatory is well suited to perform an all-sky search for PBH bursts. We conducted a search using 959 days of HAWC data and exclude the local PBH burst rate density above $3400~\mathrm{pc^{-3}~yr^{-1}}$ at 99% confidence, the strongest limit on the local PBH burst rate density from any existing electromagnetic measurement.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.04065  [pdf] - 2029845
Constraints on the Emission of Gamma Rays from M31 with HAWC
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-01-13
Cosmic rays, along with stellar radiation and magnetic fields, are known to make up a significant fraction of the energy density of galaxies such as the Milky Way. When cosmic rays interact in the interstellar medium, they produce gamma-ray emission which provides an important indication of how the cosmic rays propagate. Gamma rays from the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), located 785 kpc away, provide a unique opportunity to study cosmic-ray acceleration and diffusion in a galaxy with a structure and evolution very similar to the Milky Way. Using 33 months of data from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, we search for TeV gamma rays from the galactic plane of M31. We also investigate past and present evidence of galactic activity in M31 by searching for Fermi Bubble-like structures above and below the galactic nucleus. No significant gamma-ray emission is observed, so we use the null result to compute upper limits on the energy density of cosmic rays $>10$ TeV in M31. The computed upper limits are approximately ten times higher than expected from the extrapolation of the Fermi LAT results.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.08609  [pdf] - 2031954
Multiple Galactic Sources with Emission Above 56 TeV Detected by HAWC
HAWC Collaboration; Abeysekara, A. U.; Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Camacho, J. R. Angeles; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Arunbabu, K. P.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Baghmanyan, V.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de León, S. Coutiño; De la Fuente, E.; de León, C.; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engel, K.; Espinoza, C.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; Galván-Gámez, A.; Garcia, D.; García-González, J. A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hinton, J.; Hona, B.; Huang, D.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Kieda, D.; Lara, A.; Lee, W. H.; Vargas, H. León; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Luis-Raya, G.; Lundeen, J.; López-Coto, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Morales-Soto, J. A.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Peisker, A.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Greus, F. Salesa; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Tabachnick, E.; Tanner, M.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Torres-Escobedo, R.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, H.
Comments: Accepted by Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2019-09-18, last modified: 2020-01-09
We present the first catalog of gamma-ray sources emitting above 56 and 100 TeV with data from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory, a wide field-of-view observatory capable of detecting gamma rays up to a few hundred TeV. Nine sources are observed above 56 TeV, all of which are likely Galactic in origin. Three sources continue emitting past 100 TeV, making this the highest-energy gamma-ray source catalog to date. We report the integral flux of each of these objects. We also report spectra for three highest-energy sources and discuss the possibility that they are PeVatrons.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.08070  [pdf] - 2000346
Constraints on Lorentz invariance violation from HAWC observations of gamma rays above 100 TeV
Comments: 9 pages, 3 figures. Submitted to journal
Submitted: 2019-11-18
Due to the high energies and long distances to the sources, astrophysical observations provide a unique opportunity to test possible signatures of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). Superluminal LIV enables the decay of photons at high energy. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is among the most sensitive gamma-ray instruments currently operating above 10 TeV. HAWC finds evidence of 100 TeV photon emission from at least four astrophysical sources. These observations exclude, for the strongest of the limits set, the LIV energy scale to $2.2\times10^{31}$ eV, over 1800 times the Planck energy and an improvement of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude over previous limits.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.12518  [pdf] - 1962280
Measurement of the Crab Nebula Spectrum Past 100 TeV with HAWC
HAWC Collaboration; Abeysekara, A. U.; Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Camacho, J. R. Angeles; Acero, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Arunbabu, K. P.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Baghmanyan, V.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Brisbois, C.; Cabellero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de León, S. Coutiño; De la Fuente, E.; de León, C.; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engel, K.; Espinoza, C.; Fick, B.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; Galván-Gámez, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hinton, J.; Hona, B.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Kieda, D.; Lara, A.; Lee, W. H.; Vargas, H. León; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Luis-Raya, G.; Lundeen, J.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Morales-Soto, J. A.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Peisker, A.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Salazar, H.; Greus, F. Salesa; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Arroyo, M. Seglar; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Tabachnick, E.; Tanner, M.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.
Comments: published in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-05-29, last modified: 2019-09-17
We present TeV gamma-ray observations of the Crab Nebula, the standard reference source in ground-based gamma-ray astronomy, using data from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory. In this analysis we use two independent energy-estimation methods that utilize extensive air shower variables such as the core position, shower angle, and shower lateral energy distribution. In contrast, the previously published HAWC energy spectrum roughly estimated the shower energy with only the number of photomultipliers triggered. This new methodology yields a much improved energy resolution over the previous analysis and extends HAWC's ability to accurately measure gamma-ray energies well beyond 100 TeV. The energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula is well fit to a log parabola shape $\left(\frac{dN}{dE} = \phi_0 \left(E/\textrm{7 TeV}\right)^{-\alpha-\beta\ln\left(E/\textrm{7 TeV}\right)}\right)$ with emission up to at least 100 TeV. For the first estimator, a ground parameter that utilizes fits to the lateral distribution function to measure the charge density 40 meters from the shower axis, the best-fit values are $\phi_o$=(2.35$\pm$0.04$^{+0.20}_{-0.21}$)$\times$10$^{-13}$ (TeV cm$^2$ s)$^{-1}$, $\alpha$=2.79$\pm$0.02$^{+0.01}_{-0.03}$, and $\beta$=0.10$\pm$0.01$^{+0.01}_{-0.03}$. For the second estimator, a neural network which uses the charge distribution in annuli around the core and other variables, these values are $\phi_o$=(2.31$\pm$0.02$^{+0.32}_{-0.17}$)$\times$10$^{-13}$ (TeV cm$^2$ s)$^{-1}$, $\alpha$=2.73$\pm$0.02$^{+0.03}_{-0.02}$, and $\beta$=0.06$\pm$0.01$\pm$0.02. The first set of uncertainties are statistical; the second set are systematic. Both methods yield compatible results. These measurements are the highest-energy observation of a gamma-ray source to date.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.01808  [pdf] - 1955448
HAWC Contributions to the 36th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC2019)
Abeysekara, A. U.; Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Camacho, J. R. Angeles; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Arunbabu, K. P.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Baghmanyan, V.; Barber, A. S.; Gonzalez, J. Becerra; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Braun, J.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Cotti12, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de León, S. Coutiño; De la Fuente, E.; de León, C.; Hernandez, R. Diaz; Diaz-Cruz, L.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engel, K.; Enríquez-Rivera, O.; Espinoza, C.; Alonso, M. Fernández; Fick, B.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; Galván-Gámez, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garcia-Luna, J. L.; Garfias, F.; Giacinti, G.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hinton, J.; Hona, B.; Huang, D.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kieda, D.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; Vargas, H. León; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; López-Coto, R.; Luis-Raya, G.; Lundeen, J.; Malone, K.; Marandon, V.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A. J.; McEnery, J.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Morales-Soto, J. A.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Peisker, A.; Araujo, Y. Pérez; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Greus, F. Salesa; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Arroyo, M. Seglar; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Tabachnick, E.; Taboada, I.; Tanner, M.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Torres-Escobedo, R.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Vianello, G.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.
Comments: List of proceedings from the HAWC Collaboration presented at ICRC2019. Corrected typos in the index of the previous version. Follow the "HTML" link to access the list
Submitted: 2019-09-04
List of proceedings from the HAWC Collaboration presented at the 36th International Cosmic Ray Conference, 24 July - 1 August 2019, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.11732  [pdf] - 1920811
Searching for Dark Matter Sub-structure with HAWC
Comments: 20 pages, 10 figures. submitted to JCAP
Submitted: 2018-11-28, last modified: 2019-06-20
Simulations of dark matter show a discrepancy between the expected number of Galactic dark matter sub-halos and how many have been optically observed. Some of these unseen satellites may exist as dark dwarf galaxies: sub-halos like dwarf galaxies with no luminous counterpart. Assuming WIMP dark matter, it may be possible to detect these unseen sub-halos from gamma-ray signals originating from dark matter annihilation. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is a very high energy (500 GeV to 100 TeV) gamma ray detector with a wide field-of-view and near continuous duty cycle, making HAWC ideal for unbiased sky surveys. We perform such a search for gamma ray signals from dark dwarfs in the Milky Way halo. We perform a targeted search of HAWC gamma-ray sources which have no known association with lower-energy counterparts, based on an unbiased search of the entire sky. With no sources found to strongly prefer dark matter models, we calculate the ability of HAWC to observe dark dwarfs. We also compute the HAWC sensitivity to potential future detections for a given model of dark matter substructure.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.00628  [pdf] - 1849141
Search for Dark Matter Gamma-ray Emission from the Andromeda Galaxy with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory
Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Bernal, A.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de León, S. Coutiño; De León, C.; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Eckner, C.; Engel, K.; Enríquez-Rivera, O.; Espinoza, C.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Galván-Gámez, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfias, F.; Muñoz, A. González; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Hona, B.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Kunde, G. J.; Lennarz, D.; Vargas, H. León; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Raya, G. Luis; Luna-García, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Pelayo, R.; Pretz, J.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Riviére, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Salazar, H.; Greus, F. Salesa; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Arroyo, M. Seglar; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Taboada, I.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Zaharijas, G.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.
Comments: published in JCAP. Figure 6 (bottom) has been corrected
Submitted: 2018-04-02, last modified: 2019-03-13
The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is a nearby ($\sim$780 kpc) galaxy similar to our own Milky Way. Observational evidence suggests that it resides in a large halo of dark matter (DM), making it a good target for DM searches. We present a search for gamma rays from M31 using 1017 days of data from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory. With its wide field of view and constant monitoring, HAWC is well-suited to search for DM in extended targets like M31. No DM annihilation or decay signal was detected for DM masses from 1 to 100 TeV in the $b\bar{b}$, $t\bar{t}$, $\tau^{+}\tau^{-}$, $\mu^{+}\mu^{-}$, and $W^{+}W^{-}$ channels. Therefore we present limits on those processes. Our limits nicely complement the existing body of DM limits from other targets and instruments. Specifically the DM decay limits from our benchmark model are the most constraining for DM masses from 25 TeV to 100 TeV in the $b\bar{b}, t\bar{t}$ and $\mu^{+}\mu{-}$ channels. In addition to DM-specific limits, we also calculate general gamma-ray flux limits for M31 in 5 energy bins from 1 TeV to 100 TeV.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.08429  [pdf] - 1836634
Science Case for a Wide Field-of-View Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Observatory in the Southern Hemisphere
Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Ashkar, H.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Arceo, R.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Bretz, T.; Brisbois, C. A.; Brown, A. M.; Brun, F.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carosi, A.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Cotter, G.; De León, S. Coutiño; Cristofari, P.; Dasso, S.; de la Fuente, E.; Dingus, B. L.; Desiati, P.; Salles, F. de O.; de Souza, V.; Dorner, D.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; García-González, J. A.; DuVernois, M. A.; Di Sciascio, G.; Engel, K.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; Funk, S.; Glicenstein, J-F.; Gonzalez, J.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Harding, J. P.; Haungs, A.; Hinton, J.; Hona, B.; Hoyos, D.; Huentemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Kawata, K.; Kunwar, S.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lenain, J. -P.; Link, K.; López-Coto, R.; Marandon, V.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Wilhelmi, E. de Oña; Parsons, R. D.; Patricelli, B.; Pichel, A.; Piel, Q.; Prandini, E.; Pueschel, E.; Procureur, S.; Reisenegger, A.; Rivière, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Rovero, A. C.; Rowell, G.; Ruiz-Velasco, E. L.; Sandoval, A.; Santander, M.; Sako, T.; Sako, T. K.; Satalecka, K.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schüssler, F.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Smith, A. J.; Spencer, S.; Surajbali, P.; Tabachnick, E.; Taylor, A. M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, I.; Vallage, B.; Viana, A.; Watson, J. J.; Weisgarber, T.; Werner, F.; White, R.; Wischnewski, R.; Yang, R.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-02-22
We outline the science motivation for SGSO, the Southern Gamma-Ray Survey Observatory. SGSO will be a next-generation wide field-of-view gamma-ray survey instrument, sensitive to gamma-rays in the energy range from 100 GeV to hundreds of TeV. Its science topics include unveiling galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, monitoring the transient sky at very high energies, probing particle physics beyond the Standard Model, and the characterization of the cosmic ray flux. SGSO will consist of an air shower detector array, located in South America. Due to its location and large field of view, SGSO will be complementary to other current and planned gamma-ray observatories such as HAWC, LHAASO, and CTA.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.03982  [pdf] - 2006561
MAGIC and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray results on unassociated HAWC sources
Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Arcaro, C.; Baack, D.; Babić, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J. A.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berse, R. Ch.; Berti, A.; Bhattacharyya, W.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnoli, G.; Carosi, R.; Carosi, A.; Ceribella, G.; Chatterjee, A.; Colak, S. M.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; Delfino, M.; Delgado, J.; Di Pierro, F.; Domínguez, A.; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Elsaesser, D.; Ramazani, V. Fallah; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hassan, T.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Ishio, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Kuveždić, D.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Maggio, C.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Masuda, S.; Mazin, D.; Mielke, K.; Minev, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moreno, V.; Moretti, E.; Nagayoshi, T.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Rosillo, M. Nievas; Nigro, C.; Nilsson, K.; Ninci, D.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Persic, M.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Righi, C.; Rugliancich, A.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schweizer, T.; Sitarek, J.; Šnidarić, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takahashi, M.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Teshima, M.; Torres-Albà, N.; Treves, A.; Tsujimoto, S.; Vanzo, G.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Zarić, D.; Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Bernal, A.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de León, S. Coutiño; De León, C.; De la Fuente, E.; Hernandez, R. Diaz; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engel, K.; Enriquez-Rivera, O.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; García-González, J. A.; Garfias, F.; González-Muñoz, A.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; Vargas, H. León; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Luis-Raya, G.; Luna-García, R.; López-Coto, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Pelayo, R.; Pretz, J.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Greus, F. Salesa; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Arroyo, M. Seglar; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Taboada, I.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Vianello, G.; Villaseñor, L.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Yodh, G.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.; Álvarez, J. D.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Berenji, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caraveo, P. A.; Castro, D.; Cavazzuti, E.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Costantin, D.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desai, A.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Domínguez, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Liodakis, I.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mereu, I.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Palatiello, M.; Paliya, V. S.; Persic, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rani, B.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, M.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Troja, E.; Valverde, J.; Wood, K.; Yassine, M.
Comments: 12 pages, 3 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-01-13
The HAWC Collaboration released the 2HWC catalog of TeV sources, in which 19 show no association with any known high-energy (HE; E > 10 GeV) or very-high-energy (VHE; E > 300 GeV) sources. This catalog motivated follow-up studies by both the MAGIC and Fermi-LAT observatories with the aim of investigating gamma-ray emission over a broad energy band. In this paper, we report the results from the first joint work between HAWC, MAGIC and Fermi-LAT on three unassociated HAWC sources: 2HWC J2006+341, 2HWC J1907+084* and 2HWC J1852+013*. Although no significant detection was found in the HE and VHE regimes, this investigation shows that a minimum 1 degree extension (at 95% confidence level) and harder spectrum in the GeV than the one extrapolated from HAWC results are required in the case of 2HWC J1852+013*, while a simply minimum extension of 0.16 degrees (at 95% confidence level) can already explain the scenario proposed by HAWC for the remaining sources. Moreover, the hypothesis that these sources are pulsar wind nebulae is also investigated in detail.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.05624  [pdf] - 1806060
Constraints on Spin-Dependent Dark Matter Scattering with Long-Lived Mediators from TeV Observations of the Sun with HAWC
Comments: 11 pages, 4 figures. See also companion paper 1808.05620. Accepted for publication in Physical Review D
Submitted: 2018-08-16, last modified: 2018-11-15
We analyze the Sun as a source for the indirect detection of dark matter through a search for gamma rays from the solar disk. Capture of dark matter by elastic interactions with the solar nuclei followed by annihilation to long-lived mediators can produce a detectable gamma-ray flux. We search three years of data from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory and find no statistically significant detection of TeV gamma-ray emission from the Sun. Using this, we constrain the spin-dependent elastic scattering cross section of dark matter with protons for dark matter masses above 1 TeV, assuming an unstable mediator with a favorable lifetime. The results complement constraints obtained from Fermi-LAT observations of the Sun and together cover WIMP masses between 4 GeV and $10^6$ GeV. The cross section constraints for mediator decays to gamma rays can be as strong as $\sim10^{-45}$ cm$^{-2}$, which is more than four orders of magnitude stronger than current direct-detection experiments for 1 TeV dark matter mass. The cross-section constraints at higher masses are even better, nearly 7 orders of magnitude better than the current direct-detection constraints for 100 TeV dark matter mass. This demonstration of sensitivity encourages detailed development of theoretical models in light of these powerful new constraints.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.05620  [pdf] - 1806059
First HAWC Observations of the Sun Constrain Steady TeV Gamma-Ray Emission
Comments: 14 pages, 6 figures. See also companion paper 1808.05624. Accepted for publication in Physical Review D
Submitted: 2018-08-16, last modified: 2018-11-01
Steady gamma-ray emission up to at least 200 GeV has been detected from the solar disk in the Fermi-LAT data, with the brightest, hardest emission occurring during solar minimum. The likely cause is hadronic cosmic rays undergoing collisions in the Sun's atmosphere after being redirected from ingoing to outgoing in magnetic fields, though the exact mechanism is not understood. An important new test of the gamma-ray production mechanism will follow from observations at higher energies. Only the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory has the required sensitivity to effectively probe the Sun in the TeV range. Using three years of HAWC data from November 2014 to December 2017, just prior to the solar minimum, we search for 1--100 TeV gamma rays from the solar disk. No evidence of a signal is observed, and we set strong upper limits on the flux at a few $10^{-12}$ TeV$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ at 1 TeV. Our limit, which is the most constraining result on TeV gamma rays from the Sun, is $\sim10\%$ of the theoretical maximum flux (based on a model where all incoming cosmic rays produce outgoing photons), which in turn is comparable to the Fermi-LAT data near 100 GeV. The prospects for a first TeV detection of the Sun by HAWC are especially high during solar minimum, which began in early 2018.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.01892  [pdf] - 1761072
Very high energy particle acceleration powered by the jets of the microquasar SS 433
HAWC Collaboration; Abeysekara, A. U.; Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de León, S. Coutiño; De León, C.; De la Fuente, E.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engel, K.; Espinoza, C.; Fang, K.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; Galván-Gámez, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfias, F.; Muñoz, A. González; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hinton, J.; Hona, B.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Kar, P.; Kunde, G. J.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Vargas, H. León; Li, H.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Luis-Raya, G.; López-Coto, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Greus, F. Salesa; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Arroyo, M. Seglar; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Taboada, I.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Vianello, G.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Yodh, G.; Zepeda, A.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, H.
Comments: Preprint version of Nature paper. Contacts: S. BenZvi, B. Dingus, K. Fang, C.D. Rho , H. Zhang, H. Zhou
Submitted: 2018-10-03
SS 433 is a binary system containing a supergiant star that is overflowing its Roche lobe with matter accreting onto a compact object (either a black hole or neutron star). Two jets of ionized matter with a bulk velocity of $\sim0.26c$ extend from the binary, perpendicular to the line of sight, and terminate inside W50, a supernova remnant that is being distorted by the jets. SS 433 differs from other microquasars in that the accretion is believed to be super-Eddington, and the luminosity of the system is $\sim10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The lobes of W50 in which the jets terminate, about 40 pc from the central source, are expected to accelerate charged particles, and indeed radio and X-ray emission consistent with electron synchrotron emission in a magnetic field have been observed. At higher energies (>100 GeV), the particle fluxes of $\gamma$ rays from X-ray hotspots around SS 433 have been reported as flux upper limits. In this energy regime, it has been unclear whether the emission is dominated by electrons that are interacting with photons from the cosmic microwave background through inverse-Compton scattering or by protons interacting with the ambient gas. Here we report TeV $\gamma$-ray observations of the SS 433/W50 system where the lobes are spatially resolved. The TeV emission is localized to structures in the lobes, far from the center of the system where the jets are formed. We have measured photon energies of at least 25 TeV, and these are certainly not Doppler boosted, because of the viewing geometry. We conclude that the emission from radio to TeV energies is consistent with a single population of electrons with energies extending to at least hundreds of TeV in a magnetic field of $\sim16$~micro-Gauss.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.10423  [pdf] - 1777412
VERITAS and Fermi-LAT observations of new HAWC sources
VERITAS Collaboration; Abeysekara, A. U.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Brose, R.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Chromey, A. J.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Daniel, M. K.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Hutten, M.; Hanna, D.; Hervet, O.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Lin, T. T. Y.; McArthur, S.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; O'Brien, S.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Petrashyk, A.; Pohl, M.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rulten, C.; Sadeh, I.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Sushch, I.; Tyler, J.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Wells, R. M.; Wilcox, P.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Williamson, T. J.; Zitzer, B.; Collaboration, Fermi-LAT; :; Abdollahi, S.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caraveo, P. A.; Castro, D.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costantin, D.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Dominguez, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Horan, D.; Johannesson, G.; Kensei, S.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ojha, R.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Palatiello, M.; Paliya, V. S.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Persic, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Rani, B.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Sgro, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Valverde, J.; Vianello, G.; Vogel, M.; Wood, K.; Yassine, M.; Collaboration, HAWC; :; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Bernal, A.; Braun, J.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistran, T.; Carraminana, A.; Casanova, S.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de Leon, S. Coutino; De Leon, C.; De la Fuente, E.; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Engel, K.; Enriquez-Rivera, O.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J. A.; Garfias, F.; Munoz, A. Gonzalez; Gonzalez, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Hona, B.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hui, C. M.; Huntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; Vargas, H. Leon; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Luis-Raya, G.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lopez-Coto, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martinez-Castro, J.; Martinez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafa, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Pelayo, R.; Pretz, J.; Perez-Perez, E. G.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Riviere, C.; Rosa-Gonzalez, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Salazar, H.; Greus, F. Salesa; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Arroyo, M. Seglar; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Taboada, I.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Villasenor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Yodh, G.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.
Comments: Accepted for publication in the ApJ, Corresponding author: Nahee Park (VERITAS Collaboration), John W. Hewitt (Fermi-LAT Collaboration), Ignacio Taboada (HAWC Collaboration), 30 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-30
The HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) collaboration recently published their 2HWC catalog, listing 39 very high energy (VHE; >100~GeV) gamma-ray sources based on 507 days of observation. Among these, there are nineteen sources that are not associated with previously known TeV sources. We have studied fourteen of these sources without known counterparts with VERITAS and Fermi-LAT. VERITAS detected weak gamma-ray emission in the 1~TeV-30~TeV band in the region of DA 495, a pulsar wind nebula coinciding with 2HWC J1953+294, confirming the discovery of the source by HAWC. We did not find any counterpart for the selected fourteen new HAWC sources from our analysis of Fermi-LAT data for energies higher than 10 GeV. During the search, we detected GeV gamma-ray emission coincident with a known TeV pulsar wind nebula, SNR G54.1+0.3 (VER J1930+188), and a 2HWC source, 2HWC J1930+188. The fluxes for isolated, steady sources in the 2HWC catalog are generally in good agreement with those measured by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. However, the VERITAS fluxes for SNR G54.1+0.3, DA 495, and TeV J2032+4130 are lower than those measured by HAWC and several new HAWC sources are not detected by VERITAS. This is likely due to a change in spectral shape, source extension, or the influence of diffuse emission in the source region.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.01847  [pdf] - 1754301
Observation of Anisotropy of TeV Cosmic Rays with Two Years of HAWC
Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Bernal, A.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; De León, C.; De la Fuente, E.; Hernandez, R. Diaz; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Engel, K.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; García-González, J. A.; Garfias, F.; Muñoz, A. González; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hona, B.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Vargas, H. León; Longinotti, A. L.; Luis-Raya, G.; Luna-García, R.; López-Cámara, D.; López-Coto, R.; López-Cámara, D.; López-Coto, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Pelayo, R.; Pretz, J.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Greus, F. Salesa; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Arroyo, M. Seglar; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Taboada, I.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Vianello, G.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.
Comments: 22 pages, 14 figures, 2 tables, submission to ApJ
Submitted: 2018-05-04, last modified: 2018-07-20
After two years of operation, the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory has analyzed the TeV cosmic-ray sky over an energy range between $2.0$ and $72.8$ TeV. The HAWC detector is a ground-based air-shower array located at high altitude in the state of Puebla, Mexico. Using 300 light-tight water tanks, it collects the Cherenkov light from the particles of extensive air showers from primary gamma rays and cosmic rays. This detection method allows for uninterrupted observation of the entire overhead sky (2~sr instantaneous, 8.5~sr integrated) in the energy range from a few TeV to hundreds of TeV. Like other detectors in the northern and southern hemisphere, HAWC observes an energy-dependent anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays. The observed cosmic-ray anisotropy is dominated by a dipole moment with phase $\alpha\approx40^{\circ}$ and amplitude that slowly rises in relative intensity from $8\times10^{-4}$ at 2 TeV to $14\times10^{-4}$ around 30.3 TeV, above which the dipole decreases in strength. A significant large-scale ($>60^{\circ}$ in angular extent) signal is also observed in the quadrupole and octupole moments, and significant small-scale features are also present, with locations and shapes consistent with previous observations. Compared to previous measurements in this energy range, the HAWC cosmic-ray sky maps improve on the energy resolution and fit precision of the anisotropy. These data can be used in an effort to better constrain local cosmic-ray accelerators and the intervening magnetic fields.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.08913  [pdf] - 1684588
Constraining the $\bar{p}/p$ Ratio in TeV Cosmic Rays with Observations of the Moon Shadow by HAWC
Abeysekara, A. U.; Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Braun, J.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de León, S. Coutiño; De León, C.; la Fuentem, E. D; Hernandez, R. Diaz; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engels, K.; Enríquez-Rivera, O.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; Galván-Gámez, A.; García-González, J. A.; Muñoz, A. González; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hona, B.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Lara, A.; Lee, W. H.; Vargas, H. León; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Luis-Raya, G.; Luna-García, R.; López-Coto, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellena, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Pelayo, R.; Pretz, J.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Riviére, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Greus, F. Salesa; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Arroyo, M. Seglar; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Taboada, I.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Yodha, G. B.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.; Alvarez, J. D.
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures. Accepted by Physical Review D
Submitted: 2018-02-24, last modified: 2018-04-22
An indirect measurement of the antiproton flux in cosmic rays is possible as the particles undergo deflection by the geomagnetic field. This effect can be measured by studying the deficit in the flux, or shadow, created by the Moon as it absorbs cosmic rays that are headed towards the Earth. The shadow is displaced from the actual position of the Moon due to geomagnetic deflection, which is a function of the energy and charge of the cosmic rays. The displacement provides a natural tool for momentum/charge discrimination that can be used to study the composition of cosmic rays. Using 33 months of data comprising more than 80 billion cosmic rays measured by the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, we have analyzed the Moon shadow to search for TeV antiprotons in cosmic rays. We present our first upper limits on the $\bar{p}/p$ fraction, which in the absence of any direct measurements, provide the tightest available constraints of $\sim1\%$ on the antiproton fraction for energies between 1 and 10 TeV.