sort results by

Use logical operators AND, OR, NOT and round brackets to construct complex queries. Whitespace-separated words are treated as ANDed.

Show articles per page in mode

Myserlis, I.

Normalized to: Myserlis, I.

43 article(s) in total. 594 co-authors, from 1 to 41 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 8,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.06512  [pdf] - 2041474
Multiwavelength behaviour of the blazar 3C279: decade-long study from $\gamma$-ray to radio
Comments: 21 pages, 18 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2020-01-17
We report the results of decade-long (2008-2018) $\gamma$-ray to 1 GHz radio monitoring of the blazar 3C 279, including GASP/WEBT, $\it{Fermi}$ and $\it{Swift}$ data, as well as polarimetric and spectroscopic data. The X-ray and $\gamma$-ray light curves correlate well, with no delay > 3 hours, implying general co-spatiality of the emission regions. The $\gamma$-ray-optical flux-flux relation changes with activity state, ranging from a linear to a more complex dependence. The behaviour of the Stokes parameters at optical and radio wavelengths, including 43 GHz VLBA images, supports either a predominantly helical magnetic field or motion of the radiating plasma along a spiral path. Apparent speeds of emission knots range from 10 to 37c, with the highest values requiring bulk Lorentz factors close to those needed to explain $\gamma$-ray variability on very short time scales. The Mg II emission line flux in the `blue' and `red' wings correlates with the optical synchrotron continuum flux density, possibly providing a variable source of seed photons for inverse Compton scattering. In the radio bands we find progressive delays of the most prominent light curve maxima with decreasing frequency, as expected from the frequency dependence of the $\tau=1$ surface of synchrotron self-absorption. The global maximum in the 86 GHz light curve becomes less prominent at lower frequencies, while a local maximum, appearing in 2014, strengthens toward decreasing frequencies, becoming pronounced at $\sim5$ GHz. These tendencies suggest different Doppler boosting of stratified radio-emitting zones in the jet.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.12863  [pdf] - 1878875
The relativistic jet of the $\gamma$-ray emitting narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PKS J1222$+$0413
Comments: 18 pages, 10 figures and 6 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-04-29
We present a multi-frequency study of PKS J1222$+$0413 (4C$+$04.42), currently the highest redshift $\gamma$-ray emitting narrow-line Seyfert 1 ($\gamma$-NLS1). We assemble a broad spectral energy distribution (SED) including previously unpublished datasets: X-ray data obtained with the NuSTAR and Neil Gehrels Swift observatories; near-infrared, optical and UV spectroscopy obtained with VLT X-shooter; and multiband radio data from the Effelsberg telescope. These new observations are supplemented by archival data from the literature. We apply physical models to the broadband SED, parameterising the accretion flow and jet emission to investigate the disc-jet connection. PKS J1222$+$0413 has a much greater black hole mass than most other NLS1s, $M_\mathrm{BH}\approx2\times10^{8}$ M$_\odot$, similar to those found in flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Therefore this source provides insight into how the jets of $\gamma$-NLS1s relate to those of FSRQs.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04607  [pdf] - 1847041
High-Energy Polarimetry - a new window to probe extreme physics in AGN jets
Comments: submitted to Astro2020 (Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey)
Submitted: 2019-03-11
The constantly improving sensitivity of ground-based and space-borne observatories has made possible the detection of high-energy emission (X-rays and gamma-rays) from several thousands of extragalactic sources. Enormous progress has been made in measuring the continuum flux enabling us to perform imaging, spectral and timing studies. An important remaining challenge for high-energy astronomy is measuring polarization. The capability to measure polarization is being realized currently at X-ray energies (e.g. with IXPE), and sensitive gamma-ray telescopes capable of measuring polarization, such as AMEGO, AdEPT, e-ASTROGAM, etc., are being developed. These future gamma-ray telescopes will probe the radiation mechanisms and magnetic fields of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei at spatial scales much smaller than the angular resolution achieved with continuum observations of the instrument. In this white paper, we discuss the scientific potentials of high-energy polarimetry, especially gamma-ray polarimetry, including the theoretical implications, and observational technology advances being made. In particular, we will explore the primary scientific opportunities and wealth of information expected from synergy of multi-wavelength polarimetry that will be brought to multi-messenger astronomy.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.08367  [pdf] - 1842560
RoboPol: A four-channel optical imaging polarimeter
Comments: 13 pages, 15 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-02-22
We present the design and performance of RoboPol, a four-channel optical polarimeter operating at the Skinakas Observatory in Crete, Greece. RoboPol is capable of measuring both relative linear Stokes parameters $q$ and $u$ (and the total intensity $I$) in one sky exposure. Though primarily used to measure the polarization of point sources in the R-band, the instrument features additional filters (B, V and I), enabling multi-wavelength imaging polarimetry over a large field of view (13.6' $\times$ 13.6'). We demonstrate the accuracy and stability of the instrument throughout its five years of operation. Best performance is achieved within the central region of the field of view and in the R band. For such measurements the systematic uncertainty is below 0.1% in fractional linear polarization, $p$ (0.05% maximum likelihood). Throughout all observing seasons the instrumental polarization varies within 0.1% in $p$ and within 1$^\circ$ in polarization angle.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.06312  [pdf] - 1842378
Search for AGN counterparts of unidentified Fermi-LAT sources with optical polarimetry: Demonstration of the technique
Comments: accepted to A&A
Submitted: 2018-10-15, last modified: 2019-02-12
The third Fermi-LAT catalog (3FGL) presented the data of the first four years of observations from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. There are 3034 sources, 1010 of which still remain unidentified. Identifying and classifying gamma-ray emitters is of high significance with regard to studying high-energy astrophysics. We demonstrate that optical polarimetry can be an advantageous and practical tool in the hunt for counterparts of the unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Using data from the RoboPol project, we validated that a significant fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN) associated with 3FGL sources can be identified due to their high optical polarization exceeding that of the field stars. We performed an optical polarimetric survey within $3\sigma$ uncertainties of four unidentified 3FGL sources. We discovered a previously unknown extragalactic object within the positional uncertainty of 3FGL J0221.2+2518. We obtained its spectrum and measured a redshift of $z=0.0609\pm0.0004$. Using these measurements and archival data we demonstrate that this source is a candidate counterpart for 3FGL J0221.2+2518 and most probably is a composite object: a star-forming galaxy accompanied by AGN. We conclude that polarimetry can be a powerful asset in the search for AGN candidate counterparts for unidentified Fermi sources. Future extensive polarimetric surveys at high galactic latitudes (e.g., PASIPHAE) will allow the association of a significant fraction of currently unidentified gamma-ray sources.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.04404  [pdf] - 1830769
F-GAMMA: Multi-frequency radio monitoring of Fermi blazars. The 2.64 to 43 GHz Effelsberg light curves from 2007-2015
Comments: Accepted for publication in Section: Catalogs and data of Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2019-02-07
The advent of the Fermi-GST with its unprecedented capability to monitor the entire 4 pi sky within less than 2-3 hours, introduced new standard in time domain gamma-ray astronomy. To explore this new avenue of extragalactic physics the F-GAMMA programme undertook the task of conducting nearly monthly, broadband radio monitoring of selected blazars from January 2007 to January 2015. In this work we release all the light curves at 2.64, 4.85, 8.35, 10.45, 14.6, 23.05, 32, and 43 GHz and present first order derivative data products after all necessary post-measurement corrections and quality checks; that is flux density moments and spectral indices. The release includes 155 sources. The effective cadence after the quality flagging is around one radio SED every 1.3 months. The coherence of each radio SED is around 40 minutes. The released dataset includes more than $4\times10^4$ measurements. The median fractional error at the lowest frequencies (2.64-10.45 GHz) is below 2%. At the highest frequencies (14.6-43 GHz) with limiting factor of the atmospheric conditions, the errors range from 3% to 9%, respectively.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01663  [pdf] - 1783887
High cadence, linear and circular polarization monitoring of OJ 287 - Helical magnetic field in a bent jet
Comments: 11 pages, 9 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in section 4. Extragalactic astronomy of Astronomy and Astrophysics on August 21, 2018
Submitted: 2018-09-05
We present a multi-frequency, dense radio monitoring program of the blazar OJ287 using the 100m Effelsberg radio telescope. We analyze the evolution in total flux density, linear and circular polarization to study the jet structure and its magnetic field geometry. The total flux density is measured at nine bands from 2.64 GHz to 43 GHz, the linear polarization parameters between 2.64 GHz and 10.45 GHz, and the circular polarization at 4.85 GHz and 8.35 GHz. The mean cadence is 10 days. Between MJD 57370 and 57785, OJ287 showed flaring activity and complex linear and circular polarization behavior. The radio EVPA showed a large clockwise (CW) rotation by ~340$^{\circ}$ with a mean rate of -1.04 $^{\circ}$/day. Based on concurrent VLBI data, the rotation seems to originate within the jet core at 43 GHz (projected size $\le$ 0.15 mas or 0.67 pc). Moreover, optical data show a similar monotonic CW EVPA rotation with a rate of about -1.1 $^{\circ}$/day which is superposed with shorter and faster rotations of about 7.8 $^{\circ}$/day. The observed variability is consistent with a polarized emission component propagating on a helical trajectory within a bent jet. We constrained the helix arc length to 0.26 pc and radius to $\le$ 0.04 pc as well as the jet bending arc length projected on the plane of the sky to $\le$ 1.9-7.6 pc. A similar bending is observed in high angular resolution VLBI images at the innermost jet regions. Our results indicate also the presence of a stable polarized emission component with EVPA (-10$^{\circ}$) perpendicular to the large scale jet, suggesting dominance of the poloidal magnetic field component. Finally, the EVPA rotation begins simultaneously with an optical flare and hence the two might be physically connected. That optical flare has been linked to the interaction of a secondary SMBH with the inner accretion disk or originating in the jet of the primary.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.05367  [pdf] - 1789431
Detection of persistent VHE gamma-ray emission from PKS 1510-089 by the MAGIC telescopes during low states between 2012 and 2017
MAGIC Collaboration; Acciari, V. A.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Engels, A. Arbet; Arcaro, C.; Baack, D.; Babić, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J. A.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Besenrieder, J.; Bhattacharyya, W.; Bigongiari, C.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnoli, G.; Carosi, R.; Ceribella, G.; Chatterjee, A.; Colak, S. M.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; D'Elia, V.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; Delfino, M.; Delgado, J.; Di Pierro, F.; Domínguez, A.; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Elsaesser, D.; Ramazani, V. Fallah; Fattorini, A.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Ferrara, G.; Fidalgo, D.; Foffano, L.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Gallozzi, S.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hassan, T.; Herrera, J.; Hoang, J.; Hrupec, D.; Inoue, S.; Ishio, K.; Iwamura, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Kuveždić, D.; Lamastra, A.; Lelas, D.; Leone, F.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Oramas, A.; Maggio, C.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Masuda, S.; Mazin, D.; Minev, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Molina, E.; Moralejo, A.; Moreno, V.; Moretti, E.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Rosillo, M. Nievas; Nigro, C.; Nilsson, K.; Ninci, D.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Pedaletti, G.; Peñil, P.; Peresano, M.; Persic, M.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Righi, C.; Rugliancich, A.; Saha, L.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schweizer, T.; Sitarek, J.; Šnidarić, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Somero, A.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Teshima, M.; Torres-Albà, N.; Tsujimoto, S.; Vanzo, G.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Zarić, D.; Raiteri, C. M.; Sandrinelli, A.; Hovatta, T.; Kiehlmann, S.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Tornikoski, M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tammi, J.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Thum, C.; Agudo, I.; Molina, S. N.; Gómez, J. L.; Fuentes, A.; Casadio, C.; Traianou, E.; Myserlis, I.; Kim, J. -Y.
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2018-06-14, last modified: 2018-09-03
PKS 1510-089 is a flat spectrum radio quasar strongly variable in the optical and GeV range. We search for low-state VHE gamma-ray emission from PKS 1510-089. We aim to characterize and model the source in a broad-band context, which would provide a baseline over which high states and flares could be better understood. We use daily binned Fermi-LAT flux measurements of PKS 1510-089 to characterize the GeV emission and select the observation periods of MAGIC during low state of activity. For the selected times we compute the average radio, IR, optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray emission to construct a low-state spectral energy distribution of the source. The broadband emission is modelled within an External Compton scenario with a stationary emission region through which plasma and magnetic field are flowing. We perform also the emission-model-independent calculations of the maximum absorption in the broad line region (BLR) using two different models. Results. The MAGIC telescopes collected 75 hrs of data during times when the Fermi-LAT flux measured above 1 GeV was below 3x10-8cm-2s-1, which is the threshold adopted for the definition of a low gamma-ray activity state. The data show a strongly significant (9.5{\sigma}) VHE gamma-ray emission at the level of (4.27+-0.61stat)x10-12cm-2s-1 above 150GeV, a factor 80 smaller than the highest flare observed so far from this object. Despite the lower flux, the spectral shape is consistent with earlier detections in the VHE band. The broad-band emission is compatible with the EC scenario assuming a large emission region located beyond the BLR. For the first time the gamma-ray data allow us to place a limit on the location of the emission region during a low gamma-ray state of a FSRQ. For the used model of the BLR, the 95% C.L. on the location of the emission region allows us to place it at the distance >74% of the outer radius of the BLR.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.10485  [pdf] - 1723539
Optical polarisation variability of narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies
Comments: Presented at the conference "Revisiting narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies and their place in the Universe" (9-13 April 2018, Padova Botanical Garden, Italy) and is included in Volume 328 of the PoS as article 019
Submitted: 2018-07-27
We have monitored the R-band optical linear polarisation of ten jetted NLSy1 galaxies with the aim to quantify their variability and search for candidate long rotation of the polarisation plane. In all cases for which adequate datasets are available we observe significant variability of both the polarisation fraction and angle. In the best-sampled cases we identify candidate long rotations of the polarisation plane. We present an approach that assesses the probability that the observed phenomenology is the result of pure noise. We conclude that although this possibility cannot be excluded it is much more likely that the EVPA undergoes an intrinsic evolution. We compute the most probable parameters of the intrinsic event which forecasts events consistent with the observations. In one case we find that the EVPA shows a preferred direction which, however, does not imply any dominance of a toroidal or poloidal component of the magnetic field at those scales.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.02382  [pdf] - 1770642
Optical polarisation variability of radio loud narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies. Search for long rotations of the polarisation plane
Comments: Accepted for publication in section 2. Astrophysical processes of Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2018-07-06
Narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLSy1s) constitute the AGN subclass associated with systematically smaller black hole masses. A few radio loud ones have been detected in MeV -- GeV energy bands by Fermi and evidence for the presence of blazar-like jets has been accumulated. In this study we wish to quantify the temporal behaviour of the optical polarisation, fraction and angle, for a selected sample of radio loud NLSy1s. We also search for rotations of the polarisation plane similar to those commonly observed in blazars. We have conducted R-band optical polarisation monitoring of a sample of 10 RL NLSy1s 5 of which have been previously detected by Fermi. The dataset includes observations with the RoboPol, KANATA, Perkins and Steward polarimeters. In the cases where evidences for long rotations of the polarisation plane are found, we carry out numerical simulations to assess the probability that they are caused by intrinsically evolving EVPAs instead of observational noise. Even our moderately sampled sources show indications of variability, both in polarisation fraction and angle. For the four best sampled objects in our sample we find multiple periods of significant polarisation angle variability. In the two best sampled cases, namely J1505+0326 and J0324+3410, we find indications for three long rotations. We show that although noise can induce the observed behaviour, it is much more likely that the apparent rotation is caused by intrinsic evolution of the EVPA. To our knowledge this is the very first detection of such events in this class of sources. In the case of the largest dataset (J0324+3410) we find that the EVPA concentrates around a direction which is at 49.3\degr to the 15-GHz radio jet implying a projected magnetic field at an angle of 40.7\degr to that axis.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.00413  [pdf] - 2038184
Multi-wavelength characterization of the blazar S5~0716+714 during an unprecedented outburst phase
MAGIC Collaboration; Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Arcaro, C.; Baack, D.; Babić, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J. A.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berse, R. Ch.; Berti, A.; Bhattacharyya, W.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnoli, G.; Carosi, R.; Carosi, A.; Ceribella, G.; Chatterjee, A.; Colak, S. M.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; Delfino, M.; Delgado, J.; Di Pierro, F.; Domínguez, A.; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Elsaesser, D.; Ramazani, V. Fallah; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; Gallozzi, S.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hassan, T.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Ishio, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Kuveždić, D.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Maggio, C.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Masuda, S.; Mazin, D.; Mielke, K.; Minev, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moreno, V.; Moretti, E.; Nagayoshi, T.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Rosillo, M. Nievas; Nigro, C.; Nilsson, K.; Ninci, D.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Persic, M.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Righi, C.; Rugliancich, A.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schweizer, T.; Sitarek, J.; Šnidarić, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takahashi, M.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Teshima, M.; Torres-Albà, N.; Treves, A.; Tsujimoto, S.; Vanzo, G.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Zarić, D.; Collaboration, Fermi-LAT; Bastieri, D.; Gasparrini, D.; Lott, B.; Rani, B.; Thompson, D. J.; Collaborators, MWL; Agudo, I.; Angelakis, E.; Borman, G. A.; Casadio, C.; Grishina, T. S.; Gurwell, M.; Hovatta, T.; Itoh, R.; Järvelä, E.; Jermak, H.; Jorstad, S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Kraus, A.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Larionov, V. M.; Larionova, L. V.; Lien, A. Y.; Madejski, G.; Marscher, A.; Myserlis, I.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Molina, S. N.; Morozova, D. A.; Nalewajko, K.; Pearson, T. J.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reeves, R. A.; Savchenko, S. S.; Steele, I. A.; Tornikoski, M.; Troitskaya, Yu. V.; Troitsky, I.; Vasilyev, A. A.; Zensus, J. Anton
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-07-01
The BL Lac object S5~0716+714, a highly variable blazar, underwent an impressive outburst in January 2015 (Phase A), followed by minor activity in February (Phase B). The MAGIC observations were triggered by the optical flux observed in Phase A, corresponding to the brightest ever reported state of the source in the R-band. The comprehensive dataset collected is investigated in order to shed light on the mechanism of the broadband emission. Multi-wavelength light curves have been studied together with the broadband Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). The data set collected spans from radio, optical photometry and polarimetry, X-ray, high-energy (HE, 0.1 GeV < E < 100 GeV) with \textit{Fermi}-LAT to the very-high-energy (VHE, E>100 GeV) with MAGIC. The flaring state of Phase A was detected in all the energy bands, providing for the first time a multi-wavelength sample of simultaneous data from the radio band to the VHE. In the constructed SED the \textit{Swift}-XRT+\textit{NuSTAR} data constrain the transition between the synchrotron and inverse Compton components very accurately, while the second peak is constrained from 0.1~GeV to 600~GeV by \textit{Fermi}+MAGIC data. The broadband SED cannot be described with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model as it severely underestimates the optical flux in order to reproduce the X-ray to $\gamma$-ray data. Instead we use a two-zone model. The EVPA shows an unprecedented fast rotation. An estimation of the redshift of the source by combined HE and VHE data provides a value of $z = 0.31 \pm 0.02_{stats} \pm 0.05_{sys}$, confirming the literature value. The data show the VHE emission originating in the entrance and exit of a superluminal knot in and out a recollimation shock in the inner jet. A shock-shock interaction in the jet seems responsible for the observed flares and EVPA swing. This scenario is also consistent with the SED modelling.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.04824  [pdf] - 1591170
The dependence of optical polarisation of blazars on the synchrotron component peak frequency
Comments: Presented at the 7th International Fermi Symposium, 15-20 October 2017, Garmisch-Partenkirchen
Submitted: 2017-11-13
The RoboPol instrument and the relevant program was developed in order to conduct a systematic study of the optical polarisation variability of blazars. Driven by the discovery that long smooth rotations of the optical polarisation plane can be associated with the activity in other bands and especially in gamma rays, the program was meant to investigate the physical mechanisms causing them and quantify the optical polarisation behaviour in blazars. Over the first three nominal observing seasons (2013, 2014 and 2015) RoboPol detected 40 rotations in 24 blazars by observing a gamma-ray-loud and gamma-ray-quite unbiassed sample of blazars, providing a reliable set of events for exploring the phenomenon. The obtain datasets provided the ground for a systematic quantification of the variability of the optical polarisation in such systems. In the following after a brief review of the discoveries that relate to the gamma-ray loudness of the sources we move on to discuss a simple jet model that explains the observed dichotomy in terms of polarisation between gamma-ray-loud and quite sources and the dependence of polarisation and the stability of the polarisation angle on the synchrotron peak frequency.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.03979  [pdf] - 1608617
Scale invariant jets: from blazars to microquasars
Comments: 13 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in APJ
Submitted: 2017-11-10
Black holes, anywhere in the stellar-mass to supermassive range, are often associated with relativistic jets. Models suggest that jet production may be a universal process common in all black hole systems regardless of their mass. Although in many cases observations support such hypotheses for microquasars and Seyfert galaxies, little is known on whether boosted blazar jets also comply with such universal scaling laws. We use uniquely rich multiwavelength radio light curves from the F-GAMMA program and the most accurate Doppler factors available to date to probe blazar jets in their emission rest frame with unprecedented accuracy. We identify for the first time a strong correlation between the blazar intrinsic broad-band radio luminosity and black hole mass, which extends over $\sim$ 9 orders of magnitude down to microquasars scales. Our results reveal the presence of a universal scaling law that bridges the observing and emission rest frames in beamed sources and allows us to effectively constrain jet models. They consequently provide an independent method for estimating the Doppler factor, and for predicting expected radio luminosities of boosted jets operating in systems of intermediate or tens-of-solar mass black holes, immediately applicable to cases as those recently observed by LIGO.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.08922  [pdf] - 1605030
RoboPol: Connection between optical polarization plane rotations and gamma-ray flares in blazars
Comments: 12 pages, 16 figures, accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-10-24
We use results of our 3 year polarimetric monitoring program to investigate the previously suggested connection between rotations of the polarization plane in the optical emission of blazars and their gamma-ray flares in the GeV band. The homogeneous set of 40 rotation events in 24 sources detected by {\em RoboPol} is analysed together with the gamma-ray data provided by {\em Fermi}-LAT. We confirm that polarization plane rotations are indeed related to the closest gamma-ray flares in blazars and the time lags between these events are consistent with zero. Amplitudes of the rotations are anticorrelated with amplitudes of the gamma-ray flares. This is presumably caused by higher relativistic boosting (higher Doppler factors) in blazars that exhibit smaller amplitude polarization plane rotations. Moreover, the time scales of rotations and flares are marginally correlated.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.08537  [pdf] - 1586419
Radio QPO in the ${\gamma}$-ray-loud X-ray binary LS I +61${^\circ}$303
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-07-26
LS I +61${^\circ}$303 is a $\gamma$-ray emitting X-ray binary with periodic radio outbursts with time scales of one month. Previous observations have revealed microflares superimposed on these large outbursts with periods ranging from a few minutes to hours. This makes LS I +61${^\circ}$303, along with Cyg X-1, the only TeV emitting X-ray binary exhibiting radio microflares. To further investigate these microflaring activity in LS I +61${^\circ}$303 we observed the source with the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope at 4.85, 8.35, and 10.45 GHz and performed timing analysis on the obtained data. Radio oscillations of 15 hours time scales are detected at all three frequencies. We also compare the spectral index evolution of radio data to that of the photon index of GeV data observed by Fermi-LAT. We conclude that the observed QPO could result from multiple shocks in a jet.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.04200  [pdf] - 1614744
Full-Stokes polarimetry with circularly polarized feeds - Sources with stable linear and circular polarization in the GHz regime
Comments: 19 pages, 17 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics on May 30, 2017
Submitted: 2017-06-13
We present a pipeline that allows recovering reliable information for all four Stokes parameters with high accuracy. Its novelty relies on the treatment of the instrumental effects already prior to the computation of the Stokes parameters contrary to conventional methods, such as the M\"uller matrix one. The instrumental linear polarization is corrected across the whole telescope beam and significant Stokes $Q$ and $U$ can be recovered even when the recorded signals are severely corrupted. The accuracy we reach in terms of polarization degree is of the order of 0.1-0.2 %. The polarization angles are determined with an accuracy of almost 1$^{\circ}$. The presented methodology was applied to recover the linear and circular polarization of around 150 Active Galactic Nuclei. The sources were monitored from July 2010 to April 2016 with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope at 4.85 GHz and 8.35 GHz with a cadence of around 1.2 months. The polarized emission of the Moon was used to calibrate the polarization angle. Our analysis showed a small system-induced rotation of about 1$^{\circ}$ at both observing frequencies. Finally, we identify five sources with significant and stable linear polarization; three sources remain constantly linearly unpolarized over the period we examined; a total of 11 sources have stable circular polarization degree $m_\mathrm{c}$ and four of them with non-zero $m_\mathrm{c}$. We also identify eight sources that maintain a stable polarization angle over the examined period. All this is provided to the community for polarization observations reference. We finally show that our analysis method is conceptually different from the traditionally used ones and performs better than the M\"uller matrix method. Although it was developed for a system equipped with circularly polarized feeds it can easily be modified for systems with linearly polarized feeds as well.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.03238  [pdf] - 1561284
Multiwavelength picture of the blazar S5 0716+714 during its brightest outburst
Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures, proceeding of the JETS 2016 conference
Submitted: 2017-04-11
S5 0716+714 is a well known BL Lac object, one of the brightest and most active blazars. The discovery in the Very High Energy band (VHE, E > 100 GeV) by MAGIC happened in 2008. In January 2015 the source went through the brightest optical state ever observed, triggering MAGIC follow-up and a VHE detection with 13{\sigma} significance (ATel 6999). Rich multiwavelength coverage of the flare allowed us to construct the broad-band spectral energy distribution of S5 0716+714 during its brightest outburst. In this work we will present the preliminary analysis of MAGIC and Fermi-LAT data of the flaring activity in January and February 2015 for the HE (0.1 < HE < 300 GeV) and VHE band, together with radio (Mets\"ahovi, OVRO, VLBA, Effelsberg), sub-millimeter (SMA), optical (Tuorla, Perkins, Steward, AZT-8+ST7, LX-200, Kanata), X-ray and UV (Swift-XRT and UVOT), in the same time-window and discuss the time variability of the multiwavelength light curves during this impressive outburst.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.09111  [pdf] - 1581329
Radio and gamma-ray loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies in the spotlight
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure. Accepted for publication in the Proceedings of the IAU Symposium No. 324: New Frontiers in Black Hole Astrophysics
Submitted: 2017-01-31
Narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies provide us with unique insights into the drivers of AGN activity under extreme conditions. Given their low black hole (BH) masses and near-Eddington accretion rates, they represent a class of galaxies with rapidly growing supermassive BHs in the local universe. Here, we present the results from our multi-frequency radio monitoring of a sample of {\gamma}-ray loud NLS1 galaxies ({\gamma}NLS1s), including systems discovered only recently, and featuring both the nearest and the most distant {\gamma}NLS1s known to date. We also present high-resolution radio imaging of 1H 0323+342, which is remarkable for its spiral or ring-like host. Finally, we present new radio data of the candidate {\gamma}-emitting NLS1 galaxy RX J2314.9+2243, characterized by a very steep radio spectrum, unlike other {\gamma}NLS1s.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.01452  [pdf] - 1534199
F-GAMMA: Variability Doppler factors of blazars from multiwavelength monitoring
Comments: 9 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-01-05
Recent population studies have shown that the variability Doppler factors can adequately describe blazars as a population. We use the flux density variations found within the extensive radio multi-wavelength datasets of the F-GAMMA program, a total of 10 frequencies from 2.64 up to 142.33 GHz, in order to estimate the variability Doppler factors for 58 $\gamma$-ray bright sources, for 20 of which no variability Doppler factor has been estimated before. We employ specifically designed algorithms in order to obtain a model for each flare at each frequency. We then identify each event and track its evolution through all the available frequencies for each source. This approach allows us to distinguish significant events producing flares from stochastic variability in blazar jets. It also allows us to effectively constrain the variability brightness temperature and hence the variability Doppler factor as well as provide error estimates. Our method can produce the most accurate (16\% error on average) estimates in the literature to date.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.09403  [pdf] - 1523921
Physical Conditions and Variability Processes in AGN Jets through Multi-Frequency Linear and Circular Radio Polarization Monitoring
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2016-11-23
Radio polarimetry is an invaluable tool to investigate the physical conditions and variability processes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets. However, detecting their linear and circular polarization properties is a challenging endeavor due to their low levels and possible depolarization effects. We have developed an end-to-end data analysis methodology to recover the polarization properties of unresolved sources with high accuracy. It has been applied to recover the linear and circular polarization of 87 AGNs measured by the F-GAMMA program from July 2010 to January 2015 with a mean cadence of 1.3 months. Their linear polarization was recovered at four frequencies between 2.64 and 10.45 GHz and the circular polarization at 4.85 and 8.35 GHz. The physical conditions required to reproduce the observed polarization properties and the processes which induce their variability were investigated with a full-Stokes radiative transfer code which emulates the synchrotron emission of modeled jets. The model was used to investigate the conditions needed to reproduce the observed polarization behavior for the blazar 3C 454.3, assuming that the observed variability is attributed to evolving internal shocks propagating downstream.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.07323  [pdf] - 1521511
Robopol: Optical polarisation monitoring of blazars
Comments: 4th Annual Conference on High Energy Astrophysics in Southern Africa
Submitted: 2016-11-22
The RoboPol program has been monitoring the $R$-band linear polarisation parameters of an unbiased sample of 60 gamma-ray-loud blazars and a "control" sample of 15 gamma-ray-quite ones. The prime drive for the program has been the systematic study of the temporal behaviour of the optical polarisation and particularly the potential association of smooth and long rotations of the polarisation angle with flaring activity at high energies. Here we present the program and discuss a list of selected topics from our studies of the first three observing seasons (2013--2015) both in the angle and in the amplitude domain.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.00640  [pdf] - 1483521
RoboPol: The optical polarization of gamma-ray--loud and gamma-ray--quiet blazars
Comments: 17 pages, 16 figures, 5 tables; Accepted for publication in the MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-09-01
We present average R-band optopolarimetric data, as well as variability parameters, from the first and second RoboPol observing season. We investigate whether gamma- ray--loud and gamma-ray--quiet blazars exhibit systematic differences in their optical polarization properties. We find that gamma-ray--loud blazars have a systematically higher polarization fraction (0.092) than gamma-ray--quiet blazars (0.031), with the hypothesis of the two samples being drawn from the same distribution of polarization fractions being rejected at the 3{\sigma} level. We have not found any evidence that this discrepancy is related to differences in the redshift distribution, rest-frame R-band lu- minosity density, or the source classification. The median polarization fraction versus synchrotron-peak-frequency plot shows an envelope implying that high synchrotron- peaked sources have a smaller range of median polarization fractions concentrated around lower values. Our gamma-ray--quiet sources show similar median polarization fractions although they are all low synchrotron-peaked. We also find that the random- ness of the polarization angle depends on the synchrotron peak frequency. For high synchrotron-peaked sources it tends to concentrate around preferred directions while for low synchrotron-peaked sources it is more variable and less likely to have a pre- ferred direction. We propose a scenario which mediates efficient particle acceleration in shocks and increases the helical B-field component immediately downstream of the shock.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.08440  [pdf] - 1528165
Optical polarization of high-energy BL Lac objects
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures + Appendix with 48 polarization curves. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2016-08-30
We investigate the optical polarization properties of high-energy BL Lac objects using data from the RoboPol blazar monitoring program and the Nordic Optical Telescope. We wish to understand if there are differences in the BL Lac objects that are detected with the current-generation TeV instruments compared to those that have not yet been detected. The mean polarization fraction of the TeV-detected BL Lacs is 5% while the non-TeV sources show a higher mean polarization fraction of 7%. This difference in polarization fraction disappears when the dilution by the unpolarized light of the host galaxy is accounted for. The TeV sources show somewhat lower fractional polarization variability amplitudes than the non-TeV sources. Also the fraction of sources with a smaller spread in the Q/I - U/I -plane and a clumped distribution of points away from the origin, possibly indicating a preferred polarization angle, is larger in the TeV than in the non-TeV sources. These differences between TeV and non-TeV samples seems to arise from differences between intermediate and high spectral peaking sources instead of the TeV detection. When the EVPA variations are studied, the rate of EVPA change is similar in both samples. We detect significant EVPA rotations in both TeV and non-TeV sources, showing that rotations can occur in high spectral peaking BL Lac objects when the monitoring cadence is dense enough. Our simulations show that we cannot exclude a random walk origin for these rotations. These results indicate that there are no intrinsic differences in the polarization properties of the TeV-detected and non-TeV-detected high-energy BL Lac objects. This suggests that the polarization properties are not directly related to the TeV-detection, but instead the TeV loudness is connected to the general flaring activity, redshift, and the synchrotron peak location. (Abridged)
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.03232  [pdf] - 1510319
Inner jet kinematics and the viewing angle towards the {\gamma}-ray narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0323+342
Comments: 16 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in Research in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-08-10
Near-Eddington accretion rates onto low-mass black holes are thought to be a prime driver of the multi-wavelength properties of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) population of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Orientation effects have repeatedly been considered as another important factor involved, but detailed studies have been hampered by the lack of measured viewing angles towards this type of AGN. Here we present multi-epoch, 15 GHz VLBA images (MOJAVE program) of the radio-loud and Fermi/LAT-detected NLS1 galaxy 1H 323+342. These are combined with single-dish, multi-frequency radio monitoring of the source's variability, obtained with the Effelsberg 100-m and IRAM 30-m telescopes, in the course of the F-GAMMA program. The VLBA images reveal 6 components with apparent peeds of ~1 to ~7 c, and one quasi-stationary feature. Combining the obtained apparent jet speed ($\beta_{app}$) and variability Doppler factor ($D_{var}$) estimates together with other methods, we constrain the viewing angle towards 1H 0323+342 to $\theta \leq 4 - 13$ deg. Using literature values of $\beta_{app}$ and $D_{var}$, we also deduce a viewing angle of $\leq$ 8-9 deg towards another radio- and {\gamma}-ray-loud NLS1, namely SBS 0846+513.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.02580  [pdf] - 1523813
The F-GAMMA program: Multi-frequency study of Active Galactic Nuclei in the Fermi era. Program description and the first 2.5 years of monitoring
Comments: Accepted for publication in section 4. Extragalactic astronomy of Astronomy and Astrophysics (18 pages, 9 figures)
Submitted: 2016-08-07
To fully exploit the scientific potential of the Fermi mission, we initiated the F-GAMMA program. Between 2007 and 2015 it was the prime provider of complementary multi-frequency monitoring in the radio regime. We quantify the radio variability of gamma-ray blazars. We investigate its dependence on source class and examine whether the radio variability is related to the gamma-ray loudness. Finally, we assess the validity of a putative correlation between the two bands. The F-GAMMA monitored monthly a sample of about 60 sources at up to twelve radio frequencies between 2.64 and 228.39 GHz. We perform a time series analysis on the first 2.5-year dataset to obtain variability parameters. A maximum likelihood analysis is used to assess the significance of a correlation between radio and gamma-ray fluxes. We present light curves and spectra (coherent within ten days) obtained with the Effelsberg 100-m and IRAM 30-m telescopes. All sources are variable across all frequency bands with amplitudes increasing with frequency up to rest frame frequencies of around 60 - 80 GHz as expected by shock-in-jet models. Compared to FSRQs, BL Lacs show systematically lower variability amplitudes, brightness temperatures and Doppler factors at lower frequencies, while the difference vanishes towards higher ones. The time scales appear similar for the two classes. The distribution of spectral indices appears flatter or more inverted at higher frequencies for BL Lacs. Evolving synchrotron self-absorbed components can naturally account for the observed spectral variability. We find that the Fermi-detected sources show larger variability amplitudes as well as brightness temperatures and Doppler factors, than non-detected ones. Flux densities at 86.2 and 142.3 GHz correlate with 1 GeV fluxes at a significance level better than 3sigma, implying that gamma rays are produced very close to the mm-band emission region.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.04292  [pdf] - 1470763
RoboPol: Do optical polarization rotations occur in all blazars?
Comments: 12 pages, 8 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-07-14
We present a new set of optical polarization plane rotations in blazars, observed during the third year of operation of RoboPol. The entire set of rotation events discovered during three years of observations is analysed with the aim of determining whether these events are inherent in all blazars. It is found that the frequency of the polarization plane rotations varies widely among blazars. This variation cannot be explained either by a difference in the relativistic boosting or by selection effects caused by a difference in the average fractional polarization. We conclude that the rotations are characteristic of a subset of blazars and that they occur as a consequence of their intrinsic properties.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.00725  [pdf] - 1530943
Location of Gamma-ray emission and magnetic field strengths in OJ 287
Comments: 30 pages, 20 figures
Submitted: 2016-07-03
The Gamma-ray BL Lac object OJ 287 is known to exhibit inner-parsec "jet-wobbling", high degrees of variability at all wavelengths and quasi-stationary features including an apparent (~100 deg) position angle change in projection on the sky plane. Sub-50 micro-arcsecond resolution 86 GHz observations with the global mm-VLBI array (GMVA) supplement ongoing multi-frequency VLBI blazar monitoring at lower frequencies. Using these maps together with cm/mm total intensity and Gamma-ray observations from Fermi/LAT from 2008-2014, we aimed to determine the location of Gamma-ray emission and to explain the inner-mas structural changes. Observations with the GMVA offer approximately double the angular resolution compared with 43 GHz VLBA observations and allow us to observe above the synchrotron self-absorption peak frequency. The jet was spectrally decomposed at multiple locations along the jet. From this we derived estimates of the magnetic field. How the field decreases down the jet allowed an estimate of the distance to the jet apex and an estimate of the magnetic field strength at the jet apex and in the broad line region. Combined with accurate kinematics we attempt to locate the site of Gamma-ray activity, radio flares and spectral changes. Strong Gamma-ray flares appeared to originate from either the "core" region, a downstream stationary feature, or both, with Gamma-ray activity significantly correlated with radio flaring in the downstream quasi-stationary feature. Magnetic field estimates were determined at multiple locations along the jet, with the magnetic field found to be >1.6 G in the "core" and >0.4 G in the downstream quasi-stationary feature. We therefore found upper limits on the location of the "core" as >6.0 pc from the jet apex and determined an upper limit on the magnetic field near the jet base of the order of thousands of Gauss.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.03054  [pdf] - 1425210
Optical polarization map of the Polaris Flare with RoboPol
Comments: 13 pages, 19 figures, published in MNRAS, catalog can be found at cds.u-strasbg.fr ; Catalog and figures 16 & 19 updated to include corrections published in MNRAS erratum
Submitted: 2015-03-10, last modified: 2016-06-20
The stages before the formation of stars in molecular clouds are poorly understood. Insights can be gained by studying the properties of quiescent clouds, such as their magnetic field structure. The plane-of-the-sky orientation of the field can be traced by polarized starlight. We present the first extended, wide-field ($\sim$10 $\rm deg^2$) map of the Polaris Flare cloud in dust-absorption induced optical polarization of background stars, using the RoboPol polarimeter at the Skinakas Observatory. This is the first application of the wide-field imaging capabilities of RoboPol. The data were taken in the R-band and analysed with the automated reduction pipeline of the instrument. We present in detail optimizations in the reduction pipeline specific to wide-field observations. Our analysis resulted in reliable measurements of 641 stars with median fractional linear polarization 1.3%. The projected magnetic field shows a large scale ordered pattern. At high longitudes it appears to align with faint striations seen in the Herschel-SPIRE map of dust emission (250 $\mu m$), while in the central 4-5 deg$^2$ it shows an eddy-like feature. The overall polarization pattern we obtain is in good agreement with large scale measurements by Planck of the dust emission polarization in the same area of the sky.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.07467  [pdf] - 1450562
RoboPol: First season rotations of optical polarization plane in blazars
Comments: 16 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2015-05-27, last modified: 2016-03-22
We present first results on polarization swings in optical emission of blazars obtained by RoboPol, a monitoring program of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray bright blazars specially designed for effective detection of such events. A possible connection of polarization swing events with periods of high activity in gamma rays is investigated using the dataset obtained during the first season of operation. It was found that the brightest gamma-ray flares tend to be located closer in time to rotation events, which may be an indication of two separate mechanisms responsible for the rotations. Blazars with detected rotations have significantly larger amplitude and faster variations of polarization angle in optical than blazars without rotations. Our simulations show that the full set of observed rotations is not a likely outcome (probability $\le 1.5 \times 10^{-2}$) of a random walk of the polarization vector simulated by a multicell model. Furthermore, it is highly unlikely ($\sim 5 \times 10^{-5}$) that none of our rotations is physically connected with an increase in gamma-ray activity.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.04220  [pdf] - 1403762
What can the 2008/10 broadband flare of PKS 1502+106 tell us? Nuclear opacity, magnetic fields, and the location of gamma rays
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2016-03-14
Context. The origin of blazar variability, seen from radio up to gamma rays, is still a heavily debated matter and broadband flares offer a unique testbed towards a better understanding of these extreme objects. Such an energetic outburst was detected by Fermi/LAT in 2008 from the blazar PKS 1502+106. The outburst was observed from gamma rays down to radio frequencies. Aims. Through the delay between flare maxima at different radio frequencies, we study the frequency-dependent position of the unit-opacity surface and infer its absolute position with respect to the jet base. This nuclear opacity profile enables the magnetic field tomography of the jet. We also localize the gamma-ray emission region and explore the mechanism producing the flare. Methods. The radio flare of PKS 1502+106 is studied through single-dish flux density measurements at 12 frequencies in the range 2.64 to 226.5 GHz. To quantify it, we employ both a Gaussian process regression and a discrete cross-correlation function analysis. Results. We find that the light curve parameters (flare amplitude and cross-band delays) show a power-law dependence on frequency. Delays decrease with frequency, and the flare amplitudes increase up to about 43 GHz and then decay. This behavior is consistent with a shock propagating downstream the jet. The self-absorbed radio cores are located between about 10 and 4 pc from the jet base and their magnetic field strengths range between 14 and 176 mG, at the frequencies 2.64 to 86.24 GHz. Finally, the gamma-ray active region is located at (1.9 +/- 1.1) pc away from the jet base.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.03392  [pdf] - 1359217
RoboPol: optical polarization-plane rotations and flaring activity in blazars
Comments: 12 pages, 12 figures, accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-01-13, last modified: 2016-01-15
We present measurements of rotations of the optical polarization of blazars during the second year of operation of RoboPol, a monitoring programme of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray bright blazars specially designed for effective detection of such events, and we analyse the large set of rotation events discovered in two years of observation. We investigate patterns of variability in the polarization parameters and total flux density during the rotation events and compare them to the behaviour in a non-rotating state. We have searched for possible correlations between average parameters of the polarization-plane rotations and average parameters of polarization, with the following results: (1) there is no statistical association of the rotations with contemporaneous optical flares; (2) the average fractional polarization during the rotations tends to be lower than that in a non-rotating state; (3) the average fractional polarization during rotations is correlated with the rotation rate of the polarization plane in the jet rest frame; (4) it is likely that distributions of amplitudes and durations of the rotations have physical upper bounds, so arbitrarily long rotations are not realised in nature.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.02235  [pdf] - 1579770
Multiwavelength Study of Quiescent States of Mrk 421 with Unprecedented Hard X-Ray Coverage Provided by NuSTAR in 2013
Baloković, M.; Paneque, D.; Madejski, G.; Furniss, A.; Chiang, J.; team, the NuSTAR; :; Ajello, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Barret, D.; Blandford, R.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Forster, K.; Giommi, P.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Kitaguchi, T.; Koglin, J. E.; Madsen, K. K.; Mao, P. H.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Perri, M.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Puccetti, S.; Rana, V.; Stern, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Urry, C. M.; Westergaard, N. J.; Zhang, W. W.; Zoglauer, A.; collaboration, the VERITAS; :; Archambault, S.; Archer, A. A.; Barnacka, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortson, L.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Huetten, M.; Haakansson, N.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Nelson, T.; Nieto, D.; Ong, R. A.; Park, N.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Todd, N. W.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vincent, S.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; collaboration, the MAGIC; :; Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; Wilhelmi, E. D. de Oña; Mendez, C. Delgado; Di Pierro, F.; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Elsaesser, D.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Terrats, D. Garrido; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Eisenacher, D.; Godinović, N.; Muñoz, A. González; Guberman, D.; Hahn, A.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas-Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Garcia, J. Rodriguez; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L. O.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; collaborators, external; :; Perkins, J.; Verrecchia, F.; Leto, C.; Böttcher, M.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Bachev, R.; Berdyugin, A.; Blinov, D. A.; Carnerero, M. I.; Chen, W. P.; Chinchilla, P.; Damljanovic, G.; Eswaraiah, C.; Grishina, T. S.; Ibryamov, S.; Jordan, B.; Jorstad, S. G.; Joshi, M.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Kurtanidze, S. O.; Larionova, E. G.; Larionova, L. V.; Larionov, V. M.; Latev, G.; Lin, H. C.; Marscher, A. P.; Mokrushina, A. A.; Morozova, D. A.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Semkov, E.; Strigachev, A.; Troitskaya, Yu. V.; Troitsky, I. S.; Vince, O.; Barnes, J.; Güver, T.; Moody, J. W.; Sadun, A. C.; Sun, S.; Hovatta, T.; Richards, J. L.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A. C.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tornikoski, M.; Tammi, J.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Reinthal, R.; Angelakis, E.; Fuhrmann, L.; Myserlis, I.; Karamanavis, V.; Sievers, A.; Ungerechts, H.; Zensus, J. A.
Comments: 32 pages, 14 figures; accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-12-07
We present coordinated multiwavelength observations of the bright, nearby BL Lac object Mrk 421 taken in 2013 January-March, involving GASP-WEBT, Swift, NuSTAR, Fermi-LAT, MAGIC, VERITAS, and other collaborations and instruments, providing data from radio to very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray bands. NuSTAR yielded previously unattainable sensitivity in the 3-79 keV range, revealing that the spectrum softens when the source is dimmer until the X-ray spectral shape saturates into a steep power law with a photon index of approximately 3, with no evidence for an exponential cutoff or additional hard components up to about 80 keV. For the first time, we observed both the synchrotron and the inverse-Compton peaks of the spectral energy distribution (SED) simultaneously shifted to frequencies below the typical quiescent state by an order of magnitude. The fractional variability as a function of photon energy shows a double-bump structure which relates to the two bumps of the broadband SED. In each bump, the variability increases with energy which, in the framework of the synchrotron self-Compton model, implies that the electrons with higher energies are more variable. The measured multi-band variability, the significant X-ray-to-VHE correlation down to some of the lowest fluxes ever observed in both bands, the lack of correlation between optical/UV and X-ray flux, the low degree of polarization and its significant (random) variations, the short estimated electron cooling time, and the significantly longer variability timescale observed in the NuSTAR light curves point toward in-situ electron acceleration, and suggest that there are multiple compact regions contributing to the broadband emission of Mrk 421 during low-activity states.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.01085  [pdf] - 1347587
PKS 1502+106: A high-redshift Fermi blazar at extreme angular resolution. Structural dynamics with VLBI imaging up to 86 GHz
Comments: 22 pages, 12 figures. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2015-11-03
Context. Blazars are among the most energetic objects in the Universe. In 2008 August, Fermi/LAT detected the blazar PKS 1502+106 showing a rapid and strong gamma-ray outburst followed by high and variable flux over the next months. This activity at high energies triggered an intensive multi-wavelength campaign covering also the radio, optical, UV, and X-ray bands indicating that the flare was accompanied by a simultaneous outburst at optical/UV/X-rays and a delayed outburst at radio bands. Aims: In the current work we explore the phenomenology and physical conditions within the ultra-relativistic jet of the gamma-ray blazar PKS 1502+106. Additionally, we address the question of the spatial localization of the MeV/GeV-emitting region of the source. Methods: We utilize ultra-high angular resolution mm-VLBI observations at 43 and 86 GHz complemented by VLBI observations at 15 GHz. We also employ single-dish radio data from the F-GAMMA program at frequencies matching the VLBI monitoring. Results: PKS 1502+106 shows a compact core-jet morphology and fast superluminal motion with apparent speeds in the range 5--22 c. Estimation of Doppler factors along the jet yield values between ~7 up to ~50. This Doppler factor gradient implies an accelerating jet. The viewing angle towards the source differs between the inner and outer jet, with the former at ~3 degrees and the latter at ~1 degree, after the jet bends towards the observer beyond 1 mas. The de-projected opening angle of the ultra-fast, magnetically-dominated jet is found to be (3.8 +/- 0.5) degrees. A single jet component can be associated with the pronounced flare both at high-energies and in radio bands. Finally, the gamma-ray emission region is localized at less than 5.9 pc away from the jet base.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.04936  [pdf] - 1292363
First NuSTAR Observations of Mrk 501 within a Radio to TeV Multi-Instrument Campaign
Furniss, A.; Noda, K.; Boggs, S.; Chiang, J.; Christensen, F.; Craig, W.; Giommi, P .; Hailey, C.; Harisson, F.; Madejski, G.; Nalewajko, K.; Perri, M.; Stern, D.; Urry, M.; Verrecchia, F.; Zhang, W.; Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J. A.; Gonzalez, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; Wilhelmi, E. de Ona; Mendez, C. Delgado; Di Pierro, F.; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Glawion, D. Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D.; Fernandez-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; Lopez, R. J. Garcia; Garczarczyk, M.; Terrats, D. Garrido; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinovic, N.; Munoz, A. Gonzalez; Guberman, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kellermann, H.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; Lopez, M.; Lopez-Coto, R.; Lopez-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martinez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Rosillo, M. Nievas; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribo, M.; Rico, J.; Garcia, J. Rodriguez; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Satalecka, K.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpaa, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzic, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Will, M.; Zanin, R.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Bugaev, V.; Cardenzana, J. V; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Gerard, L.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Haakansson, N.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Lin, T. T. Y.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; de Bhroithe, A. O'Faolain; Ong, R. A.; Park, N.; Petry, D.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Ragan, K.; Ratliff, G.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; Fuhrmann, O. Vince L.; Angelakis, E.; Karamanavis, V.; Myserlis, I.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Zensus, J. A.; Ungerechts, H.; Sievers, A.; Bachev, R.; Bottcher, M.; Chen, W. P.; Damljanovic, G.; Eswaraiah, C.; Guver, T.; Hovatta, T.; Hughes, Z.; Ibryamov, S. . I.; Joner, M. D.; Jordan, B.; Jorstad, S. G.; Joshi, M.; Kataoka, J.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Kurtanidze, S. O.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Latev, G.; Lin, H. C.; Larionov, V. M.; Mokrushina, A. A.; Morozova, D. A.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Raiteri, C. M.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Readhead, A. C. R.; Sadun, A. C.; Sigua, L. A.; Semkov, E. H.; Strigachev, A.; Tammi, J.; Tornikoski, M.; Troitsky, Y. V. Troitskaya I. S.; Villata, M.
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-09-16, last modified: 2015-09-24
We report on simultaneous broadband observations of the TeV-emitting blazar Markarian 501 between 1 April and 10 August 2013, including the first detailed characterization of the synchrotron peak with Swift and NuSTAR. During the campaign, the nearby BL Lac object was observed in both a quiescent and an elevated state. The broadband campaign includes observations with NuSTAR, MAGIC, VERITAS, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), Swift X-ray Telescope and UV Optical Telescope, various ground-based optical instruments, including the GASP-WEBT program, as well as radio observations by OVRO, Mets\"ahovi and the F-Gamma consortium. Some of the MAGIC observations were affected by a sand layer from the Saharan desert, and had to be corrected using event-by-event corrections derived with a LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) facility. This is the first time that LIDAR information is used to produce a physics result with Cherenkov Telescope data taken during adverse atmospheric conditions, and hence sets a precedent for the current and future ground-based gamma-ray instruments. The NuSTAR instrument provides unprecedented sensitivity in hard X-rays, showing the source to display a spectral energy distribution between 3 and 79 keV consistent with a log-parabolic spectrum and hard X-ray variability on hour timescales. None (of the four extended NuSTAR observations) shows evidence of the onset of inverse-Compton emission at hard X-ray energies. We apply a single-zone equilibrium synchrotron self-Compton model to five simultaneous broadband spectral energy distributions. We find that the synchrotron self-Compton model can reproduce the observed broadband states through a decrease in the magnetic field strength coinciding with an increase in the luminosity and hardness of the relativistic leptons responsible for the high-energy emission.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.02314  [pdf] - 977421
Localizing the $\gamma$ rays from blazar PKS 1502+106
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure, proceedings of the 12th European VLBI Network Symposium and Users Meeting - EVN 2014, 7-10 October 2014, Cagliari, Italy. Published online in PoS, PoS(EVN 2014)087
Submitted: 2015-04-09
Blazars are among the most variable objects in the universe. They feature energetic jets of plasma that launch from the cores of these active galactic nuclei (AGN), triggering activity from radio up to gamma-ray energies. Spatial localization of the region of their MeV/GeV emission is a key question in understanding the blazar phenomenon. The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 1502+106 has exhibited extreme and correlated, radio and high-energy activity that triggered intense monitoring by the Fermi-GST AGN Multi-frequency Monitoring Alliance (F-GAMMA) program and the Global Millimeter VLBI Array (GMVA) down to $\lambda$3 mm (or 86 GHz), enabling the sharpest view to date towards this extreme object. Here, we report on preliminary results of our study of the gamma-ray loud blazar PKS 1502+106, combining VLBI and single dish data. We deduce the critical aspect angle towards the source to be $\theta_{\rm c} = 2.6^{\circ}$, calculate the apparent and intrinsic opening angles and constrain the distance of the 86 GHz core from the base of the conical jet, directly from mm-VLBI but also through a single dish relative timing analysis. Finally, we conclude that gamma rays from PKS 1502+106 originate from a region between ~1-16 pc away from the base of the hypothesized conical jet, well beyond the bulk of broad-line region (BLR) material of the source.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.02158  [pdf] - 939176
Radio jet emission from GeV-emitting narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies
Comments: Accepted for publication in 4 - Extragalactic astronomy of Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2015-01-06
We studied the radio emission from four radio-loud and gamma-ray-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies. The goal was to investigate whether a relativistic jet is operating at the source, and quantify its characteristics. We relied on the most systematic monitoring of such system in the cm and mm radio bands which is conducted with the Effelsberg 100 m and IRAM 30 m telescopes and covers the longest time-baselines and the most radio frequencies to date. We extract variability parameters and compute variability brightness temperatures and Doppler factors. The jet powers were computed from the light curves to estimate the energy output. The dynamics of radio spectral energy distributions were examined to understand the mechanism causing the variability. All the sources display intensive variability that occurs at a pace faster than what is commonly seen in blazars. The flaring events show intensive spectral evolution indicative of shock evolution. The brightness temperatures and Doppler factors are moderate, implying a mildly relativistic jet. The computed jet powers show very energetic flows. The radio polarisation in one case clearly implies a quiescent jet underlying the recursive flaring activity. Despite the generally lower flux densities, the sources appear to show all typical characteristics seen in blazars that are powered by relativistic jets.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.2417  [pdf] - 1216796
Early-time polarized optical light curve of GRB 131030A
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in MNRASL
Submitted: 2014-09-08, last modified: 2014-09-10
We report the polarized optical light curve of a gamma-ray burst afterglow obtained using the RoboPol instrument. Observations began 655 seconds after the initial burst of gamma-rays from GRB131030A, and continued uninterrupted for 2 hours. The afterglow displayed a low, constant fractional linear polarization of $p = (2.1 \pm 1.6)\,\%$ throughout, which is similar to the interstellar polarization measured on nearby stars. The optical brightness decay is consistent with a forward-shock propagating in a medium of constant density, and the low polarization fraction indicates a disordered magnetic field in the shock front. This supports the idea that the magnetic field is amplified by plasma instabilities on the shock front. These plasma instabilities produce strong magnetic fields with random directions on scales much smaller than the total observable region of the shock, and the resulting randomly-oriented polarization vectors sum to produce a low net polarization over the total observable region of the shock.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.3304  [pdf] - 1180703
The RoboPol optical polarization survey of gamma-ray - loud blazars
Comments: 14 pages, 6 figures, accepted by MNRAS. ASCII versions of Tables 2 and 3 are available as ancillary files with this submission
Submitted: 2013-11-13, last modified: 2014-05-15
We present first results from RoboPol, a novel-design optical polarimeter operating at the Skinakas Observatory in Crete. The data, taken during the May - June 2013 commissioning of the instrument, constitute a single-epoch linear polarization survey of a sample of gamma-ray - loud blazars, defined according to unbiased and objective selection criteria, easily reproducible in simulations, as well as a comparison sample of, otherwise similar, gamma-ray - quiet blazars. As such, the results of this survey are appropriate for both phenomenological population studies and for tests of theoretical population models. We have measured polarization fractions as low as $0.015$ down to $R$ magnitude of 17 and as low as $0.035$ down to 18 magnitude. The hypothesis that the polarization fractions of gamma-ray - loud and gamma-ray - quiet blazars are drawn from the same distribution is rejected at the $10^{-3}$ level. We therefore conclude that gamma-ray - loud and gamma-ray - quiet sources have different optical polarization properties. This is the first time this statistical difference is demonstrated in optical wavelengths. The polarization fraction distributions of both samples are well-described by exponential distributions with averages of $\langle p \rangle =6.4 ^{+0.9}_{-0.8}\times 10^{-2}$ for gamma-ray--loud blazars, and $\langle p \rangle =3.2 ^{+2.0}_{-1.1}\times 10^{-2}$ for gamma-ray--quiet blazars. The most probable value for the difference of the means is $3.4^{+1.5}_{-2.0}\times 10^{-2}$. The distribution of polarization angles is statistically consistent with being uniform.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.2072  [pdf] - 807308
Multi-frequency linear and circular radio polarization monitoring of jet emission elements in $Fermi$ blazars
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure, for the proceedings of the 11th Hellenic Astronomical Conference (Athens, Greece, September 8-12, 2013); 1 paragraph added in the last section; 1 reference added; minor changes in the text (mainly typos); minor changes in the text
Submitted: 2014-01-09, last modified: 2014-04-08
Radio emission in blazars -- the aligned subset of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) -- is produced by synchrotron electrons moving relativistically in their jet's magnetic field. Under the assumption of some degree of uniformity of the field, the emission can be highly polarized -- linearly and circularly. In the radio regime, the observed variability is in most of the cases attributed to flaring events undergoing opacity evolution, i.e. transitions from optically thick to thin emission (or vice versa). These transistions have a specific signature in the polarization parameter space (angle and magnitude) which can be traced with high cadence polarization monitoring and provide us with a unique probe of the microphysics of the emitting region. Here we present the full Stokes analysis of radio emission from blazars observed in the framework of the F-GAMMA program and discuss the case study of PKS\,1510$-$089 which has shown a prominent polarization event around MJD 55900.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.7555  [pdf] - 1180292
The RoboPol Pipeline and Control System
Comments: 12 pages, 16 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-10-28, last modified: 2014-03-07
We describe the data reduction pipeline and control system for the RoboPol project. The RoboPol project is monitoring the optical $R$-band magnitude and linear polarization of a large sample of active galactic nuclei that is dominated by blazars. The pipeline calibrates and reduces each exposure frame, producing a measurement of the magnitude and linear polarization of every source in the $13'\times 13'$ field of view. The control system combines a dynamic scheduler, real-time data reduction, and telescope automation to allow high-efficiency unassisted observations.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.6319  [pdf] - 1179466
An Exceptional Radio Flare in Markarian 421
Comments: 5 pages, 8 figures. Contributed talk at the meeting "The Innermost Regions of Relativistic Jets and Their Magnetic Fields", Granada, Spain. Updated to correct author list and references
Submitted: 2013-09-24, last modified: 2013-09-27
In September 2012, the high-synchrotron-peaked (HSP) blazar Markarian 421 underwent a rapid wideband radio flare, reaching nearly twice the brightest level observed in the centimeter band in over three decades of monitoring. In response to this event we carried out a five epoch centimeter- to millimeter-band multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) campaign to investigate the aftermath of this emission event. Rapid radio variations are unprecedented in this object and are surprising in an HSP BL Lac object. In this flare, the 15 GHz flux density increased with an exponential doubling time of about 9 days, then faded to its prior level at a similar rate. This is comparable with the fastest large-amplitude centimeter-band radio variability observed in any blazar. Similar flux density increases were detected up to millimeter bands. This radio flare followed about two months after a similarly unprecedented GeV gamma-ray flare (reaching a daily E>100 MeV flux of (1.2 +/- 0.7)x10^(-6) ph cm^(-2) s^(-1)) reported by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) collaboration, with a simultaneous tentative TeV detection by ARGO-YBJ. A cross-correlation analysis of long-term 15 GHz and LAT gamma-ray light curves finds a statistically significant correlation with the radio lagging ~40 days behind, suggesting that the gamma-ray emission originates upstream of the radio emission. Preliminary results from our VLBA observations show brightening in the unresolved core region and no evidence for apparent superluminal motions or substantial flux variations downstream.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.3709  [pdf] - 1173450
Multifrequency studies of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy SBS 0846+513
Comments: 11 pages, 9 figures, 4 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-08-16
The narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy SBS 0846+513 was first detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board Fermi in 2011 June-July when it underwent a period of flaring activity. Since then, as Fermi continues to accumulate data on this source, its flux has been monitored on a daily basis. Two further gamma-ray flaring episodes from SBS 0846+513 were observed in 2012 May and August, reaching a daily peak flux integrated above 100 MeV of (50+/-12)x10^-8 ph/cm^2/s, and (73+/-14)x10^-8 ph/cm^2/s on May 24 and August 7, respectively. Three outbursts were detected at 15 GHz by the Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40-m telescope in 2012 May, 2012 October, and 2013 January, suggesting a complex connection with the gamma-ray activity. The most likely scenario suggests that the 2012 May gamma-ray flare may not be directly related to the radio activity observed over the same period, while the two gamma-ray flaring episodes may be related to the radio activity observed at 15 GHz in 2012 October and 2013 January. The gamma-ray flare in 2012 May triggered Swift observations that confirmed that SBS 0846+513 was also exhibiting high activity in the optical, UV and X-ray bands, thus providing a firm identification between the gamma-ray source and the lower-energy counterpart. We compared the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the flaring state in 2012 May with that of a quiescent state. The two SEDs, modelled as an external Compton component of seed photons from a dust torus, could be fitted by changing the electron distribution parameters as well as the magnetic field. No significant evidence of thermal emission from the accretion disc has been observed. Interestingly, in the 5 GHz radio luminosity vs. synchrotron peak frequency plot SBS 0846+513 seems to lie in the flat spectrum radio quasar part of the so-called `blazar sequence'.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.1706  [pdf] - 648452
Properties of the radio jet emission of four gamma-ray Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies
Comments: Nuclei of Seyfert Galaxies and QSOs - Central Engine and Conditions of Star Formation, November 6-8, 2012, Max-Planck-Insitut f\"ur Radioastronomie (MPIfR), Bonn, Germany
Submitted: 2013-04-05
The detection of gamma rays from a small number of Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies by the LAT instrument onboard Fermi seriously challenged our understanding of AGN physics. Among the most important findings associated with their discovery has been the realisation that smaller-mass black holes seem to be hosted by these systems. Immediately after their discovery a radio multi- frequency monitoring campaign was initiated to understand their jet radio emission. Here the first results of the campaign are presented. The light curves and some first variability analyses are discussed, showing that the brightness temperatures and Doppler factors are moderate. The phenomenologies are typically blazar-like. The frequency domain on the other hand indicates intense spectral evolution and the variability patterns indicate mechanisms similar to those acting in the jets of BL Lacs and FSRQs. Finally, the linear polarisation also reveals the presence of a quiescent, optically thin jet in certain cases.