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Meyers, J.

Normalized to: Meyers, J.

79 article(s) in total. 1315 co-authors, from 1 to 23 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 8,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.12538  [pdf] - 2120117
Optimising LSST Observing Strategy for Weak Lensing Systematics
Comments: 15 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2020-06-22
The LSST survey will provide unprecedented statistical power for measurements of dark energy. Consequently, controlling systematic uncertainties is becoming more important than ever. The LSST observing strategy will affect the statistical uncertainty and systematics control for many science cases; here, we focus on weak lensing systematics. The fact that the LSST observing strategy involves hundreds of visits to the same sky area provides new opportunities for systematics mitigation. We explore these opportunities by testing how different dithering strategies (pointing offsets and rotational angle of the camera in different exposures) affect additive weak lensing shear systematics on a baseline operational simulation, using the $\rho-$statistics formalism. Some dithering strategies improve systematics control at the end of the survey by a factor of up to $\sim 3-4$ better than others. We find that a random translational dithering strategy, applied with random rotational dithering at every filter change, is the most effective of those strategies tested in this work at averaging down systematics. Adopting this dithering algorithm, we explore the effect of varying the area of the survey footprint, exposure time, number of exposures in a visit, and exposure to the Galactic plane. We find that any change that increases the average number of exposures (in filters relevant to weak lensing) reduces the additive shear systematics. Some ways to achieve this increase may not be favorable for the weak lensing statistical constraining power or for other probes, and we explore the relative trade-offs between these options given constraints on the overall survey parameters.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.03060  [pdf] - 2109230
Optimal filters for the moving lens effect
Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures, comments welcome
Submitted: 2020-06-04
We assess the prospects for detecting the moving lens effect using cosmological surveys. The bulk motion of cosmological structure induces a small-scale dipolar temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave radiation (CMB), centered around halos and oriented along the transverse velocity field. We introduce a set of optimal filters for this signal, and forecast that a high significance detection can be made with upcoming experiments. We discuss the prospects for reconstructing the bulk transverse velocity field on large scales using matched filters, finding good agreement with previous work using quadratic estimators.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.00529  [pdf] - 2071617
Cosmic variance mitigation in measurements of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect
Comments: 9+4 pages, 4 figures. v2: PRD published version, with references and clarifications added (conclusions unchanged)
Submitted: 2018-11-01, last modified: 2020-03-27
The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is sensitive to the recent phase of accelerated cosmic expansion through the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, which manifests as secondary temperature fluctuations on large angular scales. However, the large cosmic variance from primary CMB fluctuations limits the usefulness of this effect in constraining dark energy or modified gravity. In this paper, we propose a novel method to separate the ISW signal from the primary signal using gravitational lensing, based on the fact that the ISW signal is, to a good approximation, not gravitationally lensed. We forecast how well we can isolate the ISW signal for different experimental configurations, and discuss various applications, including modified gravity, large-scale CMB anomalies, and measurements of local-type primordial non-Gaussianity. Although not within reach of current experiments, the proposed method is a unique way to remove the cosmic variance of the primary signal, allowing for better CMB-based constraints on late-time phenomena than previously thought possible.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.12714  [pdf] - 2056399
CMB-HD: Astro2020 RFI Response
Comments: Response to request for information (RFI) by the Panel of Radio, Millimeter, and Submillimeter Observations from the Ground (RMS) of the Astro2020 Decadal Survey regarding the CMB-HD APC (arXiv:1906.10134). Note some text overlap with original APC. Note also detector count and cost have been reduced by 1/3, and observing time increased by 1/3 compared to original APC; science goals expanded
Submitted: 2020-02-28
CMB-HD is a proposed ultra-deep (0.5 uk-arcmin), high-resolution (15 arcseconds) millimeter-wave survey over half the sky that would answer many outstanding questions in both fundamental physics of the Universe and astrophysics. This survey would be delivered in 7.5 years of observing 20,000 square degrees, using two new 30-meter-class off-axis cross-Dragone telescopes to be located at Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert. Each telescope would field 800,000 detectors (200,000 pixels), for a total of 1.6 million detectors.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.05291  [pdf] - 2050194
Prospects and Limitations for Constraining Light Relics with Primordial Abundance Measurements
Comments: 8 pp, 4 figures
Submitted: 2019-08-14, last modified: 2019-09-22
The light relic density affects the thermal and expansion history of the early Universe leaving a number of observable imprints. We focus on the primordial abundances of light elements produced during the process of Big Bang nucleosynthesis which are influenced by the light relic density. Primordial abundances can be used to infer the density of light relics and thereby serve as a probe of physics beyond the Standard Model. We calculate the observational uncertainty on primordial light element abundances and associated quantities that would be required in order for these measurements to achieve sensitivity to the light relic density comparable to that anticipated from upcoming cosmic microwave background surveys. We identify the nuclear reaction rates that need to be better measured to maximize the utility of future observations. We show that improved measurements of the primordial helium-4 abundance can improve constraints on light relics, while more precise measurements of the primordial deuterium abundance are unlikely to be competitive with cosmic microwave background measurements of the light relic density.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.02587  [pdf] - 1956586
The CCAT-Prime Submillimeter Observatory
Comments: Astro2020 APC White Paper
Submitted: 2019-09-05
The Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope-prime (CCAT-prime) is a new 6-m, off-axis, low-emissivity, large field-of-view submillimeter telescope scheduled for first light in the last quarter of 2021. In summary, (a) CCAT-prime uniquely combines a large field-of-view (up to 8-deg), low emissivity telescope (< 2%) and excellent atmospheric transmission (5600-m site) to achieve unprecedented survey capability in the submillimeter. (b) Over five years, CCAT-prime first generation science will address the physics of star formation, galaxy evolution, and galaxy cluster formation; probe the re-ionization of the Universe; improve constraints on new particle species; and provide for improved removal of dust foregrounds to aid the search for primordial gravitational waves. (c) The Observatory is being built with non-federal funds (~ \$40M in private and international investments). Public funding is needed for instrumentation (~ \$8M) and operations (\$1-2M/yr). In return, the community will be able to participate in survey planning and gain access to curated data sets. (d) For second generation science, CCAT-prime will be uniquely positioned to contribute high-frequency capabilities to the next generation of CMB surveys in partnership with the CMB-S4 and/or the Simons Observatory projects or revolutionize wide-field, sub-millimetter line intensity mapping surveys.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.07495  [pdf] - 1945993
PICO: Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins
Comments: APC White Paper submitted to the Astro2020 decadal panel; 10 page version of the 50 page mission study report arXiv:1902.10541
Submitted: 2019-08-20
The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins (PICO) is a proposed probe-scale space mission consisting of an imaging polarimeter operating in frequency bands between 20 and 800 GHz. We describe the science achievable by PICO, which has sensitivity equivalent to more than 3300 Planck missions, the technical implementation, the schedule and cost.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.01062  [pdf] - 1928247
CMB-S4 Decadal Survey APC White Paper
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Amin, Mustafa A.; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bock, James J.; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Project White Paper submitted to the 2020 Decadal Survey, 10 pages plus references. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1907.04473
Submitted: 2019-07-31
We provide an overview of the science case, instrument configuration and project plan for the next-generation ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4, for consideration by the 2020 Decadal Survey.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.09187  [pdf] - 1919976
Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and Neutrino Cosmology
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures. Same manuscript as version submitted to Astro2020 Decadal Survey, except for additions to references and endorsers. v2 contains additional endorsers. v3 contains additional endorsers and credits
Submitted: 2019-03-21, last modified: 2019-07-21
There exist a range of exciting scientific opportunities for Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) in the coming decade. BBN, a key particle astrophysics "tool" for decades, is poised to take on new capabilities to probe beyond standard model (BSM) physics. This development is being driven by experimental determination of neutrino properties, new nuclear reaction experiments, advancing supercomputing/simulation capabilities, the prospect of high-precision next-generation cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations, and the advent of 30m class telescopes.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.08284  [pdf] - 1976842
The Simons Observatory: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Adachi, Shunsuke; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Atkins, Zachary; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Lizancos, Anton Baleato; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bhandarkar, Tanay; Bhimani, Sanah; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bolliet, Boris; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Carl, Fred. M; Cayuso, Juan; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Clark, Susan; Clarke, Philip; Contaldi, Carlo; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Coulton, Will; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Bouhargani, Hamza El; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Fergusson, James; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Halpern, Mark; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hensley, Brandon; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hoang, Thuong D.; Hoh, Jonathan; Hotinli, Selim C.; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Johnson, Matthew; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Kofman, Anna; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kusaka, Akito; LaPlante, Phil; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Liu, Jia; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McCarrick, Heather; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Mertens, James; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Moore, Jenna; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Murata, Masaaki; Naess, Sigurd; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Nicola, Andrina; Niemack, Mike; Nishino, Haruki; Nishinomiya, Yume; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Pagano, Luca; Partridge, Bruce; Perrotta, Francesca; Phakathi, Phumlani; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Rotti, Aditya; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Saunders, Lauren; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Shellard, Paul; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sifon, Cristobal; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Smith, Kendrick; Sohn, Wuhyun; Sonka, Rita; Spergel, David; Spisak, Jacob; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Treu, Jesse; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Wang, Yuhan; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Young, Edward; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zannoni, Mario; Zhang, Hezi; Zheng, Kaiwen; Zhu, Ningfeng; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1808.07445
Submitted: 2019-07-16
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment sited on Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert in Chile that promises to provide breakthrough discoveries in fundamental physics, cosmology, and astrophysics. Supported by the Simons Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and with contributions from collaborating institutions, SO will see first light in 2021 and start a five year survey in 2022. SO has 287 collaborators from 12 countries and 53 institutions, including 85 students and 90 postdocs. The SO experiment in its currently funded form ('SO-Nominal') consists of three 0.4 m Small Aperture Telescopes (SATs) and one 6 m Large Aperture Telescope (LAT). Optimized for minimizing systematic errors in polarization measurements at large angular scales, the SATs will perform a deep, degree-scale survey of 10% of the sky to search for the signature of primordial gravitational waves. The LAT will survey 40% of the sky with arc-minute resolution. These observations will measure (or limit) the sum of neutrino masses, search for light relics, measure the early behavior of Dark Energy, and refine our understanding of the intergalactic medium, clusters and the role of feedback in galaxy formation. With up to ten times the sensitivity and five times the angular resolution of the Planck satellite, and roughly an order of magnitude increase in mapping speed over currently operating ("Stage 3") experiments, SO will measure the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations to exquisite precision in six frequency bands from 27 to 280 GHz. SO will rapidly advance CMB science while informing the design of future observatories such as CMB-S4.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.04459  [pdf] - 1914293
Shear measurement bias due to spatially varying spectral energy distributions in galaxies
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-07-09
Galaxy color gradients - i.e., spectral energy distributions that vary across the galaxy profile - will impact galaxy shape measurements when the modeled point spread function (PSF) corresponds to that for a galaxy with spatially uniform color. This paper describes the techniques and results of a study of the expected impact of galaxy color gradients on weak lensing measurements with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) when the PSF size depends on wavelength. The bias on cosmic shear measurements from color gradients is computed both for parametric bulge+disk galaxy simulations and for more realistic chromatic galaxy surface brightness profiles based on HST V- and I-band images in the AEGIS survey. For the parametric galaxies, and for the more realistic galaxies derived from AEGIS galaxies with sufficient SNR that color gradient bias can be isolated, the predicted multiplicative shear biases due to color gradients are found to be at least a factor of 2 below the LSST full-depth requirement on the total systematic uncertainty in the redshift-dependent shear calibration. The analysis code and data products are publicly available (https://github.com/sowmyakth/measure_cg_bias).
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.04473  [pdf] - 1914295
CMB-S4 Science Case, Reference Design, and Project Plan
Abazajian, Kevork; Addison, Graeme; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Anderson, Adam; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bailey, Kathy; Barkats, Denis; Barron, Darcy; Barry, Peter S.; Bartlett, James G.; Thakur, Ritoban Basu; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baxter, Eric; Bean, Rachel; Bebek, Chris; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Berger, Edo; Bhimani, Sanah; Bischoff, Colin A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Bocquet, Sebastian; Boddy, Kimberly; Bonato, Matteo; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Brown, Michael L.; Bryan, Sean; Burkhart, Blakesley; Buza, Victor; Byrum, Karen; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Carron, Julien; Cecil, Thomas; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Clarence L.; Chinone, Yuji; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Cooray, Asantha; Crawford, Thomas M.; Crites, Abigail; Cukierman, Ari; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Haan, Tijmen; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Demarteau, Marcel; Devlin, Mark; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dobbs, Matt; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adriaan; Dvorkin, Cora; Edwards, William; Eimer, Joseph; Errard, Josquin; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Chang; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Flaugher, Brenna; Fraisse, Aurelien A.; Frolov, Andrei; Galitzki, Nicholas; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Gerbino, Martina; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gualtieri, Riccardo; Guarino, Victor; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Habib, Salman; Haller, Gunther; Halpern, Mark; Halverson, Nils W.; Hanany, Shaul; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hazumi, Masashi; Heitmann, Katrin; Henderson, Shawn; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renée; Holder, Gil; Holzapfel, William; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Huffer, Michael; Hui, Howard; Irwin, Kent; Johnson, Bradley R.; Johnstone, Doug; Jones, William C.; Karkare, Kirit; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kerby, James; Kernovsky, Sarah; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kuo, Chao-lin; Kurita, Nadine; Kusaka, Akito; Lahteenmaki, Anne; Lawrence, Charles R.; Lee, Adrian T.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Dale; Linder, Eric; Loverde, Marilena; Lowitz, Amy; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Matsuda, Frederick; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; McQuinn, Matthew; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Meyers, Joel; Millea, Marius; Mohr, Joseph; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Nagai, Daisuke; Nagy, Johanna; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Tyler; Negrello, Mattia; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nishino, Haruki; Nordby, Martin; Novosad, Valentine; O'Connor, Paul; Obied, Georges; Padin, Stephen; Pandey, Shivam; Partridge, Bruce; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Rahlin, Alexandra; Rajagopalan, Srini; Raveri, Marco; Reichanadter, Mark; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Graca; Roe, Natalie A.; Roy, Anirban; Ruhl, John; Salatino, Maria; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sheehy, Christopher; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shirokoff, Erik; Simon, Sara M.; Slosar, Anze; Somerville, Rachel; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stark, Antony; Stompor, Radek; Story, Kyle T.; Stoughton, Chris; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant P.; Thompson, Keith; Timbie, Peter; Tomasi, Maurizio; Treu, Jesse I.; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Umiltà, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Vieregg, Abigail G.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Wang, Gensheng; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wollack, Edward J.; Wu, W. L. Kimmy; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Yeck, James; Yoon, Ki Won; Young, Edward; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: 287 pages, 82 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-09
We present the science case, reference design, and project plan for the Stage-4 ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment CMB-S4.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.10134  [pdf] - 2084998
CMB-HD: An Ultra-Deep, High-Resolution Millimeter-Wave Survey Over Half the Sky
Comments: APC White Paper for the Astro2020 Decadal, with updated proposing team
Submitted: 2019-06-24, last modified: 2019-06-30
A millimeter-wave survey over half the sky, that spans frequencies in the range of 30 to 350 GHz, and that is both an order of magnitude deeper and of higher-resolution than currently funded surveys would yield an enormous gain in understanding of both fundamental physics and astrophysics. By providing such a deep, high-resolution millimeter-wave survey (about 0.5 uK-arcmin noise and 15 arcsecond resolution at 150 GHz), CMB-HD will enable major advances. It will allow 1) the use of gravitational lensing of the primordial microwave background to map the distribution of matter on small scales (k~10/hMpc), which probes dark matter particle properties. It will also allow 2) measurements of the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects on small scales to map the gas density and gas pressure profiles of halos over a wide field, which probes galaxy evolution and cluster astrophysics. In addition, CMB-HD would allow us to cross critical thresholds in fundamental physics: 3) ruling out or detecting any new, light (< 0.1eV), thermal particles, which could potentially be the dark matter, and 4) testing a wide class of multi-field models that could explain an epoch of inflation in the early Universe. Such a survey would also 5) monitor the transient sky by mapping the full observing region every few days, which opens a new window on gamma-ray bursts, novae, fast radio bursts, and variable active galactic nuclei. Moreover, CMB-HD would 6) provide a census of planets, dwarf planets, and asteroids in the outer Solar System, and 7) enable the detection of exo-Oort clouds around other solar systems, shedding light on planet formation. CMB-HD will deliver this survey in 5 years of observing half the sky, using two new 30-meter-class off-axis cross-Dragone telescopes to be located at Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert. The telescopes will field about 2.4 million detectors (600,000 pixels) in total.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.09208  [pdf] - 1854198
Inflation and Dark Energy from spectroscopy at $z > 2$
Ferraro, Simone; Wilson, Michael J.; Abidi, Muntazir; Alonso, David; Ansarinejad, Behzad; Armstrong, Robert; Asorey, Jacobo; Avelino, Arturo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bandura, Kevin; Battaglia, Nicholas; Bavdhankar, Chetan; Bernal, José Luis; Beutler, Florian; Biagetti, Matteo; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blazek, Jonathan; Bolton, Adam S.; Borrill, Julian; Frye, Brenda; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Bull, Philip; Burgess, Cliff; Byrnes, Christian T.; Cai, Zheng; Castander, Francisco J; Castorina, Emanuele; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Chaves-Montero, Jonás; Chen, Shi-Fan; Chen, Xingang; Balland, Christophe; Yèche, Christophe; Cohn, J. D.; Coulton, William; Courtois, Helene; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; D'Amico, Guido; Dawson, Kyle; Delabrouille, Jacques; Dey, Arjun; Doré, Olivier; Douglass, Kelly A.; Yutong, Duan; Dvorkin, Cora; Eggemeier, Alexander; Eisenstein, Daniel; Fan, Xiaohui; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foreman, Simon; García-Bellido, Juan; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Green, Daniel; Guy, Julien; Hahn, ChangHoon; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hathi, Nimish; Hawken, Adam J.; Hernández-Aguayo, César; Hložek, Renée; Huterer, Dragan; Ishak, Mustapha; Kamionkowski, Marc; Karagiannis, Dionysios; Keeley, Ryan E.; Kehoe, Robert; Khatri, Rishi; Kim, Alex; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Krause, Elisabeth; Krolewski, Alex; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Landriau, Martin; Levi, Michael; Liguori, Michele; Linder, Eric; Lukić, Zarija; de la Macorra, Axel; Plazas, Andrés A.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Martini, Paul; Masui, Kiyoshi; McDonald, Patrick; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Newburgh, Laura; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Niz, Gustavo; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Palunas, Povilas; Percival, Will J.; Piacentini, Francesco; Pieri, Matthew M.; Piro, Anthony L.; Prakash, Abhishek; Rhodes, Jason; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Rudie, Gwen C.; Samushia, Lado; Sasaki, Misao; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schlegel, David J.; Schmittfull, Marcel; Schubnell, Michael; Sehgal, Neelima; Senatore, Leonardo; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shafieloo, Arman; Shan, Huanyuan; Simon, Joshua D.; Simon, Sara; Slepian, Zachary; Slosar, Anže; Sridhar, Srivatsan; Stebbins, Albert; Escoffier, Stephanie; Switzer, Eric R.; Tarlé, Gregory; Trodden, Mark; Uhlemann, Cora; Urenña-López, L. Arturo; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Vargas-Magaña, M.; Wang, Yi; Watson, Scott; White, Martin; Xu, Weishuang; Yu, Byeonghee; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Zhu, Hong-Ming
Comments: Science white paper submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey
Submitted: 2019-03-21
The expansion of the Universe is understood to have accelerated during two epochs: in its very first moments during a period of Inflation and much more recently, at $z < 1$, when Dark Energy is hypothesized to drive cosmic acceleration. The undiscovered mechanisms behind these two epochs represent some of the most important open problems in fundamental physics. The large cosmological volume at $2 < z < 5$, together with the ability to efficiently target high-$z$ galaxies with known techniques, enables large gains in the study of Inflation and Dark Energy. A future spectroscopic survey can test the Gaussianity of the initial conditions up to a factor of ~50 better than our current bounds, crossing the crucial theoretical threshold of $\sigma(f_{NL}^{\rm local})$ of order unity that separates single field and multi-field models. Simultaneously, it can measure the fraction of Dark Energy at the percent level up to $z = 5$, thus serving as an unprecedented test of the standard model and opening up a tremendous discovery space.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04409  [pdf] - 1849245
Primordial Non-Gaussianity
Meerburg, P. Daniel; Green, Daniel; Abidi, Muntazir; Amin, Mustafa A.; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Alonso, David; Ansarinejad, Behzad; Armstrong, Robert; Avila, Santiago; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baldauf, Tobias; Ballardini, Mario; Bandura, Kevin; Bartolo, Nicola; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baumann, Daniel; Bavdhankar, Chetan; Bernal, José Luis; Beutler, Florian; Biagetti, Matteo; Bischoff, Colin; Blazek, Jonathan; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, François R.; Bull, Philip; Burgess, Cliff; Byrnes, Christian; Calabrese, Erminia; Carlstrom, John E.; Castorina, Emanuele; Challinor, Anthony; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Chaves-Montero, Jonas; Chen, Xingang; Yeche, Christophe; Cooray, Asantha; Coulton, William; Crawford, Thomas; Chisari, Elisa; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; D'Amico, Guido; de Bernardis, Paolo; de la Macorra, Axel; Doré, Olivier; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Joanna; Dvorkin, Cora; Eggemeier, Alexander; Escoffier, Stephanie; Essinger-Hileman, Tom; Fasiello, Matteo; Ferraro, Simone; Flauger, Raphael; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foreman, Simon; Friedrich, Oliver; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goon, Garrett; Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Gupta, Nikhel; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hawken, Adam J.; Hill, J. Colin; Hirata, Christopher M.; Hložek, Renée; Holder, Gilbert; Huterer, Dragan; Kamionkowski, Marc; Karkare, Kirit S.; Keeley, Ryan E.; Kinney, William; Kisner, Theodore; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Knox, Lloyd; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Koyama, Kazuya; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Lahav, Ofer; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Lee, Hayden; Liguori, Michele; Loverde, Marilena; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Maldacena, Juan; Marsh, M. C. David; Masui, Kiyoshi; Matarrese, Sabino; McAllister, Liam; McMahon, Jeff; McQuinn, Matthew; Meyers, Joel; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad; Motloch, Pavel; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Muñoz, Julian B.; Myers, Adam D.; Nagy, Johanna; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Newburgh; Nicolis, Alberto; Niemack, Michael D.; Niz, Gustavo; Nomerotski, Andrei; Page, Lyman; Pajer, Enrico; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Palma, Gonzalo A.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Percival, Will J.; Piacentni, Francesco; Pimentel, Guilherme L.; Pogosian, Levon; Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Racine, Benjamin; Stompor, Radek; Raveri, Marco; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rocha, Gracca; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruhl, John; Sasaki, Misao; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Senatore, Leonardo; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shan, Huanyuan; Shandera, Sarah; Sherwin, Blake D.; Silverstein, Eva; Simon, Sara; Slosar, Anže; Staggs, Suzanne; Starkman, Glenn; Stebbins, Albert; Suzuki, Aritoki; Switzer, Eric R.; Timbie, Peter; Tolley, Andrew J.; Tomasi, Maurizio; Tristram, Matthieu; Trodden, Mark; Tsai, Yu-Dai; Uhlemann, Cora; Umilta, Caterina; van Engelen, Alexander; Vargas-Magaña, M.; Vieregg, Abigail; Wallisch, Benjamin; Wands, David; Wandelt, Benjamin; Wang, Yi; Watson, Scott; Wise, Mark; Wu, W. L. K.; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi; Xu, Weishuang; Yasini, Siavash; Young, Sam; Yutong, Duan; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zemcov, Michael; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Zhu, Ningfeng
Comments: 5 pages + references; Submitted to the Astro2020 call for science white papers. This version: fixed author list
Submitted: 2019-03-11, last modified: 2019-03-14
Our current understanding of the Universe is established through the pristine measurements of structure in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the distribution and shapes of galaxies tracing the large scale structure (LSS) of the Universe. One key ingredient that underlies cosmological observables is that the field that sources the observed structure is assumed to be initially Gaussian with high precision. Nevertheless, a minimal deviation from Gaussianityis perhaps the most robust theoretical prediction of models that explain the observed Universe; itis necessarily present even in the simplest scenarios. In addition, most inflationary models produce far higher levels of non-Gaussianity. Since non-Gaussianity directly probes the dynamics in the early Universe, a detection would present a monumental discovery in cosmology, providing clues about physics at energy scales as high as the GUT scale.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04763  [pdf] - 1847076
Messengers from the Early Universe: Cosmic Neutrinos and Other Light Relics
Green, Daniel; Amin, Mustafa A.; Meyers, Joel; Wallisch, Benjamin; Abazajian, Kevork N.; Abidi, Muntazir; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Ansarinejad, Behzad; Armstrong, Robert; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bandura, Kevin; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nicholas; Baumann, Daniel; Bechtol, Keith; Bennett, Charles; Benson, Bradford; Beutler, Florian; Bischoff, Colin; Bleem, Lindsey; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Burgess, Cliff; Carlstrom, John E.; Castorina, Emanuele; Challinor, Anthony; Chen, Xingang; Cooray, Asantha; Coulton, William; Craig, Nathaniel; Crawford, Thomas; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; D'Amico, Guido; Demarteau, Marcel; Doré, Olivier; Yutong, Duan; Dunkley, Joanna; Dvorkin, Cora; Ellison, John; van Engelen, Alexander; Escoffier, Stephanie; Essinger-Hileman, Tom; Fabbian, Giulio; Filippini, Jeffrey; Flauger, Raphael; Foreman, Simon; Fuller, George; Garcia, Marcos A. G.; García-Bellido, Juan; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Górski, Krzysztof M.; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Hanany, Shaul; Handley, Will; Hill, J. Colin; Hirata, Christopher M.; Hložek, Renée; Holder, Gilbert; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Huterer, Dragan; Kadota, Kenji; Kamionkowski, Marc; Keeley, Ryan E.; Khatri, Rishi; Kisner, Theodore; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Knox, Lloyd; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Kovetz, Ely D.; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Lahav, Ofer; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Lee, Hayden; Liguori, Michele; Lin, Tongyan; Loverde, Marilena; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Masui, Kiyoshi; McMahon, Jeff; McQuinn, Matthew; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Motloch, Pavel; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Munõz, Julian B.; Nagy, Johanna; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nomerotski, Andrei; Page, Lyman; Piacentni, Francesco; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Stompor, Radek; Raveri, Marco; Reichardt, Christian L.; Rose, Benjamin; Rossi, Graziano; Ruhl, John; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schubnell, Michael; Schutz, Katelin; Sehgal, Neelima; Senatore, Leonardo; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sherwin, Blake D.; Simon, Sara; Slosar, Anže; Staggs, Suzanne; Stebbins, Albert; Suzuki, Aritoki; Switzer, Eric R.; Timbie, Peter; Tristram, Matthieu; Trodden, Mark; Tsai, Yu-Dai; Umiltà, Caterina; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Vargas-Magaña, M.; Vieregg, Abigail; Watson, Scott; Weiler, Thomas; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wu, W. L. K.; Xu, Weishuang; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zhu, Ningfeng; Zuntz, Joe
Comments: 5 pages + references; 1 figure; science white paper submitted to the Astro2020 decadal survey
Submitted: 2019-03-12
The hot dense environment of the early universe is known to have produced large numbers of baryons, photons, and neutrinos. These extreme conditions may have also produced other long-lived species, including new light particles (such as axions or sterile neutrinos) or gravitational waves. The gravitational effects of any such light relics can be observed through their unique imprint in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the large-scale structure, and the primordial light element abundances, and are important in determining the initial conditions of the universe. We argue that future cosmological observations, in particular improved maps of the CMB on small angular scales, can be orders of magnitude more sensitive for probing the thermal history of the early universe than current experiments. These observations offer a unique and broad discovery space for new physics in the dark sector and beyond, even when its effects would not be visible in terrestrial experiments or in astrophysical environments. A detection of an excess light relic abundance would be a clear indication of new physics and would provide the first direct information about the universe between the times of reheating and neutrino decoupling one second later.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04700  [pdf] - 1847065
Probing the origin of our Universe through cosmic microwave background constraints on gravitational waves
Comments: 5 pages + references; Submitted to the Astro2020 call for science white papers
Submitted: 2019-03-11
The next generation of instruments designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) will provide a historic opportunity to open the gravitational wave window to the primordial Universe. Through high sensitivity searches for primordial gravitational waves, and tighter limits on the energy released in processes like phase transitions, the CMB polarization data of the next decade has the potential to transform our understanding of the laws of physics underlying the formation of the Universe.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.03263  [pdf] - 1845116
Science from an Ultra-Deep, High-Resolution Millimeter-Wave Survey
Comments: 5 pages + references; Submitted to the Astro2020 call for science white papers
Submitted: 2019-03-07
Opening up a new window of millimeter-wave observations that span frequency bands in the range of 30 to 500 GHz, survey half the sky, and are both an order of magnitude deeper (about 0.5 uK-arcmin) and of higher-resolution (about 10 arcseconds) than currently funded surveys would yield an enormous gain in understanding of both fundamental physics and astrophysics. In particular, such a survey would allow for major advances in measuring the distribution of dark matter and gas on small-scales, and yield needed insight on 1.) dark matter particle properties, 2.) the evolution of gas and galaxies, 3.) new light particle species, 4.) the epoch of inflation, and 5.) the census of bodies orbiting in the outer Solar System.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.10541  [pdf] - 1842579
PICO: Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins
Comments: Probe class mission study submitted to NASA and 2020 Decadal Panel. Executive summary: 2.5 pages; Science: 28 pages; Total: 50 pages, 36 figures
Submitted: 2019-02-26, last modified: 2019-03-05
The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins (PICO) is an imaging polarimeter that will scan the sky for 5 years in 21 frequency bands spread between 21 and 799 GHz. It will produce full-sky surveys of intensity and polarization with a final combined-map noise level of 0.87 $\mu$K arcmin for the required specifications, equivalent to 3300 Planck missions, and with our current best-estimate would have a noise level of 0.61 $\mu$K arcmin (6400 Planck missions). PICO will either determine the energy scale of inflation by detecting the tensor to scalar ratio at a level $r=5\times 10^{-4}~(5\sigma)$, or will rule out with more than $5\sigma$ all inflation models for which the characteristic scale in the potential is the Planck scale. With LSST's data it could rule out all models of slow-roll inflation. PICO will detect the sum of neutrino masses at $>4\sigma$, constrain the effective number of light particle species with $\Delta N_{\rm eff}<0.06~(2\sigma)$, and elucidate processes affecting the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring the optical depth to reionization with errors limited by cosmic variance and by constraining the evolution of the amplitude of linear fluctuations $\sigma_{8}(z)$ with sub-percent accuracy. Cross-correlating PICO's map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect with LSST's gold sample of galaxies will precisely trace the evolution of thermal pressure with $z$. PICO's maps of the Milky Way will be used to determine the make up of galactic dust and the role of magnetic fields in star formation efficiency. With 21 full sky legacy maps in intensity and polarization, which cannot be obtained in any other way, the mission will enrich many areas of astrophysics. PICO is the only single-platform instrument with the combination of sensitivity, angular resolution, frequency bands, and control of systematic effects that can deliver this compelling, timely, and broad science.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.07445  [pdf] - 1841339
The Simons Observatory: Science goals and forecasts
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Dusatko, John; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Fuzia, Brittany; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; He, Yizhou; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Howe, Logan; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Kernasovskiy, Sarah S.; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kuenstner, Stephen E.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Kusaka, Akito; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Leon, David; Leung, Jason S. -Y.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lowry, Lindsay; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Niemack, Michael; Nishino, Haruki; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Page, Lyman; Partridge, Bruce; Peloton, Julien; Perrotta, Francesca; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Siritanasak, Praween; Smith, Kendrick; Smith, Stephen R.; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward J.; Xu, Zhilei; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zhang, Hezi; Zhu, Ningfeng
Comments: This paper presents an overview of the Simons Observatory science goals, details about the instrument will be presented in a companion paper. The author contribution to this paper is available at https://simonsobservatory.org/publications.php (Abstract abridged) -- matching version published in JCAP
Submitted: 2018-08-22, last modified: 2019-03-01
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a new cosmic microwave background experiment being built on Cerro Toco in Chile, due to begin observations in the early 2020s. We describe the scientific goals of the experiment, motivate the design, and forecast its performance. SO will measure the temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background in six frequency bands: 27, 39, 93, 145, 225 and 280 GHz. The initial configuration of SO will have three small-aperture 0.5-m telescopes (SATs) and one large-aperture 6-m telescope (LAT), with a total of 60,000 cryogenic bolometers. Our key science goals are to characterize the primordial perturbations, measure the number of relativistic species and the mass of neutrinos, test for deviations from a cosmological constant, improve our understanding of galaxy evolution, and constrain the duration of reionization. The SATs will target the largest angular scales observable from Chile, mapping ~10% of the sky to a white noise level of 2 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, to measure the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, at a target level of $\sigma(r)=0.003$. The LAT will map ~40% of the sky at arcminute angular resolution to an expected white noise level of 6 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, overlapping with the majority of the LSST sky region and partially with DESI. With up to an order of magnitude lower polarization noise than maps from the Planck satellite, the high-resolution sky maps will constrain cosmological parameters derived from the damping tail, gravitational lensing of the microwave background, the primordial bispectrum, and the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects, and will aid in delensing the large-angle polarization signal to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio. The survey will also provide a legacy catalog of 16,000 galaxy clusters and more than 20,000 extragalactic sources.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.03167  [pdf] - 1938329
Transverse Velocities with the Moving Lens Effect
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures, comments welcome
Submitted: 2018-12-07
Gravitational potentials which change in time induce fluctuations in the observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature. Cosmological structure moving transverse to our line of sight provides a specific example known as the moving lens effect. Here we explore how the observed CMB temperature fluctuations combined with the observed matter over-density can be used to infer the transverse velocity of cosmological structure on large scales. We show that near-future CMB surveys and galaxy surveys will have the statistical power to make a first detection of the moving lens effect, and we discuss applications for the reconstructed transverse velocity.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.03248  [pdf] - 1794996
An Overview of the LSST Image Processing Pipelines
Comments: Submitted to proceedings for ADASS XXVIII
Submitted: 2018-12-07
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an ambitious astronomical survey with a similarly ambitious Data Management component. Data Management for LSST includes processing on both nightly and yearly cadences to generate transient alerts, deep catalogs of the static sky, and forced photometry light-curves for billions of objects at hundreds of epochs, spanning at least a decade. The algorithms running in these pipelines are individually sophisticated and interact in subtle ways. This paper provides an overview of those pipelines, focusing more on those interactions than the details of any individual algorithm.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.01669  [pdf] - 1746010
The LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC) Science Requirements Document
Comments: 32 pages + 60 pages of appendices. This is v1 of the DESC SRD, an internal collaboration document that is being made public and is not planned for submission to a journal. Data products for reproducing key plots are available at the LSST DESC Zenodo community, https://zenodo.org/communities/lsst-desc; see "Executive Summary and User Guide" for instructions on how to use and cite those products
Submitted: 2018-09-05
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC) will use five cosmological probes: galaxy clusters, large scale structure, supernovae, strong lensing, and weak lensing. This Science Requirements Document (SRD) quantifies the expected dark energy constraining power of these probes individually and together, with conservative assumptions about analysis methodology and follow-up observational resources based on our current understanding and the expected evolution within the field in the coming years. We then define requirements on analysis pipelines that will enable us to achieve our goal of carrying out a dark energy analysis consistent with the Dark Energy Task Force definition of a Stage IV dark energy experiment. This is achieved through a forecasting process that incorporates the flowdown to detailed requirements on multiple sources of systematic uncertainty. Future versions of this document will include evolution in our software capabilities and analysis plans along with updates to the LSST survey strategy.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.04975  [pdf] - 1743662
Lensing reconstruction from line intensity maps: the impact of gravitational nonlinearity
Comments: 40+18 pages, 13 figures, 5 tables. v2: JCAP published version, with typos fixed and clarifications added
Submitted: 2018-03-13, last modified: 2018-09-03
We investigate the detection prospects for gravitational lensing of three-dimensional maps from upcoming line intensity surveys, focusing in particular on the impact of gravitational nonlinearities on standard quadratic lensing estimators. Using perturbation theory, we show that these nonlinearities can provide a significant contaminant to lensing reconstruction, even for observations at reionization-era redshifts. However, we show how this contamination can be mitigated with the use of a "bias-hardened" estimator. Along the way, we present an estimator for reconstructing long-wavelength density modes, in the spirit of the "tidal reconstruction" technique that has been proposed elsewhere, and discuss the dominant biases on this estimator. After applying bias-hardening, we find that a detection of the lensing potential power spectrum will still be challenging for the first phase of SKA-Low, CHIME, and HIRAX, with gravitational nonlinearities decreasing the signal to noise by a factor of a few compared to forecasts that ignore these effects. On the other hand, cross-correlations between lensing and galaxy clustering or cosmic shear from a large photometric survey look promising, provided that systematics can be sufficiently controlled. We reach similar conclusions for a single-dish survey inspired by CII measurements planned for CCAT-prime, suggesting that lensing is an interesting science target not just for 21cm surveys, but also for intensity maps of other lines.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.00885  [pdf] - 1747822
Weak lensing shear calibration with simulations of the HSC survey
Comments: 29 pages, 18 figures, 3 tables. Matches MNRAS accepted version. The Hubble Space Telescope postage stamp images used as the inputs to the simulations were publicly released at https://hsc-release.mtk.nao.ac.jp/doc/index.php/weak-lensing-simulation-catalog-pdr1/
Submitted: 2017-10-02, last modified: 2018-09-03
We present results from a set of simulations designed to constrain the weak lensing shear calibration for the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey. These simulations include HSC observing conditions and galaxy images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), with fully realistic galaxy morphologies and the impact of nearby galaxies included. We find that the inclusion of nearby galaxies in the images is critical to reproducing the observed distributions of galaxy sizes and magnitudes, due to the non-negligible fraction of unrecognized blends in ground-based data, even with the excellent typical seeing of the HSC survey (0.58" in the $i$-band). Using these simulations, we detect and remove the impact of selection biases due to the correlation of weights and the quantities used to define the sample (S/N and apparent size) with the lensing shear. We quantify and remove galaxy property-dependent multiplicative and additive shear biases that are intrinsic to our shear estimation method, including a $\sim 10$ per cent-level multiplicative bias due to the impact of nearby galaxies and unrecognized blends. Finally, we check the sensitivity of our shear calibration estimates to other cuts made on the simulated samples, and find that the changes in shear calibration are well within the requirements for HSC weak lensing analysis. Overall, the simulations suggest that the weak lensing multiplicative biases in the first-year HSC shear catalog are controlled at the 1 per cent level.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.04354  [pdf] - 1724215
CCAT-prime: Science with an Ultra-widefield Submillimeter Observatory at Cerro Chajnantor
Comments: Presented at SPIE Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy IX, June 14th, 2018
Submitted: 2018-07-11
We present the detailed science case, and brief descriptions of the telescope design, site, and first light instrument plans for a new ultra-wide field submillimeter observatory, CCAT-prime, that we are constructing at a 5600 m elevation site on Cerro Chajnantor in northern Chile. Our science goals are to study star and galaxy formation from the epoch of reionization to the present, investigate the growth of structure in the Universe, improve the precision of B-mode CMB measurements, and investigate the interstellar medium and star formation in the Galaxy and nearby galaxies through spectroscopic, polarimetric, and broadband surveys at wavelengths from 200 um to 2 mm. These goals are realized with our two first light instruments, a large field-of-view (FoV) bolometer-based imager called Prime-Cam (that has both camera and an imaging spectrometer modules), and a multi-beam submillimeter heterodyne spectrometer, CHAI. CCAT-prime will have very high surface accuracy and very low system emissivity, so that combined with its wide FoV at the unsurpassed CCAT site our telescope/instrumentation combination is ideally suited to pursue this science. The CCAT-prime telescope is being designed and built by Vertex Antennentechnik GmbH. We expect to achieve first light in the spring of 2021.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.11616  [pdf] - 1826777
Dark Matter Interactions, Helium, and the CMB
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures; v2: Updated Figure 4
Submitted: 2018-05-29, last modified: 2018-05-31
The cosmic microwave background (CMB) places a variety of model-independent constraints on the strength interactions of the dominant component of dark matter with the Standard Model. Percent-level subcomponents of the dark matter can evade the most stringent CMB bounds by mimicking the behavior of baryons, allowing for larger couplings and novel experimental signatures. However, in this note, we will show that such tightly coupled subcomponents leave a measurable imprint on the CMB that is well approximated by a change to the helium fraction, $Y_{\rm He}$. Using the existing constraint on $Y_{\rm He}$, we derive a new upper limit on the fraction of tightly coupled dark matter, $f_{\rm TCDM}$, of $f_{\rm TCDM}<0.006$ (95\% C.I.). We show that future CMB experiments can reach $f_{\rm TCDM}<0.001$ (95\% C.I.) and confirm that the bounds derived in this way agree with the results of a complete analysis. We briefly comment on the implications for model building, including milli-charged dark matter.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.01708  [pdf] - 1692438
Beyond CMB cosmic variance limits on reionization with the polarized SZ effect
Comments: v3: Added 2 figures, expanded discussion, minor edits, 6+2 pages, 8 figures. v2: Added figure, updated references, minor edits, 6+2 pages, 6 figures. v1: 6+2 pages, 5 figures. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2017-10-04, last modified: 2018-05-31
Upcoming cosmic microwave background (CMB) surveys will soon make the first detection of the polarized Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, the linear polarization generated by the scattering of CMB photons on the free electrons present in collapsed objects. Measurement of this polarization along with knowledge of the electron density of the objects allows a determination of the quadrupolar temperature anisotropy of the CMB as viewed from the space-time location of the objects. Maps of these remote temperature quadrupoles have several cosmological applications. Here we propose a new application: reconstruction of the cosmological reionization history. We show that with quadrupole measurements out to redshift 3, constraints on the mean optical depth can be improved by an order of magnitude beyond the CMB cosmic variance limit.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.2366  [pdf] - 1934226
LSST: from Science Drivers to Reference Design and Anticipated Data Products
Ivezić, Željko; Kahn, Steven M.; Tyson, J. Anthony; Abel, Bob; Acosta, Emily; Allsman, Robyn; Alonso, David; AlSayyad, Yusra; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrew, John; Angel, James Roger P.; Angeli, George Z.; Ansari, Reza; Antilogus, Pierre; Araujo, Constanza; Armstrong, Robert; Arndt, Kirk T.; Astier, Pierre; Aubourg, Éric; Auza, Nicole; Axelrod, Tim S.; Bard, Deborah J.; Barr, Jeff D.; Barrau, Aurelian; Bartlett, James G.; Bauer, Amanda E.; Bauman, Brian J.; Baumont, Sylvain; Becker, Andrew C.; Becla, Jacek; Beldica, Cristina; Bellavia, Steve; Bianco, Federica B.; Biswas, Rahul; Blanc, Guillaume; Blazek, Jonathan; Blandford, Roger D.; Bloom, Josh S.; Bogart, Joanne; Bond, Tim W.; Borgland, Anders W.; Borne, Kirk; Bosch, James F.; Boutigny, Dominique; Brackett, Craig A.; Bradshaw, Andrew; Brandt, William Nielsen; Brown, Michael E.; Bullock, James S.; Burchat, Patricia; Burke, David L.; Cagnoli, Gianpietro; Calabrese, Daniel; Callahan, Shawn; Callen, Alice L.; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Charles-Emerson, Glenaver; Chesley, Steve; Cheu, Elliott C.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Chiang, James; Chirino, Carol; Chow, Derek; Ciardi, David R.; Claver, Charles F.; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Cockrum, Joseph J.; Coles, Rebecca; Connolly, Andrew J.; Cook, Kem H.; Cooray, Asantha; Covey, Kevin R.; Cribbs, Chris; Cui, Wei; Cutri, Roc; Daly, Philip N.; Daniel, Scott F.; Daruich, Felipe; Daubard, Guillaume; Daues, Greg; Dawson, William; Delgado, Francisco; Dellapenna, Alfred; de Peyster, Robert; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Digel, Seth W.; Doherty, Peter; Dubois, Richard; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory P.; Durech, Josef; Economou, Frossie; Eracleous, Michael; Ferguson, Henry; Figueroa, Enrique; Fisher-Levine, Merlin; Focke, Warren; Foss, Michael D.; Frank, James; Freemon, Michael D.; Gangler, Emmanuel; Gawiser, Eric; Geary, John C.; Gee, Perry; Geha, Marla; Gessner, Charles J. B.; Gibson, Robert R.; Gilmore, D. Kirk; Glanzman, Thomas; Glick, William; Goldina, Tatiana; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Goodenow, Iain; Graham, Melissa L.; Gressler, William J.; Gris, Philippe; Guy, Leanne P.; Guyonnet, Augustin; Haller, Gunther; Harris, Ron; Hascall, Patrick A.; Haupt, Justine; Hernandez, Fabio; Herrmann, Sven; Hileman, Edward; Hoblitt, Joshua; Hodgson, John A.; Hogan, Craig; Huang, Dajun; Huffer, Michael E.; Ingraham, Patrick; Innes, Walter R.; Jacoby, Suzanne H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jammes, Fabrice; Jee, James; Jenness, Tim; Jernigan, Garrett; Jevremović, Darko; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Anthony S.; Johnson, Margaret W. G.; Jones, R. Lynne; Juramy-Gilles, Claire; Jurić, Mario; Kalirai, Jason S.; Kallivayalil, Nitya J.; Kalmbach, Bryce; Kantor, Jeffrey P.; Karst, Pierre; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kelly, Heather; Kessler, Richard; Kinnison, Veronica; Kirkby, David; Knox, Lloyd; Kotov, Ivan V.; Krabbendam, Victor L.; Krughoff, K. Simon; Kubánek, Petr; Kuczewski, John; Kulkarni, Shri; Ku, John; Kurita, Nadine R.; Lage, Craig S.; Lambert, Ron; Lange, Travis; Langton, J. Brian; Guillou, Laurent Le; Levine, Deborah; Liang, Ming; Lim, Kian-Tat; Lintott, Chris J.; Long, Kevin E.; Lopez, Margaux; Lotz, Paul J.; Lupton, Robert H.; Lust, Nate B.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Mahabal, Ashish; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Marsh, Darren S.; Marshall, Philip J.; Marshall, Stuart; May, Morgan; McKercher, Robert; McQueen, Michelle; Meyers, Joshua; Migliore, Myriam; Miller, Michelle; Mills, David J.; Miraval, Connor; Moeyens, Joachim; Monet, David G.; Moniez, Marc; Monkewitz, Serge; Montgomery, Christopher; Mueller, Fritz; Muller, Gary P.; Arancibia, Freddy Muñoz; Neill, Douglas R.; Newbry, Scott P.; Nief, Jean-Yves; Nomerotski, Andrei; Nordby, Martin; O'Connor, Paul; Oliver, John; Olivier, Scot S.; Olsen, Knut; O'Mullane, William; Ortiz, Sandra; Osier, Shawn; Owen, Russell E.; Pain, Reynald; Palecek, Paul E.; Parejko, John K.; Parsons, James B.; Pease, Nathan M.; Peterson, J. Matt; Peterson, John R.; Petravick, Donald L.; Petrick, M. E. Libby; Petry, Cathy E.; Pierfederici, Francesco; Pietrowicz, Stephen; Pike, Rob; Pinto, Philip A.; Plante, Raymond; Plate, Stephen; Price, Paul A.; Prouza, Michael; Radeka, Veljko; Rajagopal, Jayadev; Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Regnault, Nicolas; Reil, Kevin A.; Reiss, David J.; Reuter, Michael A.; Ridgway, Stephen T.; Riot, Vincent J.; Ritz, Steve; Robinson, Sean; Roby, William; Roodman, Aaron; Rosing, Wayne; Roucelle, Cecille; Rumore, Matthew R.; Russo, Stefano; Saha, Abhijit; Sassolas, Benoit; Schalk, Terry L.; Schellart, Pim; Schindler, Rafe H.; Schmidt, Samuel; Schneider, Donald P.; Schneider, Michael D.; Schoening, William; Schumacher, German; Schwamb, Megan E.; Sebag, Jacques; Selvy, Brian; Sembroski, Glenn H.; Seppala, Lynn G.; Serio, Andrew; Serrano, Eduardo; Shaw, Richard A.; Shipsey, Ian; Sick, Jonathan; Silvestri, Nicole; Slater, Colin T.; Smith, J. Allyn; Smith, R. Chris; Sobhani, Shahram; Soldahl, Christine; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa; Stover, Edward; Strauss, Michael A.; Street, Rachel A.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Sullivan, Ian S.; Sweeney, Donald; Swinbank, John D.; Szalay, Alexander; Takacs, Peter; Tether, Stephen A.; Thaler, Jon J.; Thayer, John Gregg; Thomas, Sandrine; Thukral, Vaikunth; Tice, Jeffrey; Trilling, David E.; Turri, Max; Van Berg, Richard; Berk, Daniel Vanden; Vetter, Kurt; Virieux, Francoise; Vucina, Tomislav; Wahl, William; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Walsh, Brian; Walter, Christopher W.; Wang, Daniel L.; Wang, Shin-Yawn; Warner, Michael; Wiecha, Oliver; Willman, Beth; Winters, Scott E.; Wittman, David; Wolff, Sidney C.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Wu, Xiuqin; Xin, Bo; Yoachim, Peter; Zhan, Hu
Comments: 57 pages, 32 color figures, version with high-resolution figures available from https://www.lsst.org/overview
Submitted: 2008-05-15, last modified: 2018-05-23
(Abridged) We describe here the most ambitious survey currently planned in the optical, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). A vast array of science will be enabled by a single wide-deep-fast sky survey, and LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: probing dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. LSST will be a wide-field ground-based system sited at Cerro Pach\'{o}n in northern Chile. The telescope will have an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg$^2$ field of view, and a 3.2 Gigapixel camera. The standard observing sequence will consist of pairs of 15-second exposures in a given field, with two such visits in each pointing in a given night. With these repeats, the LSST system is capable of imaging about 10,000 square degrees of sky in a single filter in three nights. The typical 5$\sigma$ point-source depth in a single visit in $r$ will be $\sim 24.5$ (AB). The project is in the construction phase and will begin regular survey operations by 2022. The survey area will be contained within 30,000 deg$^2$ with $\delta<+34.5^\circ$, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, $ugrizy$, covering the wavelength range 320--1050 nm. About 90\% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will uniformly observe a 18,000 deg$^2$ region about 800 times (summed over all six bands) during the anticipated 10 years of operations, and yield a coadded map to $r\sim27.5$. The remaining 10\% of the observing time will be allocated to projects such as a Very Deep and Fast time domain survey. The goal is to make LSST data products, including a relational database of about 32 trillion observations of 40 billion objects, available to the public and scientists around the world.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.04277  [pdf] - 1709414
Wavelength Dependent PSFs and their impact on Weak Lensing Measurements
Comments: 14 pages, 10 figures. Submitted to MNRAS. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2018-04-11
We measure and model the wavelength dependence of the PSF in the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) survey. We find that PSF chromaticity is present in that redder stars appear smaller than bluer stars in the $g, r,$ and $i$-bands at the 1-2 per cent level and in the $z$ and $y$-bands at the 0.1-0.2 per cent level. From the color dependence of the PSF, we fit a model between the monochromatic PSF trace radius, $R$, and wavelength of the form $R(\lambda)\propto \lambda^{b}$. We find values of $b$ between -0.2 and -0.5, depending on the epoch and filter. This is consistent with the expectations of a turbulent atmosphere with an outer scale length of $\sim 10-100$ m, indicating that the atmosphere is dominating the chromaticity. We find evidence in the best seeing data that the optical system and detector also contribute some wavelength dependence. Meyers and Burchat (2015) showed that $b$ must be measured to an accuracy of $\sim 0.02$ not to dominate the systematic error budget of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) weak lensing (WL) survey. Using simple image simulations, we find that $b$ can be inferred with this accuracy in the $r$ and $i$-bands for all positions in the LSST field of view, assuming a stellar density of 1 star arcmin$^{-2}$ and that the optical PSF can be accurately modeled. Therefore, it is possible to correct for most, if not all, of the bias that the wavelength-dependent PSF will introduce into an LSST-like WL survey.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.01055  [pdf] - 1871381
Aspects of Dark Matter Annihilation in Cosmology
Comments: 22 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2018-04-03
Cosmic microwave background (CMB) constraints on dark matter annihilation are a uniquely powerful tool in the quest to understand the nature of dark matter. Annihilation of dark matter to Standard Model particles between recombination and reionization heats baryons, ionizes neutral hydrogen, and alters the CMB visibility function. Surprisingly, CMB bounds on dark matter annihilation are not expected to improve significantly with the dramatic improvements in sensitivity expected in future cosmological surveys. In this paper, we will present a simple physical description of the origin of the CMB constraints and explain why they are nearly saturated by current observations. The essential feature is that dark matter annihilation primarily affects the ionization fraction which can only increase substantially at times when the universe was neutral. The resulting change to the CMB occurs on large angular scales and leads to a phenomenology similar to that of the optical depth to reionization. We will demonstrate this impact on the CMB both analytically and numerically. Finally, we will discuss the additional impact that changing the ionization fraction has on large scale structure.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.08913  [pdf] - 1622304
Effect of reheating on predictions following multiple-field inflation
Comments: Published in PRD. 4 figures, 10 pages
Submitted: 2017-10-24, last modified: 2018-01-23
We study the sensitivity of cosmological observables to the reheating phase following inflation driven by many scalar fields. We describe a method which allows semi-analytic treatment of the impact of perturbative reheating on cosmological perturbations using the sudden decay approximation. Focusing on $\mathcal{N}$-quadratic inflation, we show how the scalar spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio are affected by the rates at which the scalar fields decay into radiation. We find that for certain choices of decay rates, reheating following multiple-field inflation can have a significant impact on the prediction of cosmological observables.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.04058  [pdf] - 1587069
Science-Driven Optimization of the LSST Observing Strategy
LSST Science Collaboration; Marshall, Phil; Anguita, Timo; Bianco, Federica B.; Bellm, Eric C.; Brandt, Niel; Clarkson, Will; Connolly, Andy; Gawiser, Eric; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; Lochner, Michelle; Lund, Michael B.; Mahabal, Ashish; Nidever, David; Olsen, Knut; Ridgway, Stephen; Rhodes, Jason; Shemmer, Ohad; Trilling, David; Vivas, Kathy; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Willman, Beth; Yoachim, Peter; Anderson, Scott; Antilogus, Pierre; Angus, Ruth; Arcavi, Iair; Awan, Humna; Biswas, Rahul; Bell, Keaton J.; Bennett, David; Britt, Chris; Buzasi, Derek; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Chomiuk, Laura; Claver, Chuck; Cook, Kem; Davenport, James; Debattista, Victor; Digel, Seth; Doctor, Zoheyr; Firth, R. E.; Foley, Ryan; Fong, Wen-fai; Galbany, Lluis; Giampapa, Mark; Gizis, John E.; Graham, Melissa L.; Grillmair, Carl; Gris, Phillipe; Haiman, Zoltan; Hartigan, Patrick; Hawley, Suzanne; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W.; Johns-Krull, C.; Kanbur, Shashi; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Kashyap, Vinay; Kasliwal, Vishal; Kessler, Richard; Kim, Alex; Kurczynski, Peter; Lahav, Ofer; Liu, Michael C.; Malz, Alex; Margutti, Raffaella; Matheson, Tom; McEwen, Jason D.; McGehee, Peregrine; Meibom, Soren; Meyers, Josh; Monet, Dave; Neilsen, Eric; Newman, Jeffrey; O'Dowd, Matt; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Penny, Matthew T.; Peters, Christina; Poleski, Radoslaw; Ponder, Kara; Richards, Gordon; Rho, Jeonghee; Rubin, David; Schmidt, Samuel; Schuhmann, Robert L.; Shporer, Avi; Slater, Colin; Smith, Nathan; Soares-Santos, Marcelles; Stassun, Keivan; Strader, Jay; Strauss, Michael; Street, Rachel; Stubbs, Christopher; Sullivan, Mark; Szkody, Paula; Trimble, Virginia; Tyson, Tony; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Valenti, Stefano; Wagoner, Robert; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Zauderer, Bevin Ashley
Comments: 312 pages, 90 figures. Browse the current version at https://github.com/LSSTScienceCollaborations/ObservingStrategy, new contributions welcome!
Submitted: 2017-08-14
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is designed to provide an unprecedented optical imaging dataset that will support investigations of our Solar System, Galaxy and Universe, across half the sky and over ten years of repeated observation. However, exactly how the LSST observations will be taken (the observing strategy or "cadence") is not yet finalized. In this dynamically-evolving community white paper, we explore how the detailed performance of the anticipated science investigations is expected to depend on small changes to the LSST observing strategy. Using realistic simulations of the LSST schedule and observation properties, we design and compute diagnostic metrics and Figures of Merit that provide quantitative evaluations of different observing strategies, analyzing their impact on a wide range of proposed science projects. This is work in progress: we are using this white paper to communicate to each other the relative merits of the observing strategy choices that could be made, in an effort to maximize the scientific value of the survey. The investigation of some science cases leads to suggestions for new strategies that could be simulated and potentially adopted. Notably, we find motivation for exploring departures from a spatially uniform annual tiling of the sky: focusing instead on different parts of the survey area in different years in a "rolling cadence" is likely to have significant benefits for a number of time domain and moving object astronomy projects. The communal assembly of a suite of quantified and homogeneously coded metrics is the vital first step towards an automated, systematic, science-based assessment of any given cadence simulation, that will enable the scheduling of the LSST to be as well-informed as possible.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.00718  [pdf] - 1582315
Reconstructing the Primary CMB Dipole
Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures; comments welcome
Submitted: 2017-04-03
The observed dipole anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature is much larger than the fluctuations observed on smaller scales and is dominated by the kinematic contribution from the Doppler shifting of the monopole due to our motion with respect to the CMB rest frame. In addition to this kinematic component, there is expected to be an intrinsic contribution with an amplitude about two orders of magnitude smaller. Here we explore a method whereby the intrinsic CMB dipole can be reconstructed through observation of temperature fluctuations on small scales which result from gravitational lensing. Though the experimental requirements pose practical challenges, we show that one can in principle achieve a cosmic variance limited measurement of the primary dipole using the reconstruction method we describe. Since the primary CMB dipole is sensitive to the largest observable scales, such a measurement would have a number of interesting applications for early universe physics, including testing large-scale anomalies, extending the lever-arm for measuring local non-Gaussianity, and constraining isocurvature fluctuations on super-horizon scales.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.06342  [pdf] - 2042108
Phases of New Physics in the CMB
Comments: 39 pages, 10 figures, 5 tables; v2: minor corrections, references added; v3: corrected Planck parameter constraints, conclusions unchanged
Submitted: 2015-08-25, last modified: 2017-03-29
Fluctuations in the cosmic neutrino background are known to produce a phase shift in the acoustic peaks of the cosmic microwave background. It is through the sensitivity to this effect that the recent CMB data has provided a robust detection of free-streaming neutrinos. In this paper, we revisit the phase shift of the CMB anisotropy spectrum as a probe of new physics. The phase shift is particularly interesting because its physical origin is strongly constrained by the analytic properties of the Green's function of the gravitational potential. For adiabatic fluctuations, a phase shift requires modes that propagate faster than the speed of fluctuations in the photon-baryon plasma. This possibility is realized by free-streaming relativistic particles, such as neutrinos or other forms of dark radiation. Alternatively, a phase shift can arise from isocurvature fluctuations. We present simple models to illustrate each of these effects. We then provide observational constraints from the Planck temperature and polarization data on additional forms of radiation. We also forecast the capabilities of future CMB Stage IV experiments. Whenever possible, we give analytic interpretations of our results.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.06992  [pdf] - 1581254
Reconstructing CMB fluctuations and the mean reionization optical depth
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figs. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2017-01-24
The Thomson optical depth from reionization is a limiting factor in measuring the amplitude of primordial fluctuations, and hence in measuring physics that affects the low-redshift amplitude, such as the neutrino masses. Current constraints on the optical depth, based on directly measuring large-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, are challenging due to foregrounds and systematic effects. Here, we consider an indirect measurement of large-scale polarization, using observed maps of small-scale polarization together with maps of fields that distort the CMB, such as CMB lensing and patchy reionization. We find that very futuristic CMB surveys will be able to reconstruct large-scale polarization, and thus the mean optical depth, using only measurements on small scales.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.05870  [pdf] - 1532692
Isophote Shapes of Early-Type Galaxies in Massive Clusters at $z\sim1$ and 0
Comments: 22 pages, 21 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-11-17
We compare the isophote shape parameter $a_{4}$ of early-type galaxies (ETGs) between $z\sim1$ and 0 as a proxy for dynamics to investigate the epoch at which the dynamical properties of ETGs are established, using cluster ETG samples with stellar masses of $\log(M_{*}/M_{\odot})\geq10.5$ which have spectroscopic redshifts. We have 130 ETGs from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey for $z\sim1$ and 355 ETGs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey for $z\sim0$. We have developed an isophote shape analysis method which can be used for high-redshift galaxies and has been carefully compared with published results. We have applied the same method for both the $z\sim1$ and $0$ samples. We find similar dependence of the $a_{4}$ parameter on the mass and size at $z\sim1$ and 0; the main population of ETGs changes from disky to boxy at a critical stellar mass of $\log(M_{*}/M_{\odot})\sim11.5$ with the massive end dominated by boxy. The disky ETG fraction decreases with increasing stellar mass both at $z\sim1$ and $0$, and is consistent between these redshifts in all stellar mass bins when the Eddington bias is taken into account. Although uncertainties are large, the results suggest that the isophote shapes and probably dynamical properties of ETGs in massive clusters are already in place at $z>1$ and do not significantly evolve in $z<1$, despite significant size evolution in the same galaxy population. The constant disky fraction favors less violent processes than mergers as a main cause of the size and morphological evolution of intermediate mass ETGs in $z<1$.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.09365  [pdf] - 1580490
Establishing the origin of CMB B-mode polarization
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2016-10-28
Primordial gravitational waves leave a characteristic imprint on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in the form of $B$-mode polarization. Photons are also deflected by large scale gravitational waves which intervene between the source screen and our telescopes, resulting in curl-type gravitational lensing. Gravitational waves present at the epoch of reionization contribute to both effects, thereby leading to a non-vanishing cross-correlation between $B$-mode polarization and curl lensing of the CMB. Observing such a cross correlation would be very strong evidence that an observation of $B$-mode polarization was due to the presence of large scale gravitational waves, as opposed to astrophysical foregrounds or experimental systematic effects. We study the cross-correlation across a wide range of source redshifts and show that a post-SKA experiment aimed to map out the 21-cm sky between $15 \leq z \leq 30$ could rule out non-zero cross-correlation at high significance for $r \geq 0.01$.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.06673  [pdf] - 1563944
Probabilistic Cosmological Mass Mapping from Weak Lensing Shear
Comments: 22 pages, 17 figures, submitted, comments welcome
Submitted: 2016-10-21
We infer gravitational lensing shear and convergence fields from galaxy ellipticity catalogs under a spatial process prior for the lensing potential. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm with simulated Gaussian-distributed cosmological lensing shear maps and a reconstruction of the mass distribution of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 781 using galaxy ellipticities measured with the Deep Lens Survey. Given interim posterior samples of lensing shear or convergence fields on the sky, we describe an algorithm to infer cosmological parameters via lens field marginalization. In the most general formulation of our algorithm we make no assumptions about weak shear or Gaussian distributed shape noise or shears. Because we require solutions and matrix determinants of a linear system of dimension that scales with the number of galaxies, we expect our algorithm to require parallel high-performance computing resources for application to ongoing wide field lensing surveys.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.02743  [pdf] - 1494117
CMB-S4 Science Book, First Edition
Abazajian, Kevork N.; Adshead, Peter; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Allen, Steven W.; Alonso, David; Arnold, Kam S.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bartlett, James G.; Battaglia, Nicholas; Benson, Bradford A.; Bischoff, Colin A.; Borrill, Julian; Buza, Victor; Calabrese, Erminia; Caldwell, Robert; Carlstrom, John E.; Chang, Clarence L.; Crawford, Thomas M.; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; De Bernardis, Francesco; de Haan, Tijmen; Alighieri, Sperello di Serego; Dunkley, Joanna; Dvorkin, Cora; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Ferraro, Simone; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Flauger, Raphael; Fuller, George M.; Gluscevic, Vera; Green, Daniel; Grin, Daniel; Grohs, Evan; Henning, Jason W.; Hill, J. Colin; Hlozek, Renee; Holder, Gilbert; Holzapfel, William; Hu, Wayne; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Keskitalo, Reijo; Knox, Lloyd; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Kusaka, Akito; Jeune, Maude Le; Lee, Adrian T.; Lilley, Marc; Loverde, Marilena; Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Mantz, Adam; Marsh, David J. E.; McMahon, Jeffrey; Meerburg, Pieter Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber D.; Munoz, Julian B.; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Niemack, Michael D.; Peloso, Marco; Peloton, Julien; Pogosian, Levon; Pryke, Clement; Raveri, Marco; Reichardt, Christian L.; Rocha, Graca; Rotti, Aditya; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel M.; Scott, Douglas; Sehgal, Neelima; Shandera, Sarah; Sherwin, Blake D.; Smith, Tristan L.; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Starkman, Glenn D.; Story, Kyle T.; van Engelen, Alexander; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Watson, Scott; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wu, W. L. Kimmy
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-10-09
This book lays out the scientific goals to be addressed by the next-generation ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment, CMB-S4, envisioned to consist of dedicated telescopes at the South Pole, the high Chilean Atacama plateau and possibly a northern hemisphere site, all equipped with new superconducting cameras. CMB-S4 will dramatically advance cosmological studies by crossing critical thresholds in the search for the B-mode polarization signature of primordial gravitational waves, in the determination of the number and masses of the neutrinos, in the search for evidence of new light relics, in constraining the nature of dark energy, and in testing general relativity on large scales.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.00785  [pdf] - 1542744
Single-Field Inflation and the Local Ansatz: Distinguishability and Consistency
Comments: 17 pages
Submitted: 2016-10-03
The single-field consistency conditions and the local ansatz have played separate but important roles in characterizing the non-Gaussian signatures of single- and multifield inflation respectively. We explore the precise relationship between these two approaches and their predictions. We demonstrate that the predictions of the single-field consistency conditions can never be satisfied by a general local ansatz with deviations necessarily arising at order $(n_s-1)^2$. This implies that there is, in principle, a minimum difference between single- and (fully local) multifield inflation in observables sensitive to the squeezed limit such as scale-dependent halo bias. We also explore some potential observational implications of the consistency conditions and its relationship to the local ansatz. In particular, we propose a new scheme to test the consistency relations. In analogy with delensing of the cosmic microwave background, one can deproject the coupling of the long wavelength modes with the short wavelength modes and test for residual anomalous coupling.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.08143  [pdf] - 1604730
CMB Delensing Beyond the B Modes
Comments: To be submitted to JCAP. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2016-09-26
Gravitational lensing by large-scale structure significantly impacts observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB): it smooths the acoustic peaks in temperature and $E$-mode polarization power spectra, correlating previously uncorrelated modes; and it converts $E$-mode polarization into $B$-mode polarization. The act of measuring and removing the effect of lensing from CMB maps, or delensing, has been well studied in the context of $B$ modes, but little attention has been given to the delensing of the temperature and $E$ modes. In this paper, we model the expected delensed $T$ and $E$ power spectra to all orders in the lensing potential, demonstrating the sharpening of the acoustic peaks and a significant reduction in lens-induced power spectrum covariances. We then perform cosmological forecasts, demonstrating that delensing will yield improved sensitivity to parameters with upcoming surveys. We highlight the breaking of the degeneracy between the effective number of neutrino species and primordial helium fraction as a concrete application. We also show that delensing increases cosmological information as long as the measured lensing reconstruction is included in the analysis. We conclude that with future data, delensing will be crucial not only for primordial $B$-mode science but for a range of other observables as well.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.2858  [pdf] - 1425200
Monthly Modulation in Dark Matter Direct-Detection Experiments
Comments: 22 pages, 7 figures, added extensive discussion on WISP detection experiments
Submitted: 2014-09-09, last modified: 2016-06-19
The signals in dark matter direct-detection experiments should exhibit modulation signatures due to the Earth's motion with respect to the Galactic dark matter halo. The annual and daily modulations, due to the Earth's revolution about the Sun and rotation about its own axis, have been explored previously. Monthly modulation is another such feature present in direct detection signals, and provides a nearly model-independent method of distinguishing dark matter signal events from background. We study here monthly modulations in detail for both WIMP and WISP dark matter searches, examining both the effect of the motion of the Earth about the Earth-Moon barycenter and the gravitational focusing due to the Moon. For WIMP searches, we calculate the monthly modulation of the count rate and show the effects are too small to be observed in the foreseeable future. For WISP dark matter experiments, we show that the photons generated by WISP to photon conversion have frequencies which undergo a monthly modulating shift which is detectable with current technology and which cannot in general be neglected in high resolution WISP searches.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.05575  [pdf] - 1408466
Cosmic Neutrinos and Other Light Relics
Comments: 4 pages. Based on a presentation given at Rencontres de Moriond Cosmology 2016 which reported on arXiv:1508.06342 and Green, Meyers, van Engelen 2016 (forthcoming). To appear in Rencontres de Moriond Conference Proceedings
Submitted: 2016-05-18
Cosmological measurements of the radiation density in the early universe can be used as a sensitive probe of physics beyond the standard model. Observations of primordial light element abundances have long been used to place non-trivial constraints on models of new physics and to inform our understanding of the thermal history to the first few minutes of our present phase of expansion. Precision measurements of the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization will drastically improve our measurement of the cosmic radiation density over the next decade. These improved measurements will either uncover new physics or place much more stringent constraints on physics beyond the standard model, while pushing our understanding of the early universe to much earlier times.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.02243  [pdf] - 1422247
On CMB B-Mode Non-Gaussianity
Comments: 14 pages and 8 figures. Version prepared for submission to PRD. New: paragraph pointing out analogy with gravitational lensing, paragraph on squeezed limit, paragraph on normalization of fNL, new figure (7), updated figures based on improved sampling in \ell, typos, references
Submitted: 2016-03-07, last modified: 2016-04-18
We study the degree to which the cosmic microwave background (CMB) can be used to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity involving one tensor and two scalar fluctuations, focusing on the correlation of one polarization $B$ mode with two temperature modes. In the simplest models of inflation, the tensor-scalar-scalar primordial bispectrum is non-vanishing and is of the same order in slow-roll parameters as the scalar-scalar-scalar bispectrum. We calculate the $\langle BTT\rangle$ correlation arising from a primordial tensor-scalar-scalar bispectrum, and show that constraints from an experiment like CMB-Stage IV using this observable are more than an order of magnitude better than those on the same primordial coupling obtained from temperature measurements alone. We argue that $B$-mode non-Gaussianity opens up an as-yet-unexplored window into the early Universe, demonstrating that significant information on primordial physics remains to be harvested from CMB anisotropies.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.02307  [pdf] - 1056001
Chromatic CCD effects on weak lensing measurements for LSST
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures, Proceedings from Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs Workshop (2014)
Submitted: 2015-05-09, last modified: 2015-05-26
Wavelength-dependent point spread functions (PSFs) violate an implicit assumption in current galaxy shape measurement algorithms that deconvolve the PSF measured from stars (which have stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs)) from images of galaxies (which have galactic SEDs). Since the absorption length of silicon depends on wavelength, CCDs are a potential source of PSF chromaticity. Here we develop two toy models to estimate the sensitivity of the cosmic shear survey from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope to chromatic effects in CCDs. We then compare these toy models to simulated estimates of PSF chromaticity derived from the LSST photon simulator PhoSim. We find that even though sensor contributions to PSF chromaticity are subdominant to atmospheric contributions, they can still significantly bias cosmic shear results if left uncorrected, particularly in the redder filter bands and for objects that are off-axis in the field of view.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.6273  [pdf] - 1245621
Impact of Atmospheric Chromatic Effects on Weak Lensing Measurements
Comments: 25 pages, 14 figures, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2014-09-22, last modified: 2015-05-09
Current and future imaging surveys will measure cosmic shear with statistical precision that demands a deeper understanding of potential systematic biases in galaxy shape measurements than has been achieved to date. We use analytic and computational techniques to study the impact on shape measurements of two atmospheric chromatic effects for ground-based surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST): (i) atmospheric differential chromatic refraction and (ii) wavelength dependence of seeing. We investigate the effects of using the point spread function (PSF) measured with stars to determine the shapes of galaxies that have different spectral energy distributions than the stars. We find that both chromatic effects lead to significant biases in galaxy shape measurements for current and future surveys, if not corrected. Using simulated galaxy images, we find a form of chromatic `model bias' that arises when fitting a galaxy image with a model that has been convolved with a stellar, instead of galactic, point spread function. We show that both forms of atmospheric chromatic biases can be predicted (and corrected) with minimal model bias by applying an ordered set of perturbative PSF-level corrections based on machine-learning techniques applied to six-band photometry. Catalog-level corrections do not address the model bias. We conclude that achieving the ultimate precision for weak lensing from current and future ground-based imaging surveys requires a detailed understanding of the wavelength dependence of the PSF from the atmosphere, and from other sources such as optics and sensors. The source code for this analysis is available at https://github.com/DarkEnergyScienceCollaboration/chroma .
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.00302  [pdf] - 1043101
Multi-wavelength constraints on the inflationary consistency relation
Comments: Matches published version
Submitted: 2015-02-01, last modified: 2015-05-06
We present the first attempt to use a combination of CMB, LIGO, and PPTA data to constrain both the tilt and the running of primordial tensor power spectrum through constraints on the gravitational wave energy density generated in the early universe. Combining measurements at different cosmological scales highlights how complementary data can be used to test the predictions of early universe models including the inflationary consistency relation. Current data prefers a slightly positive tilt ($n_t = 0.06^{+0.63}_{-0.89}$) and a negative running ($n_{t, {\rm run}} < -0.22$) for the tensor power spectrum spectrum. Interestingly, the addition of direct gravitational wave detector data alone puts strong bounds on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r < 0.2$ since the large positive tensor tilt preferred by the \textit{Planck} temperature power spectrum is no longer allowed. Adding the recently released BICEP2/KECK and Planck 353 GHz Polarization cross correlation data puts an even stronger bound $r<0.1$ . We comment on possible effects of a large positive tilt on the background expansion and show that depending on the assumptions regarding the UV cutoff ($k_{\rm UV}/k_* = 10^{24}$) of the primordial spectrum of gravitational waves, the strongest bounds on $n_t = 0.07^{+0.52}_{-0.80}$ are derived from this effect.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.1825  [pdf] - 1005617
GREAT3 results I: systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology
Comments: 32 pages + 15 pages of technical appendices; 28 figures; submitted to MNRAS; latest version has minor updates in presentation of 4 figures, no changes in content or conclusions
Submitted: 2014-12-04, last modified: 2015-04-02
We present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically-varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially-varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by $\sim 1$ per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the S\'{e}rsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods' results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.7676  [pdf] - 935774
GalSim: The modular galaxy image simulation toolkit
Comments: 38 pages, 3 tables, 8 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Computing
Submitted: 2014-07-29, last modified: 2015-02-15
GALSIM is a collaborative, open-source project aimed at providing an image simulation tool of enduring benefit to the astronomical community. It provides a software library for generating images of astronomical objects such as stars and galaxies in a variety of ways, efficiently handling image transformations and operations such as convolution and rendering at high precision. We describe the GALSIM software and its capabilities, including necessary theoretical background. We demonstrate that the performance of GALSIM meets the stringent requirements of high precision image analysis applications such as weak gravitational lensing, for current datasets and for the Stage IV dark energy surveys of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, ESA's Euclid mission, and NASA's WFIRST-AFTA mission. The GALSIM project repository is public and includes the full code history, all open and closed issues, installation instructions, documentation, and wiki pages (including a Frequently Asked Questions section). The GALSIM repository can be found at https://github.com/GalSim-developers/GalSim .
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01026  [pdf] - 1224306
A Calibration of NICMOS Camera 2 for Low Count-Rates
Comments: Accepted for Publication in the Astronomical Journal. New version contains added reference
Submitted: 2015-02-03, last modified: 2015-02-08
NICMOS 2 observations are crucial for constraining distances to most of the existing sample of z > 1 SNe Ia. Unlike the conventional calibration programs, these observations involve long exposure times and low count rates. Reciprocity failure is known to exist in HgCdTe devices and a correction for this effect has already been implemented for high and medium count-rates. However observations at faint count-rates rely on extrapolations. Here instead, we provide a new zeropoint calibration directly applicable to faint sources. This is obtained via inter-calibration of NIC2 F110W/F160W with WFC3 in the low count-rate regime using z ~ 1 elliptical galaxies as tertiary calibrators. These objects have relatively simple near-IR SEDs, uniform colors, and their extended nature gives superior signal-to-noise at the same count rate than would stars. The use of extended objects also allows greater tolerances on PSF profiles. We find ST magnitude zeropoints (after the installation of the NICMOS cooling system, NCS) of 25.296 +- 0.022 for F110W and 25.803 +- 0.023 for F160W, both in agreement with the calibration extrapolated from count-rates 1,000 times larger (25.262 and 25.799). Before the installation of the NCS, we find 24.843 +- 0.025 for F110W and 25.498 +- 0.021 for F160W, also in agreement with the high-count-rate calibration (24.815 and 25.470). We also check the standard bandpasses of WFC3 and NICMOS 2 using a range of stars and galaxies at different colors and find mild tension for WFC3, limiting the accuracy of the zeropoints. To avoid human bias, our cross-calibration was "blinded" in that the fitted zeropoint differences were hidden until the analysis was finalized.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.4671  [pdf] - 908115
Testing Inflation with Large Scale Structure: Connecting Hopes with Reality
Comments: 27 pages + references
Submitted: 2014-12-15
The statistics of primordial curvature fluctuations are our window into the period of inflation, where these fluctuations were generated. To date, the cosmic microwave background has been the dominant source of information about these perturbations. Large scale structure is however from where drastic improvements should originate. In this paper, we explain the theoretical motivations for pursuing such measurements and the challenges that lie ahead. In particular, we discuss and identify theoretical targets regarding the measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity. We argue that when quantified in terms of the local (equilateral) template amplitude $f_{\rm NL}^{\rm loc}$ ($f_{\rm NL}^{\rm eq}$), natural target levels of sensitivity are $\Delta f_{\rm NL}^{\rm loc, eq.} \simeq 1$. We highlight that such levels are within reach of future surveys by measuring 2-, 3- and 4-point statistics of the galaxy spatial distribution. This paper summarizes a workshop held at CITA (University of Toronto) on October 23-24, 2014.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.2608  [pdf] - 1245646
Hierarchical probabilistic inference of cosmic shear
Comments: 23 pages, 9 figures, submitted, related to the 'MBI' team submissions to the GREAT3 gravitational lensing community challenge
Submitted: 2014-11-10
Point estimators for the shearing of galaxy images induced by gravitational lensing involve a complex inverse problem in the presence of noise, pixelization, and model uncertainties. We present a probabilistic forward modeling approach to gravitational lensing inference that has the potential to mitigate the biased inferences in most common point estimators and is practical for upcoming lensing surveys. The first part of our statistical framework requires specification of a likelihood function for the pixel data in an imaging survey given parameterized models for the galaxies in the images. We derive the lensing shear posterior by marginalizing over all intrinsic galaxy properties that contribute to the pixel data (i.e., not limited to galaxy ellipticities) and learn the distributions for the intrinsic galaxy properties via hierarchical inference with a suitably flexible conditional probabilitiy distribution specification. We use importance sampling to separate the modeling of small imaging areas from the global shear inference, thereby rendering our algorithm computationally tractable for large surveys. With simple numerical examples we demonstrate the improvements in accuracy from our importance sampling approach, as well as the significance of the conditional distribution specification for the intrinsic galaxy properties when the data are generated from an unknown number of distinct galaxy populations with different morphological characteristics.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.2576  [pdf] - 816799
Lensed Type Ia Supernovae as Probes of Cluster Mass Models
Comments: Minor updates to match MNRAS published version. 15 pages, 7 figures. For additional info, see http://www.supernova.lbl.gov
Submitted: 2013-12-09, last modified: 2014-04-30
Using three magnified Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) detected behind CLASH clusters, we perform a first pilot study to see whether standardizable candles can be used to calibrate cluster mass maps created from strong lensing observations. Such calibrations will be crucial when next generation HST cluster surveys (e.g. FRONTIER) provide magnification maps that will, in turn, form the basis for the exploration of the high redshift Universe. We classify SNe using combined photometric and spectroscopic observations, finding two of the three to be clearly of type SN Ia and the third probable. The SNe exhibit significant amplification, up to a factor of 1.7 at $\sim5\sigma$ significance (SN-L2). We conducted this as a blind study to avoid fine tuning of parameters, finding a mean amplification difference between SNe and the cluster lensing models of $0.09 \pm 0.09^{stat} \pm 0.05^{sys}$ mag. This impressive agreement suggests no tension between cluster mass models and high redshift standardized SNe Ia. However, the measured statistical dispersion of $\sigma_{\mu}=0.21$ mag appeared large compared to the dispersion expected based on statistical uncertainties ($0.14$). Further work with the supernova and cluster lensing models, post unblinding, reduced the measured dispersion to $\sigma_{\mu}=0.12$. An explicit choice should thus be made as to whether SNe are used unblinded to improve the model, or blinded to test the model. As the lensed SN samples grow larger, this technique will allow improved constraints on assumptions regarding e.g. the structure of the dark matter halo.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.3972  [pdf] - 809316
Perturbative Reheating After Multiple-Field Inflation: The Impact on Primordial Observables
Comments: v2: Updated to match published version, references added, typos corrected, appendix moved to main body of text. 26 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2013-11-15, last modified: 2014-04-10
We study the impact of perturbative reheating on primordial observables in models of multiple-field inflation. By performing a sudden decay calculation, we derive analytic expressions for the local-type non-linearity parameter $f_{\rm NL}^{\rm local}$, the scalar spectral index $n_\zeta$, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r_T$ as functions of the decay rates of the inflationary fields. We compare our analytic results to a fully numerical classical field theory simulation, finding excellent agreement. We find that the sensitivity of $f_{\rm NL}$, $n_\zeta$, and $r_T$ to the reheating phase depends heavily on the underlying inflationary model. We quantify this sensitivity, and discuss conditions that must be satisfied if observable predictions are to be insensitive to the dynamics of reheating. We demonstrate that upon completion of reheating, all observable quantities take values within finite ranges, the limits of which are determined completely by the conditions during inflation. Furthermore, fluctuations in both fields play an important role in determining the full dependence of the observables on the dynamics of reheating. By applying our formalism to two concrete examples, we demonstrate that variations in $f_{\rm NL}$, $n_\zeta$, and $r_T$ caused by changes in reheating dynamics are well within the sensitivity of Planck, and as such the impact of reheating must be accounted for when making predictions for models of multiple-field inflation. Our final expressions are very general, encompassing a wide range of two-field inflationary models, including the standard curvaton scenario. Our results allow a much more unified approach to studying two-field inflation including the effects of perturbative reheating. As such, entire classes of models can be studied together, allowing a more systematic approach to gaining insight into the physics of the early universe through observation.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.5101  [pdf] - 1203477
Impact of chromatic effects on galaxy shape measurements
Comments: 7 pages, 2 figures, Proceedings from Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs Workshop (2013)
Submitted: 2014-02-20
Current and future imaging surveys will measure cosmic shear with a statistical precision that demands a deeper understanding of potential systematic biases in galaxy shape measurements than has been achieved to date. We investigate the effects of using the point spread function (PSF) measured with stars to determine the shape of a galaxy that has a different spectral energy distribution (SED) than the star. We demonstrate that a wavelength dependent PSF size, for example as may originate from atmospheric seeing or the diffraction limit of the primary aperture, can introduce significant shape measurement biases. This analysis shows that even small wavelength dependencies in the PSF may introduce biases, and hence that achieving the ultimate precision for weak lensing from current and future imaging surveys will require a detailed understanding of the wavelength dependence of the PSF from all sources, including the CCD sensors.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.0882  [pdf] - 1166415
The importance of major mergers in the build up of stellar mass in brightest cluster galaxies at z=1
Comments: 15 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS. Reduced data will be made available through the ESO archive
Submitted: 2013-05-04
Recent independent results from numerical simulations and observations have shown that brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) have increased their stellar mass by a factor of almost two between z~0.9 and z~0.2. The numerical simulations further suggest that more than half this mass is accreted through major mergers. Using a sample of 18 distant galaxy clusters with over 600 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members between them, we search for observational evidence that major mergers do play a significant role. We find a major merger rate of 0.38 +/- 0.14 mergers per Gyr at z~1. While the uncertainties, which stem from the small size of our sample, are relatively large, our rate is consistent with the results that are derived from numerical simulations. If we assume that this rate continues to the present day and that half of the mass of the companion is accreted onto the BCG during these mergers, then we find that this rate can explain the growth in the stellar mass of the BCGs that is observed and predicted by simulations. Major mergers therefore appear to be playing an important role, perhaps even the dominant one, in the build up of stellar mass in these extraordinary galaxies.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.3494  [pdf] - 611265
Precision Measurement of The Most Distant Spectroscopically Confirmed Supernova Ia with the Hubble Space Telescope
Comments: 13 pages, 6 figures, published in ApJ with updated analysis
Submitted: 2012-05-15, last modified: 2013-01-08
We report the discovery of a redshift 1.71 supernova in the GOODS North field. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS spectrum has almost negligible contamination from the host or neighboring galaxies. Although the rest frame sampled range is too blue to include any Si ii line, a principal component analysis allows us to confirm it as a Type Ia supernova with 92% confidence. A recent serendipitous archival HST WFC3 grism spectrum contributed a key element of the confirmation by giving a host-galaxy redshift of 1.713 +/- 0.007. In addition to being the most distant SN Ia with spectroscopic confirmation, this is the most distant Ia with a precision color measurement. We present the ACS WFC and NICMOS 2 photometry and ACS and WFC3 spectroscopy. Our derived supernova distance is in agreement with the prediction of LambdaCDM.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1212.4438  [pdf] - 604149
Non-Gaussian Correlations Outside the Horizon in Local Thermal Equilibrium
Comments: 14 pages. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:0810.2831, arXiv:0808.2909 by other authors
Submitted: 2012-12-18
Making a connection between observations of cosmological correlation functions and those calculated from theories of the early universe requires that these quantities are conserved through the periods of the universe which we do not understand. In this paper, the results of [0810.2831] are extended to show that tree-approximation correlation functions of Heisenberg picture operators for the reduced spatial metric are constant outside the horizon during local thermal equilibrium with no non-zero conserved quantum numbers.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.3989  [pdf] - 1937760
The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: III. Correlated Properties of Type Ia Supernovae and Their Hosts at 0.9 < z < 1.46
Comments: 37 pages, 15 figures
Submitted: 2012-01-19
Using the sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey and augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the GOODS fields, we search for correlations between the properties of SNe and their host galaxies at high redshift. We use galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters and develop a model to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, we identify six SN Ia hosts that are early-type cluster members and eleven SN Ia hosts that are early-type field galaxies. We confirm for the first time at z>0.9 that SNe Ia hosted by early-type galaxies brighten and fade more quickly than SNe Ia hosted by late-type galaxies. We also show that the two samples of hosts produce SNe Ia with similar color distributions. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions (SEDs) expected for passive galaxies enable us to measure stellar masses of early-type SN hosts. In combination with stellar mass estimates of late-type GOODS SN hosts from Thomson & Chary (2011), we investigate the correlation of host mass with Hubble residual observed at lower redshifts. Although the sample is small and the uncertainties are large, a hint of this relation is found at z>0.9. By simultaneously fitting the average cluster galaxy formation history and dust content to the red-sequence scatters, we show that the reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely E(B-V) <~ 0.06. The similarity of the field and cluster early-type host samples suggests that field early-type galaxies that lie on the red sequence may also be minimally affected by dust. Hence, the early-type hosted SNe Ia studied here occupy a more favorable environment to use as well-characterized high-redshift standard candles than other SNe Ia.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.5786  [pdf] - 1937635
The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: II. The Type Ia Supernova Rate in High-Redshift Galaxy Clusters
Comments: 29 pages, 14 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ on 16 February 2011. See the HST Cluster Supernova Survey website at http://supernova.lbl.gov/2009ClusterSurvey for a version with full-resolution images and a complete listing of transient candidates from the survey. This version fixes a typo in the metadata; the paper is unchanged from v2
Submitted: 2010-10-27, last modified: 2011-11-01
We report a measurement of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate in galaxy clusters at 0.9 < z < 1.45 from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey. This is the first cluster SN Ia rate measurement with detected z > 0.9 SNe. Finding 8 +/- 1 cluster SNe Ia, we determine a SN Ia rate of 0.50 +0.23-0.19 (stat) +0.10-0.09 (sys) SNuB (SNuB = 10^-12 SNe L_{sun,B}^-1 yr^-1). In units of stellar mass, this translates to 0.36 +0.16-0.13 (stat) +0.07-0.06 (sys) SNuM (SNuM = 10^-12 SNe M_sun^-1 yr^-1). This represents a factor of approximately 5 +/- 2 increase over measurements of the cluster rate at z < 0.2. We parameterize the late-time SN Ia delay time distribution with a power law (proportional to t^s). Under the assumption of a cluster formation redshift of z_f = 3, our rate measurement in combination with lower-redshift cluster SN Ia rates constrains s = -1.41 +0.47/-0.40, consistent with measurements of the delay time distribution in the field. This measurement is generally consistent with expectations for the "double degenerate" scenario and inconsistent with some models for the "single degenerate" scenario predicting a steeper delay time distribution at large delay times. We check for environmental dependence and the influence of younger stellar populations by calculating the rate specifically in cluster red-sequence galaxies and in morphologically early-type galaxies, finding results similar to the full cluster rate. Finally, the upper limit of one host-less cluster SN Ia detected in the survey implies that the fraction of stars in the intra-cluster medium is less than 0.47 (95% confidence), consistent with measurements at lower redshifts.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.6442  [pdf] - 1937717
The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: VI. The Volumetric Type Ia Supernova Rate
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures. Submitted to the Astrophysical Journal. Revised version following referee comments. See the HST Cluster SN Survey website at http://supernova.lbl.gov/2009ClusterSurvey for control time simulations in a machine-readable table and a complete listing of transient candidates from the survey
Submitted: 2011-10-28
We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate out to z ~ 1.6 from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey. In observations spanning 189 orbits with the Advanced Camera for Surveys we discovered 29 SNe, of which approximately 20 are SNe Ia. Twelve of these SNe Ia are located in the foregrounds and backgrounds of the clusters targeted in the survey. Using these new data, we derive the volumetric SN Ia rate in four broad redshift bins, finding results consistent with previous measurements at z > 1 and strengthening the case for a SN Ia rate that is equal to or greater than ~0.6 x 10^-4/yr/Mpc^3 at z ~ 1 and flattening out at higher redshift. We provide SN candidates and efficiency calculations in a form that makes it easy to rebin and combine these results with other measurements for increased statistics. Finally, we compare the assumptions about host-galaxy dust extinction used in different high-redshift rate measurements, finding that different assumptions may induce significant systematic differences between measurements.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.5238  [pdf] - 421704
Adiabaticity and the Fate of Non-Gaussianities: The Trispectrum and Beyond
Comments: v3: Updated to match published version, minor corrections throughout, 17 pages; v2: Corrected counting of higher order non-linearity parameters, added references, updated formatting, conclusions unchanged, 16 pages; v1: 16 pages
Submitted: 2011-04-27, last modified: 2011-10-05
Extending the analysis of [1011.4934] beyond the bispectrum, we explore the superhorizon generation of local non-gaussianities and their subsequent approach to adiabaticity. Working with a class of two field models of inflation with potentials amenable to treatment with the delta N formalism we find that, as is the case for f_{NL}^{local}, the local trispectrum parameters tau_{NL} and g_{NL} are exponentially driven toward values which are slow roll suppressed if the fluctuations are driven into an adiabatic mode by a phase of effectively single field inflation. We argue that general considerations should ensure that a similar behavior will hold for the local forms of higher point correlations as well.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.3186  [pdf] - 1076663
Scaling Relations and Overabundance of Massive Clusters at z>~1 from Weak-Lensing Studies with HST
Comments: ApJ in press. See http://www.supernova.lbl.gov for additional information pertaining to the HST Cluster SN Survey
Submitted: 2011-05-16, last modified: 2011-06-17
We present weak gravitational lensing analysis of 22 high-redshift (z >~1) clusters based on Hubble Space Telescope images. Most clusters in our sample provide significant lensing signals and are well detected in their reconstructed two-dimensional mass maps. Combining the current results and our previous weak-lensing studies of five other high-z clusters, we compare gravitational lensing masses of these clusters with other observables. We revisit the question whether the presence of the most massive clusters in our sample is in tension with the current LambdaCDM structure formation paradigm. We find that the lensing masses are tightly correlated with the gas temperatures and establish, for the first time, the lensing mass-temperature relation at z >~ 1. For the power law slope of the M-TX relation (M propto T^{\alpha}), we obtain \alpha=1.54 +/- 0.23. This is consistent with the theoretical self-similar prediction \alpha=3/2 and with the results previously reported in the literature for much lower redshift samples. However, our normalization is lower than the previous results by 20-30%, indicating that the normalization in the M-TX relation might evolve. After correcting for Eddington bias and updating the discovery area with a more conservative choice, we find that the existence of the most massive clusters in our sample still provides a tension with the current Lambda CDM model. The combined probability of finding the four most massive clusters in this sample after marginalization over current cosmological parameters is less than 1%.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1011.4934  [pdf] - 374145
Non-Gaussianities in Multifield Inflation: Superhorizon Evolution, Adiabaticity, and the Fate of fnl
Comments: v3: Typos corrected, minor changes to match published version, references added, 18 pages, 1 figure. v2: Changed sign of fnl to match WMAP convention, minor changes throughout, references added, 18 pages, 1 figure. v1: 17 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2010-11-22, last modified: 2011-06-16
We explore the superhorizon generation of large fnl of the local form in two field inflation. We calculate the two- and three-point observables in a general class of potentials which allow for an analytic treatment using the delta N formalism. Motivated by the conservation of the curvature perturbation outside the horizon in the adiabatic mode and also by the observed adiabaticity of the power spectrum, we follow the evolution of fnl^{local} until it is driven into the adibatic solution by passing through a phase of effectively single field inflation. We find that although large fnl^{local} may be generated during inflation, such non-gaussianities are transitory and will be exponentially damped as the cosmological fluctuations approach adiabaticity.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.3470  [pdf] - 550889
The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: V. Improving the Dark Energy Constraints Above z>1 and Building an Early-Type-Hosted Supernova Sample
Comments: 27 pages, 11 figures. Submitted to ApJ. This first posting includes updates in response to comments from the referee. See http://www.supernova.lbl.gov for other papers in the series pertaining to the HST Cluster SN Survey. The updated supernova Union2.1 compilation of 580 SNe is available at http://supernova.lbl.gov/Union
Submitted: 2011-05-17
We present ACS, NICMOS, and Keck AO-assisted photometry of 20 Type Ia supernovae SNe Ia from the HST Cluster Supernova Survey. The SNe Ia were discovered over the redshift interval 0.623 < z < 1.415. Fourteen of these SNe Ia pass our strict selection cuts and are used in combination with the world's sample of SNe Ia to derive the best current constraints on dark energy. Ten of our new SNe Ia are beyond redshift $z=1$, thereby nearly doubling the statistical weight of HST-discovered SNe Ia beyond this redshift. Our detailed analysis corrects for the recently identified correlation between SN Ia luminosity and host galaxy mass and corrects the NICMOS zeropoint at the count rates appropriate for very distant SNe Ia. Adding these supernovae improves the best combined constraint on the dark energy density \rho_{DE}(z) at redshifts 1.0 < z < 1.6 by 18% (including systematic errors). For a LambdaCDM universe, we find \Omega_\Lambda = 0.724 +0.015/-0.016 (68% CL including systematic errors). For a flat wCDM model, we measure a constant dark energy equation-of-state parameter w = -0.985 +0.071/-0.077 (68% CL). Curvature is constrained to ~0.7% in the owCDM model and to ~2% in a model in which dark energy is allowed to vary with parameters w_0 and w_a. Tightening further the constraints on the time evolution of dark energy will require several improvements, including high-quality multi-passband photometry of a sample of several dozen z>1 SNe Ia. We describe how such a sample could be efficiently obtained by targeting cluster fields with WFC3 on HST.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1011.3501  [pdf] - 355050
Dark Radiation Emerging After Big Bang Nucleosynthesis?
Comments: v3: 5 pages, 1 figure. References added, typos corrected, notation changed throughout. v2: 5 pages, 1 figure. Reformatted, references added, acknowledgments updated, effect of radiation on CMB clarified. v1: 11 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2010-11-15, last modified: 2011-02-28
We show how recent data from observations of the cosmic microwave background may suggest the presence of additional radiation density which appeared after big bang nucleosynthesis. We propose a general scheme by which this radiation could be produced from the decay of non-relativistic matter, we place constraints on the properties of such matter, and we give specific examples of scenarios in which this general scheme may be realized.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1004.1711  [pdf] - 317710
Spectra and Light Curves of Six Type Ia Supernovae at 0.511 < z < 1.12 and the Union2 Compilation
Comments: 33 pages, 18 figures; accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal. For data tables, code for cosmological analysis and full-resolution figures, see http://supernova.lbl.gov/Union/
Submitted: 2010-04-10
We report on work to increase the number of well-measured Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at high redshifts. Light curves, including high signal-to-noise HST data, and spectra of six SNe Ia that were discovered during 2001 are presented. Additionally, for the two SNe with z>1, we present ground-based J-band photometry from Gemini and the VLT. These are among the most distant SNe Ia for which ground based near-IR observations have been obtained. We add these six SNe Ia together with other data sets that have recently become available in the literature to the Union compilation (Kowalski et al. 2008). We have made a number of refinements to the Union analysis chain, the most important ones being the refitting of all light curves with the SALT2 fitter and an improved handling of systematic errors. We call this new compilation, consisting of 557 supernovae, the Union2 compilation. The flat concordance LambdaCDM model remains an excellent fit to the Union2 data with the best fit constant equation of state parameter w=-0.997^{+0.050}_{-0.054} (stat) ^{+0.077}_{-0.082} (stat+sys\ together) for a flat universe, or w=-1.035^{+0.055}_{-0.059} (stat)^{+0.093}_{-0.097} (stat+sys together) with curvature. We also present improved constraints on w(z). While no significant change in w with redshift is detected, there is still considerable room for evolution in w. The strength of the constraints depend strongly on redshift. In particular, at z > 1, the existence and nature of dark energy are only weakly constrained by the data.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.1258  [pdf] - 1018260
Subaru FOCAS Spectroscopic Observations of High-Redshift Supernovae
Comments: 19 pages, 26 figures. PASJ in press. see http://www.supernova.lbl.gov/2009ClusterSurvey/ for additional information pertaining to the HST Cluster SN Survey
Submitted: 2009-11-06
We present spectra of high-redshift supernovae (SNe) that were taken with the Subaru low resolution optical spectrograph, FOCAS. These SNe were found in SN surveys with Suprime-Cam on Subaru, the CFH12k camera on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These SN surveys specifically targeted z>1 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). From the spectra of 39 candidates, we obtain redshifts for 32 candidates and spectroscopically identify 7 active candidates as probable SNe Ia, including one at z=1.35, which is the most distant SN Ia to be spectroscopically confirmed with a ground-based telescope. An additional 4 candidates are identified as likely SNe Ia from the spectrophotometric properties of their host galaxies. Seven candidates are not SNe Ia, either being SNe of another type or active galactic nuclei. When SNe Ia are observed within a week of maximum light, we find that we can spectroscopically identify most of them up to z=1.1. Beyond this redshift, very few candidates were spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The current generation of super red-sensitive, fringe-free CCDs will push this redshift limit higher.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.0138  [pdf] - 902265
HST Discovery of a z = 3.9 Multiply Imaged Galaxy Behind the Complex Cluster Lens WARPS J1415.1+36 at z = 1.026
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures, accepted by ApJL. See http://www.supernova.lbl.gov/ for additional information pertaining to the HST Cluster SN Survey. (This added URL is the only change in this version.)
Submitted: 2009-11-01, last modified: 2009-11-04
We report the discovery of a multiply lensed Ly Alpha (Lya) emitter at z = 3.90 behind the massive galaxy cluster WARPS J1415.1+3612 at z = 1.026. Images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope(HST) using ACS reveal a complex lensing system that produces a prominent, highly magnified arc and a triplet of smaller arcs grouped tightly around a spectroscopically confirmed cluster member. Spectroscopic observations using FOCAS on Subaru confirm strong Lya emission in the source galaxy and provide redshifts for more than 21 cluster members, from which we obtain a velocity dispersion of 807+/-185 km/s. Assuming a singular isothermal sphere profile, the mass within the Einstein ring (7.13+/-0.38") corresponds to a central velocity dispersion of 686+15-19 km/s for the cluster, consistent with the value estimated from cluster member redshifts. Our mass profile estimate from combining strong lensing and dynamical analyses is in good agreement with both X-ray and weak lensing results.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:0906.4318  [pdf] - 25574
Constraining dust and color variations of high-z SNe using NICMOS on Hubble Space Telescope
Comments: 30 pages, 10 figures; accepted for publication in ApJ; v2: revised to match the version in the journal
Submitted: 2009-06-23, last modified: 2009-08-30
We present data from the Supernova Cosmology Project for five high redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that were obtained using the NICMOS infrared camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. We add two SNe from this sample to a rest-frame I-band Hubble diagram, doubling the number of high redshift supernovae on this diagram. This I-band Hubble diagram is consistent with a flat universe (Omega_Matter, Omega_Lambda= 0.29, 0.71). A homogeneous distribution of large grain dust in the intergalactic medium (replenishing dust) is incompatible with the data and is excluded at the 5 sigma confidence level, if the SN host galaxy reddening is corrected assuming R_V=1.75. We use both optical and infrared observations to compare photometric properties of distant SNe Ia with those of nearby objects. We find generally good agreement with the expected color evolution for all SNe except the highest redshift SN in our sample (SN 1997ek at z=0.863) which shows a peculiar color behavior. We also present spectra obtained from ground based telescopes for type identification and determination of redshift.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:0908.3928  [pdf] - 134434
An Intensive HST Survey for z>1 Supernovae by Targeting Galaxy Clusters
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures, accepted by AJ, see http://www.supernova.lbl.gov for additional information pertaining to the HST Cluster SN Survey
Submitted: 2009-08-26
We present a new survey strategy to discover and study high redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). By targeting massive galaxy clusters at 0.9<z<1.5, we obtain a twofold improvement in the efficiency of finding SNe compared to an HST field survey and a factor of three improvement in the total yield of SN detections in relatively dust-free red-sequence galaxies. In total, sixteen SNe were discovered at z>0.95, nine of which were in galaxy clusters. This strategy provides a SN sample that can be used to decouple the effects of host galaxy extinction and intrinsic color in high redshift SNe, thereby reducing one of the largest systematic uncertainties in SN cosmology.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.2478  [pdf] - 22369
Galaxy Clusters in Formation: Determining the Age of the Red-Sequence in Optical and X-ray Clusters at z~1 with HST
Comments: Withdrawn from ApJL
Submitted: 2009-03-16, last modified: 2009-07-28
Using deep two-band imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the color-magnitude relations (CMR) of E/S0 galaxies in a set of 9 optically-selected clusters principally from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS) at 0.9 < z < 1.23. We find that the mean scatter in the CMR in the observed frame of this set of clusters is 0.049 +/- 0.008, as compared to 0.031 +/- 0.007 in a similarly imaged and identically analyzed X-ray sample at similar redshifts. Single-burst stellar population models of the CMR scatter suggest that the E/S0 population in these RCS clusters truncated their star-formation at z~1.6, some 0.9 Gyrs later than their X-ray E/S0 counterparts which were truncated at z~2.1. The notion that this is a manifestation of the differing evolutionary states of the two populations of cluster galaxies is supported by comparison of the fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies found in the two samples which shows that optically-selected clusters contain a smaller fraction of E/S0 galaxies at the their cores
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.1731  [pdf] - 315692
The XMM Cluster Survey: Galaxy Morphologies and the Color-Magnitude Relation in XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 at z=1.46
Comments: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2009-03-10
We present a study of the morphological fractions and color-magnitude relation in the most distant X-ray selected galaxy cluster currently known, XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 at z=1.46, using a combination of optical imaging data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys, and infrared data from the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph, mounted on the 8.2m Subaru telescope. We find that the morphological mix of the cluster galaxy population is similar to clusters at z~1: approximately ~62% of the galaxies identified as likely cluster members are ellipticals or S0s; and ~38% are spirals or irregulars. We measure the color-magnitude relations for the early type galaxies, finding that the slope in the z_850-J relation is consistent with that measured in the Coma cluster, some ~9 Gyr earlier, although the uncertainty is large. In contrast, the measured intrinsic scatter about the color-magnitude relation is more than three times the value measured in Coma, after conversion to rest frame U-V. From comparison with stellar population synthesis models, the intrinsic scatter measurements imply mean luminosity weighted ages for the early type galaxies in J2215.9-1738 of ~3 Gyr, corresponding to the major epoch of star formation coming to an end at z_f = 3-5. We find that the cluster exhibits evidence of the `downsizing' phenomenon: the fraction of faint cluster members on the red sequence expressed using the Dwarf-to-Giant Ratio (DGR) is 0.32+/-0.18. This is consistent with extrapolation of the redshift evolution of the DGR seen in cluster samples at z < 1. In contrast to observations of some other z > 1 clusters, we find a lack of very bright galaxies within the cluster.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.1648  [pdf] - 1937512
Discovery of an Unusual Optical Transient with the Hubble Space Telescope
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ. Data are available at http://supernova.lbl.gov/2006Transient/
Submitted: 2008-09-10
We present observations of SCP 06F6, an unusual optical transient discovered during the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey. The transient brightened over a period of ~100 days, reached a peak magnitude of ~21.0 in both i_775 and z_850, and then declined over a similar timescale. There is no host galaxy or progenitor star detected at the location of the transient to a 3 sigma upper limit of i_775 = 26.4 and z_850 = 26.1, giving a corresponding lower limit on the flux increase of a factor of ~120. Multiple spectra show five broad absorption bands between 4100 AA and 6500 AA and a mostly featureless continuum longward of 6500 AA. The shape of the lightcurve is inconsistent with microlensing. The transient's spectrum, in addition to being inconsistent with all known supernova types, is not matched to any spectrum in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database. We suggest that the transient may be one of a new class.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.1108  [pdf] - 132775
Looking Beyond Lambda with the Union Supernova Compilation
Comments: 32 pages, 19 figures
Submitted: 2008-07-07
The recent robust and homogeneous analysis of the world's supernova distance-redshift data, together with cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillation data, provides a powerful tool for constraining cosmological models. Here we examine particular classes of scalar field, modified gravity, and phenomenological models to assess whether they are consistent with observations even when their behavior deviates from the cosmological constant Lambda. Some models have tension with the data, while others survive only by approaching the cosmological constant, and a couple are statistically favored over LCDM. Dark energy described by two equation of state parameters has considerable phase space to avoid Lambda and next generation data will be required to constrain such physics.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.4798  [pdf] - 328768
Clusters of Galaxies in the First Half of the Universe from the IRAC Shallow Survey
Comments: 56 pages, 19 figures, 3 tables, landscape tables 1 (p. 14) and 2 (p. 29) should be printed separately. Accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal, updated version will be posted upon publication
Submitted: 2008-04-30
We have identified 335 galaxy cluster and group candidates, 106 of which are at z > 1, using a 4.5 um selected sample of objects from a 7.25 deg^2 region in the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey. Clusters were identified as 3-dimensional overdensities using a wavelet algorithm, based on photometric redshift probability distributions derived from IRAC and NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey data. We estimate only ~10% of the detections are spurious. To date 12 of the z > 1 candidates have been confirmed spectroscopically, at redshifts from 1.06 to 1.41. Velocity dispersions of ~750 km/s for two of these argue for total cluster masses well above 10^14 M_sun, as does the mass estimated from the rest frame near infrared stellar luminosity. Although not selected to contain a red sequence, some evidence for red sequences is present in the spectroscopically confirmed clusters, and brighter galaxies are systematically redder than the mean galaxy color in clusters at all redshifts. The mean I - [3.6] color for cluster galaxies up to z ~ 1 is well matched by a passively evolving model in which stars are formed in a 0.1 Gyr burst starting at redshift z_f = 3. At z > 1, a wider range of formation histories is needed, but higher formation redshifts (i.e. z_f > 3) are favored for most clusters.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.4142  [pdf] - 12092
Improved Cosmological Constraints from New, Old and Combined Supernova Datasets
Comments: 49 pages, 17 figures; accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal. For data tables, code for cosmological analysis and full-resolution figures, see http://supernova.lbl.gov/Union
Submitted: 2008-04-25
We present a new compilation of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a new dataset of low-redshift nearby-Hubble-flow SNe and new analysis procedures to work with these heterogeneous compilations. This ``Union'' compilation of 414 SN Ia, which reduces to 307 SNe after selection cuts, includes the recent large samples of SNe Ia from the Supernova Legacy Survey and ESSENCE Survey, the older datasets, as well as the recently extended dataset of distant supernovae observed with HST. A single, consistent and blind analysis procedure is used for all the various SN Ia subsamples, and a new procedure is implemented that consistently weights the heterogeneous data sets and rejects outliers. We present the latest results from this Union compilation and discuss the cosmological constraints from this new compilation and its combination with other cosmological measurements (CMB and BAO). The constraint we obtain from supernovae on the dark energy density is $\Omega_\Lambda= 0.713^{+0.027}_{-0.029} (stat)}^{+0.036}_{-0.039} (sys)}$, for a flat, LCDM Universe. Assuming a constant equation of state parameter, $w$, the combined constraints from SNe, BAO and CMB give $w=-0.969^{+0.059}_{-0.063}(stat)^{+0.063}_{-0.066} (sys)$. While our results are consistent with a cosmological constant, we obtain only relatively weak constraints on a $w$ that varies with redshift. In particular, the current SN data do not yet significantly constrain $w$ at $z>1$. With the addition of our new nearby Hubble-flow SNe Ia, these resulting cosmological constraints are currently the tightest available.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:0710.3120  [pdf] - 6091
A New Determination of the High Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rates with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2007-10-16
We present a new measurement of the volumetric rate of Type Ia supernova up to a redshift of 1.7, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) GOODS data combined with an additional HST dataset covering the North GOODS field collected in 2004. We employ a novel technique that does not require spectroscopic data for identifying Type Ia supernovae (although spectroscopic measurements of redshifts are used for over half the sample); instead we employ a Bayesian approach using only photometric data to calculate the probability that an object is a Type Ia supernova. This Bayesian technique can easily be modified to incorporate improved priors on supernova properties, and it is well-suited for future high-statistics supernovae searches in which spectroscopic follow up of all candidates will be impractical. Here, the method is validated on both ground- and space-based supernova data having some spectroscopic follow up. We combine our volumetric rate measurements with low redshift supernova data, and fit to a number of possible models for the evolution of the Type Ia supernova rate as a function of redshift. The data do not distinguish between a flat rate at redshift > 0.5 and a previously proposed model, in which the Type Ia rate peaks at redshift >1 due to a significant delay from star-formation to the supernova explosion. Except for the highest redshifts, where the signal to noise ratio is generally too low to apply this technique, this approach yields smaller or comparable uncertainties than previous work.