sort results by

Use logical operators AND, OR, NOT and round brackets to construct complex queries. Whitespace-separated words are treated as ANDed.

Show articles per page in mode

Meszaros, A.

Normalized to: Meszaros, A.

55 article(s) in total. 90 co-authors, from 1 to 32 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 3,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.07523  [pdf] - 2026557
An Oppositeness in the Cosmology: Distribution of the Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Cosmological Principle
Comments: 6 pages, 5 figures, presented at 16th INTEGRAL BART Workshop IBWS, Karlovy Vary (Carlsbad), May 20-24, 2019; a survey of the articles about the problems of the cosmological principle
Submitted: 2019-12-16
The Cosmological Principle is the assumption that the universe is spatially homogeneous and isotropic in the large-scale average. In year 1998 the author, together with his two colleagues, has shown that the BATSE's short gamma-ray bursts are not distributed isotropically on the sky. This claim was then followed by other papers confirming both the existence of anisotropies in the angular distribution of bursts and the existence of huge Gpc structures in the spatial distribution. These observational facts are in contradiction with the Cosmological Principle, because the large scale averaging hardly can be provided. The aim of this contribution is to survey these publications.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.05761  [pdf] - 1604708
What is the Astrophysical Meaning of the Intermediate Subgroup of GRBs?
Comments: journal: Proceedings of Science, Swift: 10 Years of Discovery; conference date: 2-5 December 2014; location: La Sapienza University, Rome, Italy; 6 pages, 4 figures, 1 table; accepted for publication in July 9 2015
Submitted: 2015-07-21
Published articles concerning the intermediate (third) subgroup of GRBs are surveyed. From a statistical perspective this subgroup may exist, however its significance depends on which data set is used. Its astrophysical meaning is unclear because the occurrence of this subgroup can also be an artificial selection effect. Hence, GRBs from this subgroup need not be given by a physically different phenomenon. The aim of this contribution is to search for the answer to the question in the title.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.01266  [pdf] - 1019256
Probing the Isotropy in the Sky Distribution of the Gamma-Ray Bursts
Comments: Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Afterglow Era: Proceedings of the International Workshop Held in Rome, Italy, 17-20 October 2000, ESO ASTROPHYSICS SYMPOSIA. ISBN 3-540-42771-6. Edited by E. Costa, F. Frontera, and J. Hjorth. Springer-Verlag, 2001, p. 47
Submitted: 2015-05-06
The statistical tests - done by the authors - are surveyed, which verify the null-hypothesis of the intrinsic randomness in the angular distribution of gamma-ray bursts collected at BATSE Catalog. The tests use the counts-in-cells method, an analysis of spherical harmonics, a test based on the two-point correlation function and a method based on multiscale methods. The tests suggest that the intermediate subclass of gamma-ray bursts are distributed anisotropically.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.4736  [pdf] - 1249026
A curious relation between the flat cosmological model and the elliptic integral of the first kind
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics. 2 pages
Submitted: 2013-06-19
The dependence of the luminosity distance on the redshift has a key importance in the cosmology. This dependence can well be given by standard functions for the zero cosmological constant. The purpose of this article is to present such a relation also for the non-zero cosmological constant, if the universe is spatially flat. A definite integral is used. The integration ends in the elliptic integral of the first kind. The result shows that no numerical integration is needed for the non-zero cosmological constant, if the universe is spatially flat.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1209.2485  [pdf] - 562610
Cosmological effects on the observed flux and fluence distributions of gamma-ray bursts
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure; Death of Massive Stars: Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts, Proceedings IAU Symposium No. 279
Submitted: 2012-09-11
Several claims have been put forward that an essential fraction of long-duration BATSE gamma-ray bursts should lie at redshifts larger than 5. This point-of-view follows from the natural assumption that fainter objects should, on average, lie at larger redshifts. However, redshifts larger than 5 are rare for bursts observed by Swift. The purpose of this article is to show that the most distant bursts in general need not be the faintest ones. We derive the cosmological relationships between the observed and emitted quantities, and arrive at a prediction that is tested on the ensembles of BATSE, Swift and Fermi bursts. This analysis is independent on the assumed cosmology, on the observational biases, as well as on any gamma-ray burst model. We arrive to the conclusion that apparently fainter bursts need not, in general, lie at large redshifts. Such a behaviour is possible, when the luminosities (or emitted energies) in a sample of bursts increase more than the dimming of the observed values with redshift. In such a case dP(z)/dz > 0 can hold, where P(z) is either the peak-flux or the fluence. This also means that the hundreds of faint, long-duration BATSE bursts need not lie at high redshifts, and that the observed redshift distribution of long Swift bursts might actually represent the actual distribution.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.6198  [pdf] - 1124425
On the Spectral Lags and Peak-Counts of the Gamma-Ray Bursts Detected by the RHESSI Satellite
Comments: 41 pages, 10 figures, 9 tables, accepted to be published in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2012-06-27
A sample of 427 gamma-ray bursts from a database (February 2002 - April 2008) of the RHESSI satellite is analyzed statistically. The spectral lags and peak-count rates, which have been calculated for the first time in this paper, are studied completing an earlier analysis of durations and hardness ratios. The analysis of the RHESSI database has already inferred the existence of a third group with intermediate duration, apart from the so-called short and long groups. First aim of this article is to discuss the properties of these intermediate-duration bursts in terms of peak-count rates and spectral lags. Second aim is to discuss the number of GRB groups using another statistical method and by employing the peak-count rates and spectral lags as well. The standard parametric (model-based clustering) and non-parametric (K-means clustering) statistical tests together with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling tests are used. Two new results are obtained: A. The intermediate-duration group has similar properties to the group of short bursts. Intermediate and long groups appear to be different. B. The intermediate-duration GRBs in the RHESSI and Swift databases seem to be represented by different phenomena.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.2592  [pdf] - 475843
GRB duration distribution considering the position of the Fermi
Comments: 4 pages, 6 figures. Presented as a poster on the conference '8th INTEGRAL/BART Workshop, 26-29 April 2011, Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic'. Accepted to Acta Polytechnica
Submitted: 2012-02-12
The Fermi satellite has a particular motion during its flight which enables it to catch the gamma-ray bursts mostly well. The side-effect of this favourable feature is that the lightcurves of the GBM detectors are stressed by rapidly and extremely varying background. Before this data is processed, it needs to be separated from the background. The commonly used methods were useless for most cases of Fermi, so we developed a new technique based on the motion and orientation of the satellite. The background-free lightcurve can be used to perform statistical surveys, hence we showed the efficiency of our background-filtering method presenting a statistical analysis known from the literature.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.3037  [pdf] - 1084085
On the properties of the RHESSI intermediate-duration gamma-ray bursts
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2011-09-14
The intermediate-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) identified in the data of the RHESSI satellite are investigated with respect to their spectral lags, peak count rates, redshifts, supernova observations, and star formation rates of their host galaxies. Standard statistical tests like Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Student t-test are used. It is discussed whether these bursts belong to the group of so-called short or long GRBs, or if they significantly differ from both groups.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.1265  [pdf] - 1076454
GRIPS - Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy
Comments: to appear in Exp. Astron., special vol. on M3-Call of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2010; 25 p., 25 figs; see also www.grips-mission.eu
Submitted: 2011-05-06
We propose to perform a continuously scanning all-sky survey from 200 keV to 80 MeV achieving a sensitivity which is better by a factor of 40 or more compared to the previous missions in this energy range. The Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy (GRIPS) mission addresses fundamental questions in ESA's Cosmic Vision plan. Among the major themes of the strategic plan, GRIPS has its focus on the evolving, violent Universe, exploring a unique energy window. We propose to investigate $\gamma$-ray bursts and blazars, the mechanisms behind supernova explosions, nucleosynthesis and spallation, the enigmatic origin of positrons in our Galaxy, and the nature of radiation processes and particle acceleration in extreme cosmic sources including pulsars and magnetars. The natural energy scale for these non-thermal processes is of the order of MeV. Although they can be partially and indirectly studied using other methods, only the proposed GRIPS measurements will provide direct access to their primary photons. GRIPS will be a driver for the study of transient sources in the era of neutrino and gravitational wave observatories such as IceCUBE and LISA, establishing a new type of diagnostics in relativistic and nuclear astrophysics. This will support extrapolations to investigate star formation, galaxy evolution, and black hole formation at high redshifts.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.5040  [pdf] - 1051701
Cosmological effects on the observed flux and fluence distributions of gamma-ray bursts: Are the most distant bursts in general the faintest ones?
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5 figures, 7 tables
Submitted: 2011-01-26
Several claims have been put forward that an essential fraction of long-duration BATSE gamma-ray bursts should lie at redshifts larger than 5. This point-of-view follows from the natural assumption that fainter objects should, on average, lie at larger redshifts. However, redshifts larger than 5 are rare for bursts observed by Swift, seemingly contradicting the BATSE estimates. The purpose of this article is to clarify this contradiction. We derive the cosmological relationships between the observed and emitted quantities, and we arrive at a prediction that can be tested on the ensembles of bursts with determined redshifts. This analysis is independent on the assumed cosmology, on the observational biases, as well as on any gamma-ray burst model. Four different samples are studied: 8 BATSE bursts with redshifts, 13 bursts with derived pseudo-redshifts, 134 Swift bursts with redshifts, and 6 Fermi bursts with redshifts. The controversy can be explained by the fact that apparently fainter bursts need not, in general, lie at large redshifts. Such a behaviour is possible, when the luminosities (or emitted energies) in a sample of bursts increase more than the dimming of the observed values with redshift. In such a case dP(z)/dz > 0 can hold, where P(z) is either the peak-flux or the fluence. All four different samples of the long bursts suggest that this is really the case. This also means that the hundreds of faint, long-duration BATSE bursts need not lie at high redshifts, and that the observed redshift distribution of long Swift bursts might actually represent the actual distribution.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.1765  [pdf] - 226037
Rising indications for three gamma-ray burst groups
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure, 1 table
Submitted: 2010-09-09
Several papers were written about the gamma-ray burst (GRBs) groups. Our statistical study is based on the durations and hardness ratios of the Swift and RHESSI data.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.1770  [pdf] - 226038
A comparison of the fluences and photon peak fluxes for the Swift and RHESSI gamma-ray bursts
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2010-09-09
Fluences and photon peak fluxes of the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Swift and RHESSI satellites are graphically compared.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.1558  [pdf] - 162308
Impact on cosmology of the celestial anisotropy of the short gamma-ray bursts
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure. Published in Proceedings of the 6th INTEGRAL/BART Workshop, 26-29 March, 2009; Karlovy Vary
Submitted: 2010-05-10
Recently the anisotropy of the short gamma-ray bursts detected by BATSE was announced (Vavrek et al. 2008). The impact of this discovery on cosmology is discussed. It is shown that the anisotropy found may cause the breakdown of the cosmological principle.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1003.0632  [pdf] - 1025481
Detailed Classification of Swift's Gamma-Ray Bursts
Comments: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2010-03-02
Earlier classification analyses found three types of gamma-ray bursts (short, long and intermediate in duration) in the BATSE sample. Recent works have shown that these three groups are also present in the RHESSI and the BeppoSAX databases. The duration distribution analysis of the bursts observed by the Swift satellite also favors the three-component model. In this paper, we extend the analysis of the Swift data with spectral information. We show, using the spectral hardness and the duration simultaneously, that the maximum likelihood method favors the three-component against the two-component model. The likelihood also shows that a fourth component is not needed.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.2455  [pdf] - 1024615
On the Intermediate Subgroup of the Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Database
Comments: Published in 4th Heidelberg International Symposium on High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy, 2008
Submitted: 2010-01-14
A sample of 286 gamma-ray bursts, detected by Swift satellite, is studied statistically by the chi^2 test and the Student t-test, respectively. The short and long subgroups are well detected in the Swift data. But no intermediate subgroup is seen. The non-detection of this subgroup in the Swift database can be explained, once it is assumed that in the BATSE database the short and the intermediate subgroups form a common subclass.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.0286  [pdf] - 32372
Model Independent Methods of Describing GRB Spectra Using BATSE MER Data
Comments: 3 pages, one figure
Submitted: 2010-01-02
The Gamma Ray Inverse Problem is discussed. Four methods of spectral deconvolution are presented here and applied to the BATSE's MER data type. We compare these to the Band spectra.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.3945  [pdf] - 1018849
A Search for Gamma-ray Burst Subgroups in the SWIFT and RHESSI Databases
Comments: Published in Proceedings of the 2008 Nanjing Gamma-ray Burst Conference
Submitted: 2009-12-19
A sample of 286 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Swift satellite and 358 GRBs detected by the RHESSI satellite are studied statistically. Previously published articles, based on the BATSE GRB Catalog, claimed the existence of an intermediate subgroup of GRBs with respect to duration. We use the statistical chi^2 test and the F-test to compare the number of GRB subgroups in our databases with the earlier BATSE results. Similarly to the BATSE database, the short and long subgroups are well detected in the Swift and RHESSI data. However, contrary to the BATSE data, we have not found a statistically significant intermediate subgroup in either Swift or RHESSI data.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.3928  [pdf] - 32045
A search for gravitational lensing effects in Fermi GRB data
Comments: 2009 Fermi Symposium - to appear in eConf Proceedings C091122
Submitted: 2009-12-19
As GRBs trace the high-z Universe, there is a non-negligible probability of a lensing effect being imprinted on the lightcurves of the bursts. We propose to search for lensed candidates with a cross-correlation method, by looking at bursts days to years apart coming from the same part of the sky. We look for similarities and hypothesize a Singular Isothermal Sphere (SIS) model for the lens. A lensed pair would enable us to constrain the mass of the lensing object. Our search did not reveal any gravitationally lensed events.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.3913  [pdf] - 32041
Anomalous grouping of some short BATSE GRBs
Comments: 2009 Fermi Symposium - to appear in eConf Proceedings C091122
Submitted: 2009-12-19
The power spectra of 457 short BATSE bursts were analyzed, focusing on the 64 ms lightcurves' tails in the low energy bands. Using MC simulations, 22 GRBs were identified with unusually high harmonic power above 0.03 Hz. The sky distribution of these bursts shows an extraordinarily strong dipole moment with a 99.994% significance.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.3938  [pdf] - 1018848
Statistical analysis of RHESSI GRB database
Comments: Published in Proceedings of the Swift and GRBs: Unveiling the Relativistic Universe Conference
Submitted: 2009-12-19
The Gamma-ray burst (GRB) database based on the data by the RHESSI satellite provides a unique and homogeneous database for future analyses. Here we present preliminary results on the duration and hardness ratio distributions for a sample of 228 GRBs observed with RHESSI.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.3940  [pdf] - 403926
The RHESSI Satellite and Classes of Gamma-ray Bursts
Comments: Published in Gamma-Ray Bursts 2007: Proceedings of the Santa Fe Conference
Submitted: 2009-12-19
Some articles based on the BATSE gamma-ray burst (GRB) catalog claim the existence of a third population of GRBs, besides long and short. In this contribution we wanted to verify these claims with an independent data source, namely the RHESSI GRB catalog. Our verification is based on the statistical analysis of duration and hardness ratio of GRBs. The result is that there is no significant third group of GRBs in our RHESSI GRB data-set.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:0906.1268  [pdf] - 25019
Survival analysis of the Swift optical transient data
Comments:
Submitted: 2009-06-06
In a systematic search of the OTs at GRBs the Swift satellite determined only an upper limit of the apparent brightness in a significant fraction of cases. Combining these upper limits with the really measured OT brightness we obtained a sample well suited to survival analysis. Performing a Kaplan-Meier product limit estimation we obtained an unbiased cumulative distribution of the V visual brightness. The lg(N(V)) logarithmic cumulative distribution can be well fitted with a linear function of V in the form of lg(N(V))= 0.234 V + const. We studied the dependence of V on the gamma ray properties of the bursts. We tested the dependence on the fluence, T90 duration and peak flux. We found a dependence on the peak flux on the 99.7% significance level.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.4821  [pdf] - 1002395
A comparison of the gamma-ray bursts detected by BATSE and Swift
Comments: 9 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2009-05-29
The durations of 388 gamma-ray bursts, detected by the Swift satellite, are studied statistically in order to search for their subgroups. Then the results are compared with the results obtained earlier from the BATSE database. The standard chi^2 test is used. Similarly to the BATSE database, the short and long subgroups are well detected also in the Swift data. Also the intermediate subgroup is seen in the Swift database. The whole sample of 388 GRBs gives a support for three subgroups.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.5275  [pdf] - 22898
Observational difference between gamma and X-ray properties of optically dark and bright GRBs
Comments: Santa Fe proc
Submitted: 2009-03-30
Using the discriminant analysis of the multivariate statistical analysis we compared the distribution of the physical quantities of the optically dark and bright GRBs, detected by the BAT and XRT on board of the Swift Satellite. We found that the GRBs having detected optical transients (OT) have systematically higher peak fluxes and lower HI column densities than those without OT.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.4812  [pdf] - 21874
New Statistical Results on the Angular Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts
Comments: in GAMMA-RAY BURSTS 2007: Proceedings of the Santa Fe Conference
Submitted: 2009-02-27
We presented the results of several statistical tests of the randomness in the angular sky-distribution of gamma-ray bursts in BATSE Catalog. Thirteen different tests were presented based on Voronoi tesselation, Minimal spanning tree and Multifractal spectrum for five classes (short1, short2, intermediate, long1, long2) of gamma-ray bursts, separately. The long1 and long2 classes are distributed randomly. The intermediate subclass, in accordance with the earlier results of the authors, is distributed non-randomly. Concerning the short subclass earlier statistical tests also suggested some departure from the random distribution, but not on a high enough confidence level. The new tests presented in this article suggest also non-randomness here.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.4610  [pdf] - 21818
Factor analysis of the spectral and time behavior of long GRBs
Comments: In GAMMA-RAY BURSTS 2007: Proceedings of the Santa Fe Conference
Submitted: 2009-02-26
A sample of 197 long BATSE GRBs is studied statistically. In the sample 11 variables, describing for any burst the time behavior of the spectra and other quantities, are collected. The application of the factor analysis on this sample shows that five factors describe the sample satisfactorily. Both the pseudo-redshifts coming from the variability and the Amati-relation in its original form are disfavored.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.0053  [pdf] - 1606947
Combined Swift BAT-XRT Lightcurves
Comments: 2008 NANJING GAMMA-RAY BURST CONFERENCE. AIP Conference Proceedings, Volume 1065, pp. 35-38 (2008)
Submitted: 2009-01-31
In this paper we make an attempt to combine the two kinds of data from the Swift-XRT instrument (windowed timing and photon counting modes) and the from BAT. A thorough desription of the applied procedure will be given. We apply various binning techniques to the different data: Bayes blocks, exponential binning and signal-to-noise type of binning. We present a handful of lightcurves and some possible applications.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.0103  [pdf] - 19912
Different satellites - different GRB redshift distributions?
Comments: 2008 NANJING GAMMA-RAY BURST CONFERENCE. AIP Conference Proceedings, Volume 1065, pp. 119-122 (2008)
Submitted: 2008-12-31
The measured redshifts of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which were first detected by the Swift satellite, seem to be bigger on average than the redshifts of GRBs detected by other satellites. We analyzed the redshift distribution of GRBs triggered and observed by different satellites (Swift[1], HETE2[2], BeppoSax, Ulyssses). After considering the possible biases significant difference was found at the p = 95.70% level in the redshift distributions of GRBs measured by HETE and the Swift.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.1749  [pdf] - 18421
Factor analysis of the long gamma-ray bursts
Comments: 5 pages, acceptod to A&A
Submitted: 2008-11-11
We study statistically 197 long gamma-ray bursts, detected and measured in detail by the BATSE instrument of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. In the sample 10 variables, describing for any burst the time behavior of the spectra and other quantities, are collected. The factor analysis method is used to find the latent random variables describing the temporal and spectral properties of GRBs. The application of this particular method to this sample indicates that five factors and the $\REpk$ spectral variable (the ratio of peak energies in the spectrum) describe the sample satisfactorily. Both the pseudo-redshifts inferred from the variability, and the Amati-relation in its original form, are disfavored.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:0705.0249  [pdf] - 1000383
Principal Component Analysis of Gamma-Ray Bursts' Spectra
Comments: published in Nuovo Cimento
Submitted: 2007-05-02
Principal component analysis is a statistical method, which lowers the number of important variables in a data set. The use of this method for the bursts' spectra and afterglows is discussed in this paper. The analysis indicates that three principal components are enough among the eight ones to describe the variablity of the data. The correlation between spectral index alpha and the redshift suggests that the thermal emission component becomes more dominant at larger redshifts.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:0704.0864  [pdf] - 173
Redshifts of the Long Gamma-Ray Bursts
Comments: published in Baltic Astronomy
Submitted: 2007-04-06
The low energy spectra of some gamma-ray bursts' show excess components beside the power-law dependence. The consequences of such a feature allows to estimate the gamma photometric redshift of the long gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE Catalog. There is good correlation between the measured optical and the estimated gamma photometric redshifts. The estimated redshift values for the long bright gamma-ray bursts are up to z=4, while for the the faint long bursts - which should be up to z=20 - the redshifts cannot be determined unambiguously with this method. The redshift distribution of all the gamma-ray bursts with known optical redshift agrees quite well with the BATSE based gamma photometric redshift distribution.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0702152  [pdf] - 89206
Physical Difference between the short and long GRBs
Comments: 2 figures
Submitted: 2007-02-06
We provided separate bivariate log-normal distribution fits to the BATSE short and long burst samples using the durations and fluences. We show that these fits present an evidence for a power-law dependence between the fluence and the duration, with a statistically significant different index for the long and short groups. We argue that the effect is probably real, and the two subgroups are different physical phenomena. This may provide a potentially useful constraint for models of long and short bursts.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0701905  [pdf] - 260863
On the Origin of the Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts
Comments: published in Nuovo Cimento
Submitted: 2007-01-31
The origin of dark bursts - i.e. that have no observed afterglows in X-ray, optical/NIR and radio ranges - is unclear yet. Different possibilities - instrumental biases, very high redshifts, extinction in the host galaxies - are discussed and shown to be important. On the other hand, the dark bursts should not form a new subgroup of long gamma-ray bursts themselves.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0701456  [pdf] - 88585
Properties of the intermediate type of gamma-ray bursts
Comments: In Sixteenth Maryland Astrophysics Conference
Submitted: 2007-01-16
Gamma-ray bursts can be divided into three groups ("short", "intermediate", "long") with respect to their durations. The third type of gamma-ray bursts - as known - has the intermediate duration. We show that the intermediate group is the softest one. An anticorrelation between the hardness and the duration is found for this subclass in contrast to the short and long groups.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0607369  [pdf] - 83572
A possible interrelation between the estimated luminosity distances and internal extinctions of type Ia supernovae
Comments: 8 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomische Nachrichten
Submitted: 2006-07-17
We studied the statistical properties of the luminosity distance and internal extinction data of type Ia supernovae in the lists published by Tonry et al. (2003) and Barris et al. (2004). After selecting the luminosity distance in an empty Universe as a reference level we divided the sample into low $z<0.25$ and high $z \ge 0.25$ parts. We further divided these subsamples by the median of the internal extinction. Performing sign tests using the standardized residuals between the estimated logarithmic luminosity distances and those of an empty universe, on the four subsamples separately, we recognized that the residuals were distributed symmetrically in the low redshift region, independently from the internal extinction. On the contrary, the low extinction part of the data of $z \ge 0.25$ clearly showed an excess of the points with respect to an empty Universe which was not the case in the high extinction region. This diversity pointed to an interrelation between the estimated luminosity distance and internal extinction. To characterize quantitatively this interrelation we introduced a hidden variable making use of the technics of factor analysis. After subtracting that part of the residual which was explained by the hiddenmaking use of the technics of factor analysis. After subtracting that part of the residual which was explained by the hidden variable we obtained luminosity distances which were already free from interrelation with internal extinction. Fitting the corrected luminosity distances with cosmological models we concluded that the SN Ia data alone did not exclude the possibility of the $\Lambda=0$ solution.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606377  [pdf] - 82817
Redshift distribution of gamma-ray bursts and star formation rate
Comments: 6 pages, no figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2006-06-15
The redshift distribution of gamma-ray bursts collected in the BATSE Catalog is compared with the star formation rate. We aim to clarify the accordance between them. We also study the case of comoving number density of bursts monotonously increasing up to redshift 6-20. A method independent of the models of the gamma-ray bursts is used. The short and the long subgroups are studied separately. The redshift distribution of the long bursts may be proportional to the star formation rate. For the short bursts this can also happen, but the proportionality is less evident. For the long bursts the monotonously increasing scenario is also less probable but still can occur. For the short bursts this alternative seems to be excluded.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0509909  [pdf] - 76490
A new definition of the intermediate group of gamma-ray bursts
Comments: accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2005-09-30, last modified: 2005-10-24
Gamma-ray bursts can be divided into three groups ("short", "intermediate", "long") with respect to their durations. This classification is somewhat imprecise, since the subgroup of intermediate duration has an admixture of both short and long bursts. In this paper a physically more reasonable definition of the intermediate group is presented, using also the hardnesses of the bursts. It is shown again that the existence of the three groups is real, no further groups are needed. The intermediate group is the softest one. From this new definition it follows that 11% of all bursts belong to this group. An anticorrelation between the hardness and the duration is found for this subclass in contrast to the short and long groups. Despite this difference it is not clear yet whether this group represents a physically different phenomenon.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0508673  [pdf] - 277194
Gamma-ray Bursts in Wavelet Space
Comments: GRB: 30 years of Discovery. ed by E.E. Fenimore and M. Galassi
Submitted: 2005-08-31
The gamma-ray burst's lightcurves have been analyzed using a special wavelet transformation. The applied wavelet base is based on a typical Fast Rise-Exponential Decay (FRED) pulse. The shape of the wavelet coefficients' total distribution is determined on the observational frequency grid. Our analysis indicates that the pulses in the long bursts' high energy channel lightcurves are more FRED-like than the lower ones, independently from the actual physical time-scale.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0508023  [pdf] - 1088778
A Gamma-Ray Bursts' Fluence-Duration Correlation
Comments: In Gamma-Ray Burst in the Afterglow Era. Springer. ed by E. Costa, F. Frontera, and J. Hjorth
Submitted: 2005-08-01
We present an analysis indicating that there is a correlation between the fluences and the durations of gamma-ray bursts, and provide arguments that this reflects a correlation between the total emitted energies and the intrinsic durations. For the short (long) bursts the total emitted energies are roughly proportional to the first (second) power of the intrinsic duration. This difference in the energy-duration relationship is statistically significant, and may provide an interesting constraint on models aiming to explain the short and long gamma-ray bursts.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0507688  [pdf] - 74857
Where is the 3rd subgroup of GRBs?
Comments: Published in Baltic Astronomy
Submitted: 2005-07-29
It is shown that in the duration-hardness plane the GRBs of the third intermediate subgroup are well defined. Their durations are intermediate (i.e. roughly between 2 and 10 seconds), but their hardnesses are the lowest. They are even softer than the long bursts.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0411219  [pdf] - 68818
Interpretations of gamma-ray burst spectroscopy. II. Bright BATSE bursts
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2004-11-09
We analyze the spectral lags of a sample of bright gamma-ray burst pulses observed by CGRO BATSE and compare these with the results of high-resolution spectroscopical investigations. We find that pulses with hard spectra have the largest lags, and that there is a similar, but weaker correlation between hardness-intensity correlation index, eta, and lag. We also find that the lags differ considerably between pulses within a burst. Furthermore, the peak energy mainly decreases with increasing lag. Assuming a lag-luminosity relation as suggested by Norris et al., there will thus be a positive luminosity--peak-energy correlation. We also find that the hardness ratio, of the total flux in two channels, only weakly correlates with the spectral evolution parameters. These results are consistent with those found in the analytical and numerical analysis in Paper I. Finally, we find that for these bursts, dominated by a single pulse, there is a correlation between the observed energy-flux, F, and the inverse of the lag, t_lag: F propto t_lag^{-1}. We interpret this flux-lag relation found as a consequence of the lag-luminosity relation and that these bursts have to be relatively narrowly distributed in z. However, they still have to, mainly, lie beyond z ~ 0.01, since they do not coincide with the local super-cluster of galaxies. We discuss the observed correlations within the collapsar model, in which the collimation of the outflow varies. Both the thermal photospheric emission as well as non-thermal, optically-thin synchrotron emission should be important.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0303207  [pdf] - 55446
Anisotropy in the angular distribution of the long gamma-ray bursts?
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures, forthcoming in Astron.Astrophys
Submitted: 2003-03-10
The gamma-ray bursts detected by the BATSE instrument may be separated into "short", "intermediate" and "long" subgroups. Previous statistical tests found an anisotropic sky-distribution on large angular scales for the intermediate subgroup, and probably also for the short subgroup. In this article the description and the results of a further statistical test - namely the nearest neighbour analysis - are given. Surprisingly, this test gives an anisotropy for the long subgroup on small angular scales. The discussion of this result suggests that this anisotropy may be real.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0301262  [pdf] - 362947
'On the difference between the short and long gamma-ray bursts'
Comments: A.A. in press ; significantly revised version of astro-ph/0007438; 16 pages 5 PS figures
Submitted: 2003-01-14
We argue that the distributions of both the intrinsic fluence and the intrinsic duration of the gamma-ray emission in gamma-ray bursts from the BATSE sample are well represented by log-normal distributions, in which the intrinsic dispersion is much larger than the cosmological time dilatation and redshift effects. We perform separate bivariate log-normal distribution fits to the BATSE short and long burst samples. The bivariate log-normal behaviour results in an ellipsoidal distribution, whose major axis determines an overall statistical relation between the fluence and the duration. We show that this fit provides evidence for a power-law dependence between the fluence and the duration, with a statistically significant different index for the long and short groups. We discuss possible biases, which might affect this result, and argue that the effect is probably real. This may provide a potentially useful constraint for models of long and short bursts.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0207558  [pdf] - 50701
On the Reality of the Accelerating Universe
Comments: 11 pages, no figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2002-07-25
Two groups recently deduced the positive value for the cosmological constant, concluding at a high (>= 99%) confidence level that the Universe should be accelerating. This conclusion followed from the statistical analysis of dozens of high-redshift supernovae. In this paper this conclusion is discussed. From the conservative frequentist's point of view the validity of null hypothesis of the zero cosmological constant is tested by the classical statistical chi^2 test for the 60 supernovae listed in Perlmutter et al. 1999 (ApJ, 517, 565). This sample contains 42 objects discovered in the frame of Supernova Cosmology Project and 18 low-redshift object detected earlier. Excluding the event SN1997O, which is doubtlessly an outlier, one obtains the result: The probability for seeing a worse chi^2 - if the null hypothesis is true - is in the 5% to 8% range, a value that does not indicate significant evidence againts the null. If one excludes further five possible outliers, proposed to be done by Perlmutter et al. 1999, then the sample of 54 supernovae is in an excellent accordance with the null hypothesis. It also seems that upernovae from the High-z Supernova Search Team does not change the acceptance of null hypothesis. This means that the rejection of the Einstein equations with zero cosmological constant - based on the supernova data alone - is still premature.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0203364  [pdf] - 48385
The Rees-Sciama effect and the primordial nucleosynthesis
Comments: Astronomy and Astrophysics, accepted for publication, 4 pages
Submitted: 2002-03-21
It is known that, theoretically, the Rees-Sciama effect may cause arbitrarily large additional redshifts in the cosmic microwave background radiation due to transparent expanding voids having sizes comparable with the size of horizon. Therefore, again theoretically, eventual huge voids existing immediately after the recombination may essentially change the predictions of the theory of big bang nucleosynthesis. If this eventuality holds, then the dark matter can be dominantly baryonic and, simultaneously, one can be in accordance with the predictions of primordial nucleosynthesis theory. Studying this eventuality one arrives at the result that the observed extreme isotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation rejects the existence of any such huge voids, and hence this eventuality does not hold.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0007438  [pdf] - 37276
A Possible Intrinsic Fluence-Duration Power-Law Relation in Gamma-ray Bursts
Comments: revised version, ApJ subm 3/15/01; includes substantial additional calculations and discussion of biases, title change, additional figure
Submitted: 2000-07-28, last modified: 2001-03-20
We argue that the distributions of both the intrinsic fluence and the intrinsic duration of the gamma-ray emission in gamma-ray bursts from the BATSE sample are well represented by log-normal distributions, in which the intrinsic dispersion is much larger than the cosmological time dilatation and redshift effects. We perform separate bivariate log-normal distribution fits to the BATSE short and long burst samples. The bivariate log-normal behavior results in an ellipsoidal distribution, whose major axis determines an overall statistical relation between the fluence and the duration. We show that this fit provides evidence for a power-law dependence between the fluence and the duration, with a statistically significant different index for the long and short groups. We discuss possible biases which might affect this result, and argue that the effect is probably real. This may provide a potentially useful constraint for models of long and short bursts.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0003284  [pdf] - 35158
A Remarkable Angular Distribution of the Intermediate Subclass of Gamma-Ray Bursts
Comments: 14 pages, 2 figures, Accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal, typo changes
Submitted: 2000-03-20, last modified: 2000-05-09
In the article a test is developed, which allows to test the null-hypothesis of the intrinsic randomness in the angular distribution of gamma-ray bursts collected at the Current BATSE Catalog. The method is a modified version of the well-known counts-in-cells test, and fully eliminates the non-uniform sky-exposure function of BATSE instrument. Applying this method to the case of all gamma-ray bursts no intrinsic non-randomness is found. The test also did not find intrinsic non-randomnesses for the short and long gamma-ray bursts, respectively. On the other hand, using the method to the new intermediate subclass of gamma-ray bursts, the null-hypothesis of the intrinsic randomness for 181 intermediate gamma-ray bursts is rejected on the 96.4% confidence level. Taking 92 dimmer bursts from this subclass itself, we obtain the surprising result: This "dim" subclass of the intermediate subclass has an intrinsic non-randomness on the 99.3% confidence level. On the other hand, the 89 "bright" bursts show no intrinsic non-randomness.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9912076  [pdf] - 109739
Testing the Intrinsic Randomnesses in the Angular Distributions of Gamma-Ray Bursts
Comments: 5 pages, 1 figure, contribution in 5th Huntsville Gamma-Ray Burst Symposium Proceedings
Submitted: 1999-12-03
The counts-in-cells and the two-point angular correlation function method are used to test the randomnesses in the angular distributions of both the all gamma-ray bursts collected at BATSE Catalog, and also their three subclasses ("short", "intermediate", "long"). The methods elimate the non-zero sky-exposure function of BATSE instrument. Both tests suggest intrinsic non-randomnesses for the intermediate subclass; for the remaining three cases only the correlation function method. The confidence levels are between 95% and 99.9%. Separating the GRBs into two parts ("dim half" and "bright half", respectively) we obtain the result that the "dim" half shows a non-randomness on the 99.3% confidence level from the counts-in-cells test.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9912037  [pdf] - 109700
On the existence of the intrinsic anisotropies in the angular distributions of gamma-ray bursts
Comments: 6 pages. Astronomy and Astrophysics, accepted for publication
Submitted: 1999-12-01
This articles is concerned primarily with the intrinsic anisotropy in the angular distribution of 2281 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) collected in Current BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog until the end of year 1998, and, second, with intrinsic anisotropies of three subclasses ("short", "intermediate", "long") of GRBs. Testing based on spherical harmonics of each class, in equatorial coordinates, is presented. Because the sky exposure function of BATSE instrument is not dependent on the right ascension $\alpha$, any non-zero spherical harmonic proportional either to $P_n^m(\sin \delta) \sin m \alpha$ or to $P_n^m(\sin \delta) \cos m\alpha$ with $m \neq 0$ ($\delta$ is the declination), immediately indicates an intrinsic non-zero term. It is a somewhat surprising result that the "intermediate" subclass shows an intrinsic anisotropy at the $97\%$ significance level caused by the high non-zero $P_3^1(\sin \delta) \sin m \alpha$ harmonic. The remaining two subclasses, and the full sample of GRBs, remain isotropic.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9909379  [pdf] - 108415
An intrinsic anisotropy in the angular distribution of gamma-ray bursts
Comments: 5 pages, Accepted in A&A
Submitted: 1999-09-22
The anisotropy of the sky distribution of 2025 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) collected in Current BATSE catalog is confirmed. It is shown that the quadrupole term being proportional to $\sim \sin 2b \sin l$ is non-zero with a probability 99.9%. The occurrence of this anisotropy term is then supported by the binomial test even with the probability 99.97%. It is also argued that this anisotropy cannot be caused exclusively by instrumental effects due to the non-uniform sky exposure of BATSE instrument; there should exist also some intrinsic anisotropy in the angular distribution of GRBs. Separating GRBs into short and long subclasses, it is shown that the 251 short ones are distributed anisotropically, but the 681 long ones seem to be distributed still isotropically. The 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that they are distributed differently with a 98.7% probability. The character of anisotropy suggests that the cosmological origin of short GRBs further holds, and there is no evidence for their Galactical origin. The work in essence contains the key ideas and results of a recently published paper (\cite{balazs}), to which the new result following from the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is added, too.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9807006  [pdf] - 102000
Anisotropy of the sky distribution of gamma-ray bursts
Comments: 6 peges, no figure. Accepted in A&A
Submitted: 1998-07-01
The isotropy of gamma-ray bursts collected in Current BATSE catalog is studied. It is shown that the quadrupole term being proportional to $\sim \sin 2b \sin l$ is non-zero with a probability 99.9%. The occurrence of this anisotropy term is then confirmed by the binomial test even with the probability 99.97 %. Hence, the sky distribution of all known gamma-ray bursts is anisotropic. It is also argued that this anisotropy cannot be caused exclusively by instrumental effects due to the nonuniform sky exposure of BATSE instrument. Separating the GRBs into short and long subclasses, it is shown that the short ones are distributed anisotropically, but the long ones seem to be distributed still isotropically. The character of anisotropy suggests that the cosmological origin of short GRBs further holds, and there is no evidence for their Galactical origin.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9708084  [pdf] - 98262
A Principal Component Analysis of the 3B Gamma-Ray Burst Data
Comments: Ap.J., accepted 12/9/97; revised version contains a new appendix, somewhat expanded discussion; latex, aaspp4, 15 pages
Submitted: 1997-08-08, last modified: 1997-12-09
We have carried out a principal component analysis for 625 gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog for which non-zero values exist for the nine measured variables. This shows that only two out of the three basic quantities of duration, peak flux and fluence are independent, even if this relation is strongly affected by instrumental effects, and these two account for 91.6% of the total information content. The next most important variable is the fluence in the fourth energy channel (at energies above 320 keV). This has a larger variance and is less correlated with the fluences in the remaining three channels than the latter correlate among themselves. Thus a separate consideration of the fourth channel, and increased attention on the related hardness ratio $H43$ appears useful for future studies. The analysis gives the weights for the individual measurements needed to define a single duration, peak flux and fluence. It also shows that, in logarithmic variables, the hardness ratio $H32$ is significantly correlated with peak flux, while $H43$ is significantly anticorrelated with peak flux. The principal component analysis provides a potentially useful tool for estimating the improvement in information content to be achieved by considering alternative variables or performing various corrections on available measurements
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9512164  [pdf] - 93848
Cosmological Evolution and Luminosity Function Effects on Number Counts, Redshift and Time Dilation of Bursting Sources
Comments: Ap.J., in press, uuencoded .ps file, 33 pages plus 5 figures
Submitted: 1995-12-28
We present analytic formulae for the integral number count distribution of cosmological bursting or steady sources valid over the entire range of fluxes, including density evolution and either standard candle or a power law luminosity function. These are used to derive analytic formulae for the mean redshift, the time dilations and the dispersion of these quantities for sources within a given flux range for Friedmann models with $\Omega=1,~ \Lambda=0$ without K-corrections, and we discuss the extension to cases with $\Omega <1$ and inclusion of K-corrections. Applications to the spatial distribution of cosmological gamma ray burst sources are discussed, both with and without an intrinsic energy stretching of the burst time profiles, and the implied ranges of redshift $z$ are considered for a specific time dilation signal value. The simultaneous consideration of time dilation information and of fits of the number distribution versus peak flux breaks the degeneracy inherent in the latter alone, allowing a unique determination of the density evolution index and the characteristic luminosity of the sources. For a reported time dilation signal of 2.25 and neglecting [including] energy stretching we find that the proper density should evolve more steeply with redshift than comoving constant, and the redshifts of the dimmest sources with stretching would be very large. However, the expected statistical dispersion in the redshifts is large, especially for power law luminosity functions, and remains compatible with that of distant quasars. For smaller time dilation values of 1.75 and 1.35 the redshifts are more compatible with conventional ideas about galaxy formation, and the evolution is closer to a comoving constant or a slower evolution. More generally, we have considered a wide range of possible measured time dilation
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9507053  [pdf] - 92991
Cosmological Brightness Distribution Fits of Gamma Ray Burst Sources
Comments: Ap.J. in press, uuencoded .ps file, 9 pages manuscript plus 5 figures
Submitted: 1995-07-13
We discuss detailed fits of the BATSE and PVO gamma-ray burst peak-flux distributions with Friedman models taking into account possible density evolution and standard candle or power law luminosity functions. A chi-square analysis is used to estimate the goodness of the fits and we derive the significance level of limits on the density evolution and luminosity function parameters. Cosmological models provide a good fit over a range of parameter space which is physically reasonable.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9503087  [pdf] - 92504
The Brightness Distribution of Bursting Sources in Relativistic Cosmologies
Comments: 16 pages plus one figure, uuencoded postscript file. to appear in Ap.J.
Submitted: 1995-03-24
We present analytical solutions for the integral distribution of arbitrary bursting or steady source counts as a function of peak photon count rate within Friedmann cosmological models. We discuss both the standard candle and truncated power-law luminosity function cases with a power-law density evolution. While the analysis is quite general, the specific example discussed here is that of a cosmological gamma-ray burst distribution. These solutions show quantitatively the degree of dependence of the counts on the density and luminosity function parameters, as well as the the weak dependence on the closure parameter and the maximum redshift. An approximate comparison with the publicly available Compton Gamma Ray Observatory data gives an estimate of the maximum source luminosity and an upper limit to the minimum luminosity. We discuss possible ways of further constraining the various parameters.