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Menn, W.

Normalized to: Menn, W.

38 article(s) in total. 143 co-authors, from 1 to 38 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 34,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.08524  [pdf] - 2096532
Time dependence of the flux of helium nuclei in cosmic rays measured by the PAMELA experiment between July 2006 and December 2009
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-05-18
Precise time-dependent measurements of the Z = 2 component in the cosmic radiation provide crucial information about the propagation of charged particles through the heliosphere. The PAMELA experiment, with its long flight duration (15th June 2006 - 23rd January 2016) and the low energy threshold (80 MeV/n) is an ideal detector for cosmic ray solar modulation studies. In this paper, the helium nuclei spectra measured by the PAMELA instrument from July 2006 to December 2009 over a Carrington rotation time basis are presented. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional model for cosmic-ray propagation inside the heliosphere was used to interpret the time-dependent measured fluxes. Proton-to-helium flux ratio time profiles at various rigidities are also presented in order to study any features which could result from the different masses and local interstellar spectra shapes.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.10183  [pdf] - 1915726
Solar energetic particle events observed by the PAMELA mission
Comments: 26 pages, 13 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2018-07-26
Despite the significant progress achieved in recent years, the physical mechanisms underlying the origin of solar energetic particles (SEPs) are still a matter of debate. The complex nature of both particle acceleration and transport poses challenges to developing a universal picture of SEP events that encompasses both the low-energy (from tens of keV to a few hundreds of MeV) observations made by space-based instruments and the GeV particles detected by the worldwide network of neutron monitors in ground-level enhancements (GLEs). The high-precision data collected by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) satellite experiment offer a unique opportunity to study the SEP fluxes between $\sim$80 MeV and a few GeV, significantly improving the characterization of the most energetic events. In particular, PAMELA can measure for the first time with good accuracy the spectral features at moderate and high energies, providing important constraints for current SEP models. In addition, the PAMELA observations allow the relationship between low and high-energy particles to be investigated, enabling a clearer view of the SEP origin. No qualitative distinction between the spectral shapes of GLE, sub-GLE and non-GLE events is observed, suggesting that GLEs are not a separate class, but are the subset of a continuous distribution of SEP events that are more intense at high energies. While the spectral forms found are to be consistent with diffusive shock acceleration theory, which predicts spectral rollovers at high energies that are attributed to particles escaping the shock region during acceleration, further work is required to explore the relative influences of acceleration and transport processes on SEP spectra.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.10948  [pdf] - 1729092
Lithium and Beryllium isotopes with the PAMELA experiment
Comments: 13 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1512.06535
Submitted: 2018-06-27
The cosmic-ray lithium and beryllium ($^{6}$Li, $^{7}$Li, $^{7}$Be, $^{9}$Be, $^{10}$Be) isotopic composition has been measured with the satellite-borne experiment PAMELA, which was launched into low-Earth orbit on-board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. The rare lithium and beryllium isotopes in cosmic rays are believed to originate mainly from the interaction of high energy carbon, nitrogen and oxygen nuclei with the interstellar medium (ISM), but also on "tertiary" interactions in the ISM (i.e. produced by further fragmentation of secondary beryllium and boron). In this paper the isotopic ratios $^{7}$Li/$^{6}$Li and $^{7}$Be/($^{9}$Be + $^{10}$Be) measured between 150 and 1100 MeV/n using two different detector systems from July 2006 to September 2014 will be presented.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.06166  [pdf] - 1651033
Evidence of energy and charge sign dependence of the recovery time for the December 2006 Forbush event measured by the PAMELA experiment
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-03-16
New results on the short-term galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity variation (Forbush decrease) in December 2006 measured by the PAMELA instrument are presented. Forbush decreases are sudden suppressions of the GCR intensities which are associated with the passage of interplanetary transients such as shocks and interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). Most of the past measurements of this phenomenon were carried out with ground-based detectors such as neutron monitors or muon telescopes. These techniques allow only the indirect detection of the overall GCR intensity over an integrated energy range. For the first time, thanks to the unique features of the PAMELA magnetic spectrometer, the Forbush decrease commencing on 2006 December 14, following a CME at the Sun on 2006 December 13 was studied in a wide rigidity range (0.4 - 20 GV) and for different species of GCRs detected directly in space. The daily averaged GCR proton intensity was used to investigate the rigidity dependence of the amplitude and the recovery time of the Forbush decrease. Additionally, for the first time, the temporal variations in the helium and electron intensities during a Forbush decrease were studied. Interestingly, the temporal evolutions of the helium and proton intensities during the Forbush decrease were found in good agreement, while the low rigidity electrons (< 2 GV) displayed a faster recovery. This difference in the electron recovery is interpreted as a charge-sign dependence introduced by drift motions experienced by the GCRs during their propagation through the heliosphere.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.10310  [pdf] - 1627840
Ten Years of PAMELA in Space
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-01-31
The PAMELA cosmic ray detector was launched on June 15th 2006 on board the Russian Resurs-DK1 satellite, and during ten years of nearly continuous data-taking it has observed new interesting features in cosmic rays (CRs). In a decade of operation it has provided plenty of scientific data, covering different issues related to cosmic ray physics. Its discoveries might change our basic vision of the mechanisms of production, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. The antimatter measurements, focus of the experiment, have set strong constraints to the nature of Dark Matter. Search for signatures of more exotic processes (such as the ones involving Strange Quark Matter) was also pursued. Furthermore, the long-term operation of the instrument had allowed a constant monitoring of the solar activity during its maximum and a detailed and prolonged study of the solar modulation, improving the comprehension of the heliosphere mechanisms. PAMELA had also measured the radiation environment around the Earth, and it detected for the first time the presence of an antiproton radiation belt surrounding our planet. The operation of Resurs-DK1 was terminated in 2016. In this article we will review the main features of the PAMELA instrument and its constructing phases. Main part of the article will be dedicated to the summary of the most relevant PAMELA results over a decade of observation
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.08418  [pdf] - 1624412
Unexpected cyclic behavior in cosmic ray protons observed by PAMELA at 1 AU
Comments: article 4 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2018-01-24
Protons detected by the PAMELA experiment in the period 2006-2014 have been analyzed in the energy range between 0.40-50 GV to explore possible periodicities besides the well known solar undecennial modulation. An unexpected clear and regular feature has been found at rigidities below 15 GV, with a quasi-periodicity of $\sim$450 days. A possible Jovian origin of this periodicity has been investigated in different ways. The results seem to favor a small but not negligible contribution to cosmic rays from the Jovian magnetosphere, even if other explanations cannot be excluded.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.02766  [pdf] - 1534397
Secondary positrons and electrons measured by PAMELA experiment
Comments: XXV ECRS 2016 Proceedings - eConf C16-09-04.3
Submitted: 2017-01-10, last modified: 2017-01-17
We present a measurements of electron and positron fluxes below the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity in wide energy range from 50 MeV to several GeV by the PAMELA magnetic spectrometer. The instrument was launched on June 15th 2006 on-board the Resurs-DK satellite on low orbit with 70 degrees inclination and altitude between 350 and 600 km. The procedure of trajectories calculations in the geomagnetic field separates stably trapped and albedo components produced in interactions of cosmic ray protons with the residual atmosphere from galactic cosmic rays. Features of spatial distributions of secondary electrons and positrons in the near Earth space, including the South Atlantic Anomaly, were investigated.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.08626  [pdf] - 1429604
Time dependence of the electron and positron components of the cosmic radiation measured by the PAMELA experiment between July 2006 and December 2015
Comments: 11 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2016-06-28
Cosmic-ray electrons and positrons are a unique probe of the propagation of cosmic rays as well as of the nature and distribution of particle sources in our Galaxy. Recent measurements of these particles are challenging our basic understanding of the mechanisms of production, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays. Particularly striking are the differences between the low energy results collected by the space-borne PAMELA and AMS-02 experiments and older measurements pointing to sign-charge dependence of the solar modulation of cosmic-ray spectra. The PAMELA experiment has been measuring the time variation of the positron and electron intensity at Earth from July 2006 to December 2015 covering the period for the minimum of solar cycle 23 (2006-2009) till the middle of the maximum of solar cycle 24, through the polarity reversal of the heliospheric magnetic field which took place between 2013 and 2014. The positron to electron ratio measured in this time period clearly shows a sign-charge dependence of the solar modulation introduced by particle drifts. These results provide the first clear and continuous observation of how drift effects on solar modulation have unfolded with time from solar minimum to solar maximum and their dependence on the particle rigidity and the cyclic polarity of the solar magnetic field.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.05509  [pdf] - 1368182
PAMELA's measurements of geomagnetic cutoff variations during the 14 December 2006 storm
Comments: 26 pages, 6 figures and 1 table. Accepted for publication in Space Weather
Submitted: 2016-02-17, last modified: 2016-03-03
Data from the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) satellite experiment were used to measure the geomagnetic cutoff for high-energy (>80 MeV) protons during the 14 December 2006 geomagnetic storm. The variations of the cutoff latitude as a function of rigidity were studied on relatively short timescales, corresponding to spacecraft orbital periods (94 min). Estimated cutoff values were compared with those obtained by means of a trajectory tracing approach based on a dynamical empirical modeling of the Earth's magnetosphere. We found significant variations in the cutoff latitude, with a maximum suppression of about 7 deg at lowest rigidities during the main phase of the storm. The observed reduction in the geomagnetic shielding and its temporal evolution were related to the changes in the magnetospheric configuration, investigating the role of interplanetary magnetic field, solar wind and geomagnetic parameters. PAMELA's results represent the first direct measurement of geomagnetic cutoffs for protons with kinetic energies in the sub-GeV and GeV region.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.06535  [pdf] - 1359100
Measurements of Cosmic-Ray Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes with the PAMELA experiment
Comments: 22 pages, 17 figures, Accepted for publication on the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2015-12-21
The cosmic-ray hydrogen and helium ($^1$H, $^2$H, $^3$He, $^4$He) isotopic composition has been measured with the satellite-borne experiment PAMELA, which was launched into low-Earth orbit on-board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. The rare isotopes $^2$H and $^3$He in cosmic rays are believed to originate mainly from the interaction of high energy protons and helium with the galactic interstellar medium. The isotopic composition was measured between 100 and 1100 MeV/n for hydrogen and between 100 and 1400 MeV/n for helium isotopes using two different detector systems over the 23rd solar minimum from July 2006 to December 2007.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.01079  [pdf] - 1430648
Time dependence of the e^- flux measured by PAMELA during the July 2006 - December 2009 solar minimum
Comments: 40 pages, 18 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2015-12-03
Precision measurements of the electron component in the cosmic radiation provide important information about the origin and propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy not accessible from the study of the cosmic-ray nuclear components due to their differing diffusion and energy-loss processes. However, when measured near Earth, the effects of propagation and modulation of galactic cosmic rays in the heliosphere, particularly significant for energies up to at least 30 GeV, must be properly taken into account. In this paper the electron (e^-) spectra measured by PAMELA down to 70 MeV from July 2006 to December 2009 over six-months time intervals are presented. Fluxes are compared with a state-of-the-art three-dimensional model of solar modulation that reproduces the observations remarkably well.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.00543  [pdf] - 1314413
PAMELA's measurements of geomagnetically trapped and albedo protons
Comments: Conference: The 34th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC2015), 30 July - 6 August, 2015, The Hague, The Netherlands, Volume: PoS(ICRC2015)288
Submitted: 2015-11-02, last modified: 2015-11-09
Data from the PAMELA satellite experiment were used to perform a detailed measurement of under-cutoff protons at low Earth orbits. On the basis of a trajectory tracing approach using a realistic description of the magnetosphere, protons were classified into geomagnetically trapped and re-entrant albedo. The former include stably-trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly, which were analyzed in the framework of the adiabatic theory, investigating energy spectra, spatial and angular distributions; results were compared with the predictions of the AP8 and the PSB97 empirical trapped models. The albedo protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and un-trapped, spreading over all latitudes and including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudo-trapped) components. Features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated as well. PAMELA observations significantly improve the characterization of the high energy proton populations in near Earth orbits.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.1765  [pdf] - 1302931
Back-Tracing and Flux Reconstruction for Solar Events with PAMELA
Comments: 25 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2014-12-04, last modified: 2015-11-02
The PAMELA satellite-borne experiment is providing first direct measurements of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) with energies from $\sim$80 MeV to several GeV in near-Earth space. Its unique observational capabilities include the possibility of measuring the flux angular distribution and thus investigating possible anisotropies related to SEP events. This paper focuses on the analysis methods developed to estimate SEP energy spectra as a function of the particle pitch angle with respect to the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). The crucial ingredient is provided by an accurate simulation of the asymptotic exposition of the PAMELA apparatus, based on a realistic reconstruction of particle trajectories in the Earth's magnetosphere. As case study, the results of the calculation for the May 17, 2012 event are reported.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.05407  [pdf] - 1344328
Solar energetic particle events: trajectory analysis and flux reconstruction with PAMELA
Comments: Conference: The 34th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC2015), 30 July - 6 August, 2015, The Hague, The Netherlands, Volume: PoS(ICRC2015)085
Submitted: 2015-11-02
The PAMELA satellite experiment is providing first direct measurements of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) with energies from about 80 MeV to several GeV in near-Earth space, bridging the low energy data by other space-based instruments and the Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) data by the worldwide network of neutron monitors. Its unique observational capabilities include the possibility of measuring the flux angular distribution and thus investigating possible anisotropies. This work reports the analysis methods developed to estimate the SEP energy spectra as a function of the particle pitch-angle with respect to the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) direction. The crucial ingredient is provided by an accurate simulation of the asymptotic exposition of the PAMELA apparatus, based on a realistic reconstruction of particle trajectories in the Earth's magnetosphere. As case study, the results for the May 17, 2012 event are presented.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.00530  [pdf] - 1314411
PAMELA's measurements of geomagnetic cutoff variations during solar energetic particle events
Comments: Conference: The 34th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC2015), 30 July - 6 August, 2015, The Hague, The Netherlands, Volume: PoS(ICRC2015)287
Submitted: 2015-11-02
Data from the PAMELA satellite experiment were used to measure the geomagnetic cutoff for high-energy ($\gtrsim$ 80 MeV) protons during the solar particle events on 2006 December 13 and 14. The variations of the cutoff latitude as a function of rigidity were studied on relatively short timescales, corresponding to single spacecraft orbits (about 94 minutes). Estimated cutoff values were cross-checked with those obtained by means of a trajectory tracing approach based on dynamical empirical modeling of the Earth's magnetosphere. We find significant variations in the cutoff latitude, with a maximum suppression of about 6 deg for $\sim$80 MeV protons during the main phase of the storm. The observed reduction in the geomagnetic shielding and its temporal evolution were compared with the changes in the magnetosphere configuration, investigating the role of IMF, solar wind and geomagnetic (Kp, Dst and Sym-H indexes) variables and their correlation with PAMELA cutoff results.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.06249  [pdf] - 1290331
Search for anisotropies in cosmic-ray positrons detected by the PAMELA experiment
Comments: The value of the dipole anisotropy upper limit has been changed. The method is correct but there was a miscalculation in the relative formula
Submitted: 2015-09-21, last modified: 2015-10-08
The PAMELA detector was launched on board of the Russian Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15, 2006. Data collected during the first four years have been used to search for large-scale anisotropies in the arrival directions of cosmic-ray positrons. The PAMELA experiment allows for a full sky investigation, with sensitivity to global anisotropies in any angular window of the celestial sphere. Data samples of positrons in the rigidity range 10 GV $\leq$ R $\leq$ 200 GV were analyzed. This article discusses the method and the results of the search for possible local sources through analysis of anisotropy in positron data compared to the proton background. The resulting distributions of arrival directions are found to be isotropic. Starting from the angular power spectrum, a dipole anisotropy upper limit \delta = 0.166 at 95% C.L. is determined. Additional search is carried out around the Sun. No evidence of an excess correlated with that direction was found.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.06253  [pdf] - 984056
Re-Entrant Albedo Proton Fluxes Measured by the PAMELA Experiment
Comments: 28 pages, 8 figures. Accepted for publication in Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics
Submitted: 2015-04-23
We present a precise measurement of downward-going albedo proton fluxes for kinetic energy above $\sim$ 70 MeV performed by the PAMELA experiment at an altitude between 350 and 610 km. On the basis of a trajectory tracing simulation, the analyzed protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and un-trapped spreading over all latitudes, including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudo-trapped) components. In addition, features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated in detail. PAMELA results significantly improve the characterization of the high energy albedo proton populations at low Earth orbits.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.00935  [pdf] - 1224302
PAMELA's Measurements of Magnetospheric Effects on High Energy Solar Particles
Comments: 21 pages, 4 figures. Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 2015-02-03
The nature of particle acceleration at the Sun, whether through flare reconnection processes or through shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), is still under scrutiny despite decades of research. The measured properties of solar energetic particles (SEPs) have long been modeled in different particle-acceleration scenarios. The challenge has been to disentangle to the effects of transport from those of acceleration. The Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) instrument, enables unique observations of SEPs including composition and the angular distribution of the particles about the magnetic field, i.e. pitch angle distribution, over a broad energy range (>80 MeV) -- bridging a critical gap between space-based measurements and ground-based. We present high-energy SEP data from PAMELA acquired during the 2012 May 17 SEP event. These data exhibit differential anisotropies and thus transport features over the instrument rigidity range. SEP protons exhibit two distinct pitch angle distributions; a low-energy population that extends to 90{\deg} and a population that is beamed at high energies (>1 GeV), consistent with neutron monitor measurements. To explain a low-energy SEP population that exhibits significant scattering or redistribution accompanied by a high-energy population that reaches the Earth relatively unaffected by dispersive transport effects, we postulate that the scattering or redistribution takes place locally. We believe these are the first comprehensive measurements of the effects of solar energetic particle transport in the Earth's magnetosheath.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.1258  [pdf] - 927734
Trapped proton fluxes at low Earth orbits measured by the PAMELA experiment
Comments: 22 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2014-12-03, last modified: 2015-01-28
We report an accurate measurement of the geomagnetically trapped proton fluxes for kinetic energy above > 70 MeV performed by the PAMELA mission at low Earth orbits (350-610 km). Data were analyzed in the frame of the adiabatic theory of charged particle motion in the geomagnetic field. Flux properties were investigated in detail, providing a full characterization of the particle radiation in the South Atlantic Anomaly region, including locations, energy spectra and pitch angle distributions. PAMELA results significantly improve the description of the Earth's radiation environment at low altitudes placing important constraints on the trapping and interaction processes, and can be used to validate current trapped particle radiation models.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.1657  [pdf] - 1215440
Measurement of boron and carbon fluxes in cosmic rays with the PAMELA experiment
Comments:
Submitted: 2014-07-07
The propagation of cosmic rays inside our galaxy plays a fundamental role in shaping their injection spectra into those observed at Earth. One of the best tools to investigate this issue is the ratio of fluxes for secondary and primary species. The boron-to-carbon (B/C) ratio, in particular, is a sensitive probe to investigate propagation mechanisms. This paper presents new measurements of the absolute fluxes of boron and carbon nuclei, as well as the B/C ratio, from the PAMELA space experiment. The results span the range 0.44 - 129 GeV/n in kinetic energy for data taken in the period July 2006 - March 2008.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.0133  [pdf] - 755110
The cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum measured by PAMELA
Comments: 14 pages, 4 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters. Corrected a typo in the flux units of Table 1
Submitted: 2013-08-01, last modified: 2013-08-21
Precision measurements of the positron component in the cosmic radiation provide important information about the propagation of cosmic rays and the nature of particle sources in our Galaxy. The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make a new measurement of the cosmic-ray positron flux and fraction that extends previously published measurements up to 300 GeV in kinetic energy. The combined measurements of the cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum and fraction provide a unique tool to constrain interpretation models. During the recent solar minimum activity period from July 2006 to December 2009 approximately 24500 positrons were observed. The results cannot be easily reconciled with purely secondary production and additional sources of either astrophysical or exotic origin may be required.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.2198  [pdf] - 698251
Cosmic-Ray Positron Identification with the PAMELA experiment
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures, v2: MLP variable description added, bibliography updated. A revised version will appear in proc. 33rd International Cosmic Ray Conference, Rio de Janeiro 2013
Submitted: 2013-06-10, last modified: 2013-07-25
The PAMELA satellite borne experiment is designed to study cosmic rays with great accuracy in a wide energy range. One of PAMELA's main goal is the study of the antimatter component of cosmic rays. The experiment, housed on board the Russian satellite Resurs-DK1, was launched on June 15th 2006 and it is still taking data. In this work we present the measurement of galactic positron energy spectrum in the energy range between 500 MeV and few hundred GeV.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.5420  [pdf] - 1166104
Measurement of the isotopic composition of hydrogen and helium nuclei in cosmic rays with the PAMELA experiment
Comments: 11 pages, 11 figures, 5 tables. To appear in Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2013-04-19
The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make new measurements of cosmic ray H and He isotopes. The isotopic composition was measured between 100 and 600 MeV/n for hydrogen and between 100 and 900 MeV/n for helium isotopes over the 23rd solar minimum from July 2006 to December 2007. The energy spectrum of these components carries fundamental information regarding the propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy which are competitive with those obtained from other secondary to primary measurements such as B/C.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.4108  [pdf] - 1159116
Time dependence of the proton flux measured by PAMELA during the July 2006 - December 2009 solar minimum
Comments: 17 pages, 5 figures, 1 table, to appear in Astrophysical Journal. Corrected two elements of Table 1
Submitted: 2013-01-17, last modified: 2013-01-21
The energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays carry fundamental information regarding their origin and propagation. These spectra, when measured near Earth, are significantly affected by the solar magnetic field. A comprehensive description of the cosmic radiation must therefore include the transport and modulation of cosmic rays inside the heliosphere. During the end of the last decade the Sun underwent a peculiarly long quiet phase well suited to study modulation processes. In this paper we present proton spectra measured from July 2006 to December 2009 by PAMELA. The large collected statistics of protons allowed the time variation to be followed on a nearly monthly basis down to 400 MV. Data are compared with a state-of-the-art three-dimensional model of solar modulation.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1107.4882  [pdf] - 392046
The discovery of geomagnetically trapped cosmic ray antiprotons
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJL
Submitted: 2011-07-25
The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of trapped protons at energies above some tens of MeV. This Letter reports the discovery of an antiproton radiation belt around the Earth. The trapped antiproton energy spectrum in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region has been measured by the PAMELA experiment for the kinetic energy range 60--750 MeV. A measurement of the atmospheric sub-cutoff antiproton spectrum outside the radiation belts is also reported. PAMELA data show that the magnetospheric antiproton flux in the SAA exceeds the cosmic-ray antiproton flux by three orders of magnitude at the present solar minimum, and exceeds the sub-cutoff antiproton flux outside radiation belts by four orders of magnitude, constituting the most abundant source of antiprotons near the Earth.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1107.4519  [pdf] - 1078152
Observations of the December 13 and 14, 2006, Solar Particle Events in the 80 MeV/n - 3 GeV/n range from space with PAMELA detector
Comments: Accepted for publication on Astrophysical journal
Submitted: 2011-07-22
We present the space spectrometer PAMELA observations of proton and helium fluxes during the December 13 and 14, 2006 solar particle events. This is the first direct measurement of the solar energetic particles in space with a single instrument in the energy range from $\sim$ 80 MeV/n up to $\sim$ 3 GeV/n. In the event of December 13 measured energy spectra of solar protons and helium were compared with results obtained by neutron monitors and other detectors. Our measurements show a spectral behaviour different from those derived from the neutron monitor network. No satisfactory analytical fitting was found for the energy spectra. During the first hours of the December 13 event solar energetic particles spectra were close to the exponential form demonstrating rather significant temporal evolution. Solar He with energy up to ~1 GeV/n was recorded on December 13. In the event of December 14 energy of solar protons reached ~600 MeV whereas maximum energy of He was below 100 MeV/n. The spectra were slightly bended in the lower energy range and preserved their form during the second event. Difference in the particle flux appearance and temporal evolution in these two events may argue for a special conditions leading to acceleration of solar particles up to relativistic energies.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1103.4055  [pdf] - 436233
PAMELA Measurements of Cosmic-ray Proton and Helium Spectra
Comments: 13 pages, 4 figures, link to SOM (with tables) in the references. This manuscript has been accepted for publication in Science. This version has not undergone final editing. Please refer to the complete version of record at http://www.sciencemag.org/ [www.sciencemag.org]
Submitted: 2011-03-21
Protons and helium nuclei are the most abundant components of the cosmic radiation. Precise measurements of their fluxes are needed to understand the acceleration and subsequent propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. We report precision measurements of the proton and helium spectra in the rigidity range 1 GV-1.2 TV performed by the satellite-borne experiment PAMELA. We find that the spectral shapes of these two species are different and cannot be well described by a single power law. These data challenge the current paradigm of cosmic-ray acceleration in supernova remnants followed by diffusive propagation in the Galaxy. More complex processes of acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays are required to explain the spectral structures observed in our data.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1103.2880  [pdf] - 382572
The cosmic-ray electron flux measured by the PAMELA experiment between 1 and 625 GeV
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in PRL
Submitted: 2011-03-15
Precision measurements of the electron component in the cosmic radiation provide important information about the origin and propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Here we present new results regarding negatively charged electrons between 1 and 625 GeV performed by the satellite-borne experiment PAMELA. This is the first time that cosmic-ray electrons have been identified above 50 GeV. The electron spectrum can be described with a single power law energy dependence with spectral index -3.18 +- 0.05 above the energy region influenced by the solar wind (> 30 GeV). No significant spectral features are observed and the data can be interpreted in terms of conventional diffusive propagation models. However, the data are also consistent with models including new cosmic-ray sources that could explain the rise in the positron fraction.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.0821  [pdf] - 903254
PAMELA results on the cosmic-ray antiproton flux from 60 MeV to 180 GeV in kinetic energy
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2010-07-06
The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make a new measurement of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio which extends previously published measurements down to 60 MeV and up to 180 GeV in kinetic energy. During 850 days of data acquisition approximately 1500 antiprotons were observed. The measurements are consistent with purely secondary production of antiprotons in the galaxy. More precise secondary production models are required for a complete interpretation of the results.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.3522  [pdf] - 902911
A statistical procedure for the identification of positrons in the PAMELA experiment
Comments: 27 pages, 11 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2010-01-20
The PAMELA satellite experiment has measured the cosmic-ray positron fraction between 1.5 GeV and 100 GeV. The need to reliably discriminate between the positron signal and proton background has required the development of an ad hoc analysis procedure. In this paper, a method for positron identification is described and its stability and capability to yield a correct background estimate is shown. The analysis includes new experimental data, the application of three different fitting techniques for the background sample and an estimate of systematic uncertainties due to possible inaccuracies in the background selection. The new experimental results confirm both solar modulation effects on cosmic-rays with low rigidities and an anomalous positron abundance above 10 GeV.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.2551  [pdf] - 24317
The PAMELA Space Experiment
Comments: Proceedings for the "XLIVth Rencontres de Moriond session devoted to Electroweak Interactions and Unified Theories", La Thuile 2009
Submitted: 2009-05-15
The 15th of June 2006, the PAMELA satellite-borne experiment was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome and it has been collecting data since July 2006. The apparatus comprises a time-of-flight system, a silicon-microstrip magnetic spectrometer, a silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter, an anticoincidence system, a shower tail counter scintillator and a neutron detector. The combination of these devices allows precision studies of the charged cosmic radiation to be conducted over a wide energy range (100 MeV -- 100's GeV) with high statistics. The primary scientific goal is the measurement of the antiproton and positron energy spectrum in order to search for exotic sources, such as dark matter particle annihilations. PAMELA is also searching for primordial antinuclei (anti-helium) and testing cosmic-ray propagation models through precise measurements of the anti-particle energy spectrum and precision studies of light nuclei and their isotopes. Moreover, PAMELA is investigating phenomena connected with solar and earth physics.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.4994  [pdf] - 17892
A new measurement of the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio up to 100 GeV in the cosmic radiation
Comments: 10 pages, 4 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2008-10-28, last modified: 2009-02-25
A new measurement of the cosmic ray antiproton-to-proton flux ratio between 1 and 100 GeV is presented. The results were obtained with the PAMELA experiment, which was launched into low-earth orbit on-board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. During 500 days of data collection a total of about 1000 antiprotons have been identified, including 100 above an energy of 20 GeV. The high-energy results are a ten-fold improvement in statistics with respect to all previously published data. The data follow the trend expected from secondary production calculations and significantly constrain contributions from exotic sources, e.g. dark matter particle annihilations.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.4995  [pdf] - 17893
Observation of an anomalous positron abundance in the cosmic radiation
Comments: Submitted to Nature, 20 pages, 5 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2008-10-28
Positrons are known to be produced in interactions between cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter ("secondary production"). Positrons may, however, also be created by dark matter particle annihilations in the galactic halo or in the magnetospheres of near-by pulsars. The nature of dark matter is one of the most prominent open questions in science today. An observation of positrons from pulsars would open a new observation window on these sources. Here we present results from the PAMELA satellite experiment on the positron abundance in the cosmic radiation for the energy range 1.5 - 100 GeV. Our high energy data deviate significantly from predictions of secondary production models, and may constitute the first indirect evidence of dark matter particle annihilations, or the first observation of positron production from near-by pulsars. We also present evidence that solar activity significantly affects the abundance of positrons at low energies.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.3830  [pdf] - 383919
Capability of the PAMELA Time-Of-Flight to identify light nuclei: results from a beam test calibration
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures, accepted for pubblication in NIMA
Submitted: 2008-10-21
PAMELA is a space telescope orbiting around the Earth since June 2006. The scientific objectives addressed by the mission are the measurement of the antiprotons and positrons spectra in cosmic rays, the hunt for anti-nuclei as well as the determination of light nuclei fluxes from Hydrogen to Oxygen in a wide energy range and with very high statistics. In this paper the charge discrimination capabilities of the PAMELA Time-Of-Flight system for light nuclei, determined during a beam test calibration, will be presented.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.3508  [pdf] - 17610
First Results from the PAMELA Space Mission
Comments: Parallel talk at ICHEP08, Philadelphia, USA, July 2008. 5 pages, LaTeX, 3 eps figures
Submitted: 2008-10-20
On the 15th of June 2006, the PAMELA satellite-borne experiment was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome and it has been collecting data since July 2006. The apparatus comprises a time-of-flight system, a silicon-microstrip magnetic spectrometer, a silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter, an anticoincidence system, a shower tail counter scintillator and a neutron detector. The combination of these devices allows precision studies of the charged cosmic radiation to be conducted over a wide energy range (100 MeV - 100's GeV) with high statistics. The primary scientific goal is the measurement of the antiproton and positron energy spectrum in order to search for exotic sources, such as dark matter particle annihilations. PAMELA is also searching for primordial antinuclei (anti-helium), and testing cosmic-ray propagation models through precise measurements of the antiparticle energy spectrum and precision studies of light nuclei and their isotopes. We review the status of the apparatus and present preliminary results concerning antiparticle measurements and dark-matter indirect searches.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:0708.1808  [pdf] - 3969
Launch of the Space experiment PAMELA
Comments: Accepted for publication on Advances in Space Research
Submitted: 2007-08-14
PAMELA is a satellite borne experiment designed to study with great accuracy cosmic rays of galactic, solar, and trapped nature in a wide energy range protons: 80 MeV-700 GeV, electrons 50 MeV-400 GeV). Main objective is the study of the antimatter component: antiprotons (80 MeV-190 GeV), positrons (50 MeV-270 GeV) and search for antimatter with a precision of the order of 10^-8). The experiment, housed on board the Russian Resurs-DK1 satellite, was launched on June, 15, 2006 in a 350*600 km orbit with an inclination of 70 degrees. The detector is composed of a series of scintillator counters arranged at the extremities of a permanent magnet spectrometer to provide charge, Time-of-Flight and rigidity information. Lepton/hadron identification is performed by a Silicon-Tungsten calorimeter and a Neutron detector placed at the bottom of the device. An Anticounter system is used offline to reject false triggers coming from the satellite. In self-trigger mode the Calorimeter, the neutron detector and a shower tail catcher are capable of an independent measure of the lepton component up to 2 TeV. In this work we describe the experiment, its scientific objectives and the performance in the first months after launch.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0608697  [pdf] - 84574
PAMELA - A Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics
Comments: Replaced some paragraphs in text and some pictures
Submitted: 2006-08-31, last modified: 2007-01-12
The PAMELA experiment is a satellite-borne apparatus designed to study charged particles in the cosmic radiation with a particular focus on antiparticles. PAMELA is mounted on the Resurs DK1 satellite that was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome on June 15th 2006. The PAMELA apparatus comprises a time-of-flight system, a magnetic spectrometer, a silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter, an anticoincidence system, a shower tail catcher scintillator and a neutron detector. The combination of these devices allows antiparticles to be reliably identified from a large background of other charged particles. This paper reviews the design, space qualification and on-ground performance of PAMELA. The in-orbit performance will be discussed in future publications.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0212253  [pdf] - 53643
The Cosmic-Ray Proton and Helium Spectra measured with the CAPRICE98 balloon experiment
Comments: To be published on Astroparticle Physics (44 pages, 13 figures, 5 tables)
Submitted: 2002-12-11
A new measurement of the primary cosmic-ray proton and helium fluxes from 3 to 350 GeV was carried out by the balloon-borne CAPRICE experiment in 1998. This experimental setup combines different detector techniques and has excellent particle discrimination capabilities allowing clear particle identification. Our experiment has the capability to determine accurately detector selection efficiencies and systematic errors associated with them. Furthermore, it can check for the first time the energy determined by the magnet spectrometer by using the Cherenkov angle measured by the RICH detector well above 20 GeV/n. The analysis of the primary proton and helium components is described here and the results are compared with other recent measurements using other magnet spectrometers. The observed energy spectra at the top of the atmosphere can be represented by (1.27+-0.09)x10^4 E^(-2.75+-0.02) particles (m^2 GeV sr s)^-1, where E is the kinetic energy, for protons between 20 and 350 GeV and (4.8+-0.8)x10^2 E^(-2.67+-0.06) particles (m^2 GeV nucleon^-1 sr s)^-1, where E is the kinetic energy per nucleon, for helium nuclei between 15 and 150 GeV nucleon^-1.