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Matteucci, Francesca

Normalized to: Matteucci, F.

264 article(s) in total. 807 co-authors, from 1 to 46 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 2,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.10226  [pdf] - 2098891
Predicted rates of merging neutron stars in galaxies
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-05-20
In this work, we compute rates of merging neutron stars (MNS) in galaxies of different morphological type, as well as the cosmic MNS rate in a unitary volume of the Universe adopting different cosmological scenarios. Our aim is to provide predictions of kilonova rates for future observations both at low and high redshift. In the adopted galaxy models, we take into account the production of r-process elements either by MNS or core-collapse supernovae. In computing the MNS rates we adopt either a constant total time delay for merging (10 Myr) or a distribution function of such delays. Our main conclusions are: i) the observed present time MNS rate in our Galaxy is well reproduced either with a constant time delay or a distribution function $\propto t^{-1}$. The [Eu/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relation in the Milky Way can be well reproduced with only MNS, if the time delay is short and constant. If the distribution function of delays is adopted, core-collapse supernovae as are also required. ii) The present time cosmic MNS rate can be well reproduced in any cosmological scenario, either pure luminosity evolution or a typical hierarchical one, and spirals are the main contributors to it. iii) The spirals are the major contributors to the cosmic MNS at all redshifts in hierarchical scenarios. In the pure luminosity evolution scenario, the spirals are the major contributors locally, whereas at high redshift ellipticals dominate. iv) The predicted cosmic MNS rate well agrees with the cosmic rate of short Gamma Ray Bursts if the distribution function of delays is adopted, in a cosmological hierarchical scenario observationally derived. v) Future observations of Kilonovae in ellipticals will allow to disentangle among constant or a distribution of time delays as well as among different cosmological scenarios.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.05717  [pdf] - 2093417
On the variation of carbon abundance in galaxies and its implications
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2020-05-12
The trends of chemical abundances and abundance ratios observed in stars of different ages, kinematics, and metallicities bear the imprints of several physical processes that concur to shape the host galaxy properties. By inspecting these trends, we get precious information on stellar nucleosynthesis, the stellar mass spectrum, the timescale of structure formation, the efficiency of star formation, as well as any inward or outward flows of gas. In this paper, we analyse recent determinations of carbon-to-iron and carbon-to-oxygen abundance ratios in different environments (the Milky Way and elliptical galaxies) using our latest chemical evolution models that implement up-to-date stellar yields and rely on the tight constraints provided by asteroseismic stellar ages (whenever available). A scenario where most carbon is produced by rotating massive stars, with yields largely dependent on the metallicity of the parent proto-star clouds, allows us to fit simultaneously the high-quality data available for the local Galactic components (thick and thin discs) and for microlensed dwarf stars in the Galactic bulge, as well as the abundance ratios inferred for massive elliptical galaxies. Yet, more efforts are needed from both observers and theoreticians in order to base these conclusions on firmer grounds.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.10133  [pdf] - 2089242
Heavy element evolution in the inner regions of the Milky Way
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2020-04-21
We present results for the evolution of the abundances of heavy elements (O, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Ni and Fe) in the inner Galactic regions ($R_{GC} < 4$kpc). We adopt a detailed chemical evolution model already tested for the Galactic bulge and compare the results with APOGEE data. We start with a set of yields from the literature which are considered the best to reproduce the abundance patterns in the solar vicinity. We find that in general the predicted trends nicely reproduce the data but in some cases either the trend or the absolute values of the predicted abundances need to be corrected, even by large factors, in order to reach the best agreement. We suggest how the current stellar yields should be modified to reproduce the data and we discuss whether such corrections are reasonable in the light of the current knowledge of stellar nucleosynthesis. However, we also critically discuss the observations. Our results suggest that Si, Ca, Cr and Ni are the elements for which the required corrections are the smallest, while for Mg and Al moderate modifications are necessary. On the other hand, O and K need the largest corrections to reproduce the observed patterns, a conclusion already reached for solar vicinity abundance patterns, with the exception of oxygen. For Mn we apply corrections already suggested in previous works. \end{abstract}
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.11085  [pdf] - 2093246
Detailed abundances in the Galactic center: Evidence of a metal-rich alpha-enhanced stellar population
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ, Figure 7 corrected
Submitted: 2020-03-24, last modified: 2020-03-26
We present a detailed study of the composition of 20 M giants in the Galactic center with 15 of them confirmed to be in the Nuclear Star Cluster. As a control sample we have also observed 7 M giants in the Milky Way Disk with similar stellar parameters. All 27 stars are observed using the NIRSPEC spectograph on the KECK II telescope in the K-band at a resolving power of R=23,000. We report the first silicon abundance trends versus [Fe/H] for stars in the Galactic center. While finding a disk/bulge like trend at subsolar metallicities, we find that [Si/Fe] is enhanced at supersolar metallicities. We speculate on possible enrichment scenarios to explain such a trend. However, the sample size is modest and the result needs to be confirmed by additional measurements of silicon and other \textalpha-elements. We also derive a new distribution of [Fe/H] and find the most metal rich stars at [Fe/H]=+0.5 dex, confirming our earlier conclusions that the Galactic center hosts no stars with extreme chemical composition.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.06832  [pdf] - 2076630
The influence of a top-heavy integrated galactic IMF and dust on the chemical evolution of high-redshift starbursts
Comments: 21 pages, 14 Figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-08-19, last modified: 2020-03-24
We study the effects of the integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF) and dust evolution on the abundance patterns of high redshift starburst galaxies. In our chemical models, the rapid collapse of gas clouds triggers an intense and rapid star formation episode, which lasts until the onset of a galactic wind, powered by the thermal energy injected by stellar winds and supernova explosions. Our models follow the evolution of several chemical elements (C, N, $\alpha$-elements and Fe) both in the gas and dust phases. %The most recent stellar yield and dust prescriptions are adopted. We test different values of $\beta$, the slope of the embedded cluster mass function for the IGIMF, where lower $\beta$ values imply a more top-heavy initial mass function (IMF). The computed abundances are compared to high-quality abundance measurements obtained in lensed galaxies and from composite spectra in large samples of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range $2 \lesssim z \lesssim 3$. The adoption of the IGIMF causes a sensible increase of the rate of star formation with respect to a standard Salpeter IMF, with a strong impact on chemical evolution. We find that in order to reproduce the observed abundance patterns in these galaxies, either we need a very top-heavy IGIMF ($\beta < 2$) or large amounts of dust. In particular, if dust is important, the IGIMF should have $\beta \ge 2$, which means an IMF slightly more top-heavy than the Salpeter one. The evolution of the dust mass with time for galaxies of different mass and IMF is also computed, highlighting that the dust amount increases with a top-heavier IGIMF.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.08450  [pdf] - 2055811
Chemical evolution of ultra-faint dwarf galaxies: testing the IGIMF
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-11-19, last modified: 2020-02-26
We test the integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF) on the chemical evolution of 16 ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies discussing in detail the results obtained for three of them: Bo\"otes I, Bo\"otes II and Canes Venatici I, taken as prototypes of the smallest and the largest UFDs. These objects have very small stellar masses ($\sim 10^3-10^4 \mathrm{M_{\odot}}$) and quite low metallicities ([Fe/H]$<-1.0$ dex). We consider four observational constraints: the present-day stellar mass, the [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relation, the stellar metallicity distribution function and the cumulative star formation history. Our model follows in detail the evolution of several chemical species (H, He, $\alpha$-elements and Fe). We take into account detailed nucleosynthesis and gas flows (in and out). Our results show that the IGIMF, coupled with the very low star formation rate predicted by the model for these galaxies ($\sim 10^{-4}-10^{-6}\ \mathrm{M_{\odot}yr^{-1}}$), cannot reproduce the main chemical properties, because it implies a negligible number of core-collapse SNe and even Type Ia SNe, the most important polluters of galaxies. On the other hand, a constant classical Salpeter IMF gives the best agreement with data, but we cannot exclude that other formulations of the IGIMF could reproduce the properties of these galaxies. Comparing with Galaxy data we suggest that UFDs could not be the building blocks of the entire Galactic halo, although more data are necessary to draw firmer conclusions.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.05735  [pdf] - 2047989
On the Origin of Dust in Galaxy Clusters at Low to Intermediate Redshift
Comments: MNRAS. Accepted on Feb 11th, 2020. 13 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-12, last modified: 2020-02-13
Stacked analyses of galaxy clusters at low-to-intermediate redshift show signatures attributable to dust, but the origin of this dust is uncertain. We test the hypothesis that the bulk of cluster dust derives from galaxy ejecta. To do so, we employ dust abundances obtained from detailed chemical evolution models of galaxies. We integrate the dust abundances over cluster luminosity functions (one-slope and two-slope Schechter functions). We consider both a hierarchical scenario of galaxy formation and an independent evolution of the three main galactic morphologies: elliptical/S0, spiral and irregular. We separate the dust residing within galaxies from the dust ejected in the intracluster medium. To the latter, we apply thermal sputtering. The model results are compared to low-to-intermediate redshift observations of dust masses. We find that in any of the considered scenarios, elliptical/S0 galaxies contribute negligibly to the present-time intracluster dust, despite producing the majority of gas-phase metals in galaxy clusters. Spiral galaxies, instead, provide both the bulk of the spatially-unresolved dust and of the dust ejected into the intracluster medium. The total dust-to-gas mass ratio in galaxy clusters amounts to $10^{-4}$, while the intracluster medium dust-to-gas mass ratio amounts to $10^{-6}$ at most. These dust abundances are consistent with the estimates of cluster observations at $0.2 < z <1$. We propose that galactic sources, spiral galaxies in particular, are the major contributors to the cluster dust budget.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.04271  [pdf] - 2030601
Modelling the chemical evolution of Zr, La, Ce and Eu in the Galactic discs and bulge
Comments: 8 pages, 2 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-11-11, last modified: 2020-01-09
We study the chemical evolution of Zr, La, Ce and Eu in the Milky Way discs and bulge by means of chemical evolution models compared with recent spectroscopic data. We consider detailed chemical evolution models for the Galactic thick disc, thin disc and bulge, which have been already tested to reproduce the observed [$\alpha$/Fe] vs [Fe/H] diagrams and metallicity distribution functions for the three different components, and we apply them to follow the evolution of neutron capture elements. In the [Eu/Fe] vs [Fe/H] diagram, we observe and predict three distinct sequences corresponding to the thick disc, thin disc and bulge, similarly to what happens for the $\alpha$-elements. We can nicely reproduce the three sequences by assuming different timescales of formation and star formation efficiencies for the three different components, with the thin disc forming on a longer timescale of formation with respect to the thick disc and bulge. On the other hand, in the [X/Fe] vs [Fe/H] diagrams for Zr, La and Ce, the three populations are mixed and also from the model point of view there is an overlapping between the predictions for the different Galactic components, but the observed behaviour can be also reproduced by assuming different star formation histories in the three components. In conclusions, it is straightforward to see how different star formation histories can lead to different abundance patterns and also looking at the abundance patterns of neutron capture elements can help in constraining the history of formation and evolution of the major Galactic components.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.06512  [pdf] - 2034527
Galactic archaeology at high redshift: inferring the nature of GRB host galaxies from abundances
Comments: 23 pages, 20 figures. Accepted for publication on ApJ. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1903.01353
Submitted: 2019-12-12
We identify the nature of high redshift long Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) host galaxies by comparing the observed abundance ratios in the interstellar medium with detailed chemical evolution models accounting for the presence of dust. We compare abundance data from long Gamma-Ray Bursts afterglow spectra to abundance patterns as predicted by our models for different galaxy types. We analyse [X/Fe] abundance ratios (where X is C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, Ni, Zn) as functions of [Fe/H]. Different galaxies (irregulars, spirals, spheroids) are, in fact, characterised by different star formation histories, which produce different [X/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relations ("time-delay model"). This allows us to identify the star formation history of the host galaxies and to infer their age (i.e. the time elapsed from the beginning of star formation) at the time of the GRB events. Unlike previous works, we use newer models in which we adopt updated stellar yields and prescriptions for dust production, accretion and destruction. We consider a sample of seven LGRB host galaxies. Our results suggest that two of them (GRB 050820, GRB 120815A) are star forming spheroids, two (GRB 081008, GRB 161023A) are spirals and three (GRB 090926A, GRB 050730, GRB 120327A) are irregulars. The inferred ages of the considered host galaxies span from 10 Myr to slightly more than 1 Gyr.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.10535  [pdf] - 1994248
Abundances of disk and bulge giants from high-resolution optical spectra -- IV. Zr, La, Ce, Eu
Comments: 14 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2019-09-23
Stellar mass and metallicity are factors that affect the neutron-capture process. Due to this, the enrichment of the ISM and the abundance of neutron-capture elements vary with time, making them suitable probes for the Galactic chemical evolution. In this work we make a differential comparison of neutron-capture element abundances determined in the local disk(s) and the bulge, focusing on minimising possible systematic effects in the analysis, with the aim of finding possible differences/similarities between the populations. Abundances are determined for Zr, La, Ce and Eu in 45 bulge giants and 291 local disk giants, from high-resolution optical spectra. The abundances are determined by fitting synthetic spectra using the SME-code. The disk sample is separated into thin/thick disk components using a combination of abundances and kinematics. We find flat Zr, La, Ce trends in the bulge, with a $\sim 0.1$ dex higher La abundance compared with the disk, possibly indicating a higher s-process contribution for La in the bulge. [Eu/Fe] decreases with increasing [Fe/H], with a plateau at around [Fe/H] $\sim -0.4$, pointing at similar enrichment as $\alpha$-elements in all populations. We find that the r-process dominated the neutron-capture production at early times both in the disks and bulge. [La/Eu] for the bulge are systematically higher than the thick disk, pointing to either a) a different amount of SN II or b) a different contribution of the s-process in the two populations. Considering [(La+Ce)/Zr], the bulge and the thick disk follow each other closely, suggesting a similar ratio of high/low mass asymptotic giant branch-stars.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.04378  [pdf] - 1958340
The contribution from rotating massive stars to the enrichment in Sr and Ba of the Milky Way
Comments: 13 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2019-09-10
Most neutron capture elements have a double production by r- and s-processes, but the question of production sites is complex and still open. Recent studies show that including stellar rotation can have a deep impact on nucleosynthesis. We studied the evolution of Sr and Ba in the Milky Way. A chemical evolution model was employed to reproduce the Galactic enrichment. We tested two different nucleosynthesis prescriptions for s-process in massive stars, adopted from the Geneva group and the Rome group. Rotation was taken into account, studying the effects of stars without rotation or rotating with different velocities. We also tested different production sites for the r-process: magneto rotational driven supernovae and neutron star mergers. The evolution of the abundances of Sr and Ba is well reproduced. The comparison with the most recent observations shows that stellar rotation is a good assumption, but excessive velocities result in overproduction of these elements. In particular, the predicted evolution of the [Sr/Ba] ratio at low metallicity does not explain the data at best if rotation is not included. Adopting different rotational velocities for different stellar mass and metallicity better explains the observed trends. Despite the differences between the two sets of adopted stellar models, both show a better agreement with the data assuming an increase of rotational velocity toward low metallicity. Assuming different r-process sources does not alter this conclusion.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.09130  [pdf] - 1966813
Evolution of lithium in the Milky Way halo, discs and bulge
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-06-21, last modified: 2019-08-29
In this work, we study the Galactic evolution of lithium by means of chemical evolution models in the light of the most recent spectroscopic data from Galactic stellar surveys. We consider detailed chemical evolution models for the Milky Way halo, discs and bulge, and we compare our model predictions with the most recent spectroscopic data for these different Galactic components. In particular, we focus on the decrease of lithium at high metallicity observed by the AMBRE Project, the Gaia-ESO Survey, and other spectroscopic surveys, which still remains unexplained by theoretical models. We analyse the various lithium producers and confirm that novae are the main source of lithium in the Galaxy, in agreement with other previous studies. Moreover, we show that, by assuming that the fraction of binary systems giving rise to novae is lower at higher metallicity, we can suggest a novel explanation to the lithium decline at super-solar metallicities: the above assumption is based on independent constraints on the nova system birthrate, that have been recently proposed in the literature. As regards to the thick disc, it is less lithium enhanced due to the shorter timescale of formation and higher star formation efficiency with respect to the thin disc and, therefore, we have a faster evolution and the "reverse knee" in the A(Li) vs. [Fe/H] relation is shifted towards higher metallicities. Finally, we present our predictions about lithium evolution in the Galactic bulge, that, however, still need further data to be confirmed or disproved.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.09476  [pdf] - 2007938
The evolution of CNO isotopes: the impact of massive stellar rotators
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures, 2 tables; submitted to MNRAS; comments welcome
Submitted: 2019-07-22
Chemical abundances and abundance ratios measured in galaxies provide precious information about the mechanisms, modes and time scales of the assembly of cosmic structures. Yet, the nucleogenesis and chemical evolution of elements heavier than helium are dictated mostly by the physics of the stars and the shape of the stellar mass spectrum. In particular, estimates of CNO isotopic abundances in the hot, dusty media of high-redshift starburst galaxies offer a unique glimpse into the shape of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in extreme environments that can not be accessed with direct observations (star counts). Underlying uncertainties in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis theory, however, may hurt our chances of getting a firm grasp of the IMF in these galaxies. In this work, we adopt new yields for massive stars, covering different initial rotational velocities. First, we implement the new yield set in a well-tested chemical evolution model for the Milky Way. The calibrated model is then adapted to the specific case of a prototype submillimeter galaxy (SMG). We show that, if the formation of fast-rotating stars is favoured in the turbulent medium of violently star-forming galaxies irrespective of metallicity, the IMF needs to be skewed towards high-mass stars in order to explain the CNO isotope ratios observed in SMGs. If, instead, stellar rotation becomes negligible beyond a given metallicity threshold, as is the case for our own Galaxy, there is no need to invoke a top-heavy IMF in starbursts.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.11196  [pdf] - 1929698
2D chemical evolution model: the impact of galactic disc asymmetries on azimuthal chemical abundance variations
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics (A&A), 17 pages, 18 Figures
Submitted: 2018-11-27, last modified: 2019-06-24
Galactic disc chemical evolution models generally ignore azimuthal surface density variation that can introduce chemical abundance azimuthal gradients. Recent observations, however, have revealed chemical abundance changes with azimuth in the gas and stellar components of both the Milky Way and external galaxies. To quantify the effects of spiral arm density fluctuations on the azimuthal variations of the oxygen and iron abundances in disc galaxies. We develop a new 2D galactic disc chemical evolution model, capable of following not just radial but also azimuthal inhomogeneities. The density fluctuations resulting from a Milky Way-like N-body disc formation simulation produce azimuthal variations in the oxygen abundance gradients of the order of 0.1 dex. Moreover, in agreement with the most recent observations in external galaxies, the azimuthal variations are more evident in the outer galactic regions. Using a simple analytical model, we show that the largest fluctuations with azimuth result near the spiral structure corotation resonance, where the relative speed between spiral and gaseous disc is the slowest. In conclusion we provided a new 2D chemical evolution model capable of following azimuthal density variations. Density fluctuations extracted from a Milky Way-like dynamical model lead to a scatter in the azimuthal variations of the oxygen abundance gradient in agreement with observations in external galaxies. We interpret the presence of azimuthal scatter at all radii by the presence of multiple spiral modes moving at different pattern speeds, as found in both observations and numerical simulations.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.12440  [pdf] - 1912787
The origin of stellar populations in the Galactic bulge from chemical abundances
Comments: 11 pages, 9 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-03-29, last modified: 2019-06-21
In this work, we study the formation and chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge with particular focus on the abundance pattern ([Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H]), metallicity and age distribution functions. We consider detailed chemical evolution models for the Galactic bulge and inner disc, with the aim of shedding light on the connection between these components and the origin of bulge stars. In particular, we first present a model assuming a fast and intense star formation, with the majority of bulge stars forming on a timescale less than 1 Gyr. Then we analyze the possibility of two distinct stellar populations in the bulge, as suggested by Gaia-ESO and APOGEE data. These two populations, one metal poor and the other metal rich, can have had two different origins: i) the metal rich formed after a stop of roughly 250 Myr in the star formation rate of the bulge, or ii) the metal rich population is made of stars formed in the inner disc and brought into the bulge by the early secular evolution of the bar. We also examine the case of multiple star bursts in the bulge with consequent formation of multiple populations, as suggested by studies of microlensed stars. After comparing model results and observations, we suggest that the most likely scenario is that there are two main stellar populations, both made mainly by old stars (> 10 Gyr), with the metal rich and younger one formed from inner thin disc stars, in agreement with kinematical arguments. However, on the basis of dynamical simulations, we cannot completely exclude that the second population formed after a stop in the star formation during the bulge evolution, so that all the stars formed in situ.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.03465  [pdf] - 1886541
The Fall of a Giant. Chemical evolution of Enceladus, alias the Gaia Sausage
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2019-03-08, last modified: 2019-05-12
We present the first chemical evolution model for Enceladus, alias the Gaia Sausage, to investigate the star formation history of one of the most massive satellites accreted by the Milky Way during a major merger event. Our best chemical evolution model for Enceladus nicely fits the observed stellar [$\alpha$/Fe]-[Fe/H] chemical abundance trends, and reproduces the observed stellar metallicity distribution function, by assuming low star formation efficiency, fast infall time scale, and mild outflow intensity. We predict a median age for Enceladus stars $12.33^{+0.92}_{-1.36}$ Gyr, and - at the time of the merger with our Galaxy ($\approx10$ Gyr ago from Helmi et al.) - we predict for Enceladus a total stellar mass $M_{\star} \approx 5 \times 10^{9}\,\text{M}_{\odot}$. By looking at the predictions of our best model, we discuss that merger events between the Galaxy and systems like Enceladus may have inhibited the gas accretion onto the Galaxy disc at high redshifts, heating up the gas in the halo. This scenario could explain the extended period of quenching in the star formation activity of our Galaxy about 10 Gyr ago, which is predicted by Milky Way chemical evolution models, in order to reproduce the observed bimodality in [$\alpha$/Fe]-[Fe/H] between thick- and thin-disc stars.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.05105  [pdf] - 1882573
From 'bathtub' galaxy evolution models to metallicity gradients
Comments: accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-03-12, last modified: 2019-04-26
We model gas phase metallicity radial profiles of galaxies in the local Universe by building on the `bathtub' chemical evolution formalism - where a galaxy's gas content is determined by the interplay between inflow, star formation and outflows. In particular, we take into account inside-out disc growth and add physically-motivated prescriptions for radial gradients in star formation efficiency (SFE). We fit analytical models against the metallicity radial profiles of low-redshift star-forming galaxies in the mass range $\log(M_\star/M_\odot)$ = [9.0-11.0] derived by Belfiore et al. 2017, using data from the MaNGA survey. The models provide excellent fits to the data and are capable of reproducing the change in shape of the radial metallicity profiles, including the flattening observed in the centres of massive galaxies. We derive the posterior probability distribution functions for the model parameters and find significant degeneracies between them. The parameters describing the disc assembly timescale are not strongly constrained from the metallicity profiles, while useful constrains are obtained for the SFE (and its radial dependence) and the outflow loading factor. The inferred value for the SFE is in good agreement with observational determinations. The inferred outflow loading factor is found to decrease with stellar mass, going from nearly unity at $\log(M_\star/M_\odot) = 9.0$ to close to zero at $\log(M_\star/M_\odot) =11.0$, in general agreement with previous empirical determinations. These values are the lowest we can obtain for a physically-motivated choice of initial mass function and metallicity calibration. We explore alternative choices which produce larger loading factors at all masses, up to order unity at the high-mass end.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.01660  [pdf] - 1846913
Explaining the decrease in ISM lithium at super-solar metallicities in the solar vicinity
Comments: A&A 623, A99 (2019). 5 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2019-02-05, last modified: 2019-03-12
We propose here that the lithium decrease at super-solar metallicities observed in high resolution spectroscopic surveys can be explained by the interplay of mixed populations, coming from the inner regions of the Milky Way disc. The lower lithium content of these stars is a consequence of inside-out disc formation, plus radial migration. In this framework, local stars with super-solar metallicities would have migrated to the solar vicinity and depleted their original lithium during their travel time. To arrive to such a result, we took advantage of the AMBRE catalog of lithium abundances combined with chemical evolution models which take into account the contribution to the lithium enrichment by different nucleosynthetic sources. A large proportion of migrated stars can explain the observed lower lithium abundance at super-solar metallicities. We stress that nowadays, there is no stellar model able to predict Li-depletion for such super-solar metallicity stars, and the Solar Li-depletion has to be assumed. In addition, it currently exists no solid quantitative estimate of the proportion of migrated stars in the Solar neighborhood and their travel time. Our results illustrate how important it is to properly include radial migration when comparing chemical evolution models to observations, and that in this case, the lithium decrease at larger metallicities does not necessarily imply that stellar yields have to be modified, contrary to previous claims in literature.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.01353  [pdf] - 1841687
The nature of GRB host galaxies from chemical abundances
Comments: 17 pages, 19 figures; submitted
Submitted: 2019-03-04
We try to identify the nature of high redshift long Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) host galaxies by comparing the observed abundance ratios in the interstellar medium with detailed chemical evolution models accounting for the presence of dust. We compared measured abundance data from LGRB afterglow spectra to abundance patterns as predicted by our models for different galaxy types. We analysed in particular [X/Fe] abundance ratios (where X is C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, Ni, Zn) as functions of [Fe/H]. Different galaxies (irregulars, spirals, ellipticals) are, in fact, characterised by different star formation histories, which produce different [X/Fe] ratios ("time-delay model"). This allows us to identify the morphology of the hosts and to infer their age (i.e. the time elapsed from the beginning of star formation) at the time of the GRB events, as well as other important parameters. Relative to previous works, we use newer models in which we adopt updated stellar yields and prescriptions for dust production, accretion and destruction. We have considered a sample of seven LGRB host galaxies. Our results have suggested that two of them (GRB 050820, GRB 120815A) are ellipticals, two (GRB 081008, GRB 161023A) are spirals and three (GRB 050730, GRB 090926A, GRB 120327A) are irregulars. We also found that in some cases changing the initial mass function can give better agreement with the observed data. The calculated ages of the host galaxies span from the order of 10 Myr to little more than 1 Gyr.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.03525  [pdf] - 1875207
Neutron Star Mergers Might not be the Only Source of r-Process Elements in the Milky Way
Comments: 29 pages, 10 figures, 1 table, re-submitted to ApJ (revised version)
Submitted: 2018-09-10, last modified: 2019-03-04
Probing the origin of r-process elements in the universe represents a multi-disciplinary challenge. We review the observational evidence that probe the properties of r-process sites, and address them using galactic chemical evolution simulations, binary population synthesis models, and nucleosynthesis calculations. Our motivation is to define which astrophysical sites have significantly contributed to the total mass of r-process elements present in our Galaxy. We found discrepancies with the neutron star (NS-NS) merger scenario. Assuming they are the only site, the decreasing trend of [Eu/Fe] at [Fe/H]\,$>-1$ in the disk of the Milky Way cannot be reproduced while accounting for the delay-time distribution (DTD) of coalescence times ($\propto~t^{-1}$) derived from short gamma-ray bursts and population synthesis models. Steeper DTD functions ($\propto~t^{-1.5}$) or power laws combined with a strong burst of mergers before the onset of Type~Ia supernovae can reproduce the [Eu/Fe] trend, but this scenario is inconsistent with the similar fraction of short gamma-ray bursts and Type~Ia supernovae occurring in early-type galaxies, and reduces the probability of detecting GW170817 in an early-type galaxy. One solution is to assume an extra production site of Eu that would be active in the early universe, but would fade away with increasing metallicity. If this is correct, this extra site could be responsible for roughly 50% of the Eu production in the early universe, before the onset of Type~Ia supernovae. Rare classes of supernovae could be this additional r-process source, but hydrodynamic simulations still need to ensure the conditions for a robust r-process pattern.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.02915  [pdf] - 1828935
Catching Element Formation In The Act
Fryer, Chris L.; Timmes, Frank; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Couture, Aaron; Adams, Fred; Aoki, Wako; Arcones, Almudena; Arnett, David; Auchettl, Katie; Avila, Melina; Badenes, Carles; Baron, Eddie; Bauswein, Andreas; Beacom, John; Blackmon, Jeff; Blondin, Stephane; Bloser, Peter; Boggs, Steve; Boss, Alan; Brandt, Terri; Bravo, Eduardo; Brown, Ed; Brown, Peter; Budtz-Jorgensen, Steve Bruenn. Carl; Burns, Eric; Calder, Alan; Caputo, Regina; Champagne, Art; Chevalier, Roger; Chieffi, Alessandro; Chipps, Kelly; Cinabro, David; Clarkson, Ondrea; Clayton, Don; Coc, Alain; Connolly, Devin; Conroy, Charlie; Cote, Benoit; Couch, Sean; Dauphas, Nicolas; deBoer, Richard James; Deibel, Catherine; Denisenkov, Pavel; Desch, Steve; Dessart, Luc; Diehl, Roland; Doherty, Carolyn; Dominguez, Inma; Dong, Subo; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Fan, Doreen; Fields, Brian; Fields, Carl; Filippenko, Alex; Fisher, Robert; Foucart, Francois; Fransson, Claes; Frohlich, Carla; Fuller, George; Gibson, Brad; Giryanskaya, Viktoriya; Gorres, Joachim; Goriely, Stephane; Grebenev, Sergei; Grefenstette, Brian; Grohs, Evan; Guillochon, James; Harpole, Alice; Harris, Chelsea; Harris, J. Austin; Harrison, Fiona; Hartmann, Dieter; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Heger, Alexander; Hernanz, Margarita; Herwig, Falk; Hirschi, Raphael; Hix, Raphael William; Hoflich, Peter; Hoffman, Robert; Holcomb, Cole; Hsiao, Eric; Iliadis, Christian; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Janka, Thomas; Jerkstrand, Anders; Johns, Lucas; Jones, Samuel; Jose, Jordi; Kajino, Toshitaka; Karakas, Amanda; Karpov, Platon; Kasen, Dan; Kierans, Carolyn; Kippen, Marc; Korobkin, Oleg; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Kozma, Cecilia; Krot, Saha; Kumar, Pawan; Kuvvetli, Irfan; Laird, Alison; Laming, Martin; Larsson, Josefin; Lattanzio, John; Lattimer, James; Leising, Mark; Lennarz, Annika; Lentz, Eric; Limongi, Marco; Lippuner, Jonas; Livne, Eli; Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole; Longland, Richard; Lopez, Laura A.; Lugaro, Maria; Lutovinov, Alexander; Madsen, Kristin; Malone, Chris; Matteucci, Francesca; McEnery, Julie; Meisel, Zach; Messer, Bronson; Metzger, Brian; Meyer, Bradley; Meynet, Georges; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Miller, Jonah; Miller, Richard; Milne, Peter; Misch, Wendell; Mitchell, Lee; Mosta, Philipp; Motizuki, Yuko; Muller, Bernhard; Mumpower, Matthew; Murphy, Jeremiah; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Nakar, Ehud; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Nugent, Peter; Nunes, Filomena; O'Shea, Brian; Oberlack, Uwe; Pain, Steven; Parker, Lucas; Perego, Albino; Pignatari, Marco; Pinedo, Gabriel Martinez; Plewa, Tomasz; Poznanski, Dovi; Priedhorsky, William; Pritychenko, Boris; Radice, David; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Rauscher, Thomas; Reddy, Sanjay; Rehm, Ernst; Reifarth, Rene; Richman, Debra; Ricker, Paul; Rijal, Nabin; Roberts, Luke; Ropke, Friedrich; Rosswog, Stephan; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Ruiz, Chris; Savin, Daniel Wolf; Schatz, Hendrik; Schneider, Dieter; Schwab, Josiah; Seitenzahl, Ivo; Shen, Ken; Siegert, Thomas; Sim, Stuart; Smith, David; Smith, Karl; Smith, Michael; Sollerman, Jesper; Sprouse, Trevor; Spyrou, Artemis; Starrfield, Sumner; Steiner, Andrew; Strong, Andrew W.; Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Suntzeff, Nick; Surman, Rebecca; Tanimori, Toru; The, Lih-Sin; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Tolstov, Alexey; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tomsick, John; Townsley, Dean; Tsintari, Pelagia; Tsygankov, Sergey; Vartanyan, David; Venters, Tonia; Vestrand, Tom; Vink, Jacco; Waldman, Roni; Wang, Lifang; Wang, Xilu; Warren, MacKenzie; West, Christopher; Wheeler, J. Craig; Wiescher, Michael; Winkler, Christoph; Winter, Lisa; Wolf, Bill; Woolf, Richard; Woosley, Stan; Wu, Jin; Wrede, Chris; Yamada, Shoichi; Young, Patrick; Zegers, Remco; Zingale, Michael; Zwart, Simon Portegies
Comments: 14 pages including 3 figures
Submitted: 2019-02-07
Gamma-ray astronomy explores the most energetic photons in nature to address some of the most pressing puzzles in contemporary astrophysics. It encompasses a wide range of objects and phenomena: stars, supernovae, novae, neutron stars, stellar-mass black holes, nucleosynthesis, the interstellar medium, cosmic rays and relativistic-particle acceleration, and the evolution of galaxies. MeV gamma-rays provide a unique probe of nuclear processes in astronomy, directly measuring radioactive decay, nuclear de-excitation, and positron annihilation. The substantial information carried by gamma-ray photons allows us to see deeper into these objects, the bulk of the power is often emitted at gamma-ray energies, and radioactivity provides a natural physical clock that adds unique information. New science will be driven by time-domain population studies at gamma-ray energies. This science is enabled by next-generation gamma-ray instruments with one to two orders of magnitude better sensitivity, larger sky coverage, and faster cadence than all previous gamma-ray instruments. This transformative capability permits: (a) the accurate identification of the gamma-ray emitting objects and correlations with observations taken at other wavelengths and with other messengers; (b) construction of new gamma-ray maps of the Milky Way and other nearby galaxies where extended regions are distinguished from point sources; and (c) considerable serendipitous science of scarce events -- nearby neutron star mergers, for example. Advances in technology push the performance of new gamma-ray instruments to address a wide set of astrophysical questions.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.00914  [pdf] - 1842346
Galactic Archaeology with asteroseismic ages: evidence for delayed gas infall in the formation of the Milky Way disc
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A; 20 pages, 20 figures
Submitted: 2018-09-04, last modified: 2019-01-29
Precise stellar ages from asteroseismology have become available and can help setting stronger constraints on the evolution of the Galactic disc components. Recently, asteroseismology has confirmed a clear age difference in the solar annulus between two distinct sequences in the [$\alpha$/Fe] versus [Fe/H] abundance ratios relation: the high-$\alpha$ and low-$\alpha$ stellar populations. We aim at reproducing these new data with chemical evolution models including different assumptions for the history and number of accretion events. We tested two different approaches: a revised version of the `two-infall' model where the high-$\alpha$ phase forms by a fast gas accretion episode and the low-$\alpha$ sequence follows later from a slower gas infall rate, and the parallel formation scenario where the two disc sequences form coevally and independently. The revised `two-infall' model including uncertainties in age and metallicity is capable of reproducing: i) the [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] abundance relation at different Galactic epochs, ii) the age$-$metallicity relation and the time evolution [$\alpha$/Fe]; iii) the age distribution of the high-$\alpha$ and low-$\alpha$ stellar populations, iv) the metallicity distribution function. The parallel approach is not capable of properly reproduce the stellar age distribution, in particular at old ages. In conclusion, the best chemical evolution model is the revised `two-infall' one, where a consistent delay of $\sim$4.3 Gyr in the beginning of the second gas accretion episode is a crucial assumption to reproduce stellar abundances and ages.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.02732  [pdf] - 1868053
A new delay time distribution for merging neutron stars tested against Galactic and cosmic data
Comments: 17 pages, 14 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-01-07
The merging of two neutron stars (MNS) is thought to be the source of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRB) and gravitational wave transients, as well as the main production site of r-process elements like Eu. We have derived a new delay time distribution (DTD) for MNS systems from theoretical considerations and we have tested it against (i) the SGRB redshift distribution and (ii) the Galactic evolution of Eu and Fe, in particular the [Eu/Fe] vs [Fe/H] relation. For comparison, we also tested other DTDs, as proposed in the literature. To address the first item, we have convolved the DTD with the cosmic star formation rate, while for the second we have employed a detailed chemical evolution model of the Milky Way. We have also varied the DTD of Type Ia SNe (the main Fe producers), the contribution to Eu production from core-collapse SNe, as well as explored the effect of a dependence on the metallicity of the occurrence probability of MNS. Our main results can be summarized as follows: (i) the SGRB redshift distribution can be fitted using DTDs for MNS that produce average timescales of 300-500 Myr; (ii) if the MNS are the sole producers of the Galactic Eu and the occurrence probability of MNS is constant the Eu production timescale must be on the order of <30 Myr; (iii) allowing for the Eu production in core-collapse SNe, or adopting a metallicity-dependent occurrence probability, allow us to reproduce both observational constraints, but many uncertainties are still present in both assumptions.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.06841  [pdf] - 1790719
Is the IMF in ellipticals bottom-heavy? Clues from their chemical abundances
Comments: 24 pages, 25 figures, accepted for publication on MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-05-17, last modified: 2018-11-15
We tested the implementation of different IMFs in our model for the chemical evolution of ellipticals, with the aim of reproducing the observed relations of [Fe/H] and [Mg/Fe] abundances with galaxy mass in a sample of early-type galaxies selected from the SPIDER-SDSS catalog. Abundances in the catalog were derived from averaged spectra, obtained by stacking individual spectra according to central velocity dispersion, as a proxy of galaxy mass. We tested initial mass functions already used in a previous work, as well as two new models, based on low-mass tapered ("bimodal") IMFs, where the IMF becomes either (1) bottom-heavy in more massive galaxies, or (2) is time-dependent, switching from top-heavy to bottom-heavy in the course of galactic evolution. We found that observations could only be reproduced by models assuming either a constant, Salpeter IMF, or a time-dependent distribution, as other IMFs failed. We further tested the models by calculating their M/L ratios. We conclude that a constant, time-independent bottom-heavy IMF does not reproduce the data, especially the increase of the $[\alpha/Fe]$ ratio with galactic stellar mass, whereas a variable IMF, switching from top to bottom-heavy, can match observations. For the latter models, the IMF switch always occurs at the earliest possible considered time, i.e. $t_{\text{switch}}= 0.1$ Gyr.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.11415  [pdf] - 1747932
Abundance gradients along the Galactic disc from chemical evolution models
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-05-28, last modified: 2018-09-10
In this paper, we study the formation and chemical evolution of the Milky Way disc with particular focus on the abundance patterns ([$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H]) at different Galactocentric distances, the present-time abundance gradients along the disc and the time evolution of abundance gradients. We consider the chemical evolution models for the Galactic disc developed by Grisoni et al. (2017) for the solar neighborhood, both the two-infall and the one-infall ones, and we extend our analysis to the other Galactocentric distances. In particular, we examine the processes which mainly influence the formation of the abundance gradients: the inside-out scenario, a variable star formation efficiency, and radial gas flows. We compare our model results with recent abundance patterns obtained along the Galactic disc from the APOGEE survey and with abundance gradients observed from Cepheids, open clusters, HII regions and PNe. We conclude that the inside-out scenario is a key ingredient, but cannot be the only one to explain abundance patterns at different Galactocentric distances and abundance gradients. Further ingredients, such as radial gas flows and variable star formation efficiency, are needed to reproduce the observed features in the thin disc. The evolution of abundance gradients with time is also shown, although firm conclusions cannot still be drawn.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.01280  [pdf] - 1709513
Stellar populations dominated by massive stars in dusty starburst galaxies across cosmic time
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures. Authors' version. Published online by Nature on 04 June 2018. For extra pptx slides prepared for this work, please see http://www.roe.ac.uk/~rji/IMF_Zhang_2018_slides.pptx
Submitted: 2018-06-04
All measurements of cosmic star formation must assume an initial distribution of stellar masses -- the stellar initial mass function -- in order to extrapolate from the star-formation rate measured for typically rare, massive stars (> 8 Msun) to the total star-formation rate across the full stellar mass spectrum. The shape of the stellar initial mass function in various galaxy populations underpins our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies across cosmic time. Classical determinations of the stellar initial mass function in local galaxies are traditionally made at ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared wavelengths, which cannot be probed in dust-obscured galaxies, especially in distant starbursts, whose apparent star-formation rates are hundreds to thousands of times higher than in our Milky Way, selected at submillimetre (rest-frame far-infrared) wavelengths. The 13C/18O abundance ratio in the cold molecular gas -- which can be probed via the rotational transitions of the 13CO and C18O isotopologues -- is a very sensitive index of the stellar initial mass function, with its determination immune to the pernicious effects of dust. Here we report observations of 13CO and C18O emission for a sample of four dust-enshrouded starbursts at redshifts of approximately two to three, and find unambiguous evidence for a top-heavy stellar initial mass function in all of them. A low 13CO/C18O ratio for all our targets -- alongside a well-tested, detailed chemical evolution model benchmarked on the Milky Way -- implies that there are considerably more massive stars in starburst events than in ordinary star-forming spiral galaxies. This can bring these extraordinary starbursts closer to the `main sequence' of star-forming galaxies, though such main-sequence galaxies may not be immune to changes in initial stellar mass function, depending upon their star-formation densities.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.05701  [pdf] - 1724903
The $^{7}$Be(n,p)$^{7}$Li reaction and the Cosmological Lithium Problem: measurement of the cross section in a wide energy range at n_TOF (CERN)
Damone, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Mastromarco, M.; Mengoni, A.; Cosentino, L.; Maugeri, E.; Heinitz, S.; Schumann, D.; Dressler, R.; Käppeler, F.; Colonna, N.; Finocchiaro, P.; Andrzejewski, J.; Perkowski, J.; Gawlik, A.; Aberle, O.; Altstadt, S.; Ayranov, M.; Audouin, L.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea-Correa, J.; Ballof, J.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Bellia, G.; Bernardes, A. P.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Borge, M. J. G.; Bosnar, D.; Brown, A.; Brugger, M.; Busso, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Catherall, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y. H.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cristallo, S.; Diakaki, M.; Dietz, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dorsival, A.; Dupont, E.; Duran, I.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Furman, W.; Ganesan, S.; García-Rio, A.; Gilardoni, S.; Glodariu, T.; Göbel, K.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Goodacre, T. D.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Johnston, K.; Kadi, Y.; Kalamara, A.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kohester, U.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kurtulgil, D.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer-Woods, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Meo, S. Lo; Lonsdale, S. J.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Marsh, B.; Martíne, T.; Correia, J. G. Martins; Masi, A.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Matteucci, F.; Mazzone, A.; Mendoza, E.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Musumarra, A.; Negret, A.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Piersanti, L.; Piscopo, M.; Plompen, A.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Radeck, D.; Rajeev, K.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Rothe, S.; Rout, P.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schell, J.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Sedyshev, P.; Seiffert, C.; Smith, A. G.; Sosnin, N. V.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Stora, T.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wolf, C.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-03-15
We report on the measurement of the $^{7}$Be($n, p$)$^{7}$Li cross section from thermal to approximately 325 keV neutron energy, performed in the high-flux experimental area (EAR2) of the n_TOF facility at CERN. This reaction plays a key role in the lithium yield of the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) for standard cosmology. The only two previous time-of-flight measurements performed on this reaction did not cover the energy window of interest for BBN, and showed a large discrepancy between each other. The measurement was performed with a Si-telescope, and a high-purity sample produced by implantation of a $^{7}$Be ion beam at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. While a significantly higher cross section is found at low-energy, relative to current evaluations, in the region of BBN interest the present results are consistent with the values inferred from the time-reversal $^{7}$Li($p, n$)$^{7}$Be reaction, thus yielding only a relatively minor improvement on the so-called Cosmological Lithium Problem (CLiP). The relevance of these results on the near-threshold neutron production in the p+$^{7}$Li reaction is also discussed.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.04439  [pdf] - 1614842
The effects of the IMF on the chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies
Comments: 14 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-10-12, last modified: 2017-11-27
We describe the use of our chemical evolution model to reproduce the abundance patterns observed in a catalog of elliptical galaxies from the SDSS DR4. The model assumes ellipticals form by fast gas accretion, and suffer a strong burst of star formation followed by a galactic wind which quenches star formation. Models with fixed IMF failed in simultaneously reproducing the observed trends with the galactic mass. So, we tested a varying IMF; contrary to the diffused claim that the IMF should become bottom heavier in more massive galaxies, we find a better agreement with data by assuming an inverse trend, where the IMF goes from being bottom heavy in less massive galaxies to top heavy in more massive ones. This naturally produces a downsizing in star formation, favoring massive stars in largest galaxies. Finally, we tested the use of the Integrated Galactic IMF, obtained by averaging the canonical IMF over the mass distribution function of the clusters where star formation is assumed to take place. We combined two prescriptions, valid for different SFR regimes, to obtain the IGIMF values along the whole evolution of the galaxies in our models. Predicted abundance trends reproduce the observed slopes, but they have an offset relative to the data. We conclude that bottom-heavier IMFs do not reproduce the properties of the most massive ellipticals, at variance with previous suggestions. On the other hand, an IMF varying with galactic mass from bottom-heavier to top-heavier should be preferred
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.09671  [pdf] - 1666781
Fluorine in the Solar Neighborhood: Chemical Evolution Models
Comments: 10 pages, 10 figure. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-11-27
In the light of the new observational data related to fluorine abundances in the solar neighborhood stars, we present here chemical evolution models testing different fluorine nucleosynthesis prescriptions with the aim to best fit those new data related to the abundance ratios [F/O] vs. [O/H] and [F/Fe] vs. [Fe/H]. The adopted chemical evolution models are: i) the classical "two-infall" model which follows the chemical evolution of halo-thick disk and thin disk phases, ii) and the "one-infall" model designed only for the thin disk evolution. We tested the effects on the predicted fluorine abundance ratios of different nucleosynthesis yield sources: AGB stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, Type II and Type Ia supernovae, and novae. We find that the fluorine production is dominated by AGB stars but the Wolf-Rayet stars are required to reproduce the trend of the observed data in the solar neighborhood by J\"onsson et al. (2017a) with our chemical evolution models. In particular, the best model both for the "two-infall" and "one-infall" cases requires an increase by a factor of two of the Wolf-Rayet yields given by Meynet & Arnould (2000). We also show that the novae, even if their yields are still uncertain, could help to better reproduce the secondary behavior of F in the [F/O] vs. [O/H] relation. The inclusion of the fluorine production by Wolf-Rayet stars seems to be essential to reproduce the observed ratio [F/O] vs [O/H] in the solar neighborhood by J\"onsson et al. (2017a). Moreover, the inclusion of novae helps substantially to reproduce the observed fluorine secondary behavior.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.04553  [pdf] - 1630247
Near-infrared spectroscopic observations of massive young stellar object candidates in the Central Molecular Zone
Comments: 12 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-11-13
We present a spectroscopic follow-up of photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the Central Molecular Zone of the Galactic center. Our goal is to quantify the contamination of this YSO sample by reddened giant stars with circumstellar envelopes and to determine the star formation rate in the CMZ. We obtained KMOS low-resolution near-infrared spectra (R ~4000) between 2.0 and 2.5 um of sources, many of them previously identified, by mid-infrared photometric criteria, as massive YSOs in the Galactic center. Our final sample consists of 91 stars with good signal-to-noise ratio. We separate YSOs from cool late-type stars based on spectral features of CO and Br_gamma at 2.3 um and 2.16 um respectively. We make use of SED model fits to the observed photometric data points from 1.25 to 24 um in order to estimate approximate masses for the YSOs. Using the spectroscopically identified YSOs in our sample, we confirm that existing colour-colour diagrams and colour-magnitude diagrams are unable to efficiently separate YSOs and cool late-type stars. In addition, we define a new colour-colour criterion that separates YSOs from cool late-type stars in the H-Ks vs H-[8.0] diagram. We use this new criterion to identify YSO candidates in the |l| < 1.5, |b|<0.5 degree region and use model SED fits to estimate their approximate masses. By assuming an appropriate initial mass function (IMF) and extrapolating the stellar IMF down to lower masses, we determine a star formation rate (SFR) of ~0.046 +/- 0.026 Msun/yr assuming an average age of 0.75 +/- 0.25 Myr for the YSOs. This value is lower than estimates found using the YSO counting method in the literature. Our SFR estimate in the CMZ agrees with the previous estimates from different methods and reaffirms that star formation in the CMZ is proceeding at a lower rate than predicted by various star forming models.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.02614  [pdf] - 1584425
The AMBRE Project: chemical evolution models for the Milky Way thick and thin discs
Comments: 12 pages, 10 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-06-08, last modified: 2017-08-29
We study the chemical evolution of the thick and thin discs of the Galaxy by comparing detailed chemical evolution models with recent data from the AMBRE Project. The data suggest that the stars in the thick and thin discs form two distinct sequences with the thick disc stars showing higher [{\alpha}/Fe] ratios. We adopt two different approaches to model the evolution of thick and thin discs. In particular, we adopt: i) a two-infall approach where the thick disc forms fast and before the thin disc and by means of a fast gas accretion episode, whereas the thin disc forms by means of a second accretion episode on a longer timescale; ii) a parallel approach, where the two discs form in parallel but at different rates. By comparing our model results with the observed [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] and the metallicity distribution functions in the two Galactic components, we conclude that the parallel approach can account for a group of {\alpha}-enhanced metal rich stars present in the data, whereas the two-infall approach cannot explain these stars unless they are the result of stellar migration. In both approaches, the thick disc has formed on a timescale of accretion of 0.1 Gyr, whereas the thin disc formed on a timescale of 7 Gyr in the solar region. In the two-infall approach a gap in star formation between the thick and thin disc formation of several hundreds of Myr should be present, at variance with the parallel approach where no gap is present.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.06784  [pdf] - 1586212
The cosmic dust rate across the Universe
Comments: 15 pages, 7 figures. Accepted for publication by MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-07-21, last modified: 2017-08-11
We investigate the evolution of interstellar dust in the Universe by means of chemical evolution models of galaxies of different morphological types, reproducing the main observed features of present day galaxies. We adopt the most updated prescriptions for dust production from supernovae and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars as well as for dust accretion and destruction processes. Then, we study the cosmic dust rate in the framework of three different cosmological scenarios for galaxy formation: i) a pure luminosity scenario (PLE), ii) a number density evolution scenario (DE), as suggested by the classical hierarchical clustering scenario and iii) an alternative scenario, in which both spirals and ellipticals are allowed to evolve in number on an observationally motivated basis. Our results give predictions about the evolution of the dust content in different galaxies as well as the cosmic dust rate as a function of redshift. Concerning the cosmic dust rate, the best scenario is the alternative one, which predicts a peak at 2 < z < 3 and reproduces the cosmic star formation rate. We compute the evolution of the comoving dust density parameter {\Omega} dust and find agreement with data for z < 0.5 in the framework of DE and alternative scenarios. Finally, the evolution of the average cosmic metallicity is presented and it shows a quite fast increase in each scenario, reaching the solar value at the present time, although most of the heavy elements are incorporated into solid grains, and therefore not observable in the gas phase.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.07450  [pdf] - 1736167
Origin of the Galactic Halo: accretion vs. in situ formation
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, to appear in Proceedings of IAU Symposium 334 "Rediscovering our Galaxy" in Potsdam (Germany), July 10-14, 2017
Submitted: 2017-07-24, last modified: 2017-07-25
We test the hypothesis that the classical and ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal satellites of the our Galaxy have been the building blocks of the Galactic halo by comparing their [O/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] patterns with the ones observed in Galactic halo stars. The [O/Fe] ratio deviates substantially from the observed abundance ratios in the Galactic halo stars for [Fe/H] > -2 dex, while they overlap for lower metallicities. On the other hand, for the neutron capture elements, the discrepancy is extended at all the metallicities, suggesting that the majority of stars in the halo are likely to have been formed in situ. We present the results for a model considering the effects of an enriched gas stripped from dwarf satellites on the chemical evolution of the Galactic halo. We find that the resulting chemical abundances of the halo stars depend on the adopted infall time-scale, and the presence of a threshold in the gas for star formation.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.06701  [pdf] - 1582774
The evolution of CNO isotopes: a new window on cosmic star-formation history and the stellar IMF in the age of ALMA
Comments: 15 pages, 7 figures, MNRAS in press (the accepted version match the one already available from the arXiv)
Submitted: 2017-04-21, last modified: 2017-05-29
We use state-of-the-art chemical models to track the cosmic evolution of the CNO isotopes in the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies, yielding powerful constraints on their stellar initial mass function (IMF). We re-assess the relative roles of massive stars, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and novae in the production of rare isotopes such as 13C, 15N, 17O and 18O, along with 12C, 14N and 16O. The CNO isotope yields of super-AGB stars, novae and fast-rotating massive stars are included. Having reproduced the available isotope enrichment data in the solar neighbourhood, and across the Galaxy, and having assessed the sensitivity of our models to the remaining uncertainties, e.g. nova yields and star-formation history, we show that we can meaningfully constrain the stellar IMF in galaxies using C, O and N isotope abundance ratios. In starburst galaxies, where data for multiple isotopologue lines are available, we find compelling new evidence for a top-heavy stellar IMF, with profound implications for their star-formation rates and efficiencies, perhaps also their stellar masses. Neither chemical fractionation nor selective photodissociation can significantly perturb globally-averaged isotopologue abundance ratios away from the corresponding isotope ones, as both these processes will typically affect only small mass fractions of molecular clouds in galaxies. Thus the Atacama Large Millimetre Array now stands ready to probe the stellar IMF, and even the ages of specific starburst events in star-forming galaxies across cosmic time unaffected by the dust obscuration effects that plague optical/near-infrared studies.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.09596  [pdf] - 1871369
The chemical evolution of the Milky Way
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, in Frontier Research in Astrophysics - II 23-28 May 2016 Mondello (Palermo), Italy
Submitted: 2017-05-26
We will discuss some highlights concerning the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, the Milky Way. First we will describe the main ingredients necessary to build a model for the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. Then we will illustrate some Milky Way models which includes detailed stellar nucleosynthesis and compute the evolution of a large number of chemical elements, including C, N, O, $\alpha$-elements, Fe and heavier. The main observables and in particular the chemical abundances in stars and gas will be considered. A comparison theory-observations will follow and finally some conclusions from this astroarchaeological approach will be derived.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.06449  [pdf] - 1583574
The connection between the Galactic halo and ancient Dwarf Satellites
Comments: To appear in Proceeding of Science: Frontier Research in Astrophysics - II 23-28 May 2016 Mondello (Palermo), Italy
Submitted: 2017-05-18
We explore the hypothesis that the classical and ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way have been the building blocks of the Galactic halo by comparing their [O/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] versus [Fe/H] patterns with the ones observed in Galactic halo stars. Oxygen abundances deviate substantially from the observed abundances in the Galactic halo stars for [Fe/H] values larger than -2 dex, while they overlap for lower metallicities. On the other hand, for the [Ba/Fe] ratio the discrepancy is extended at all [Fe/H] values, suggesting that the majority of stars in the halo are likely to have been formed in situ. Therefore, we suggest that [Ba/Fe] ratios are a better diagnostic than [O/Fe] ratios. Moreover, we show the effects of an enriched infall of gas with the same chemical abundances as the matter ejected and/or stripped from dwarf satellites of the Milky Way on the chemical evolution of the Galactic halo. We find that the resulting chemical abundances of the halo stars depend on the assumed infall time scale, and the presence of a threshold in the gas for star formation.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.01297  [pdf] - 1583064
The Galactic habitable zone around M and FGK stars with chemical evolution models with dust
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A, 10 pages 6 figures
Submitted: 2017-05-03, last modified: 2017-05-09
The Galactic habitable zone is defined as the region with highly enough metallicity to form planetary systems in which Earth-like planets could be born and might be capable of sustaining life surviving to the destructive effects of nearby supernova explosion events. Galactic chemical evolution models can be useful tools for studying the galactic habitable zones in different systems. Our aim here is to find the Galactic habitable zone using chemical evolution models for the Milky Way disc, adopting the most recent prescriptions for the evolution of dust and for the probability of finding planetary systems around M and FGK stars. Moreover, for the first time, we will express those probabilities in terms of the dust-to-gas ratio of the ISM in the solar neighborhood as computed by detailed chemical evolution models. At a fixed Galactic time and Galactocentric distance we determine the number of M and FGK stars having Earths (but no gas giant planets) which survived supernova explosions, using the formalism of our Paper I. The probabilities of finding terrestrial planets but not gas giant planets around M stars deviate substantially from the ones around FGK stars for supersolar values of [Fe/H]. For both FGK and M stars the maximum number of stars hosting habitable planets is at 8 kpc from the Galactic Centre, if destructive effects by supernova explosions are taken into account. At the present time the total number of M stars with habitable planets are $\simeq$ 10 times the number of FGK stars. Moreover, we provide a sixth order polynomial fit (and a linear one but more approximated) for the relation found with chemical evolution models in the solar neighborhood between the [Fe/H] abundances and the dust-to-gas ratio.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.07214  [pdf] - 1567050
The nova V1369 Cen -- a short review
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, 2 tables. To appear in the proceedings of the conference "The Golden Age of Cataclysmic Variables and Related Objects - III" held in Palermo, Italy, 7-12 September 2015
Submitted: 2017-04-24
We briefly present the spectroscopic evolution of the recent outburst of the classical nova V1369 Cen, and the presence of a narrow absorption line identified as due to the resonance of neutral lithium at 6708 \AA. We also discuss the consequences for the chemical evolution of lithium in the Galaxy.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.03325  [pdf] - 1582482
The Gaia-ESO Survey: Exploring the complex nature and origins of the Galactic bulge populations
Comments: Accepted in A&A 30 March 2017
Submitted: 2017-04-11
Abridged: We used the fourth internal data release of the Gaia-ESO survey to characterize the bulge chemistry, spatial distribution, kinematics, and to compare it chemically with the thin and thick disks. The sample consist on ~2500 red clump stars in 11 bulge fields ($-10^\circ\leq l\leq+8^\circ$ and $-10^\circ\leq b\leq-4^\circ$), and a set of ~6300 disk stars selected for comparison. The bulge MDF is confirmed to be bimodal across the whole sampled area, with metal-poor stars dominating at high latitudes. The metal-rich stars exhibit bar-like kinematics and display a bimodality in their magnitude distribution, a feature which is tightly associated with the X-shape bulge. They overlap with the metal-rich end of the thin disk sequence in the [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plane. Metal-poor bulge stars have a more isotropic hot kinematics and do not participate in the X-shape bulge. With similar Mg-enhancement levels, the position of the metal-poor bulge sequence "knee" is observed at [Fe/H]$_{knee}=-0.37\pm0.09$, being 0.06 dex higher than that of the thick disk. It suggests a higher SFR for the bulge than for the thick disk. Finally, we present a chemical evolution model that suitably fits the whole bulge sequence by assuming a fast ($<1$ Gyr) intense burst of stellar formation at early epochs. We associate metal-rich stars with the B/P bulge formed from the secular evolution of the early thin disk. On the other hand, the metal-poor subpopulation might be the product of an early prompt dissipative collapse dominated by massive stars. Nevertheless, our results do not allow us to firmly rule out the possibility that these stars come from the secular evolution of the early thick disk. This is the first time that an analysis of the bulge MDF and $\alpha$-abundances has been performed in a large area on the basis of a homogeneous, fully spectroscopic analysis of high-resolution, high S/N data.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.05603  [pdf] - 1530718
New analytical solutions for chemical evolution models: characterizing the population of star-forming and passive galaxies
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures, A&A in press
Submitted: 2016-05-18, last modified: 2017-02-16
Analytical models of chemical evolution, including inflow and outflow of gas, are important tools to study how the metal content in galaxies evolves as a function of time. In this work, we present new analytical solutions for the evolution of the gas mass, total mass and metallicity of a galactic system, when a decaying exponential infall rate of gas and galactic winds are assumed. We apply our model to characterize a sample of local star-forming and passive galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, with the aim of reproducing their observed mass-metallicity relation; in this way, we can derive how the two populations of star-forming and passive galaxies differ in their particular distribution of ages, formation time scales, infall masses and mass loading factors. We find that the local passive galaxies are on average older and assembled on shorter typical time-scales than the local star-forming ones; on the other hand, the larger mass star-forming galaxies show generally older ages and longer typical formation time-scales compared with the smaller mass star-forming galaxies. Finally, we conclude that the local star-forming galaxies experience stronger galactic winds than the passive galaxy population. We explore the effect of assuming different initial mass functions in our model, showing that to reproduce the observed mass-metallicity relation stronger winds are requested if the initial mass function is top-heavy. Finally, our analytical models predict the assumed sample of local galaxies to lie on a tight surface in the 3D space defined by stellar metallicity, star formation rate and stellar mass, thus mimicking the well-known "fundamental relation".
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.08469  [pdf] - 1530901
A simple and general method for solving detailed chemical evolution with delayed production of iron and other chemical elements
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-06-27, last modified: 2016-12-23
We present a theoretical method for solving the chemical evolution of galaxies, by assuming an instantaneous recycling approximation for chemical elements restored by massive stars and the Delay Time Distribution formalism for the delayed chemical enrichment by Type Ia Supernovae. The galaxy gas mass assembly history, together with the assumed stellar yields and initial mass function, represent the starting point of this method. We derive a simple and general equation which closely relates the Laplace transforms of the galaxy gas accretion history and star formation history, which can be used to simplify the problem of retrieving these quantities in the galaxy evolution models assuming a linear Schmidt-Kennicutt law. We find that - once the galaxy star formation history has been reconstructed from our assumptions - the differential equation for the evolution of the chemical element $X$ can be suitably solved with classical methods. We apply our model to reproduce the [O/Fe] and [Si/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] chemical abundance patterns as observed at the solar neighborhood, by assuming a decaying exponential infall rate of gas and different delay time distributions for Type Ia Supernovae; we also explore the effect of assuming a nonlinear Schmidt-Kennicutt law, with the index of the power law being $k=1.4$. Although approximate, we conclude that our model with the single degenerate scenario for Type Ia Supernovae provides the best agreement with the observed set of data. Our method can be used by other complementary galaxy stellar population synthesis models to predict also the chemical evolution of galaxies.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.04384  [pdf] - 1533359
Fluorine in the Solar neighborhood: No evidence for the neutrino process
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-12-13, last modified: 2016-12-16
Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are known to produce `cosmic' fluorine but it is uncertain whether these stars are the main producers of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood or if any of the other proposed formation sites, type II supernovae and/or Wolf-Rayet stars, are more important. Recent articles have proposed both Asymptotic Giant Branch stars as well as type II supernovae as the dominant sources of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood. In this paper we set out to determine the fluorine abundance in a sample of 49 nearby, bright K-giants for which we previously have determined the stellar parameters as well as alpha abundances homogeneously from optical high-resolution spectra. The fluorine abundance is determined from a 2.3 $\mu$m HF molecular line observed with the spectrometer Phoenix. We compare the fluorine abundances with those of alpha elements mainly produced in type II supernovae and find that fluorine and the alpha-elements do not evolve in lock-step, ruling out type II supernovae as the dominating producers of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood. Furthermore, we find a secondary behavior of fluorine with respect to oxygen, which is another evidence against the type II supernovae playing a large role in the production of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood. This secondary behavior of fluorine will put new constraints on stellar models of the other two suggested production sites: Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and Wolf-Rayet stars.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.08979  [pdf] - 1528342
The dust-to-stellar mass ratio as a valuable tool to probe the evolution of local and distant star forming galaxies
Comments: 15 pages, 4 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-10-27
The survival of dust grains in galaxies depends on various processes. Dust can be produced in stars, it can grow in the interstellar medium and be destroyed by astration and interstellar shocks. In this paper, we assemble a few data samples of local and distant star-forming galaxies to analyse various dust-related quantities in low and high redshift galaxies, to study how the relations linking the dust mass to the stellar mass and star formation rate evolve with redshift. We interpret the available data by means of chemical evolution models for discs and proto-spheroid (PSPH) starburst galaxies. In particular, we focus on the dust-to-stellar mass (DTS) ratio, as this quantity represents a true measure of how much dust per unit stellar mass survives the various destruction processes in galaxies and is observable. The theoretical models outline the strong dependence of this quantity on the underlying star formation history. Spiral galaxies are characterised by a nearly constant DTS as a function of the stellar mass and cosmic time, whereas PSPHs present an early steep increase of the DTS, which stops at a maximal value and decreases in the latest stages. In their late starburst phase, these models show a decrease of the DTS with their mass, which allows us to explain the observed anti-correlation between the DTS and the stellar mass. The observed redshift evolution of the DTS ratio shows an increase from z~0 to z~1, followed by a roughly constant behaviour at 1<z<2.5. Our models indicate a steep decrease of the global DTS at early times, which implies an expected decrease of the DTS at larger redshift.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.03833  [pdf] - 1483573
A new galactic chemical evolution model with dust: results for dwarf irregular galaxies and DLA systems
Comments: Accepted for publication by MNRAS, 20 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2016-09-13
We present a galactic chemical evolution model which adopts updated prescriptions for all the main processes governing the dust cycle. We follow in detail the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species (C, O, S, Si, Fe and Zn) in the gas and dust of a typical dwarf irregular galaxy. The dwarf irregular galaxy is assumed to evolve with a low but continuous level of star formation and experience galactic winds triggered by supernova explosions. We predict the evolution of the gas to dust ratio in such a galaxy and discuss critically the main processes involving dust, such as dust production by AGB stars and Type II SNe, destruction and accretion (gas condensation in clouds). We then apply our model to Damped Lyman-Alpha systems which are believed to be dwarf irregulars, as witnessed by their abundance patterns. Our main conclusions are: i) we can reproduce the observed gas to dust ratio in dwarf galaxies. ii) We find that the process of dust accretion plays a fundamental role in the evolution of dust and in certain cases it becomes the dominant process in the dust cycle. On the other hand, dust destruction seems to be a negligible process in irregulars. iii) Concerning Damped Lyman-Alpha systems, we show that the observed gas-phase abundances of silicon, normalized to volatile elements (zinc and sulfur), are in agreement with our model. iv) The abundances of iron and silicon in DLA systems suggest that the two elements undergo a different history of dust formation and evolution. Our work casts light on the nature of iron-rich dust: the observed depletion pattern of iron is well reproduced only when an additional source of iron dust is considered. Here we explore the possibility of a contribution from Type Ia SNe as well as an efficient accretion of iron nano-particles.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.03606  [pdf] - 1443955
Lighting up stars in chemical evolution models: the CMD of Sculptor
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-05-11
We present a novel approach to draw the synthetic color-magnitude diagram of galaxies, which can provide - in principle - a deeper insight in the interpretation and understanding of current observations. In particular, we `light up' the stars of chemical evolution models, according to their initial mass, metallicity and age, to eventually understand how the assumed underlying galaxy formation and evolution scenario affects the final configuration of the synthetic CMD. In this way, we obtain a new set of observational constraints for chemical evolution models beyond the usual photospheric chemical abundances. The strength of our method resides in the very fine grid of metallicities and ages of the assumed database of stellar isochrones. In this work, we apply our photo-chemical model to reproduce the observed CMD of the Sculptor dSph and find that we can reproduce the main features of the observed CMD. The main discrepancies are found at fainter magnitudes in the main sequence turn-off and sub-giant branch, where the observed CMD extends towards bluer colors than the synthetic one; we suggest that this is a signature of metal-poor stellar populations in the data, which cannot be captured by our assumed one-zone chemical evolution model.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.00460  [pdf] - 1379005
Nitrogen and oxygen abundances in the Local Universe
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-03-01
We present chemical evolution models aimed at reproducing the observed (N/O) vs. (O/H) abundance pattern of star forming galaxies in the Local Universe. We derive gas-phase abundances from SDSS spectroscopy and a complementary sample of low-metallicity dwarf galaxies, making use of a consistent set of abundance calibrations. This collection of data clearly confirms the existence of a plateau in the (N/O) ratio at very low metallicity, followed by an increase of this ratio up to high values as the metallicity increases. This trend can be interpreted as due to two main sources of nitrogen in galaxies: i) massive stars, which produce small amounts of pure primary nitrogen and are responsible for the (N/O) ratio in the low metallicity plateau; ii) low- and intermediate-mass stars, which produce both secondary and primary nitrogen and enrich the interstellar medium with a time delay relative to massive stars, and cause the increase of the (N/O) ratio. We find that the length of the low-metallicity plateau is almost solely determined by the star formation efficiency, which regulates the rate of oxygen production by massive stars. We show that, to reproduce the high observed (N/O) ratios at high (O/H), as well as the right slope of the (N/O) vs. (O/H) curve, a differential galactic wind - where oxygen is assumed to be lost more easily than nitrogen - is necessary. No existing set of stellar yields can reproduce the observed trend without assuming differential galactic winds. Finally, considering the current best set of stellar yields, a bottom-heavy initial mass function is favoured to reproduce the data.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.00344  [pdf] - 1378999
Are ancient dwarf satellites the building blocks of the Galactic halo?
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-03-01
According to the current cosmological cold dark matter paradigm, the Galactic halo could have been the result of the assemblage of smaller structures. Here we explore the hypothesis that the classical and ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way have been the building blocks of the Galactic halo by comparing their [$\alpha$/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] versus [Fe/H] patterns with the ones observed in Galactic halo stars. The $\alpha$ elements deviate substantially from the observed abundances in the Galactic halo stars for [Fe/H] values larger than -2 dex, while they overlap for lower metallicities. On the other hand, for the [Ba/Fe] ratio the discrepancy is extended at all [Fe/H] values, suggesting that the majority of stars in the halo are likely to have been formed in situ. Therefore, we suggest that [Ba/Fe] ratios are a better diagnostic than [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios. Moreover, for the first time we consider the effects of an enriched infall of gas with the same chemical abundances as the matter ejected and/or stripped from dwarf satellites of the Milky Way on the chemical evolution of the Galactic halo. We find that the resulting chemical abundances of the halo stars depend on the assumed infall time scale, and the presence of a threshold in the gas for star formation. In particular, in models with an infall timescale for the halo around 0.8 Gyr coupled with a threshold in the surface gas density for the star formation (4 $\mathrm{M}_{\odot}\,\mathrm{pc}^{-2}$), and the enriched infall from dwarf spheroidal satellites, the first halo stars formed show [Fe/H]$>$-2.4 dex. In this case, to explain [$\alpha$/Fe] data for stars with [Fe/H]$<$-2.4 dex we need stars formed in dSph systems.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.01004  [pdf] - 1400443
Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, Lecture delivered at "The 8th European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics" 13-20 September 2015, Santa Tecla (Italy)
Submitted: 2016-02-02
In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galaxies. I will show how, from these comparisons, one can derive important constraints on stellar nucleosynthesis and galaxy formation mechanisms. Most of the concepts described in this lecture can be found in the monograph by Matteucci (2012).
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.08300  [pdf] - 1327388
Modern yields per stellar generation: the effect of the IMF
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS, 9 pages, 6 figures, 3 tables; revised version appearing in the Journal (v2)
Submitted: 2015-03-28, last modified: 2015-11-03
Gaseous and stellar metallicities in galaxies are nowadays routinely used to constrain the evolutionary processes in galaxies. This requires the knowledge of the average yield per stellar generation, $y_{\text{Z}}$, i.e. the quantity of metals that a stellar population releases into the interstellar medium (ISM), which is generally assumed to be a fixed fiducial value. Deviations of the observed metallicity from the expected value of $y_{\text{Z}}$ are used to quantify the effect of outflows or inflows of gas, or even as evidence for biased metallicity calibrations or inaccurate metallicity diagnostics. Here we show that $\rm y_{\text{Z}}$ depends significantly on the Initial Mass Function (IMF), varying by up to a factor larger than three, for the range of IMFs typically adopted in various studies. Varying the upper mass cutoff of the IMF implies a further variation of $y_{\text{Z}}$ by an additional factor that can be larger than two. These effects, along with the variation of the gas mass fraction restored into the ISM by supernovae ($R$, which also depends on the IMF), may yield to deceiving results, if not properly taken into account. In particular, metallicities that are often considered unusually high can actually be explained in terms of yield associated with commonly adopted IMFs such as the Kroupa (2001) or Chabrier (2003). We provide our results for two different sets of stellar yields (both affected by specific limitations) finding that the uncertainty introduced by this assumption can be as large as $\sim0.2$ dex. Finally, we show that $y_{\text{Z}}$ is not substantially affected by the initial stellar metallicity as long as $\text{Z}> 10^{-3}~\text{Z}_{\odot}$.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.02622  [pdf] - 1331042
Chemical evolution of the inner 2 degrees of the Milky Way bulge: [alpha/Fe] trends and metallicity gradients
Comments: Accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2015-10-09
The structure, formation, and evolution of the Milky Way bulge is a matter of debate. Important diagnostics for discriminating between bulge models include alpha-abundance trends with metallicity, and spatial abundance and metallicity gradients. Due to the severe optical extinction in the inner Bulge region, only a few detailed investigations have been performed of this region. Here we aim at investigating the inner 2 degrees by observing the [alpha/Fe] element trends versus metallicity, and by trying to derive the metallicity gradient. [alpha/Fe] and metallicities have been determined by spectral synthesis of 2 micron spectra observed with VLT/CRIRES of 28 M-giants, lying along the Southern minor axis at (l,b)=(0,0), (0,-1), and (0,-2). VLT/ISAAC spectra are used to determine the effective temperature of the stars. We present the first connection between the Galactic Center and the Bulge using similar stars, high spectral resolution, and analysis techniques. The [alpha/Fe] trends in all our 3 fields show a large similarity among each other and with trends further out in the Bulge, with a lack of an [\alpha/Fe] gradient all the way into the centre. This suggests a homogeneous Bulge when it comes to the enrichment process and star-formation history. We find a large range of metallicities (-1.2<[Fe/H]<+0.3), with a lower dispersion in the Galactic center: -0.2<[Fe/H]<+0.3. The derived metallicities get in the mean, progressively higher the closer to the Galactic plane they lie. We could interpret this as a continuation of the metallicity gradient established further out in the Bulge, but due to the low number of stars and possible selection effects, more data of the same sort as presented here is necessary to conclude on the inner metallicity gradient from our data alone. Our results firmly argues for the center being in the context of the Bulge rather than very distinct.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.08048  [pdf] - 1259089
Early optical spectra of nova V1369 Cen show presence of Lithium
Comments: 6 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in ApJLetters
Submitted: 2015-06-26
We present early high resolution spectroscopic observations of the nova V1369 Cen. We have detected an absorption feature at 6695.6 \AA\, that we have identified as blue--shifted $^7$Li I $\lambda$6708 \AA. The absorption line, moving at -550 km/s, was observed in five high-resolution spectra of the nova obtained at different epochs. On the basis of the intensity of this absorption line we infer that a single nova outburst can inject in the Galaxy $M_{Li} =$ 0.3 - 4.8 $\times 10^{-10}$ M$_{\odot}$. Given the current estimates of Galactic nova rate, this amount is sufficient to explain the puzzling origin of the overabundance of Lithium observed in young star populations.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.4137  [pdf] - 1296056
Progenitors of Supernovae Type Ia and Chemical Enrichment in Hydrodynamical Simulations -I. The Single Degenerate Scenario
Comments: 19 pages, 6 figures, 1 table. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-02-17, last modified: 2015-06-19
The nature of the Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) progenitors remains still uncertain. This is a major issue for galaxy evolution models since both chemical and energetic feedback play a major role in the gas dynamics, star formation and therefore in the overall stellar evolution. The progenitor models for the SNIa available in the literature propose different distributions for regulating the explosion times of these events. These functions are known as the Delay Time Distributions (DTDs). This work is the first one in a series of papers aiming at studying five different DTDs for SNIa. Here, we implement and analyse the Single Degenerate scenario (SD) in galaxies dominated by a rapid quenching of the star formation, displaying the majority of the stars concentrated in the bulge component. We find a good fit to both the present observed SNIa rates in spheroidal dominated galaxies, and to the [O/Fe] ratios shown by the bulge of the Milky Way. Additionally, the SD scenario is found to reproduce a correlation between the specific SNIa rate and the specific star formation rate, which closely resembles the observational trend, at variance with previous works. Our results suggest that SNIa observations in galaxies with very low and very high specific star formation rates can help to impose more stringent constraints on the DTDs and therefore on SNIa progenitors.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.08949  [pdf] - 1232144
Chemical evolution of the Galactic Center
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-03-31
In recent years, the Galactic Center (GC) region (200 pc in radius) has been studied in detail with spectroscopic stellar data as well as an estimate of the ongoing star formation rate. The aims of this paper are to study the chemical evolution of the GC region by means of a detailed chemical evolution model and to compare the results with high resolution spectroscopic data in order to impose constraints on the GC formation history.The chemical evolution model assumes that the GC region formed by fast infall of gas and then follows the evolution of alpha-elements and Fe. We test different initial mass functions (IMFs), efficiencies of star formation and gas infall timescales. To reproduce the currently observed star formation rate, we assume a late episode of star formation triggered by gas infall/accretion. We find that, in order to reproduce the [alpha/Fe] ratios as well as the metallicity distribution function observed in GC stars, the GC region should have experienced a main early strong burst of star formation, with a star formation efficiency as high as 25 Gyr^{-1}, occurring on a timescale in the range 0.1-0.7 Gyr, in agreement with previous models of the entire bulge. Although the small amount of data prevents us from drawing firm conclusions, we suggest that the best IMF should contain more massive stars than expected in the solar vicinity, and the last episode of star formation, which lasted several hundred million years, should have been triggered by a modest episode of gas infall/accretion, with a star formation efficiency similar to that of the previous main star formation episode. This last episode of star formation produces negligible effects on the abundance patterns and can be due to accretion of gas induced by the bar. Our results exclude an important infall event as a trigger for the last starburst.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.02954  [pdf] - 1043152
The role of neutron star mergers in the chemical evolution of the Galactic halo
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures, A&A in press, v2: minor changes
Submitted: 2015-03-10, last modified: 2015-03-26
Aims. We explore the problem of the site of production of Eu. We use also the information present in the observed spread in the Eu abundances in the early Galaxy, not only its average trend. Moreover, we extend to other heavy elements (Ba, Sr, Rb, Zr) our investigations to provide additional constraints to our results. Methods. We adopt a stochastic chemical evolution model taking into account inhomogeneous mixing. The adopted yields of Eu from neutron star mergers (NSM) and from core-collapse supernovae (SNII) are those that are able to explain the average [Eu/Fe]-[Fe/H] trend observed for solar neighborhood stars, in the framework of a well-tested homogeneous model for the chemical evolution of the MilkyWay. Rb, Sr, Zr, and Ba are produced by both the s- and r-process. The s-process contribution by spinstars is the same as in our previous papers. Results. NSM that merge in less than 10 Myr or NSM combined with a source of r-process generated by massive stars can explain the spread of [Eu/Fe] in the Galactic halo. The combination of r-process production by NSM and s-process production by spinstars is able to reproduce the available observational data for Sr, Zr and Ba. We also show the first predictions for Rb in the Galactic halo. Conclusions. We confirm previous results that either NSM with very short time scale or both NSM and at least a fraction of SNII should have contributed to the synthesis of Eu in the Galaxy. The r-process production by NSM - complemented by an s-process production by spinstars - provide results compatible with our previous findings based on other r-process sites. We critically discuss the weak and strong points of both NSM and SNII scenarios for producing Eu and eventually suggest that the best solution is probably a mixed one in which both sources produce Eu. In fact, this scenario better reproduces the scatter observed in all the studied elements. [abridged]
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.05221  [pdf] - 1224488
The IGIMF and other IMFs in dSphs: the case of Sagittarius
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS, 16 pages, 16 figures; typos fixed and references updated (v2); Fig. 16 revised (v3); version matching the one appearing on the electronic Journal
Submitted: 2015-02-18, last modified: 2015-03-20
We have studied the effects of various initial mass functions (IMFs) on the chemical evolution of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). In particular, we tested the effects of the integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF) on various predicted abundance patterns. The IGIMF depends on the star formation rate and metallicity and predicts less massive stars in a regime of low star formation, as it is the case in dwarf spheroidals. We adopted a detailed chemical evolution model following the evolution of $\alpha$-elements, Fe and Eu, and assuming the currently best set of stellar yields. We also explored different yield prescriptions for the Eu, including production from neutron star mergers. Although the uncertainties still present in the stellar yields and data prevent us from drawing firm conclusions, our results suggest that the IGIMF applied to Sgr predicts lower [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios than classical IMFs and lower [hydrostatic/explosive] $\alpha$-element ratios, in qualitative agreement with observations. In our model, the observed high [Eu/O] ratios in Sgr is due to reduced O production, resulting from the IGIMF mass cutoff of the massive oxygen-producing stars, as well as to the Eu yield produced in neutron star mergers, a more promising site than core-collapse supernovae, although many uncertainties are still present in the Eu nucleosynthesis. We find that a model, similar to our previous calculations, based on the late addition of iron from the Type Ia supernova time-delay (necessary to reproduce the shape of [X/Fe] versus [Fe/H] relations) but also including the reduction of massive stars due to the IGIMF, better reproduces the observed abundance ratios in Sgr than models without the IGIMF.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.03686  [pdf] - 1224412
Are z>2 Herschel galaxies proto-spheroids?
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ; 26 pages; 13 figures
Submitted: 2015-02-12
We present a backward approach for the interpretation of the evolution of the near-infrared and the far-infrared luminosity functions across the redshift range 0<z<3. In our method, late-type galaxies are treated by means of a parametric phenomenological method based on PEP/HerMES data up to z~4, whereas spheroids are described by means of a physically motivated backward model. The spectral evolution of spheroids is modelled by means of a single-mass model, associated to a present-day elliptical with K-band luminosity comparable to the break of the local early-type luminosity function. The formation of proto-spheroids is assumed to occurr across the redshift range 1< z < 5. The key parameter is represented by the redshift z_0.5 at which half proto-spheroids are already formed. A statistical study indicates for this parameter values between z_0.5=1.5 and z_0.5=3. We assume as fiducial value z_0.5~2, and show that this assumption allows us to describe accourately the redshift distributions and the source counts. By assuming z_0.5 ~ 2 at the far-IR flux limit of the PEP-COSMOS survey, the PEP-selected sources observed at z>2 can be explained as progenitors of local spheroids caught during their formation. We also test the effects of mass downsizing by dividing the spheroids into three populations of different present-day stellar masses. The results obtained in this case confirm the validity of our approach, i.e. that the bulk of proto-spheroids can be modelled by means of a single model which describes the evolution of galaxies at the break of the present-day early type K-band LF.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.5797  [pdf] - 1215822
The effect of stellar migration on Galactic chemical evolution: a heuristic approach
Comments: Accepted for publication by ApJ
Submitted: 2014-07-22, last modified: 2015-02-09
In the last years, stellar migration in galactic discs has been the subject of several investigations. However, its impact on the chemical evolution of the Milky Way still needs to be fully quantified. In this paper, we aim at imposing some constraints on the significance of this phenomenon by considering its influence on the chemical evolution of the Milky Way thin disc. We do not investigate the physical mechanisms underlying the migration of stars. Rather, we introduce a simple, heuristic treatment of stellar migration in a detailed chemical evolution model for the thin disc of the Milky Way, which already includes radial gas flows and reproduces several observational constraints for the solar vicinity and the whole Galactic disc. When stellar migration is implemented according to the results of chemo-dynamical simulations by Minchev et. al. (2013) and finite stellar velocities of 1 km s$^{-1}$ are taken into account, the high-metallicity tail of the metallicity distribution function of long-lived thin-disc stars is well reproduced. By exploring the velocity space, we find that the migrating stars must travel with velocities in the range 0.5 -2 km s$^{-1}$ to properly reproduce the high-metallicity tail of the metallicity distribution. We confirm previous findings by other authors that the observed spread in the age-metallicity relation of solar neighbourhood stars can be explained by the presence of stars which originated at different Galactocentric distances, and we conclude that the chemical properties of stars currently observed in the solar vicinity do suggest that stellar migration is present to some extent.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01836  [pdf] - 931991
The effect of radial gas flows on the chemical evolution of the Milky Way and M31
Comments: Accepted for publication in Proceedings of Science, XIII Nuclei in the Cosmos (7-11 July 2014, Debrecen, Hungary)
Submitted: 2015-02-06
We present detailed chemical evolution models for the Milky Way and M31 in presence of radial gas flows. These models follow in detail the evolution of several chemical elements (H, He, CNO, $\alpha$ elements, Fe-peak elements) in space and time. The contribution of supernovae of different type to chemical enrichment is taken into account. We find that an inside-out formation of the disks coupled with radial gas inflows of variable speed can reproduce very well the observed abundance gradients in both galaxies. We also discuss the effects of other parameters, such as a threshold in the gas density for star formation and efficiency of star formation varying with galactic radius. Moreover, for the first time we compute the galactic habitable zone in our Galaxy and M31 in presence of radial gas flows. The main effect is to enhance the number of stars hosting a habitable planet with respect to the models without radial flow, in the region of maximum probability for this occurrence. In the Milky Way the maximum number of stars hosting habitable planets is at 8 kpc from the Galactic center, and the model with radial gas flows predicts a number of planets which is 38% larger than that predicted by the classical model.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.8538  [pdf] - 1222907
The Chemical Evolution of Phosphorus
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal Letters. 6 pages, 4 figures; reference added to earlier version
Submitted: 2014-10-30, last modified: 2014-11-03
Phosphorus is one of the few remaining light elements for which little is known about its nucleosynthetic origin and chemical evolution, given the lack of optical absorption lines in the spectra of long-lived FGK-type stars. We have identified a P I doublet in the near-ultraviolet (2135/2136 A) that is measurable in stars of low metallicity. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope-STIS spectra, we have measured P abundances in 13 stars spanning -3.3 <= [Fe/H] <= -0.2, and obtained an upper limit for a star with [Fe/H] ~ -3.8. Combined with the only other sample of P abundances in solar-type stars in the literature, which spans a range of -1 <= [Fe/H] <= +0.2, we compare the stellar data to chemical evolution models. Our results support previous indications that massive-star P yields may need to be increased by a factor of a few to match stellar data at all metallicities. Our results also show that hypernovae were important contributors to the P production in the early universe. As P is one of the key building blocks of life, we also discuss the chemical evolution of the important elements to life, C-N-O-P-S, together.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.7257  [pdf] - 1222811
Chemical evolution of the bulge of M31: predictions about abundance ratios
Comments: Accepted for publication by MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-10-27
We aim at reproducing the chemical evolution of the bulge of M31 by means of a detailed chemical evolution model, including radial gas flows coming from the disk. We study the impact of the initial mass function, the star formation rate and the time scale for bulge formation on the metallicity distribution function of stars. We compute several models of chemical evolution using the metallicity distribution of dwarf stars as an observational constraint for the bulge of M31. Then, by means of the model which best reproduces the metallicity distribution function, we predict the [X/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relations for several chemical elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, C, N). Our best model for the bulge of M31 is obtained by means of a robust statistical method and assumes a Salpeter initial mass function, a Schmidt-Kennicutt law for star formation with an exponent k=1.5, an efficiency of star formation of $\sim 15\pm 0.27\, Gyr^{-1}$, and an infall timescale of $\sim 0.10\pm 0.03$Gyr. Our results suggest that the bulge of M31 formed very quickly by means of an intense star formation rate and an initial mass function flatter than in the solar vicinity but similar to that inferred for the Milky Way bulge. The [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios in the stars of the bulge of M31 should be high for most of the [Fe/H] range, as is observed in the Milky Way bulge. These predictions await future data to be proven.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.6905  [pdf] - 1215914
Chemical evolution models: GRB host identification and cosmic dust predictions
Comments: 15 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-07-25
The nature of some GRB host galaxies has been investigated by means of chemical evolution models of galaxies of different morphological type following the evolution of the abundances of H, He, C, N, O, $\alpha$-elements, Ni, Fe, Zn, and including also the evolution of dust. By comparing predictions with abundance data, we were able to constrain nature and age of GRB hosts. We also computed a theoretical cosmic dust rate, including stellar dust production, accretion and destruction, under the hypotheses of pure luminosity evolution and strong number density evolution of galaxies. We suggest that one of the three GRB hosts is a massive proto-spheroid catched during its formation, while for the other two the situation is more uncertain, although one could perhaps be a spheroid and the other a spiral galaxy. We estimated the chemical ages of the host galaxies which vary from 15 to 320 Myr. Concerning the cosmic effective dust production rate in an unitary volume of the Universe, our results show that in the case of pure luminosity evolution there is a first peak between redshift $z=8$ and $9$ and another at $z\sim 5$, whereas in the case of strong number density evolution it increases slightly from $z=10$ to $z\sim 2$ and then it decreases down to $z=0$. Finally, we found tha the total cosmic dust mass density at the present time is: $\Omega_{dust} \sim 3.5\cdot 10^{-5}$in the case of pure luminosity evolution and $\Omega_{dust} \sim 7\cdot 10^{-5}$ in the case of number density evolution.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.0615  [pdf] - 1648494
Chemical Evolution of M31
Comments: To be published in:"Lessons from the Local Group: A Conference in Honour of David Block and Bruce Elmegreen" Editors: Prof. Dr. Kenneth Freeman, Dr. Bruce Elmegreen, Prof. Dr. David Block, Matthew Woolway, Springer
Submitted: 2014-06-03
We review chemical evolution models developed for M31 as well as the abundance determinations available for this galaxy. Then we present a recent chemical evolution model for M31 including radial gas flows and galactic fountains along the disk, as well as a model for the bulge. Our models are predicting the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species such as H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca and Fe. From comparison between model predictions and observations we can derive some constraints on the evolution of the disk and the bulge of M31. We reach the conclusions that Andromeda must have evolved faster than the Milky Way and inside-out, and that its bulge formed much faster than the disk on a timescale $\leq$ 0.5 Gyr. Finally, we present a study where we apply the model developed for the disk of M31 in order to study the probability of finding galactic habitable zones in this galaxy.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.2476  [pdf] - 831915
Chemical evolution of classical and ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies
Comments: 19 pages, 14 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-04-09
We present updated chemical evolution models of two dwarf spheroidal galaxies (Sculptor and Carina) and the first detailed chemical evolution models of two ultra-faint dwarfs (Hercules and Bo\"otes I). Our results suggest that the dwarf spheroidals evolve with a low efficiency of star formation, confirming previous results, and the ultra-faint dwarfs with an even lower one. Under these assumptions, we can reproduce the stellar metallicity distribution function, the $[\alpha/Fe]$ vs. $[Fe/H]$ abundance patterns and the total stellar and gas masses observed at the present time in these objects. In particular, for the ultra-faint dwarfs we assume a strong initial burst of star formation, with the mass of the system being already in place at early times. On the other hand, for the classical dwarf spheroidals the agreement with the data is found by assuming the star formation histories suggested by the Color-Magnitude diagrams and a longer time-scale of formation via gas infall. We find that all these galaxies should experience galactic winds, starting in all cases before $1$ Gyr from the beginning of their evolution. From comparison with Galaxy data, we conclude that it is unlikely that the ultra-faint dwarfs have been the building blocks of the whole Galactic halo, although more data are necessary before drawing firm conclusions.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.2268  [pdf] - 1208283
The galactic habitable zone of the Milky Way and M31 from chemical evolution models with gas radial flows
Comments: Accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-03-10
The galactic habitable zone is defined as the region with sufficient abundance of heavy elements to form planetary systems in which Earth-like planets could be born and might be capable of sustaining life, after surviving to close supernova explosion events. Galactic chemical evolution models can be useful for studying the galactic habitable zones in different systems. We apply detailed chemical evolution models including radial gas flows to study the galactic habitable zones in our Galaxy and M31. We compare the results to the relative galactic habitable zones found with "classical" (independent ring) models, where no gas inflows were included. For both the Milky Way and Andromeda, the main effect of the gas radial inflows is to enhance the number of stars hosting a habitable planet with respect to the "classical" model results, in the region of maximum probability for this occurrence, relative to the classical model results. These results are obtained by taking into account the supernova destruction processes. In particular, we find that in the Milky Way the maximum number of stars hosting habitable planets is at 8 kpc from the Galactic center, and the model with radial flows predicts a number which is 38% larger than what predicted by the classical model. For Andromeda we find that the maximum number of stars with habitable planets is at 16 kpc from the center and that in the case of radial flows this number is larger by 10 % relative to the stars predicted by the classical model.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.1952  [pdf] - 782065
Women in Italian astronomy
Comments: 10 pages; document prepared for INAF-Astrophysical National Institute, Italy
Submitted: 2014-02-09
This document gives some quantitative facts about the role of women in Italian astronomy. More than 26% of Italian IAU members are women: this is the largest fraction among the world leading countries in astronomy. Most of this high fraction is due to their presence in INAF, where women make up 32% of the research staff (289 out of 908) and 40% of the technical/administrative staff (173 out of 433); the percentage is slightly lower among permanent research staff (180 out of 599, about 30%). The presence of women is lower in the Universities (27 out of 161, about 17%, among staff). In spite of these (mildly) positive facts, we notice that similarly to other countries (e.g. USA and Germany) career prospects for Italian astronomers are clearly worse for women than for men. Within INAF, the fraction of women is about 35-40% among non-permanent position, 36% for Investigators, 17% for Associato/Primo Ricercatore, and only 13% among Ordinario/Dirigente di Ricerca. The situation is even worse at University (only 6% of Professore Ordinario are women). We found that similar trends are also present if researchers are ordered according to citation rather than position: for instance, women make up only 15% among the 100 most cited astronomers working in Italy, a percentage which is however twice that over all Europe. A similar fraction is found among first authors of most influential papers, which cannot be explained as a residual of a lower female presence in the past. We conclude that implicit sex discrimination factors probably dominate over explicit ones and are still strongly at work. Finally, we discuss the possible connection between the typical career pattern and these factors.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.1087  [pdf] - 1202029
The dust content of QSO hosts at high redshift
Comments: 22 pages, 8 figures, MNRAS, accepted
Submitted: 2013-12-04
Infrared observations of high-z quasar (QSO) hosts indicate the presence of large masses of dust in the early universe. When combined with other observables, such as neutral gas masses and star formation rates, the dust content of z~6 QSO hosts may help constraining their star formation history. We have collected a database of 58 sources from the literature discovered by various surveys and observed in the FIR. We have interpreted the available data by means of chemical evolution models for forming proto-spheroids, investigating the role of the major parameters regulating star formation and dust production. For a few systems, given the derived small dynamical masses, the observed dust content can be explained only assuming a top-heavy initial mass function, an enhanced star formation efficiency and an increased rate of dust accretion. However, the possibility that, for some systems, the dynamical mass has been underestimated cannot be excluded. If this were the case, the dust mass can be accounted for by standard model assumptions. We provide predictions regarding the abundance of the descendants of QSO hosts; albeit rare, such systems should be present and detectable by future deep surveys such as Euclid already at z>4.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.6980  [pdf] - 1201897
Europium production: neutron star mergers versus core-collapse supernovae
Comments: 9 pages, 8 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-11-27
We have explored the Eu production in the Milky Way by means of a very detailed chemical evolution model. In particular, we have assumed that Eu is formed in merging neutron star (or neutron star black hole) binaries as well as in type II supernovae. We have tested the effects of several important parameters influencing the production of Eu during the merging of two neutron stars, such as: i) the time scale of coalescence, ii) the Eu yields and iii) the range of initial masses for the progenitors of the neutron stars. The yields of Eu from type II supernovae are very uncertain, more than those from coalescing neutron stars, so we have explored several possibilities. We have compared our model results with the observed rate of coalescence of neutron stars, the solar Eu abundance, the [Eu/Fe] versus [Fe/H] relation in the solar vicinity and the [Eu/H] gradient along the Galactic disc. Our main results can be summarized as follows: i) neutron star mergers can be entirely responsible for the production of Eu in the Galaxy if the coalescence time scale is no longer than 1 Myr for the bulk of binary systems, the Eu yield is around $3 \times 10^{-7}$ M$_\odot$, and the mass range of progenitors of neutron stars is 9-50 M$_\odot$; ii) both type II supernovae and merging neutron stars can produce the right amount of Eu if the neutron star mergers produce $2 \times 10^{-7}$ M$_\odot$ per system and type II supernovae, with progenitors in the range 20-50 M$_\odot$, produce yields of Eu of the order of $10^{-8}-10^{-9}$ M$_\odot$; iii) either models with only neutron stars producing Eu or mixed ones can reproduce the observed Eu abundance gradient along the Galactic disc.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.1283  [pdf] - 1179026
The Chemical Evolution of the Milky Way: the Three Infall Model
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-09-05
We present a new chemical evolution model for the Galaxy that assumes three main infall episodes of primordial gas for the formation of halo, thick and thin disk, respectively. We compare our results with selected data taking into account NLTE effects. The most important parameters of the model are (i) the timescale for gas accretion, (ii) the efficiency of star formation and (iii) a threshold in the gas density for the star formation process, for each Galactic component. We find that, in order to best fit the features of the solar neighbourhood, the halo and thick disk must form on short timescales (~0.2 and ~1.25 Gyr, respectively), while a longer timescale is required for the thin-disk formation. The efficiency of star formation must be maximum (10 Gyr-1) during the thick-disk phase and minimum (1 Gyr-1) during the thin-disk formation. Also the threshold gas density for star formation is suggested to be different in the three Galactic components. Our main conclusion is that in the framework of our model an independent episode of accretion of extragalactic gas, which gives rise to a burst of star formation, is fundamental to explain the formation of the thick disk. We discuss our results in comparison to previous studies and in the framework of modern galaxy formation theories.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.1549  [pdf] - 726269
Abundance gradients in spiral disks: is the gradient inversion at high redshift real?
Comments: 15 pages, 19 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-08-07
We compute the abundance gradients along the disk of the Milky Way by means of the two-infall model: in particular, the gradients of oxygen and iron and their temporal evolution. First, we explore the effects of several physical processes which influence the formation and evolution of abundance gradients. They are: i) the inside-out formation of the disk, ii) a threshold in the gas density for star formation, iii) a variable star formation efficiency along the disk, iv) radial flows and their speed, and v) different total surface mass density (gas plus stars) distributions for the halo. We are able to reproduce at best the present day gradients of oxygen and iron if we assume an inside-out formation, no threshold gas density, a constant efficiency of star formation along the disk and radial gas flows. It is particularly important the choice of the velocity pattern for radial flows and the combination of this velocity pattern with the surface mass density distribution in the halo. Having selected the best model, we then explore the evolution of abundance gradients in time and find that the gradients in general steepen in time and that at redshift z~3 there is a gradient inversion in the inner regions of the disk, in the sense that at early epochs the oxygen abundance decreases toward the Galactic center. This effect, which has been observed, is naturally produced by our models if an inside-out formation of the disk and and a constant star formation efficiency are assumed. The inversion is due to the fact that in the inside-out formation a strong infall of primordial gas, contrasting chemical enrichment, is present in the innermost disk regions at early times. The gradient inversion remains also in the presence of radial flows, either with constant or variable speed in time, and this is a new result.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.0137  [pdf] - 1173130
Galactic and Cosmic Type Ia SN rates: is it possible to impose constraints on SNIa progenitors?
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures, Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-08-01
We compute the Type Ia supernova rates in typical elliptical galaxies by varying the progenitor models for Type Ia supernovae. To do that a formalism which takes into account the delay distribution function (DTD) of the explosion times and a given star formation history is adopted. Then the chemical evolution for ellipticals with baryonic initial masses $10^{10}$, $10^{11}$ and $10^{12} M_{\odot}$ is computed, and the mass of Fe produced by each galaxy is precisely estimated. We also compute the expected Fe mass ejected by ellipticals in typical galaxy clusters (e.g. Coma and Virgo), under different assumptions about Type Ia SN progenitors. As a last step, we compute the cosmic Type Ia SN rate in an unitary volume of the Universe by adopting several cosmic star formation rates and compare it with the available and recent observational data. Unfortunately, no firm conclusions can be derived only from the cosmic SNIa rate, neither on SNIa progenitors nor on the cosmic star formation rate. Finally, by analysing all our results together, and by taking into account previous chemical evolution results, we try to constrain the best Type Ia progenitor model. We conclude that the best progenitor models for Type Ia SNe are still the single degenerate model, the double degenerate wide model, and the empirical bimodal model. All these models require the existence of prompt Type Ia supernovae, exploding in the first 100 Myr since the beginning of star formation, although their fraction should not exceed 15-20% in order to fit chemical abundances in galaxies.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.4079  [pdf] - 1172741
Colour gradients of high-redshift Early-Type Galaxies from hydrodynamical monolithic models
Comments: 13 pages, 7 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication on MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-07-15
We analyze the evolution of colour gradients predicted by the hydrodynamical models of early type galaxies (ETGs) in Pipino et al. (2008), which reproduce fairly well the chemical abundance pattern and the metallicity gradients of local ETGs. We convert the star formation (SF) and metal content into colours by means of stellar population synthetic model and investigate the role of different physical ingredients, as the initial gas distribution and content, and eps_SF, i.e. the normalization of SF rate. From the comparison with high redshift data, a full agreement with optical rest-frame observations at z < 1 is found, for models with low eps_SF, whereas some discrepancies emerge at 1 < z < 2, despite our models reproduce quite well the data scatter at these redshifts. To reconcile the prediction of these high eps_SF systems with the shallower colour gradients observed at lower z we suggest intervention of 1-2 dry mergers. We suggest that future studies should explore the impact of wet galaxy mergings, interactions with environment, dust content and a variation of the Initial Mass Function from the galactic centers to the peripheries.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.4385  [pdf] - 1166004
Modelling the chemical evolution of the Galaxy halo
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. 11 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2013-04-16
We study the chemical evolution and formation of the Galactic halo through the analysis of its stellar metallicity distribution function and some key elemental abundance patterns. Starting from the two-infall model for the Galaxy, which predicts too few low-metallicity stars, we add a gas outflow during the halo phase with a rate proportional to the star formation rate through a free parameter, lambda. In addition, we consider a first generation of massive zero-metal stars in this two-infall + outflow model adopting two different top-heavy initial mass functions and specific population III yields. The metallicity distribution function of halo stars, as predicted by the two-infall + outflow model shows a good agreement with observations, when the parameter lambda=14 and the time scale for the first infall, out of which the halo formed, is not longer than 0.2 Gyr, a lower value than suggested previously. Moreover, the abundance patterns [X/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] for C, N and alpha-elements O, Mg, Si, S, Ca show a good agreement with the observational data. If population III stars are included, under the assumption of different initial mass functions, the overall agreement of the predicted stellar metallicity distribution function with observational data is poorer than in the case without population III. We conclude that it is fundamental to include both a gas infall and outflow during the halo formation to explain the observed halo metallicity distribution function, in the framework of a model assuming that the stars in the inner halo formed mostly in situ. Moreover, we find that it does not exist a satisfactory initial mass function for population III stars which reproduces the observed halo metallicity distribution function. As a consequence, there is no need for a first generation of only massive stars to explain the evolution of the Galactic halo.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.2939  [pdf] - 1165869
The two regimes of the cosmic sSFR evolution are due to spheroids and discs
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2013-04-10
This paper aims at explaining the two phases in the observed specific star formation rate (sSFR), namely the high (>3/Gyr) values at z>2 and the smooth decrease since z=2. In order to do this, we compare to observations the specific star formation rate evolution predicted by well calibrated models of chemical evolution for elliptical and spiral galaxies, using the additional constraints on the mean stellar ages of these galaxies (at a given mass). We can conclude that the two phases of the sSFR evolution across cosmic time are due to different populations of galaxies. At z>2 the contribution comes from spheroids: the progenitors of present-day massive ellipticals (which feature the highest sSFR) as well as halos and bulges in spirals (which contribute with average and lower-than-average sSFR). In each single galaxy the sSFR decreases rapidly and the star formation stops in <1 Gyr. However the combination of different generations of ellipticals in formation might result in an apparent lack of strong evolution of the sSFR (averaged over a population) at high redshift. The z<2 decrease is due to the slow evolution of the gas fraction in discs, modulated by the gas accretion history and regulated by the Schmidt law. The Milky Way makes no exception to this behaviour.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.2764  [pdf] - 1165842
Neutron-capture element deficiency of the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2013-04-09
We present an assessment of the barium abundance ratios for red giant member stars in the faint Hercules dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy. Our results are drawn from intermediate-resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra around the Ba II 6141.71 AA absorption line at low signal-to-noise ratios. For three brighter stars we were able to gain estimates from direct equivalent-width measurements, while for the remaining eight stars only upper limits could be obtained. These results are investigated in a statistical manner and indicate very low Ba abundances of log epsilon (Ba) < 0.7 dex (3 sigma). We discuss various possible systematic biasses, first and foremost, a blend with the Fe I 6141.73 AA-line, but most of those would only lead to even lower abundances. A better match with metal-poor halo and dSph stars can only be reached by including a large uncertainty in the continuum placement. This contrasts with the high dispersions in iron and calcium (in excess of 1 dex) in this galaxy. While the latter spreads are typical of the very low luminosity, dark-matter dominated dSphs, a high level of depletion in heavy elements suggests that chemical enrichment in Hercules was governed by very massive stars, coupled with a very low star formation efficiency. While very low abundances of some heavy elements are also found in individual stars of other dwarf galaxies, this is the first time that a very low Ba abundance is found within an entire dSph over a broad metallicity range.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.7399  [pdf] - 832331
The dust properties of z ~ 3 MIPS-LBGs from photo-chemical models
Comments: 31pages,9 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2013-03-29
The stacked spectral energy distribution (SED) of Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24$\mu m$ detected Lyman break galaxies (MIPS-LBGs) is fitted by means of spectro-photometric model GRASIL with an "educated" fitting approach which benefits from results of chemical evolution models. The star formation rate(SFR)-age-metallicity degeneracies of SED modelling are broken by using SFH and chemical enrichment history suggested by chemical models, which also provide dust mass, dust abundance and chemical elements locked in dust component. We derive the total mass $M_{tot}$, stellar mass $M_{\ast}$, gas mass $M_{g}$, dust mass $M_{d}$, age and SFR of the stacked MIPS-LBG in a self-consistent way. Our estimate of $M_{\ast}= 8\times 10^{10}$ agrees with other works based on UV-optical SED fitting. We suggest that MIPS-LBGs at $z\sim3$ are young (0.3-0.6 Gyr), massive ($M_{tot} \sim 10^{11} M_{\odot}$), dusty ($M_{d} \sim 10^{8} M_{\odot}$), metal rich ($Z \sim Z_{\odot} $) progenitors of elliptical galaxies suffering a strong burst of star formation (SFR $\sim 200 M_{\odot}/yr$). Our estimate of $M_{d}=7 \times 10^{7} M_{\odot}$ of the stacked MIPS-LBG is about a factor of eight lower than the estimated value based on single temperature grey-body fitting, suggesting that self-consistent SED models are needed to estimate dust mass. By comparing with the Milky Way molecular cloud and dust properties, we suggest that denser and dustier environments and flatter dust size distribution are likely in high redshift massive star forming galaxies. These dust properties, as well as the different types of SFHs, can cause different SED shapes between high redshift star-forming ellipticals and local star-burst templates. This discrepancy of SED shapes could in turn explain the non detection at submillimeter wavelengths, of IR luminous ($L_{IR} \succeq 10^{12} L_{\odot} $) MIPS-LBGs.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.5153  [pdf] - 637761
The Effects of radial inflow of gas and galactic fountains on the chemical evolution of M31
Comments: Accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2013-01-22
Galactic fountains and radial gas flows are very important ingredients in modeling the chemical evolution of galactic disks. Our aim here is to study the effects of galactic fountains and radial gas flows in the chemical evolution of the disk of M31. We adopt a ballistic method to study the effects of galactic fountains on the chemical enrichment of the M31 disk. We find that the landing coordinate for the fountains in M31 is no more than 1 kpc from the starting point, thus producing negligible effect on the chemical evolution of the disk. We find that the delay time in the enrichment process due to fountains is no longer than 100 Myr and this timescale also produces negligible effects on the results. Then, we compute the chemical evolution of the M31 disk with radial gas flows produced by the infall of extragalactic material and fountains. We find that a moderate inside-out formation of the disk coupled with radial flows of variable speed can very well reproduce the observed gradient. We discuss also the effects of other parameters such a threshold in the gas density for star formation and an efficiency of star formation varying with the galactic radius. We conclude that the most important physical processes in creating disk gradients are the inside-out formation and the radial gas flows. More data on abundance gradients both locally and at high redshift are necessary to confirm this conclusion.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1209.4462  [pdf] - 1151520
Chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge: different stellar populations and possible gradients
Comments: 9 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in Section 5. of Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2012-09-20
We compute the chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge to explain the existence of two main stellar populations recently observed. After comparing model results and observational data we suggest that the old more metal poor stellar population formed very fast (on a timescale of 0.1-0.3 Gyr) by means of an intense burst of star formation and an initial mass function flatter than in the solar vicinity whereas the metal rich population formed on a longer timescale (3 Gyr). We predict differences in the mean abundances of the two populations (-0.52 dex for <[Fe/H]>) which can be interpreted as a metallicity gradients. We also predict possible gradients for Fe, O, Mg, Si, S and Ba between sub-populations inside the metal poor population itself (e.g. -0.145 dex for <[Fe/H]>). Finally, by means of a chemo-dynamical model following a dissipational collapse, we predict a gradient inside 500 pc from the Galactic center of -0.26 dex kpc^{-1} in Fe.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.6303  [pdf] - 1125121
The thick disk rotation-metallicity correlation as a fossil of an "inverse chemical gradient" in the early Galaxy
Comments: Accepted for publication on Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2012-07-26
The thick disk rotation--metallicity correlation, \partial V_\phi/\partial[Fe/H] =40\div 50 km s^{-1}dex^{-1} represents an important signature of the formation processes of the galactic disk. We use nondissipative numerical simulations to follow the evolution of a Milky Way (MW)-like disk to verify if secular dynamical processes can account for this correlation in the old thick disk stellar population. We followed the evolution of an ancient disk population represented by 10 million particles whose chemical abundances were assigned by assuming a cosmologically plausible radial metallicity gradient with lower metallicity in the inner regions, as expected for the 10-Gyr-old MW. Essentially, inner disk stars move towards the outer regions and populate layers located at higher |z|. A rotation--metallicity correlation appears, which well resembles the behaviour observed in our Galaxy at a galactocentric distance between 8 kpc and 10 kpc. In particular,we measure a correlation of \partial V_\phi/\partial[Fe/H]\simeq 60 km s^{-1}dex^{-1} for particles at 1.5 kpc < |z| < 2.0 kpc that persists up to 6 Gyr. Our pure N-body models can account for the V_\phi vs. [Fe/H] correlation observed in the thick disk of our Galaxy, suggesting that processes internal to the disk such as heating and radial migration play a role in the formation of this old stellar component. In this scenario, the positive rotation-metallicity correlation of the old thick disk population would represent the relic signature of an ancient "inverse" chemical (radial) gradient in the inner Galaxy, which resulted from accretion of primordial gas.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.4302  [pdf] - 1124230
Small-scale hero: massive-star enrichment in the Hercules dwarf spheroidal
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, to appear in the proceedings of `First Stars IV - from Hayashi to the future', M. Umemura, K. Omukai (eds.)
Submitted: 2012-06-19
Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are often conjectured to be the sites of the first stars. The best current contenders for finding the chemical imprints from the enrichment by those massive objects are the "ultrafaint dwarfs" (UFDs). Here we present evidence for remarkably low heavy element abundances in the metal poor Hercules UFD. Combined with other peculiar abundance patterns this indicates that Hercules was likely only influenced by very few, massive explosive events - thus bearing the traces of an early, localized chemical enrichment with only very little other contributions from other sources at later times.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.2417  [pdf] - 498971
Metallicity effects on the cosmic SNIb/c and GRB rates
Comments: Accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Main Journal, 2012 April 03 10 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2012-04-11
Supernovae Ib/c are likely to be associated to long GRBs, therefore it is important to compare the SN rate in galaxies with the GRB rate. To do that we computed Type Ib/c SN rates in galaxies of different morphological type by assuming different histories of star formation and different supernova Ib/c progenitors. We included some recent suggestions about the dependence of the minimum mass of single Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars upon the stellar metallicity and therefore upon galactic chemical evolution. We adopted several cosmic star formation rates as functions of cosmic time, either observationally or theoretically derived, including the one computed with our galaxy models. Then we computed the cosmic Type Ib/c SN rates. We derived the following conclusions: i) the ratio cosmic GRB - Type Ib/c rate varies in the range 10^{-2}-10^{-4} in the whole redshift range, thus suggesting that only a small fraction of all the Type Ib/c SNe gives rise to GRBs. ii) The metallicity dependence of Type Ib/c SN progenitors produces lower cosmic SN Ib/c rates at early times, for any chosen cosmic star formation rate. iii) Different theoretical cosmic star formation rates, computed under different scenarios of galaxy formation, produce SN Ib/c cosmic rates which differ mainly at very high redshift. However, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions on the high redshift trend because of the large uncertainties in the data. iv) GRBs can be important tracers of star formation at high redshift if their luminosity function does not vary with redshift and they can help in discriminating among different galaxy formation models.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.2266  [pdf] - 1117879
Effects of thermohaline instability and rotation-induced mixing on the evolution of light elements in the Galaxy : D, 3He and 4He
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2012-04-10
Recent studies of low- and intermediate-mass stars show that the evolution of the chemical elements in these stars is very different from that proposed by standard stellar models. Rotation-induced mixing modifies the internal chemical structure of main sequence stars, although its signatures are revealed only later in the evolution when the first dredge-up occurs. Thermohaline mixing is likely the dominating process that governs the photospheric composition of low-mass red giant branch stars and has been shown to drastically reduce the net 3He production in these stars. The predictions of these new stellar models need to be tested against galaxy evolution. In particular, the resulting evolution of the light elements D, 3He and 4He should be compared with their primordial values inferred from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data and with the abundances derived from observations of different Galactic regions. We study the effects of thermohaline mixing and rotation-induced mixing on the evolution of the light elements in the Milky Way. We compute Galactic evolutionary models including new yields from stellar models computed with thermohaline instability and rotation-induced mixing. We discuss the effects of these important physical processes acting in stars on the evolution of the light elements D, 3He, and 4He in the Galaxy. Galactic chemical evolution models computed with stellar yields including thermohaline mixing and rotation fit better observations of 3He and 4He in the Galaxy than models computed with standard stellar yields. The inclusion of thermohaline mixing in stellar models provides a solution to the long-standing "3He problem" on a Galactic scale. Stellar models including rotation-induced mixing and thermohaline instability reproduce also the observations of D and 4He.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.6359  [pdf] - 1116258
Metallicity Gradients in Disks: Do Galaxies Form Inside-Out?
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A; 12 pages; 5 figures (several typos corrected and author affiliations updated)
Submitted: 2012-01-30, last modified: 2012-02-13
We examine radial and vertical metallicity gradients using a suite of disk galaxy simulations, supplemented with two classic chemical evolution approaches. We determine the rate of change of gradient and reconcile differences between extant models and observations within the `inside-out' disk growth paradigm. A sample of 25 disks is used, consisting of 19 from our RaDES (Ramses Disk Environment Study) sample, realised with the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. Four disks are selected from the MUGS (McMaster Unbiased Galaxy Simulations) sample, generated with the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code GASOLINE, alongside disks from Rahimi et al. (GCD+) and Kobayashi & Nakasato (GRAPE-SPH). Two chemical evolution models of inside-out disk growth were employed to contrast the temporal evolution of their radial gradients with those of the simulations. We find that systematic differences exist between the predicted evolution of radial abundance gradients in the RaDES and chemical evolution models, compared with the MUGS sample; specifically, the MUGS simulations are systematically steeper at high-redshift, and present much more rapid evolution in their gradients. We find that the majority of the models predict radial gradients today which are consistent with those observed in late-type disks, but they evolve to this self-similarity in different fashions, despite each adhering to classical `inside-out' growth. We find that radial dependence of the efficiency with which stars form as a function of time drives the differences seen in the gradients; systematic differences in the sub-grid physics between the various codes are responsible for setting these gradients. Recent, albeit limited, data at redshift z=1.5 are consistent with the steeper gradients seen in our SPH sample, suggesting a modest revision of the classical chemical evolution models may be required.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.3824  [pdf] - 1092430
Chemical evolution of the Milky Way: the origin of phosphorus
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A (minor changes with respect to the submitted version)
Submitted: 2011-12-16, last modified: 2012-01-19
Context. Recently, for the first time the abundance of P has been measured in disk stars. This provides the opportunity of comparing the observed abundances with predictions from theoretical models. Aims. We aim at predicting the chemical evolution of P in the Milky Way and compare our results with the observed P abundances in disk stars in order to put constraints on the P nucleosynthesis. Methods. To do that we adopt the two-infall model of galactic chemical evolution, which is a good model for the Milky Way, and compute the evolution of the abundances of P and Fe. We adopt stellar yields for these elements from different sources. The element P should have been formed mainly in Type II supernovae. Finally, Fe is mainly produced by Type Ia supernovae. Results. Our results confirm that to reproduce the observed trend of [P/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] in disk stars, P is formed mainly in massive stars. However, none of the available yields for P can reproduce the solar abundance of this element. In other words, to reproduce the data one should assume that massive stars produce more P than predicted by a factor of ~ 3. Conclusions. We conclude that all the available yields of P from massive stars are largely underestimated and that nucleosynthesis calculations should be revised. We also predict the [P/Fe] expected in halo stars.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.1751  [pdf] - 1092805
Cosmic star formation rate: a theoretical approach
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1108.5040
Submitted: 2012-01-09
The cosmic star formation rate (CSFR), is an important clue to investigate the history of the assembly and evolution of galaxies. Here, we develop a method to study the CSFR from a purely theoretical point of view. Starting from detailed models of chemical evolution, we obtain the histories of star formation of galaxies of different morphological types. These histories are then used to determine the luminosity functions of the same galaxies by means of a spectro-photometric code. We obtain the CSFR under different hypothesis. First, we study the hypothesis of a pure luminosity evolution scenario, in which all galaxies are supposed to form at the same redshift and then evolve only in luminosity. Then we consider scenarios in which the number density or the slope of the LFs are assumed to vary with redshift. After comparison with available data we conclude that a pure luminosity evolution does not provide a good fit to the data, especially at very high redshift, although many uncertainties are still present in the data. On the other hand, a variation in the number density of ellipticals and spirals as a function of redshift can provide a better fit to the observed CSFR. We also explore cases of variable slope of the LFs with redshift and variations of number density and slope at the same time. We cannot find any of those cases which can improve the fit to the data respect to the solely number density variation. Finally, we compute the evolution of the average cosmic metallicity in galaxies with redshift.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.3285  [pdf] - 1091635
The Radio - X-ray relation as a star formation indicator: Results from the VLA--E-CDFS Survey
Comments: 21 pages, 10 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2011-11-14
In order to trace the instantaneous star formation rate at high redshift, and hence help understanding the relation between the different emission mechanisms related to star formation, we combine the recent 4 Ms Chandra X-ray data and the deep VLA radio data in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South region. We find 268 sources detected both in the X-ray and radio band. The availability of redshifts for $\sim 95$ of the sources in our sample allows us to derive reliable luminosity estimates and the intrinsic properties from X-ray analysis for the majority of the objects. With the aim of selecting sources powered by star formation in both bands, we adopt classification criteria based on X-ray and radio data, exploiting the X-ray spectral features and time variability, taking advantage of observations scattered across more than ten years. We identify 43 objects consistent with being powered by star formation. We also add another 111 and 70 star forming candidates detected only in the radio or X-ray band, respectively. We find a clear linear correlation between radio and X-ray luminosity in star forming galaxies over three orders of magnitude and up to $z \sim 1.5$. We also measure a significant scatter of the order of 0.4 dex, higher than that observed at low redshift, implying an intrinsic scatter component. The correlation is consistent with that measured locally, and no evolution with redshift is observed. Using a locally calibrated relation between the SFR and the radio luminosity, we investigate the L_X(2-10keV)-SFR relation at high redshift. The comparison of the star formation rate measured in our sample with some theoretical models for the Milky Way and M31, two typical spiral galaxies, indicates that, with current data, we can trace typical spirals only at z<0.2, and strong starburst galaxies with star-formation rates as high as $\sim 100 M_\odot yr^{-1}$, up to $z\sim 1.5$.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:1107.5477  [pdf] - 1078259
Manganese evolution in Omega Centauri: a clue to the cluster formation mechanisms?
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2011-07-27
We model the evolution of manganese relative to iron in the progenitor system of the globular cluster Omega Centauri by means of a self-consistent chemical evolution model. We use stellar yields that already reproduce the measurements of [Mn/Fe] versus [Fe/H] in Galactic field disc and halo stars, in Galactic bulge stars and in the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We compare our model predictions to the Mn abundances measured in a sample of 10 red giant members and 6 subgiant members of Omega Cen. The low values of [Mn/Fe] observed in a few, metal-rich stars of the sample cannot be explained in the framework of our standard, homogeneous chemical evolution model. Introducing cooling flows that selectively bring to the cluster core only the ejecta from specific categories of stars does not help to heal the disagreement with the observations. The capture of field stars does not offer a viable explanation either. The observed spread in the data and the lowest [Mn/Fe] values could, in principle, be understood if the system experienced inhomogeneous chemical evolution. Such an eventuality is qualitatively discussed in the present paper. However, more measurements of Mn in Omega Cen stars are needed to settle the issue of Mn evolution in this cluster.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.4881  [pdf] - 1076222
Effects of radial flows on the chemical evolution of the Milky Way disk
Comments: Accepted by A&A; 11 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2011-04-26
The majority of chemical evolution models assume that the Galactic disk forms by means of infall of gas and divide the disk into several independent rings without exchange of matter between them. However, if gas infall is important, radial gas flows should be taken into account as a dynamical consequence of infall. The aim of this paper is to test the effect of radial gas flows on detailed chemical evolution models (one-infall and two-infall) for the Milky Way disk with different prescriptions for the infall law and star formation rate. We found, that with a gas radial inflow of constant speed the metallicity gradient tends to steepen. Taking into account a constant time scale for the infall rate along the Galaxy disk and radial flows with a constant speed, we obtained a too flat gradient, at variance with data, implying that an inside-out formation and/or a variable gas flow speed are required. To reproduce the observed gradients the gas flow should increase in modulus with the galactocentric distance, both in the one-infall and two-infall models. However, the inside-out disk formation coupled with a threshold in the gas density (only in the two-infall model) for star formation and/or a variable efficiency of star formation with galactocentric distance can also reproduce the observed gradients without radial flows. We showed that the radial flows can be the most important process in reproducing abundance gradients but only with a variable gas speed. Finally, one should consider that uncertainties in the data concerning gradients prevent us to draw firm conclusions. Future more detailed data will help to ascertain whether the radial flows are a necessary ingredient in the formation and evolution of the Galactic disk and disks in general.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:1103.1844  [pdf] - 1052604
Abundance ratios in the hot ISM of elliptical galaxies
Comments: 11 pages, 4 figures, to appear on A&A
Submitted: 2011-03-09
To constrain the recipes put forth to solve the theoretical Fe discrepancy in the hot interstellar medium of elliptical galaxies and at the same time explain the [alpha/Fe] ratios. In order to do so we use the latest theoretical nucleosynthetic yields, we incorporate the dust, we explore differing SNIa progenitor scenarios by means of a self-consistent chemical evolution model which reproduces the properties of the stellar populations in elliptical galaxies. Models with Fe-only dust and/or a lower effective SNIa rate achieve a better agreement with the observed Fe abundance. However, a suitable modification to the SNIa yield with respect to the standard W7 model is needed to fully match the abundance ratio pattern. The 2D explosion model C-DDT by Maeda et al. (2010) is a promising candidate for reproducing the [Fe/H] and the [alpha/Fe] ratios. (A&A format)
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.4197  [pdf] - 1052228
Chemical Evolution of Dwarf Irregular and Blue Compact Galaxies
Comments: 21 pages, 19 figures, 4 tables. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2011-02-21
Dwarf irregular and blue compact galaxies are very interesting objects since they are relatively simple and unevolved. We present new models for the chemical evolution of these galaxies by assuming different regimes of star formation (bursting and continuous) and different kinds of galactic winds (normal and metal-enhanced). Our results show that in order to reproduce all the properties of these galaxies, including the spread in the chemical abundances, the star formation should have proceeded in bursts and the number of bursts should be not larger than 10 in each galaxy, and that metal-enhanced galactic winds are required. A metal-enhanced wind efficiency increasing with galactic mass can by itself reproduce the observed mass-metallicity relation although also an increasing efficiency of star formation and/or number and/or duration of bursts can equally well reproduce such a relation. Metal enhanced winds together with an increasing amount of star formation with galactic mass are required to explain most of the properties of these galaxies. Normal galactic winds, where all the gas is lost at the same rate, do not reproduce the features of these galaxies. We suggest that these galaxies should have suffered a different number of bursts varying from 2 to 10 and that the efficiency of metal-enhanced winds should have been not too high ($\lambda_{mw}\sim1$). We predict for these galaxies present time Type Ia SN rates from 0.00084 and 0.0023 per century. Finally, by comparing the abundance patterns of Damped Lyman-$\alpha$ objects with our models we conclude that they are very likely the progenitors of the present day dwarf irregulars. (abridged)
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.4900  [pdf] - 958239
The Role of the IGIMF in the chemical evolution of the solar neighbourhood
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures, to appear in the proceedings of the conference "UP: Have Observations Revealed a Variable Upper End of the Initial Mass Function?", ASP Conference Series
Submitted: 2011-01-25
The integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF) is computed from the combination of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) and the embedded cluster mass function, described by a power law with index beta. The result of the combination is a time-varying IMF which depends on the star formation rate. We applied the IGIMF formalism to a chemical evolution model for the solar neighbourhood and compared the results obtained by assuming three possible values for beta with the ones obtained by means of a standard, well-tested, constant IMF. In general, a lower absolute value of beta implies a flatter IGIMF, hence a larger number of massive stars, higher Type Ia and II supernova rates, higher mass ejection rates and higher [alpha/Fe] values at a given metallicity. Our suggested fiducial value for beta is 2, since with this value we can account for most of the local observables. We discuss our results in a broader perspective, with some implications regarding the possible universality of the IMF and the importance of the star formation threshold.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.4180  [pdf] - 1033874
Dynamical properties of AMAZE and LSD galaxies from gas kinematics and the Tully-Fisher relation at z~3
Comments: A&A accepted
Submitted: 2010-07-23, last modified: 2010-12-27
We present a SINFONI integral field kinematical study of 33 galaxies at z~3 from the AMAZE and LSD projects which are aimed at studying metallicity and dynamics of high-redshift galaxies. The number of galaxies analyzed in this paper constitutes a significant improvement compared to existing data in the literature and this is the first time that a dynamical analysis is obtained for a relatively large sample of galaxies at z~3. 11 galaxies show ordered rotational motions (~30% of the sample), in these cases we estimate dynamical masses by modeling the gas kinematics with rotating disks and exponential mass distributions. We find dynamical masses in the range 2 \times 10^9 M\odot - 2 \times 10^11 M\odot with a mean value of ~ 2 \times 10^10 M\odot. By comparing observed gas velocity dispersion with that expected from models, we find that most rotating objects are dynamically "hot", with intrinsic velocity dispersions of the order of ~90 km s-1. The median value of the ratio between the maximum disk rotational velocity and the intrinsic velocity dispersion for the rotating objects is 1.6, much lower than observed in local galaxies value (~10) and slightly lower than the z~2 value (2 - 4). Finally we use the maximum rotational velocity from our modeling to build a baryonic Tully-Fisher relation at z~3. Our measurements indicate that z~3 galaxies have lower stellar masses (by a factor of ten on average) compared to local galaxies with the same dynamical mass. However, the large observed scatter suggests that the Tully-Fisher relation is not yet "in place" at these early cosmic ages, possibly due to the young age of galaxies. A smaller dispersion of the Tuly-Fisher relation is obtained by taking into account the velocity dispersion with the use of the S_0.5 indicator, suggesting that turbulent motions might have an important dynamical role.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.4435  [pdf] - 251323
The nature of Long-GRB host galaxies from chemical abundances
Comments: 8 pages, 9 figures, two references added
Submitted: 2010-07-26, last modified: 2010-11-02
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic events after the Big Bang and they have been observed up to very high redshift. By means of measures of chemical abundances now available for the galaxies hosting such events,thought to originate from the explosion of very powerful supernovae (Type Ib/c), we have the opportunity to study the nature of these host galaxies. The aim of this paper is to identify the hosts of Long GRBs (LGRBs) observed both at low and high redshift to see whether the hosts can be galaxies of the same type observed at different cosmic epochs. We adopt detailed chemical evolution models for galaxies of different morphological type (ellipticals, spirals, irregulars) which follow the time evolution of the abundances of several chemical elements (H, He, $\alpha$-elements, Fe), and compare the results with the observed abundances and abundance ratios in galaxies hosting LGRBs. We find that the abundances and abundance ratios predicted by models devised for typical irregular galaxies can well fit the abundances in the hosts both at high and low redshift. We also find that the predicted Type Ib/c supernova rate for irregulars is in good agreement with observations. Models for spirals and particularly ellipticals do not fit the high-redshift hosts of LGRBs (DLA systems) nor the low redshift hosts: in particular, ellipticals cannot possibly be the hosts of gamma-ray-bursts at low redshift since they do not show any star formation, and therefore no supernovae Ib/c. We conclude that the observed abundance and abundance ratios in LGRBs hosts suggest that these hosts are irregular galaxies both at high and low redshift thus showing that the host galaxies belong to in an evolutionary sequence.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.1469  [pdf] - 1041139
Galactic astroarchaeology: reconstructing the bulge history by means of the newest data
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2010-10-07
The chemical abundances measured in stars of the Galactic bulge offer an unique opportunity to test galaxy formation models as well as impose strong constraints on the history of star formation and stellar nucleosynthesis. The aims of this paper are to compare abundance predictions from a detailed chemical evolution model for the bulge with the newest data. Some of the predictions have already appeared on previous paper (O, Mg, Si, S and Ca) but some other predictions are new (Ba, Cr and Ti). We compute several chemical evolution models by adopting different initial mass functions for the Galactic bulge and then compare the results to new data including both giants and dwarf stars in the bulge. In this way we can impose strong constraints on the star formation history of the bulge. We find that in order to reproduce at best the metallicity distribution function one should assume a flat IMF for the bulge not steeper than the Salpeter one. The initial mass function derived for the solar vicinity provides instead a very poor fit to the data. The [el/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relations in the bulge are well reproduced by a very intense star formation rate and a flat IMF as in the case of the stellar metallicity distribution. Our model predicts that the bulge formed very quickly with the majority of stars formed inside the first 0.5 Gyr. Our results strongly suggest that the new data, and in particular the MDF of the bulge, confirm what concluded before and in particular that the bulge formed very fast, from gas shed by the halo, and that the initial mass function was flatter than in the solar vicinity and in the disk, although not so flat as previously thought. Finally, our model can also reproduce the decrease of the [O/Mg] ratio for [Mg/H] > 0 in the bulge, which is confirmed by the new data and interpreted as due to mass loss in massive stars.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:1008.3875  [pdf] - 1034440
The chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies with stellar and QSO dust production
Comments: 16 pages, 16 figures, A&A accepted
Submitted: 2010-08-23
The presence of dust strongly affects the way we see galaxies and also the chemical abundances we measure in gas. It is therefore important to study he chemical evolution of galaxies by taking into account dust evolution. We aim at performing a detailed study of abundance ratios of high redshift objects and their dust properties. We focus on Lyman-Break galaxies (LBGs) and Quasar (QSO) hosts and likely progenitors of low- and high-mass present-day elliptical galaxies, respectively. We have adopted a chemical evolution model for elliptical galaxies taking account the dust production from low and intermediate mass stars, supernovae Ia, supernovae II, QSOs and both dust destruction and accretion processes. By means of such a model we have followed the chemical evolution of ellipticals of different baryonic masses. Our model complies with chemical downsizing. We made predictions for the abundance ratios versus metallicity trends for models of differing masses that can be used to constrain the star formation rate, initial mass function and dust mass in observed galaxies. We predict the existence of a high redshift dust mass-stellar mass relationship. We have found a good agreement with the properties of LBGs if we assume that they formed at redshift z=2-4. In particular, a non-negligible amount of dust is needed to explain the observed abundance pattern. We studied the QSO SDSS J114816, one of the most distant QSO ever observed (z=6.4), and we have been able to reproduce the amount of dust measured in this object. The dust is clearly due to the production from supernovae and the most massive AGB stars as well as from the grain growth in the interstellar medium. The QSO dust is likely to dominate only in the very central regions of the galaxies and during the early development of the galactic wind.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.5357  [pdf] - 268110
VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy of the GRB 090926A afterglow
Comments: 12 pages, 8 .ps figures, accepted for publication in A&A. Abstract reduced due to space constraints
Submitted: 2010-07-29
The aim of this paper is to study the environment and intervening absorbers of the gamma-ray burst GRB 090926A through analysis of optical spectra of its afterglow. We analyze medium resolution spectroscopic observations (R=10 000, corresponding to 30 km/s, S/N=15 - 30 and wavelength range 3000-25000) of the optical afterglow of GRB 090926A, taken with X-shooter at the VLT ~ 22 hr after the GRB trigger. The spectrum shows that the ISM in the GRB host galaxy at z = 2.1071 is rich in absorption features, with two components contributing to the line profiles. In addition to the ground state lines, we detect C II, O I, Si II, Fe II and Ni II excited absorption features. No host galaxy emission lines, molecular absorption features nor diffuse interstellar bands are detected in the spectrum. The Hydrogen column density associated to GRB 090926A is log N_H/cm^{-2} = 21.60 +/- 0.07, and the metallicity of the host galaxy is in the range [X/H] =3.2X10^{-3}-1.2X10^{-2} with respect to the solar values, i.e., among the lowest values ever observed for a GRB host galaxy. A comparison with galactic chemical evolution models has suggested that the host of GRB090926A is likely to be a dwarf irregular galaxy. We put an upper limit to the Hydrogen molecular fraction of the host galaxy ISM, which is f < 7X10^{-7}. We derive information on the distance between the host absorbing gas and the site of the GRB explosion. The distance of component I is found to be 2.40 +/- 0.15 kpc, while component II is located far away from the GRB, possibly at ~ 5 kpc. These values are compatible with that found for other GRBs.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.3500  [pdf] - 1032604
The chemical evolution of IC10
Comments: 10 pages, 14 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2010-05-19, last modified: 2010-07-27
Dwarf irregular galaxies are relatively simple unevolved objects where it is easy to test models of galactic chemical evolution. We attempt to determine the star formation and gas accretion history of IC10, a local dwarf irregular for which abundance, gas, and mass determinations are available. We apply detailed chemical evolution models to predict the evolution of several chemical elements (He, O, N, S) and compared our predictions with the observational data. We consider additional constraints such as the present-time gas fraction, the star formation rate (SFR), and the total estimated mass of IC10. We assume a dark matter halo for this galaxy and study the development of a galactic wind. We consider different star formation regimes: bursting and continuous. We explore different wind situations: i) normal wind, where all the gas is lost at the same rate and ii) metal-enhanced wind, where metals produced by supernovae are preferentially lost. We study a case without wind. We vary the star formation efficiency (SFE), the wind efficiency, and the time scale of the gas infall, which are the most important parameters in our models. We find that only models with metal-enhanced galactic winds can reproduce the properties of IC10. The star formation must have proceeded in bursts rather than continuously and the bursts must have been less numerous than ~10 over the whole galactic lifetime. Finally, IC10 must have formed by a slow process of gas accretion with a timescale of the order of 8 Gyr.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.1455  [pdf] - 200714
A decline and fall in the future of Italian Astronomy?
Antonelli, Angelo; Antonuccio-Delogu, Vincenzo; Baruffolo, Andrea; Benetti, Stefano; Bianchi, Simone; Biviano, Andrea; Bonafede, Annalisa; Bondi, Marco; Borgani, Stefano; Bragaglia, Angela; Brescia, Massimo; Brucato, John Robert; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Brunino, Riccardo; Cantiello, Michele; Casasola, Viviana; Cassano, Rossella; Cellino, Alberto; Cescutti, Gabriele; Cimatti, Andrea; Comastri, Andrea; Corbelli, Edvige; Cresci, Giovanni; Criscuoli, Serena; Cristiani, Stefano; Cupani, Guido; De Grandi, Sabrina; D'Elia, Valerio; Del Santo, Melania; De Lucia, Gabriella; Desidera, Silvano; Di Criscienzo, Marcella; D'Odorico, Valentina; Dotto, Elisabetta; Fontanot, Fabio; Gai, Mario; Gallerani, Simona; Gallozzi, Stefano; Garilli, Bianca; Gioia, Isabella; Girardi, Marisa; Gitti, Myriam; Granato, Gianluigi; Gratton, Raffaele; Grazian, Andrea; Gruppioni, Carlotta; Hunt, Leslie; Leto, Giuseppe; Israel, Gianluca; Magliocchetti, Manuela; Magrini, Laura; Mainetti, Gabriele; Mannucci, Filippo; Marconi, Alessandro; Marelli, Martino; Maris, Michele; Matteucci, Francesca; Meneghetti, Massimo; Mennella, Aniello; Mercurio, Amata; Molendi, Silvano; Monaco, Pierluigi; Moretti, Alessia; Murante, Giuseppe; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Orio, Marina; Paizis, Adamantia; Panessa, Francesca; Pasian, Fabio; Pentericci, Laura; Pozzetti, Lucia; Rossetti, Mariachiara; Santos, Joana S.; Saro, Alexandro; Schneider, Raffaella; Silva, Laura; Silvotti, Roberto; Smart, Richard; Tiengo, Andrea; Tornatore, Luca; Tozzi, Paolo; Trussoni, Edoardo; Valentinuzzi, Tiziano; Vanzella, Eros; Vazza, Franco; Vecchiato, Alberto; Venturi, Tiziana; Vianello, Giacomo; Viel, Matteo; Villalobos, Alvaro; Viotto, Valentina; Vulcani, Benedetta
Comments: Also available at http://adoptitaastronom.altervista.org/index.html
Submitted: 2010-07-08
On May 27th 2010, the Italian astronomical community learned with concern that the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) was going to be suppressed, and that its employees were going to be transferred to the National Research Council (CNR). It was not clear if this applied to all employees (i.e. also to researchers hired on short-term contracts), and how this was going to happen in practice. In this letter, we give a brief historical overview of INAF and present a short chronicle of the few eventful days that followed. Starting from this example, we then comment on the current situation and prospects of astronomical research in Italy.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.5863  [pdf] - 1033416
Quantifying the uncertainties of chemical evolution studies. II. Stellar yields
Comments: 28 pages, 23 figures. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2010-06-30
This is the second paper of a series which aims at quantifying the uncertainties in chemical evolution model predictions related to the underlying model assumptions. Specifically, it deals with the uncertainties due to the choice of the stellar yields. We adopt a widely used model for the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and test the effects of changing the stellar nucleosynthesis prescriptions on the predicted evolution of several chemical species. We find that, except for a handful of elements whose nucleosynthesis in stars is well understood by now, large uncertainties still affect the model predictions. This is especially true for the majority of the iron-peak elements, but also for much more abundant species such as carbon and nitrogen. The main causes of the mismatch we find among the outputs of different models assuming different stellar yields and among model predictions and observations are: (i) the adopted location of the mass cut in models of type II supernova explosions; (ii) the adopted strength and extent of hot bottom burning in models of asymptotic giant branch stars; (iii) the neglection of the effects of rotation on the chemical composition of the stellar surfaces; (iv) the adopted rates of mass loss and of (v) nuclear reactions, and (vi) the different treatments of convection. Our results suggest that it is mandatory to include processes such as hot bottom burning in intermediate-mass stars and rotation in stars of all masses in accurate studies of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. In spite of their importance, both these processes still have to be better understood and characterized. As for massive stars, presupernova models computed with mass loss and rotation are available in the literature, but they still wait for a self-consistent coupling with the results of explosive nucleosynthesis computations.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.5678  [pdf] - 1032842
The dust content of high-z submillimeter galaxies revealed by Herschel
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics Letters. One reference updated
Submitted: 2010-05-31, last modified: 2010-06-07
We use deep observations taken with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS), on board the Herschel satellite as part of the PACS evolutionary probe (PEP) guaranteed project along with submm ground-based observations to measure the dust mass of a sample of high-z submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). We investigate their dust content relative to their stellar and gas masses, and compare them with local star-forming galaxies. High-z SMGs are dust rich, i.e. they have higher dust-to-stellar mass ratios compared to local spiral galaxies (by a factor of 30) and also compared to local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, by a factor of 6). This indicates that the large masses of gas typically hosted in SMGs have already been highly enriched with metals and dust. Indeed, for those SMGs whose gas mass is measured, we infer dust-to-gas ratios similar or higher than local spirals and ULIRGs. However, similarly to other strongly star-forming galaxies in the local Universe and at high-z, SMGs are characterized by gas metalicities lower (by a factor of a few) than local spirals, as inferred from their optical nebular lines, which are generally ascribed to infall of metal-poor gas. This is in contrast with the large dust content inferred from the far-IR and submm data. In short, the metalicity inferred from the dust mass is much higher (by more than an order of magnitude) than that inferred from the optical nebular lines. We discuss the possible explanations of this discrepancy and the possible implications for the investigation of the metalicity evolution at high-z.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.2154  [pdf] - 1026833
Abundance gradient slopes versus mass in spheroids: predictions by monolithic models
Comments: Accepted for publication by MNRAS, the paper contains 7 figures and 2 tables
Submitted: 2010-05-12
We investigate whether it is possible to explain the wide range of observed gradients in early type galaxies in the framework of monolithic models. To do so, we extend the set of hydrodynamical simulations by Pipino et al. (2008a) by including low-mass ellipticals and spiral (true) bulges. These models satisfy the mass-metallicity and the mass-[alpha/Fe] relations. The typical metallicity gradients predicted by our models have a slope of -0.3 dex per decade variation in radius, consistent with the mean values of several observational samples. However, we also find a few quite massive galaxies in which this slope is -0.5 dex per decade, in agreement with some recent data. In particular, we find a mild dependence from the mass tracers when we transform the stellar abundance gradients into radial variations of the Mg_2 line-strength index, but not in the Mg_b. We conclude that, rather than a mass- slope relation, is more appropriate to speak of an increase in the scatter of the gradient slope with the galactic mass. We can explain such a behaviour with different efficiencies of star formation in the framework of the revised monolithic formation scenario, hence the scatter in the observed gradients should not be used as an evidence of the need of mergers. Indeed, model galaxies that exhibit the steepest gradient slopes are preferentially those with the highest star formation efficiency at that given mass.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.3199  [pdf] - 160740
An investigation of chromospheric activity spanning the Vaughan--Preston gap: impact on stellar ages
Comments: 5 pages, 2 Figures, 1 Table, published in A&A.
Submitted: 2009-04-21, last modified: 2010-05-03
Chromospheric activity is widely used as an age indicator for solar-type stars based on the early evidence that there is a smooth evolution from young and active to old and inactive stars. We analysed chromospheric activity in five solar-type stars in two open clusters, in order to study how chromospheric activity evolves with time. We took UVES high-resolution, high S/N ratio spectra of 3 stars in IC 4756 and 2 in NGC 5822, which were combined with a previously studied data-set and reanalysed here. The emission core of the deep, photospheric Ca II K line was used as a probe of the chromospheric activity. All of the 5 stars in the new sample, including those in the 1.2 Gyr-old NGC 5822, have activity levels comparable to those of Hyades and Praesepe. A likely interpretation of our data is that solar-type-star chromospheric activity, from the age of the Hyades until that of the Sun, does not evolve smoothly. Stars change from active to inactive on a short timescale. Evolution before and after such a transition is much less significant than cyclical and long-term variations. We show that data presented in the literature to support a correlation between age and activity could be also interpreted differently in the light of our results.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:1004.4139  [pdf] - 1026492
Chemical Evolution Models for Spiral Disks: the Milky Way, M31 and M33
Comments: 11 pages, 12 figures, rerecommended for publication in the Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2010-04-23
The distribution of chemical abundances and their variation in time are important tools to understand the chemical evolution of galaxies: in particular, the study of chemical evolution models can improve our understanding of the basic assumptions made for modelling our Galaxy and other spirals. To test a standard chemical evolution model for spiral disks in the Local Universe and study the influence of a threshold gas density and different efficiencies in the star formation rate (SFR) law on radial gradients (abundance, gas and SFR). We adopt a one-infall chemical evolution model where the Galactic disk forms inside-out by means of infall of gas, and we test different thresholds and efficiencies in the SFR. The model is scaled to the disk properties of three Local Group galaxies (the Milky Way, M31 and M33) by varying its dependence on the star formation efficiency and the time scale for the infalling gas into the disk. Using this simple model we are able to reproduce most of the observed constraints available in the literature for the studied galaxies. The radial oxygen abundance gradients and their time evolution are studied in detail. The present day abundance gradients are more sensitive to the threshold than to other parameters, while their temporal evolutions are more dependent on the chosen SFR efficiency. The most massive disks seem to have evolved faster (i.e. with more efficient star formation) than the less massive ones, thus suggesting a downsizing in star formation for spirals. The threshold and the efficiency of star formation play a very important role in the chemical evolution of spiral disks and an efficiency varying with radius can be used to regulate the star formation. The oxygen abundance gradient can steepen or flatten in time depending on the choice of this parameter
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:1004.0832  [pdf] - 1026135
Effects of the integrated galactic IMF on the chemical evolution of the solar neighbourhood
Comments: 22 pages, 19 figures
Submitted: 2010-04-06
The initial mass function determines the fraction of stars of different intial mass born per stellar generation. In this paper, we test the effects of the integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF) on the chemical evolution of the solar neighbourhood. The IGIMF (Weidner & Kroupa 2005) is computed from the combination of the stellar intial mass function (IMF), i.e. the mass function of single star clusters, and the embedded cluster mass function, i.e. a power law with index beta. By taking into account also the fact that the maximum achievable stellar mass is a function of the total mass of the cluster, the IGIMF becomes a time-varying IMF which depends on the star formation rate. We applied this formalism to a chemical evolution model for the solar neighbourhood and compared the results obtained by assuming three possible values for beta with the results obtained by means of a standard, well-tested, constant IMF. In general, a lower absolute value of beta implies a flatter IGIMF, hence a larger number of massive stars and larger metal ejection rates. This translates into higher type Ia and II supernova rates, higher mass ejection rates from massive stars and a larger amount of gas available for star formation, coupled with lower present-day stellar mass densities. (abridged) We also discuss the importance of the present day stellar mass function (PDMF) in providing a way to disentangle among various assumptions for beta. Our results indicate that the model adopting the IGIMF computed with beta ~2 should be considered the best since it allows us to reproduce the observed PDMF and to account for most of the chemical evolution constraints considered in this work.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.2547  [pdf] - 1025169
Abundances and physical parameters for stars in the open clusters NGC 5822 and IC 4756
Comments: 10 pages, 3 figures, A&A accepted
Submitted: 2010-02-12, last modified: 2010-03-08
Classical chemical analyses may be affected by systematic errors that would cause observed abundance differences between dwarfs and giants. For some elements, however, the abundance difference could be real. We address the issue by observing 2 solar--type dwarfs in NGC 5822 and 3 in IC 4756, and comparing their composition with that of 3 giants in either of the aforementioned clusters. We determine iron abundance and stellar parameters of the dwarf stars, and the abundances of calcium, sodium, nickel, titanium, aluminium, chromium, silicon and oxygen for both the giants and dwarfs. We acquired UVES high-resolution, of high signal--to--noise ratio (S/N) spectra. The width of the cross correlation profiles was used to measure rotation velocities. For abundance determinations, the standard equivalent width analysis was performed differentially with respect to the Sun. For lithium and oxygen, we derived abundances by comparing synthetic spectra with observed line features. We find an iron abundance for dwarf stars equal to solar to within the margins of error for IC 4756, and slightly above for NGC 5822 ([Fe/H]= 0.01 and 0.05 dex respectively). The 3 stars in NG 4756 have lithium abundances between Log N(Li) 2.6 and 2.8 dex, the two stars in NGC 5822 have Log N(Li) ~ 2.8 and 2.5, respectively. For sodium, silicon, and titanium, we show that abundances of giants are significantly higher than those of the dwarfs of the same cluster (about 0.15, 0.15, and 0.35 dex).
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4374  [pdf] - 637666
The Origin of the Mass-Metallicity relation: an analytical approach
Comments: Accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2010-01-25
The existence of a mass-metallicity (MZ) relation in star forming galaxies at all redshift has been recently established. We aim at studying some possible physical mechanisms contributing to the MZ relation by adopting analytical solutions of chemical evolution models including infall and outflow. We explore the hypotheses of a variable galactic wind rate, infall rate and yield per stellar generation (i.e. a variation in the IMF), as possible causes for the MZ relation. By means of analytical models we compute the expected O abundance for galaxies of a given total baryonic mass and gas mass.The stellar mass is derived observationally and the gas mass is derived by inverting the Kennicutt law of star formation, once the star formation rate is known. Then we test how the parameters describing the outflow, infall and IMF should vary to reproduce the MZ relation, and we exclude the cases where such a variation leads to unrealistic situations. We find that a galactic wind rate increasing with decreasing galactic mass or a variable IMF are both viable solutions for the MZ relation. A variable infall rate instead is not acceptable. It is difficult to disentangle among the outflow and IMF solutions only by considering the MZ relation, and other observational constraints should be taken into account to select a specific solution. For example, a variable efficiency of star formation increasing with galactic mass can also reproduce the MZ relation and explain the downsizing in star formation suggested for ellipticals. The best solution could be a variable efficiency of star formation coupled with galactic winds, which are indeed observed in low mass galaxies.
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.3745  [pdf] - 1018837
On the origin of the helium-rich population in the peculiar globular cluster Omega Centauri
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure, to appear in the Proceedings of IAU Symposium No. 268, Light Elements in the Universe (C. Charbonnel, M. Tosi, F. Primas, C. Chiappini, eds., Cambridge Univ. Press)
Submitted: 2009-12-18
In this contribution we discuss the origin of the extreme helium-rich stars which inhabit the blue main sequence (bMS) of the Galactic globular cluster Omega Centauri. In a scenario where the cluster is the surviving remnant of a dwarf galaxy ingested by the Milky Way many Gyr ago, the peculiar chemical composition of the bMS stars can be naturally explained by considering the effects of strong differential galactic winds, which develop owing to multiple supernova explosions in a shallow potential well.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.1299  [pdf] - 1017868
On the origin of the helium-rich population in Omega Centauri
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-10-07
To study the possible origin of the huge helium enrichment attributed to the stars on the blue main sequence of Omega Centauri, we make use of a chemical evolution model that has proven able to reproduce other major observed properties of the cluster, namely, its stellar metallicity distribution function, age-metallicity relation and trends of several abundance ratios with metallicity. In this framework, the key condition to satisfy all the available observational constraints is that a galactic-scale outflow develops in a much more massive parent system, as a consequence of multiple supernova explosions in a shallow potential well. This galactic wind must carry out preferentially the metals produced by explosive nucleosynthesis in supernovae, whereas elements restored to the interstellar medium through low-energy stellar winds by both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars must be mostly retained. Assuming that helium is ejected through slow winds by both AGB stars and fast rotating massive stars (FRMSs), the interstellar medium of Omega Centauri's parent galaxy gets naturally enriched in helium in the course of its evolution.
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.4308  [pdf] - 1003084
The Evolution of Carbon and Oxygen in the Bulge and Disk of the Milky Way
Comments: 18 pages, 6 figures, submitted to Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2009-07-24
The evolution of C and O abundances in the Milky Way can impose strong constraints on stellar nucleosynthesis and help understanding the formation and evolution of our Galaxy. The aim is to review the measured C and O abundances in the disk and bulge of the Galaxy and compare them with model predictions. We adopt two successful chemical evolution models for the bulge and the disk, which assume the same nucleosynthesis prescriptions but different histories of star formation. The data show a clear distinction between the trend of [C/O] in the thick and thin Galactic disks, while the thick disk and bulge trends are indistinguishable with a large (>0.5 dex) increase in the C/O ratio in the range from -0.1 to +0.4 dex for [O/H]. In our models we consider yields from massive stars with and without the inclusion of metallicity-dependent stellar winds. The observed increase in the [C/O] ratio with metallicity in the bulge and thick disk lies between the predictions utilizing the mass-loss rates of Maeder (1992) and those of Meynet & Maeder (2002). A model without metallicity-dependent yields completely fails to match the observations. Thus, the relative increase in carbon abundance at high metallicity appears to be due to metallicity-dependent stellar winds in massive stars. These results also explain the steep decline of the [O/Fe] ratio with [Fe/H] in the Galactic bulge, while the [Mg/Fe] ratio is enhanced at all [Fe/H]. (abridged)
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:0906.3400  [pdf] - 1002607
Effects of Galactic fountains and delayed mixing in the chemical evolution of the Milky Way
Comments: Accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2009-06-18
The majority of galactic chemical evolution models assumes the instantaneous mixing approximation (IMA). This assumption is probably not realistic as indicated by the existence of chemical inhomogeneities, although current chemical evolution models of the Milky Way can reproduce the majority of the observational constraints under the IMA. The aim of this paper is to test whether relaxing this approximation in a detailed chemical evolution model can improve or worsen the agreement with observations. To do that, we investigated two possible causes for relaxing of the instantaneous mixing: i) the ``galactic fountain time delay effect'' and ii) the ``metal cooling time delay effect''. We found that the effect of galactic fountains is negligible if an average time delay of 0.1 Gyr, as suggested in a previous paper, is assumed. Longer time delays produce differences in the results but they are not realistic. We also found that the O abundance gradient in the disk is not affected by galactic fountains. The metal cooling time delays produce strong effects on the evolution of the chemical abundances only if we adopt stellar yields depending on metallicity. If instead, the yields computed for to the solar chemical composition are adopted, negligible effects are produced, as in the case of the galactic fountain delay. The relaxation of the IMA by means of the galactic fountain model, where the delay is considered only for massive stars and only in the disk, does not affect the chemical evolution results. The combination of metal dependent yields and time delay in the chemical enrichment from all stars starting from the halo phase, instead, produces results at variance with observations.
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.0272  [pdf] - 1002095
The Effect of Different Type Ia Supernova Progenitors on Galactic Chemical Evolution
Comments: Accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2009-05-04
Our aim is to show how different hypotheses about Type Ia supernova progenitors can affect Galactic chemical evolution. We include different Type Ia SN progenitor models, identified by their distribution of time delays, in a very detailed chemical evolution model for the Milky Way which follows the evolution of several chemical species. We test the single degenerate and the double degenerate models for supernova Ia progenitors, as well as other more empirical models based on differences in the time delay distributions. We find that assuming the single degenerate or the double degenerate scenario produces negligible differences in the predicted [O/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relation. On the other hand, assuming a percentage of prompt (exploding in the first 100 Myr) Type Ia supernovae of 50%, or that the maximum Type Ia rate is reached after 3-4 Gyr from the beginning of star formation, as suggested by several authors, produces more noticeable effects on the [O/Fe] trend. However, given the spread still existing in the observational data no model can be firmly excluded on the basis of only the [O/Fe] ratios. On the other hand, when the predictions of the different models are compared with the G-dwarf metallicity distribution, the scenarios with very few prompt Type Ia supernovae can be excluded. Models including the single degenerate or double degenerate scenario with a percentage of 10-13% of prompt Type Ia supernovae produce results in very good agreement with the observations. A fraction of prompt Type Ia supernovae larger than 30% worsens the agreement with observations and the same occurs if no prompt Type Ia supernovae are allowed. In particular, two empirical models for the Type Ia SN progenitors can be excluded: the one without prompt Type Ia supernovae and the one assuming delay time distribution going like t^{-0.5}.
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.2168  [pdf] - 1001919
Stellar mass-loss, rotation and the chemical enrichment of early type galaxies
Comments: 13 pages, 5 figures, MNRAS in press
Submitted: 2009-04-14
We present a comparison between the [Ca,C,N/Fe]-mass relations observed in local spheroids and the results of a chemical evolution model which already successfully reproduces the [Mg/Fe]-mass and the [Fe/H]-mass relations in these systems. We find that the [Ca/Fe]-mass relation is naturally explained by such a model without any additional assumption. In particular, the observed under-abundance of Ca with respect to Mg can be attributed to the different contributions from supernovae Type Ia and supernovae Type II to the nucleosynthesis of these two elements. For C and N, we consider new stellar yields that take into account stellar mass loss and rotation. These yields have been shown to successfully reproduce the C and N abundances in Milky Way metal-poor stars. The use of these new stellar yields produces a good agreement between the chemical evolution model predictions and the integrated stellar population observations for C. In the case of N, the inclusion of fast rotators and stellar mass-loss nucleosynthesis prescriptions improves our predictions for the slope of the [N/Fe] vs. sigma relation, but a zero point discrepancy of 0.3 dex remains. This work demonstrates that current stellar yields are unable to simultaneously reproduce the large mean stellar [<N/Fe>] ratios inferred from integrated spectra of elliptical galaxies and the low N abundance measured in the gas of high redshift spheroids from absorption lines. However, it seems reasonable to suggest that there may be uncertainties in either the inferred stellar or gas-phase N abundances at the level of 0.3 dex. (abriged)
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.2180  [pdf] - 1001920
The evolution of the mass-metallicity relation in galaxies of different morphological types
Comments: 20 pages, 13 figures, accepted by Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2009-04-14
By means of chemical evolution models for ellipticals, spirals and irregular galaxies, we aim at investigating the physical meaning and the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity relation as well as how this relation is connected with galaxy morphology. {abridged} We assume that galaxy morphologies do not change with cosmic time. We present a method to account for a spread in the epochs of galaxy formation and to refine the galactic mass grid. (abridged) We compare our predictions to observational results obtained for galaxies between redshifts 0.07 and 3.5. We reproduce the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation mainly by means of an increasing efficiency of star formation with mass in galaxies of all morphological types, without any need to invokegalactic outflows favoring the loss of metals in the less massive galaxies. Our predictions can help constraining the slope and the zero point of the observed local MZ relation, both affected by uncertainties related to the use of different metallicity calibrations. We show how, by considering the MZ, the O/H vs star formation rate (SFR), and the SFR vs galactic mass diagrams at various redshifts, it is possible to constrain the morphology of the galaxies producing these relations. Our results indicate that the galaxies observed at z=3.5 should be mainly proto-ellipticals, whereas at z=2.2 the observed galaxies consist of a morphological mix of proto-spirals and proto-ellipticals. At lower redshifts, the observed MZ relation is well reproduced by considering both spirals and irregulars. (abridged)
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.2202  [pdf] - 1001921
The Mass-Metallicity relation in galaxies of different morphological types
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, talk presented at "Probing Stellar Populations out to the Distant Universe," September 2008, Cefalu, Italy
Submitted: 2009-04-14
By means of chemical evolution models of different morphological types, we study the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation and its evolution with redshift. Our aim is to understand the role of galaxies of different morphological types in the MZ relation at various redshift. One major result is that at high redshift, the majority of the galaxies falling on the MZ plot are apparently proto-ellipticals. Finally, we show some preliminary results of a study of the MZ relation in a framework of hierarchical galaxy formation.
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.2354  [pdf] - 1000824
Theoretical cosmic Type Ia supernova rates
Comments: Revised version, 18 pages, 15 figures, accepted for publication in the New Astronomy journal
Submitted: 2008-07-15, last modified: 2009-03-16
The aim of this work is the computation of the cosmic Type Ia supernova rates at very high redshifts (z>2). We adopt various progenitor models in order to predict the number of explosions in different scenarios for galaxy formation and to check whether it is possible to select the best delay time distribution model, on the basis of the available observations of Type Ia supernovae. We also computed the Type Ia supernova rate in typical elliptical galaxies of different initial luminous masses and the total amount of iron produced by Type Ia supernovae in each case. It emerges that: it is not easy to select the best delay time distribution scenario from the observational data and this is because the cosmic star formation rate dominates over the distribution function of the delay times; the monolithic collapse scenario predicts an increasing trend of the SN Ia rate at high redshifts whereas the predicted rate in the hierarchical scheme drops dramatically at high redshift; for the elliptical galaxies we note that the predicted maximum of the Type Ia supernova rate depends on the initial galactic mass. The maximum occurs earlier (at about 0.3 Gyr) in the most massive ellipticals, as a consequence of downsizing in star formation. We find that different delay time distributions predict different relations between the Type Ia supernova rate per unit mass at the present time and the color of the parent galaxies and that bluer ellipticals present higher supernova Type Ia rates at the present time.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.2768  [pdf] - 1001472
Cosmological formation and chemical evolution of an elliptical galaxy
Comments: 8 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2009-02-16
We aim at studying the effect of a cosmologically motivated gas infall law for the formation of a massive elliptical galaxy in order to understand its impact on the formation of the spheroids. We replace the empirical infall law of the model by Pipino & Matteucci with a cosmologically derived infall law for the formation of an elliptical galaxy. We constrast our predictions with observations. We also compare the obtained results with those of Pipino & Matteucci. We computed models with and without galactic winds: we found that models without wind predict a too large current SNIa rate. In particular, the cosmological model produces a current SNIa which is about ten times higher than the observed values. Moreover models without wind predict a large current SNII rate, too large even if compared with the recent GALEX data. The predicted SNII rate for the model with wind, on the other hand, is too low if compared with the star formation histories given by GALEX. Last but not least, the mean value for the [Mg/Fe] ratio in the dominant stellar population of the simulated galaxy, as predicted by the cosmological model, is too low if compared to observations. This is, a very important result indicating that the cosmological infall law is in contrast with the chemical evolution. A cosmologically derived infall law for an elliptical galaxy cannot reproduce all the chemical constraints given by the observations. The problem resides in the fact that the cosmologically derived infall law implies a slow gas accretion with consequent star formation rate active for a long period. In this situation low [Mg/Fe] ratios are produced for the dominant stellar population in a typical elliptical, at variance with observations.
[116]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.1207  [pdf] - 20151
Modeling the effects of dust evolution on the SEDs of galaxies of different morphological type
Comments: 25 pages, 25 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2009-01-09
We present photometric evolution models of galaxies, in which, in addition to the stellar component, the effects of an evolving dusty interstellar medium have been included with particular care. Starting from the work of Calura, Pipino & Matteucci (2008), in which chemical evolution models have been used to study the evolution of both the gas and dust components of the interstellar medium in the solar neighbourhood, elliptical and irregular galaxies, it has been possible to combine these models with a spectrophotometric stellar code that includes dust reprocessing (GRASIL) (Silva et al. 1998) to analyse the evolution of the spectral energy distributions (SED) of these galaxies. We test our models against observed SEDs both in the local universe and at high redshift and use them to predict how the percentage of reprocessed starlight evolves for each type of galaxy. The importance of following the dust evolution is investigated by comparing our results with those obtained by adopting simple assumptions to treat this component.
[117]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.3505  [pdf] - 18769
The origin of abundance gradients in the Milky Way: the predictions of different models
Comments: 13 pages, 17 figures and 2 tables. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2008-11-21
We aim at studying the abundance gradients along the Galactic disk and their dependence upon several parameters: a threshold in the surface gas density regulating star formation, the star formation efficiency, the timescale for the formation of the thin disk and the total surface mass density of the stellar halo. We test a model which considers a cosmological infall law. This law does not predict an inside-out disk formation, but it allows to well fit the properties of the solar vicinity. We study several cases. We find that to reproduce at the same time the abundance, star formation rate and surface gas density gradients along the Galactic disk it is necessary to assume an inside-out formation for the disk. The threshold in the gas density is not necessary and the same effect could be reached by assuming a variable star formation efficiency. A cosmologically derived infall law with an inside-out process for the disk formation and a variable star formation efficiency can indeed well reproduce all the properties of the disk. However, the cosmological model presented here does not have sufficient resolution to capture the requested inside-out formation for the disk.
[118]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.2258  [pdf] - 1001068
The timescales of chemical enrichment in the Galaxy
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figure, invited talk at IAU Symposim 258 "Ages of Stars"
Submitted: 2008-11-13
The time-scales of chemical enrichment are fundamental to understand the evolution of abundances and abundance ratios in galaxies. In particular, the time-scales for the enrichment by SNe II and SNe Ia are crucial in interpreting the evolution of abundance ratios such as [alpha/Fe]. In fact, the alpha-elements are produced mainly by SNe II on time-scales of the order of 3 to 30 Myr, whereas the Fe is mainly produced by SNe Ia on a larger range of time-scales, going from 30 Myr to a Hubble time. This produces differences in the [alpha/Fe] ratios at high and low redshift and it is known as "time-delay" model. In this talk we review the most common progenitor models for SNe Ia and the derived rates together with the effect of the star formation history on the [alpha/Fe] versus [Fe/H] diagram in the Galaxy. From these diagrams we can derive the timescale for the formation of the inner halo (roughly 2 Gyr), the timescale for the formation of the local disk (roughly 7-8 Gyr) as well the time-scales for the formation of the whole disk. These are functions of the galactocentric distance and vary from 2-3 Gyr in the inner disk up to a Hubble time in the outer disk (inside-out formation). Finally, the timescale for the formation of the bulge is found to be no longer than 0.3 Gyr, similar to the timescale for the formation of larger spheroids such as elliptical galaxies. We show the time-delay model applied to galaxies of different morphological type, identified by different star formation histories, and how it constrains differing galaxy formation models.
[119]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.1591  [pdf] - 18391
Constraining the star formation histories of GRB Host Galaxies from their observed abundance patterns
Comments: 15 pages, 11 figures, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2008-11-10
Long-duration Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are linked to the collapse of massive stars and their hosts are exclusively identified as active, star forming galaxies. Four long GRBs observed at high spectral resolution at redshift 1.5 <z < 4 allowed the determination of the elemental abundances for a set of different chemical elements. In this paper, for the first time, by means of detailed chemical evolution models taking into account also dust production, we attempt to constrain the star formation history of the host galaxies of these GRBs from the study of the chemical abundances measured in their ISM. We are also able to provide constraints on the age and on the dust content of GRB hosts. Our results support the hypothesis that long duration GRBs occur preferentially in low metallicity, star forming galaxies. We compare the specific star formation rate, namely the star formation rate per unit stellar mass, predicted for the hosts of these GRBs with observational values for GRB hosts distributed across a large redshift range. Our models predict a decrease of the specific star formation rate (SSFR) with redshift, consistent with the observed decrease of the comoving cosmic SFR density between z ~2 and z=0. On the other hand, observed GRB hosts seems to follow an opposite trend in the SSFR vs redshift plot, with an increase of the SSFR with decreasing redshift. Finally, we compare the SSFR of GRB050730 host with values derived for a sample of Quasar damped Lyman alpha systems. Our results indicate that the abundance pattern and the specific star formation rates of the host galaxies of these GRBs are basically compatible with the ones determined in Quasar damped Lyman alpha systems, suggesting similar chemical evolution paths.
[120]  oai:arXiv.org:0810.2045  [pdf] - 17345
Supermassive black holes, star formation and downsizing of elliptical galaxies
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2008-10-11
The overabundance of Mg relative to Fe, observed in the nuclei of bright ellipticals, and its increase with galactic mass, poses a serious problem for all current models of galaxy formation. Here we improve on the one-zone chemical evolution models for elliptical galaxies by taking into account positive feedback produced in the early stages of super-massive central black hole growth. We can account for both the observed correlation and the scatter if the observed anti-hierarchical behaviour of the AGN population couples to galaxy assembly and results in an enhancement of the star formation efficiency which is proportional to galactic mass. At low and intermediate galactic masses, however, a slower mode for star formation suffices to account for the observational properties.
[121]  oai:arXiv.org:0806.2410  [pdf] - 900324
AMAZE. I. The evolution of the mass-metallicity relation at z>3
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures, A&A in press, replaced with accepted version
Submitted: 2008-06-14, last modified: 2008-08-14
We present initial results of an ESO-VLT large programme (AMAZE) aimed at determining the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation at z>3 by means of deep near-IR spectroscopy. Gas metallicities are measured, for an initial sample of nine star forming galaxies at z~3.5, by means of optical nebular lines redshifted into the near-IR. Stellar masses are accurately determined by using Spitzer-IRAC data, which sample the rest-frame near-IR stellar light in these distant galaxies. When compared with previous surveys, the mass-metallicity relation inferred at z~3.5 shows an evolution much stronger than observed at lower redshifts. The evolution is prominent even in massive galaxies, indicating that z~3 is an epoch of major action in terms of star formation and metal enrichment also for massive systems. There are also indications that the metallicity evolution of low mass galaxies is stronger relative to high mass systems, an effect which can be considered the chemical version of the galaxy downsizing. The mass-metallicity relation observed at z~3.5 is difficult to reconcile with the predictions of some hierarchical evolutionary models. Such discrepancies suggest that at z>3 galaxies are assembled mostly with relatively un-evolved sub-units, i.e. small galaxies with low star formation efficiency. The bulk of the star formation and metallicity evolution probably occurs once small galaxies are already assembled into bigger systems.
[122]  oai:arXiv.org:0808.0118  [pdf] - 15055
The effect of differential galactic winds on the chemical evolution of galaxies
Comments: 11 pages, 10 figures, A&A accepted
Submitted: 2008-08-01
(Abridged) The aim of this paper is to study the basic equations of the chemical evolution of galaxies with gas flows. We focus on models in which the outflow is differential, namely in which the heavy elements (or some of the heavy elements) can leave the parent galaxy more easily than other chemical species such as H and He. We study the chemical evolution of galaxies in the framework of simple models. This allows us to solve analytically the equations for the evolution of gas masses and metallicities. We find new analytical solutions for various cases in which the effects of winds and infall are taken into account. Differential galactic winds have the effect of reducing the global metallicity of a galaxy, with the amount of reduction increasing with the ejection efficiency of the metals. Abundance ratios are predicted to remain constant throughout the whole evolution of the galaxy, even in the presence of differential winds. One way to change them is by assuming differential winds with different ejection efficiencies for different elements. However, simple models apply only to elements produced on short timescales, namely all by Type II SNe, and therefore large differences in the ejection efficiencies of different metals are unlikely. Variations in abundance ratios such as [O/Fe] in galaxies, without including the Fe production by Type Ia supernovae, can in principle be obtained by assuming an unlikely different efficiency in the loss of O relative to Fe from Type II supernovae. Therefore, we conclude that it is not realistic to ignore Type Ia supernovae and that the delayed production of some chemical elements relative to others (time-delay model) remains the most plausible explanation for the evolution of alpha-elements relative to Fe.
[123]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.1463  [pdf] - 14352
The chemical evolution of Manganese in different stellar systems
Comments: 9 pages, 3 figures, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2008-07-09
Aims. To model the chemical evolution of manganese relative to iron in three different stellar systems: the solar neighbourhood, the Galactic bulge and the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy, and compare our results with the recent and homogeneous observational data. Methods. We adopt three chemical evolution models well able to reproduce the main properties of the solar vicinity, the galactic Bulge and the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal. Then, we compare different stellar yields in order to identify the best set to match the observational data in these systems. Results. We compute the evolution of manganese in the three systems and we find that in order to reproduce simultaneously the [Mn/Fe] versus [Fe/H] in the Galactic bulge, the solar neighbourhood and Sagittarius, the type Ia SN Mn yield must be metallicity-dependent. Conclusions. We conclude that the different histories of star formation in the three systems are not enough to reproduce the different behaviour of the [Mn/Fe] ratio, unlike the situation for [alpha/Fe]; rather, it is necessary to invoke metallicity-dependent type Ia SN Mn yields, as originally suggested by McWilliam, Rich & Smecker-Hane in 2003.
[124]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.0793  [pdf] - 12367
Are dry mergers of Ellipticals the way to reconcile model predictions with the downsizing?
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, A&A accepted
Submitted: 2008-05-06
To show that the bulk of the star formation and the galaxy assembly should occur simultaneously in order to reproduce at the same time the downsizing and the chemical properties of present-day massive spheroids within one effective radius.By means of chemical evolution models we create galactic building blocks of several masses and different chemical properties. We then construct a sample of possible merger histories going from a multiple minor merger scenario to a single major merger event aimed at reproducing a single massive elliptical galaxy. We compare our results against the mass-[Mg/Fe] and the mass-metallicity relations. We found that a series of multiple dry-mergers (no star formation in connection with the merger) involving building-blocks which have been created ad hoc in order to satisfy the [Mg/Fe]-mass relation cannot fit the mass-metallicity relation and viceversa. A major dry merger, instead, does not worsen the agreement with observation if it happens between galaxies which already obey to both the mass- or sigma-[Mg/Fe] and the mass-(sigma-) metallicity relations. However, this process alone cannot explain the physical reasons for these trends. Dry mergers alone cannot be the way to reconcile the need of a more efficient star formation in the most massive galaxies with the late time assembly suggested in the hierarchical paradigm in order to recover the galaxy downsizing.
[125]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.1492  [pdf] - 11623
Chemical evolution of the Milky Way and its Satellites
Comments: To appear on the Proceedings of the 37th Saas-Fee Advanced Course of the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy, " The Origin of the Galaxy and the Local Group", eds. E. Grebel and B. Moore, 93 pages, 65 figures
Submitted: 2008-04-09
This paper contains the lectures I delivered during the 37th Saas-Fee Advanced Course in March 2007. It reviews all the main ingredients necessary to build galactic chemical evolution models with particular attention to the Milky Way and the dwarf spheroidals of the Local Group. Both analytical and numerical models are discussed. Model results are compared to observations in order to infer constraints on stellar nucleosynthesis and on the formation and evolution of galaxies.Particular attention is devoted to interpret abundance ratios in galaxies with different star formation histories. Finally, the cosmic chemical evolution is discussed
[126]  oai:arXiv.org:0706.2932  [pdf] - 2385
The formation of the [alpha/Fe] radial gradients in the stars of elliptical galaxies
Comments: A&A accepted, replaced with final version after the peer-review process
Submitted: 2007-06-20, last modified: 2008-04-04
The scope of this paper is two-fold: i) to test and improve our previous models of an outside-in formation for the majority of ellipticals in the context of the SN-driven wind scenario, by means of a careful study of gas inflows/outflows; ii) to explain the observed slopes, either positive or negative, in the radial gradient of the mean stellar [alpha/Fe], and their apparent lack of any correlation with all the other observables. In order to pursue these goals we present a new class of hydrodynamical simulations for the formation of single elliptical galaxies in which we implement detailed prescriptions for the chemical evolution of H, He, O and Fe. We find that all the models which predict chemical properties (such as the central mass-weighted abundance ratios, the colours as well as the [<Fe/H>] gradient) within the observed ranges for a typical elliptical, also exhibit a variety of gradients in the [<alpha/Fe>] ratio, in agreement with the observations (namely positive, null or negative). All these models undergo an outside-in formation, in the sense that star formation stops earlier in the outermost than in the innermost regions, owing to the onset of a galactic wind. The typical [<Z/H>] gradients predicted by our models have a slope of -0.3 dex per decade variation in radius, consistent with the mean values of several observational samples. We can safely conclude that the history of star formation is fundamental for the creation of abundance gradients in ellipticals but that radial flows with different velocity in conjunction with the duration and efficiency of star formation in different galactic regions are responsible for the gradients in the [<alpha/Fe>] ratios.
[127]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.3032  [pdf] - 11106
Galactic fountains and their connection with high and intermediate velocity clouds
Comments: Accepted 17/03/2008 by A&A
Submitted: 2008-03-20, last modified: 2008-03-28
The aim of this paper is to calculate the expansion law and chemical enrichment of a supershell powered by the energetic feedback of a typical Galactic OB association at various galactocentric radii. We study then the orbits of the fragments created when the supershell breaks out and we compare their kinetic and chemical properties with the available observations of high - and intermediate - velocity clouds. We use the Kompaneets (1960) approximation for the evolution of the superbubble driven by sequential supernova explosions and we compute the abundances of oxygen and iron residing in the thin cold supershell. We assume that supershells are fragmented by means of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and we follow the orbit of the clouds either ballistically or by means of a hybrid model considering viscous interaction between the clouds and the extra-planar gas.Given the self-similarity of the Kompaneets solutions, clouds are always formed ~ 448 pc above the plane. If the initial metallicity is solar, the pollution from dying stars of the OB association has a negligible effect on the chemical composition of the clouds. The maximum height reached by the clouds above the plane seldom exceeds 2 kpc and when averaging over different throwing angles, the landing coordinate differs from the throwing coordinate ~ 1 kpc at most. The range of heights and [O/Fe] ratios spun by our clouds suggest us that the high velocity clouds cannot have a Galactic origin, whereas intermediate velocity clouds have kinematic properties similar to our modeled clouds but overabundance observed for the [O/Fe] ratios which can be reproduced only with initial metallicities which are too low compared for those of the Galaxy disk.
[128]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.3016  [pdf] - 11104
The role of massive stars in galactic chemical evolution
Comments: 12 pages, 6 Figures. To appear on the Proceedings of the IAUS 250
Submitted: 2008-03-20
I will review the role of massive stars in galactic evolution both from the nucleosynthesis and energetics point of view. In particular, I will highlight some important observational facts explained by means of massive stars in galaxies of different morphological type: the Milky Way, ellipticals and dwarf spheroidals. I will describe first the time-delay model and its interpretation in terms of abundance ratios in galaxies, then I will discuss the importance of mass loss in massive stars to reproduce the data in the Galactic bulge and disk. I will discuss also how massive stars can be important producers of primary nitrogen if rotation in stellar models is taken into account. Concerning elliptical galaxies, I will show that to reproduce the observed [Mg/Fe] versus Mass relation in these galaxies it is necessary to assume a more important role of massive stars in more massive galaxies and that this can be achieved by means of downsizing in star formation. I will discuss how massive stars are responsible in triggering galactic winds both in ellipticals and dwarf spheroidals. These latter systems show a low overabundance of alpha-elements relative to Fe with respect to Galactic stars of the same [Fe/H]: this is interpreted as due to a slow star formation coupled with very efficient galactic winds. Finally, I will show a comparison between the predicted Type Ib/c rates in galaxies and the observed GRB rate and how we can impose constraints on the mechanism of galaxy formation by studying the GRB rate at high redshift.
[129]  oai:arXiv.org:0707.1345  [pdf] - 2941
Loss of star forming gas in SDSS galaxies
Comments: 29 pages, 9 figures, ApJ, accepted
Submitted: 2007-07-09, last modified: 2008-03-13
Using the star formation rates from the SDSS galaxy sample, extracted using the MOPED algorithm, and the empirical Kennicutt law relating star formation rate to gas density, we calculate the time evolution of the gas fraction as a function of the present stellar mass. We show how the gas-to-stars ratio varies with stellar mass, finding good agreement with previous results for smaller samples at the present epoch. For the first time we show clear evidence for progressive gas loss with cosmic epoch, especially in low-mass systems. We find that galaxies with small stellar masses have lost almost all of their cold baryons over time, whereas the most massive galaxies have lost little. Our results also show that the most massive galaxies have evolved faster and turned most of their gas into stars at an early time, thus strongly supporting a downsizing scenario for galaxy evolution.
[130]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.3368  [pdf] - 10340
A comparison of the s- and r-process element evolution in local dwarf spheroidal galaxies and in the Milky Way
Comments: 12 pages, 5 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2008-02-22
We study the nucleosynthesis of several neutron capture elements (barium, europium, lanthanum, and yttrium) in local group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies and in the Milky Way by comparing the evolution of [Ba/Fe], [Eu/Fe], [La/Fe], [Y/Fe], [Ba/Y], [Ba/Eu], [Y/Eu], and [La/Eu] observed in dSph galaxies and in our Galaxy with predictions of detailed chemical evolution models. The models for all dSph galaxies and for the Milky Way are able to reproduce several observational features of these galaxies, such as a series of abundance ratios and the stellar metallicities distributions. The Milky Way model adopts the two-infall scenario, whereas the most important features of the models for the dSph galaxies are the low star-formation rate and the occurrence of intense galactic winds. We predict that the [s-r/Fe] ratios in dSphs are generally different than the corresponding ratios in the Milky Way, at the same [Fe/H] values. This is interpreted as a consequence of the time-delay model coupled with different star formation histories. In particular, the star-formation is less efficient in dSphs than in our Galaxy and it is influenced by strong galactic winds. Our predictions are in very good agreement with the available observational data. The time-delay model for the galactic chemical enrichment coupled with different histories of star formation in different galaxies allow us to succesfully interpret the observed differences in the abundance ratios of s- and r- process elements, as well as of $\alpha$-elements in dSphs and in the Milky Way. These differences strongly suggest that the main stellar populations of these galaxies could not have had a common origin and, consequently, that the progenitors of local dSphs might not be the same objects as the building blocks of our Galaxy.
[131]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.1847  [pdf] - 10040
The chemical evolution of a Milky Way-like galaxy: the importance of a cosmologically motivated infall law
Comments: This paper has 26 pages, 19 figures and 5 tables
Submitted: 2008-02-13
We aim at finding a cosmologically motivated infall law to understand if the LambdaCDM cosmology can reproduce the main chemical characteristics of a Milky Way-like spiral galaxy. In this work we test several different gas infall laws, starting from that suggested in the two-infall model for the chemical evolution of the Milky Way by Chiappini et al., but focusing on laws derived from cosmological simulations which follows a concordance LambdaCDM cosmology. By means of a detailed chemical evolution model for the solar vicinity, we study the effects of the different gas infall laws on the abundance patterns and the G-dwarf metallicity distribution. The cosmological gas infall law predicts two main gas accretion episodes. By means of this cosmologically motivated infall law, we study the star formation rate, the SNIa and SNII rate, the total amount of gas and stars in the solar neighbourhood and the behaviour of several chemical abundances. We find that the results of the two-infall model are fully compatible with the evolution of the Milky Way with cosmological accretion laws. A gas assembly history derived from a DM halo, compatible with the formation of a late-type galaxy from the morphological point of view, can produce chemical properties in agreement with the available observations.
[132]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.2547  [pdf] - 9078
The evolution of the photometric properties of Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies
Comments: 13 pages, Astronomy & Astrophysics, accepted
Submitted: 2008-01-16
We investigate the present-day photometric properties of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group. From the analysis of their integrated colours, we consider a possible link between dwarf spheroidals and giant ellipticals. From the analysis of the V vs (B-V) plot, we search for a possible evolutionary link between dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) and dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrrs). By means of chemical evolution models combined with a spectro-photometric model, we study the evolution of six Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies (Carina, Draco, Sagittarius, Sculptor, Sextans and Ursa Minor). The chemical evolution models, which adopt up-to-date nucleosynthesis from low and intermediate mass stars as well as nucleosynthesis and energetic feedback from supernovae type Ia and II, reproduce several observational constraints of these galaxies, such as abundance ratios versus metallicity and the metallicity distributions. The proposed scenario for the evolution of these galaxies is characterised by low star formation rates and high galactic wind efficiencies. Such a scenario allows us to predict integrated colours and magnitudes which agree with observations. Our results strongly suggest that the first few Gyrs of evolution, when the star formation is most active, are crucial to define the luminosities, colours, and other photometric properties as observed today. After the star formation epoch, the galactic wind sweeps away a large fraction of the gas of each galaxy, which then evolves passively. Our results indicate that it is likely that at a certain stage of their evolution, dSphs and dIrrs presented similar photometric properties. However, after that phase, they evolved along different paths, leading them to their currently disparate properties.
[133]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.2551  [pdf] - 9079
Interstellar dust evolution in galaxies of different morphological types
Comments: 22 pages, to appear on the proceedings of "XIXemes Rencontres de Blois"
Submitted: 2008-01-16
We study interstellar dust evolution in various environments by means of chemical evolution models for galaxies of different morphological types. We start from the formalism developed by Dwek (1998) to study dust evolution in the solar neighbourhood and extend it to ellipticals and dwarf irregular galaxies, showing how the evolution of the dust production rates and of the dust fractions depend on the galactic star formation history. The observed dust fractions observed in the solar neighbourhood can be reproduced by assuming that dust destruction depends the condensation temperatures T_c of the elements. In elliptical galaxies, type Ia SNe are the major dust factories in the last 10 Gyr. With our models, we successfully reproduce the dust masses observed in local ellipticals (~10^6 M_sun) by means of recent FIR and SCUBA observations. We show that dust is helpful in solving the iron discrepancy observed in the hot gaseous halos surrounding local ellipticals. In dwarf irregulars, we show how a precise determination of the dust depletion pattern could be useful to put solid constraints on the dust condensation efficiencies. Our results will be helpful to study the spectral properties of dust grains in local and distant galaxies.
[134]  oai:arXiv.org:0801.1769  [pdf] - 8907
Stars, gas and dust in elliptical galaxies
Comments: 12 pages, 4 figures, to appear on the proceedings of "XIXemes Rencontres de Blois"
Submitted: 2008-01-11
I will present recent theoretical results on the formation and the high redshift assembly of spheroids. These findings have been obtained by utilising different and complementary techniques: chemodynamical models offer great insight in the radial abundance gradients in the stars; while state semi-analytic codes implementing a detailed treatment of the chemical evolution allow an exploration of the role of the galactic mass in shaping many observed relations. The results will be shown by following the path represented by the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation in stars, gas and dust. I will show how, under a few sensible assumptions, it is possible to reproduce a large number of observables ranging from the Xrays to the Infrared. By comparing model predictions with observations, we derive a picture of galaxy formation in which the higher is the mass of the galaxy, the shorter are the infall and the star formation timescales. Therefore, the stellar component of the most massive and luminous galaxies might attain a metallicity Z > Z_sun in only 0.5 Gyr. Each galaxy is created outside-in, i.e. the outermost regions accrete gas, form stars and develop a galactic wind very quickly, compared to the central core in which the star formation can last up to ~ 1.3 Gyr.
[135]  oai:arXiv.org:0712.2880  [pdf] - 260137
The evolution of the mass-metallicity relation at z~3
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, to appear in the proceedings of "A Century of Cosmology: Past, Present and Future" (Venezia, August 2007)
Submitted: 2007-12-18
We present preliminary results of an ESO-VLT large programme (AMAZE) aimed at determining the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation at z~3 by means of deep near-IR spectroscopy. Gas metallicities and stellar masses are measured for an initial sample of nine star forming galaxies at z~3.3. When compared with previous surveys, the mass-metallicity relation inferred at z~3.3 shows an evolution significantly stronger than observed at lower redshifts. There are also some indications that the metallicity evolution of low mass galaxies is stronger relative to high mass systems, an effect which can be considered as the chemical version of the galaxy downsizing. The mass-metallicity relation observed at z~3.3 is difficult to reconcile with the predictions of some hierarchical evolutionary models. We shortly discuss the possible implications of such discrepancies.
[136]  oai:arXiv.org:0710.4129  [pdf] - 6278
Evolution of chemical abundances in Seyfert galaxies
Comments: 17 pages, 15 figures, 3 tables, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2007-10-22
We computed the chemical evolution of spiral bulges hosting Seyfert nuclei, based on updated chemical and spectro-photometrical evolution models for the bulge of our Galaxy, made predictions about other quantities measured in Seyferts, and modeled the photometry of local bulges. The chemical evolution model contains detailed calculations of the Galactic potential and of the feedback from the central supermassive black hole, and the spectro-photometric model covers a wide range of stellar ages and metallicities. We followed the evolution of bulges in the mass range 10^9 - 10^{11} Msun by scaling the star formation efficiency and the bulge scalelength as in the inverse-wind scenario for elliptical galaxies, and considering an Eddington limited accretion onto the central supermassive black hole. We successfully reproduced the observed black hole-host bulge mass relation. The observed nuclear bolometric luminosity is reproduced only at high redshift or for the most massive bulges; in the other cases, at z = 0 a rejuvenation mechanism is necessary. The black hole feedback is in most cases not significant in triggering the galactic wind. The observed high star formation rates and metal overabundances are easily achieved, as well as the constancy of chemical abundances with redshift and the bulge present-day colours. Those results are not affected if we vary the index of the stellar IMF from x=0.95 to x=1.35; a steeper IMF is instead required in order to reproduce the colour-magnitude relation and the present K-band luminosity of the bulge.
[137]  oai:arXiv.org:0706.2197  [pdf] - 2242
The cycle of interstellar dust in galaxies of different morphological types
Comments: 20 pages, A&A, accepted. Minor changes after referee report
Submitted: 2007-06-14, last modified: 2007-10-05
By means of chemical evolution models for galaxies of different morphological type, we have performed a detailed study of the evolution of the cosmic dust properties in different environments: the solar neighbourhood, elliptical galaxies and dwarf irregular galaxies. Starting from the same formalism as developed by Dwek (1998), We have taken into account dust production from low and intermediate mass stars, supernovae II and Ia as well as dust destruction and dust accretion processes in a detailed model of chemical evolution for the solar vicinity. Then, by means of the same dust prescriptions but adopting different galactic models (different star formation histories and presence of galactic winds), we have extended our study to ellipticals and dwarf irregular galaxies. We have investigated how the assumption of different star formation histories affects the dust production rates, the dust depletion, the dust accretion and destruction rates. We have shown how the inclusion of the dust treatment is helpful in solving the so-called Fe discrepancy, observed in the hot gaseous halos of local ellipticals, and in reproducing the chemical abundances observed in the Lyman Break Galaxies. Finally, our new models can be very useful in future detailed spectro-photometric studies of galaxies.
[138]  oai:arXiv.org:0709.0658  [pdf] - 4606
Chemical evolution of bulges at high redshift
Comments: 4 pages, 6 figures, to appear on the IAU Symposium 245 Proceedings, Eds. M. Bureau, E. Athanassoula, B. Barbuy
Submitted: 2007-09-05
We present a new class of hydrodynamical models for the formation of bulges (either massive elliptical galaxies or classical bulges in spirals) in which we implement detailed prescriptions for the chemical evolution of H, He, O and Fe. Our results hint toward an outside-in formation in the context of the supernovae-driven wind scenario. The build-up of the chemical properties of the stellar populations inhabiting the galactic core is very fast. Therefore we predict a non significant evolution of both the mass-metallicity and the mass-[alpha/Fe] relations after the first 0.5 - 1 Gyr. In this framework we explain how the observed slopes, either positive or negative, in the radial gradient of the mean stellar [alpha/Fe], and their apparent lack of any correlation with all the other observables, can arise as a consequence of the interplay between star formation and metal-enhanced internal gas flows.
[139]  oai:arXiv.org:0709.0273  [pdf] - 4508
Chemical evolution of Seyfert galaxies
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure, to appear the proceedings of IAUS245 "Formation and Evolution of Galaxy Bulges"
Submitted: 2007-09-03
We computed the chemical evolution of Seyfert galaxies, residing in spiral bulges, based on an updated model for the Milky Way bulge with updated calculations of the Galactic potential and of the feedback from the central supermassive black hole (BH) in a spherical approximation. We followed the evolution of bulges of masses $2\times 10^{9}-10^{11}M_{\odot}$ by scaling the star-formation efficiency and the bulge scalelenght as in the inverse-wind scenario for ellipticals. We successfully reproduced the observed relation between the BH mass and that of the host bulge, and the observed peak nuclear bolometric luminosity. The observed metal overabundances are easily achieved, as well as the constancy of chemical abundances with the redshift.
[140]  oai:arXiv.org:0708.4026  [pdf] - 4375
The Evolution of Oxygen and Magnesium in the Bulge and Disk of the Milky Way
Comments: 22 pages including 5 figures. Submitted to the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2007-08-29
We show that the Galactic bulge and disk share a similar, strong, decline in [O/Mg] ratio with [Mg/H]. The similarity of the [O/Mg] trend in these two, markedly different, populations suggests a metallicity-dependent modulation of the stellar yields from massive stars, by mass loss from winds, and related to the Wolf-Rayet phenomenon, as proposed by McWilliam & Rich (2004). We have modified existing models for the chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge and the solar neighborhood with the inclusion of metallicity-dependent oxygen yields from theoretical predictions for massive stars that include mass loss by stellar winds. Our results significantly improve the agreement between predicted and observed [O/Mg] ratios in the bulge and disk above solar metallicity; however, a small zero-point normalization problem remains to be resolved. The zero-point shift indicates that either the semi-empirical yields of Francois et al. (2004) need adjustment, or that the bulge IMF is not quite as flat as found by Ballero et al. (2007); the former explanation is preferred. Our result removes a previous inconsistency between the interpretation of [O/Fe] and [Mg/Fe] ratios in the bulge, and confirms the conclusion that the bulge formed more rapidly than the disk, based on the over-abundances of elements produced by massive stars. We also provide an explanation for the long-standing difference between [Mg/Fe] and [O/Fe] trends among disk stars more metal-rich than the sun.
[141]  oai:arXiv.org:0707.4108  [pdf] - 3470
What hydrodynamical simulations tell us about the radial properties of the stellar populations in Ellipticals
Comments: 2 pages, to appear on the "Pathways Through an Eclectic Universe" conference proceedings, Eds J. Knapen, T. Mahoney and A. Vazdekis
Submitted: 2007-07-27
Elliptical galaxies probably host the most metal rich stellar populations in the Universe. The processes leading to both the formation and the evolution of such stars are discussed by means of a new gas dynamical model which implements detailed chemical evolution prescriptions. Moreover, the radial variations in the metallicity distribution of these stars are investigated by means of G-dwarf-like diagrams. By comparing model predictions with observations, we derive a picture of galaxy formation in which the higher is the mass of the galaxy, the shorter are the infall and the star formation timescales. The galaxies seem to have formed outside-in, namely the most external regions accrete gas, form stars and develop a galactic wind very quickly (a few Myr) compared to the central core, where the star formation can last up to 1 Gyr. We show for the first time a model able in reproducing the mass-metallicity and the color-magnitude relations as well as the radial metallicity gradient, and, at the same time, the observed either positive or negative slopes in the [alpha/Fe] abundace ratio gradient in stars.
[142]  oai:arXiv.org:0705.1921  [pdf] - 1245
Chemical enrichment of galaxy clusters from hydrodynamical simulations
Comments: to appear on MNRAS
Submitted: 2007-05-12
We present cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters aimed at studying the process of metal enrichment of the intra--cluster medium (ICM). These simulations have been performed by implementing a detailed model of chemical evolution in the Tree-SPH \gd code. This model allows us to follow the metal release from SNII, SNIa and AGB stars, by properly accounting for the lifetimes of stars of different mass, as well as to change the stellar initial mass function (IMF), the lifetime function and the stellar yields. As such, our implementation of chemical evolution represents a powerful instrument to follow the cosmic history of metal production. The simulations presented here have been performed with the twofold aim of checking numerical effects, as well as the impact of changing the model of chemical evolution and the efficiency of stellar feedback.
[143]  oai:arXiv.org:0705.1650  [pdf] - 1188
A new comprehensive set of elemental abundances in DLAs III. Star formation histories
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures, Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2007-05-11
We obtained comprehensive sets of elemental abundances for eleven damped Ly-alpha systems (DLAs) at z_DLA=1.7-2.5. In Paper I of this series, we showed for three DLA galaxies that we can derive their star formation histories and ages from a detailed comparison of their intrinsic abundance patterns with chemical evolution models. We determine in this paper the star formation properties of six additional DLA galaxies. The derived results confirm that no single star formation history explains the diverse sets of abundance patterns in DLAs. We demonstrate that the various star formation histories reproducing the DLA abundance patterns are typical of local irregular, dwarf starburst and quiescent spiral galaxies. Independent of the star formation history, the DLAs have a common characteristic of being weak star forming galaxies; models with high star formation efficiencies are ruled out. All the derived DLA star formation rates per unit area are moderate or low, with values between -3.2 < log SFR < -1.1 M_sol yr^{-1} kpc^{-2}. The DLA abundance patterns require a large spread in ages ranging from 20 Myr up to 3 Gyr. The oldest DLA in our sample is observed at z_DLA=1.864 with an age estimated to more than 3 Gyr; it nicely indicates that galaxies were already forming at z_f>10. But, most of the DLAs show ages much younger than that of the Universe at the epoch of observation. Young galaxies thus seem to populate the high redshift Universe at z>2, suggesting relatively low redshifts of formation (z~3) for most high-redshift galaxies. The DLA star formation properties are compared with those of other high-redshift galaxies identified in deep imaging surveys with the aim of obtaining a global picture of high-redshift objects.
[144]  oai:arXiv.org:0704.2032  [pdf] - 445
Effects of the galactic winds on the stellar metallicity distribution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in Asttronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2007-04-16
To study the effects of galactic winds on the stellar metallicity distributions and on the evolution of Draco and Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxies, we compared the predictions of several chemical evolution models, adopting different prescriptions for the galactic winds, with the photometrically-derived stellar metallicity distributions of both galaxies. The chemical evolution models for Draco and Ursa Minor, which are able to reproduce several observational features of these two galaxies, such as the several abundance ratios, take up-to-date nucleosynthesis into account for intermediate-mass stars and supernovae of both types, as well as the effect of these objects on the energetics of the systems. For both galaxies, the model that best fits the data contains an intense continuous galactic wind, occurring at a rate proportional to the star formation rate. Models with a wind rate assumed to be proportional only to the supernova rate also reproduce the observed SMD, but do not match the gas mass, whereas the models with no galactic winds fail to reproduce the observed SMDs. In the case of Ursa Minor, the same model as in previous works reproduces the observed distribution very well with no need to modify the main parameters of the model. The model for Draco, on the other hand, is slightly modified. The observed SMD requires a model with a lower supernova type Ia thermalization efficiency ($\eta_{SNeIa}$ = 0.5 instead of $\eta_{SNeIa}$ = 1.0) in order to delay the galactic wind, whereas all the other parameters are kept the same. The model results, compared to observations, strongly suggest that intense and continuous galactic winds play a very important role in the evolution of local dSphs.
[145]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0609410  [pdf] - 85002
The impact of stellar rotation on the CNO abundance patterns in the Milky Way at low metallicities
Comments: Contribution to Nuclei in the Cosmos IX (Proceedings of Science - 9 pages, 4 figs., accepted) - Version 2: one reference added in the caption of Fig. 2
Submitted: 2006-09-14, last modified: 2007-04-13
We investigate the effect of new stellar models, which take rotation into account, computed for very low metallicities on the chemical evolution of the earliest phases of the Milky Way. We check the impact of these new stellar yields on a model for the halo of the Milky Way that can reproduce the observed halo metallicity distribution. In this way we try to better constrain the ISM enrichment timescale, which was not done in our previous work. The stellar models adopted in this work were computed under the assumption that the ratio of the initial rotation velocity to the critical velocity of stars is roughly constant with metallicity. This naturally leads to faster rotation at lower metallicity, as metal poor stars are more compact than metal rich ones. We find that the new Z = 10-8 stellar yields computed for large rotational velocities have a tremendous impact on the interstellar medium nitrogen enrichment for log(O/H)+12 < 7 (or [Fe/H]< -3). We show that upon the inclusion of the new stellar calculations in a chemical evolution model for the galactic halo with infall and outflow, both high N/O and C/O ratios are obtained in the very-metal poor metallicity range in agreement with observations. Our results give further support to the idea that stars at very low metallicities could have initial rotational velocities of the order of 600-800kms-1. An important contribution to N from AGB stars is still needed in order to explain the observations at intermediate metallicities. One possibility is that AGB stars at very low metallicities also rotate fast. This could be tested in the future, once stellar evolution models for fast rotating AGB stars will be available.
[146]  oai:arXiv.org:0704.0770  [pdf] - 146
Chemical Evolution
Comments: 56 pages, Lectures delivered at the XVIII Canarie Winter School on "Emission Lines Universe"
Submitted: 2007-04-05
In this series of lectures we first describe the basic ingredients of galactic chemical evolution and discuss both analytical and numerical models. Then we compare model results for the Milky Way, Dwarf Irregulars, Quasars and the Intra-Cluster- Medium with abundances derived from emission lines. These comparisons allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar nucleosynthesis and the mechanisms of galaxy formation.
[147]  oai:arXiv.org:0704.0535  [pdf] - 1944030
The Formation of Globular Cluster Systems in Massive Elliptical Galaxies: Globular Cluster Multimodality from Radial Variation of Stellar Populations
Comments: 32 pages (referee format), 9 figures, ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2007-04-04
The most massive elliptical galaxies show a prominent multi-modality in their globular cluster system color distributions. Understanding the mechanisms which lead to multiple globular cluster sub-populations is essential for a complete picture of massive galaxy formation. By assuming that globular cluster formation traces the total star formation and taking into account the radial variations in the composite stellar populations predicted by the Pipino & Matteucci (2004) multi-zone photo-chemical evolution code, we compute the distribution of globular cluster properties as a function of galactocentric radius. We compare our results to the spectroscopic measurements of globular clusters in nearby early-type galaxies by Puzia et al. (2006) and show that the observed multi-modality in globular cluster systems of massive ellipticals can be, at least partly, ascribed to the radial variation in the mix of stellar populations. Our model predicts the presence of a super-metal-rich population of globular clusters in the most massive elliptical galaxies, which is in very good agreement with the spectroscopic observations. Furthermore, we investigate the impact of other non-linear mechanisms that shape the metallicity distribution of globular cluster systems, in particular the role of merger-induced globular cluster formation and a non-linear color-metallicity transformation, and discuss their influence in the context of our model (abridged)
[148]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0703760  [pdf] - 90569
Contrasting copper evolution in Omega Centauri and the Milky Way
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures; accepted for publication in MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2007-03-29
Despite the many studies on stellar nucleosynthesis published so far, the scenario for the production of Cu in stars remains elusive. In particular, it is still debated whether copper originates mostly in massive stars or type Ia supernovae. To answer this question, we compute self-consistent chemical evolution models taking into account the results of updated stellar nucleosynthesis. By contrasting copper evolution in Omega Cen and the Milky Way, we end up with a picture where massive stars are the major responsible for the production of Cu in Omega Cen as well as the Galactic disc.
[149]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0702714  [pdf] - 89768
On the evolution of the Fe abundance and of the Type Ia SN rate in clusters of galaxies
Comments: MNRAS, in press, 6 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2007-02-27
The study of the Fe abundance in the intra cluster medium (ICM) provides strong constraints on the integrated star formation history and supernova rate of the cluster galaxies, as well as on the ICM enrichment mechanisms. In this Letter, using chemical evolution models for galaxies of different morphological types, we study the evolution of the Fe content of clusters of galaxies. We assume that the ICM Fe enrichment occurs by means of galactic winds arising from elliptical galaxies and from gas stripped from the progenitors of S0 galaxies via external mechanisms, due to the interaction of the inter stellar medium with the ICM. The Fe-rich gas ejected by ellipticals accounts for the X_Fe,ICM values observed at z > 0.5, whereas the gas stripped from the progenitors of the S0 galaxies accounts for the increase of X_Fe,ICM observed at z<0.5. We tested two different scenarios for Type Ia supernova (SN) progenitors and we model the Type Ia SN rate observed in clusters, finding a good agreement between our predictions and the available observations.
[150]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0702652  [pdf] - 89706
The connection between Gamma-ray bursts and Supernovae Ib/c
Comments: A&A, in press, 15 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2007-02-26
It has been established that Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are connected to Supernovae (SNe) explosions of Type Ib/c. We intend to test whether the hypothesis of Type Ib/c SNe from different massive progenitors can reproduce the local GRB rate as well as the GRB rate as a function of redshift. We aim to predict the GRB rate at very high redshift under different assumptions about galaxy formation and star formation histories in galaxies. We assume different star formation histories in galaxies of different morphological type: ellipticals, spirals and irregulars. We explore different hypotheses concerning the progenitors of Type Ib/c SNe. We find an excellent agreement between the observed GRB local rate and the predicted Type Ib/c SN rate in irregular galaxies, when a range for single Wolf-Rayet stars of 40-100 M_sun is adopted. We also predict the cosmic Type Ib/c SN rate by taking into account all the galaxy types in an unitary volume of the Universe and we compare it with the observed cosmic GRB rate as a function of redshift. By assuming the formation of spheroids at high redshift, we predict a cosmic Type Ib/c SN rate, which is always higher than the GRB rate, suggesting that only a small fraction (0.1-1 %) of Type Ib/c SNe become GRBs. In particular, we find a ratio between the cosmic GRB rate and the cosmic Type Ib/c rate in the range 0.001-0.01, in agreement with previous estimates. Finally, due to the high star formation in spheroids at high redshift, which is our preferred scenario for galaxy formation, we predict more GRBs at high redshift than in the hierarchical scenario for galaxy formation, a prediction which awaits to be proven by future observations.
[151]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0702137  [pdf] - 89191
Formation & evolution of the Galactic bulge: constraints from stellar abundances
Comments: 26 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2007-02-05
We compute the chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge in the context of an inside-out model for the formation of the Milky Way. The model contains updated stellar yields from massive stars. The main purpose of the paper is to compare the predictions of this model with new observations of chemical abundance ratios and metallicity distributions in order to put constraints on the formation and evolution of the bulge. We computed the evolution of several alpha-elements and Fe and performed several tests by varying different parameters such as star formation efficiency, slope of the initial mass function and infall timescale. We also tested the effect of adopting a primary nitrogen contribution from massive stars. The [alpha/Fe] abundance ratios in the Bulge are predicted to be supersolar for a very large range in [Fe/H], each element having a different slope. These predictions are in very good agreement with most recent accurate abundance determinations. We also find a good fit of the most recent Bulge stellar metallicity distributions. We conclude that the Bulge formed on a very short timescale (even though timescales much shorter than about 0.1 Gyr are excluded) with a quite high star formation efficiency of about 20 Gyr$^{-1}$ and with an initial mass function more skewed toward high masses (i.e. x <= 0.95) than the solar neighbourhood and rest of the disk. The results obtained here are more robust than previous ones since they are based on very accurate abundance measurements.
[152]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0702047  [pdf] - 89101
Testing the universal stellar IMF on the metallicity distribution in the bulges of the Milky Way and M31
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2007-02-01
We test whether the universal initial mass function (UIMF) or the integrated galaxial IMF (IGIMF) can be employed to explain the metallicity distribution (MD) of giants in the Galactic bulge. We make use of a single-zone chemical evolution model developed for the Milky Way bulge in the context of an inside-out model for the formation of the Galaxy. We checked whether it is possible to constrain the yields above $80 M_{\sun}$ by forcing the UIMF and required that the resulting MD matches the observed ones. We also extended the analysis to the bulge of M31 to investigate a possible variation of the IMF among galactic bulges. Several parameters that have an impact on stellar evolution (star-formation efficiency, gas infall timescale) are varied. We show that it is not possible to satisfactorily reproduce the observed metallicity distribution in the two galactic bulges unless assuming a flatter IMF ($x \leq 1.1$) than the universal one. We conlude that it is necessary to assume a variation in the IMF among the various environments.
[153]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0701162  [pdf] - 88291
The chemical evolution of Omega Centauri's progenitor system
Comments: 11 pages, 9 figures; accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2007-01-07
Chemical evolution models are presented for the anomalous globular cluster Omega Centauri. After demonstrating that the chemical features of Omega Cen can not be reproduced in the framework of the closed-box self-enrichment scenario, we discuss a model in which this cluster is the remnant of a dwarf spheroidal galaxy evolved in isolation and then swallowed by the Milky Way. Both infall of primordial matter and metal-enriched gas outflows have to be considered in order to reproduce the stellar metallicity distribution function, the age-metallicity relation and several abundance ratios. Yet, as long as an ordinary stellar mass function and standard stellar yields are assumed, we fail by far to get the enormous helium enhancement required to explain the blue main sequence (and, perhaps, the extreme horizontal branch) stellar data. Rotating models of massive stars producing stellar winds with large helium excesses at low metallicities have been put forward as promising candidates to solve the `helium enigma' of Omega Cen (Maeder & Meynet, 2006, A&A, 448, L37). However, we show that for any reasonable choice of the initial mass function the helium-to-metal enrichment of the integrated stellar population is unavoidably much lower than 70 and conclude that the issue of the helium enhancement in Omega Cen still waits for a satisfactory explanation. We briefly speculate upon possible solutions.
[154]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0611650  [pdf] - 87036
Formation and evolution of the Galactic bulge: constraints from stellar abundances
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, to appear on "The Metal Rich Universe" Conference Proceedings
Submitted: 2006-11-20
We present results for the chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge in the context of an inside-out formation model of the Galaxy. A supernova-driven wind was also included in analogy with elliptical galaxies. New observations of chemical abundance ratios and metallicity distribution have been employed in order to check the model results. We confirm previous findings that the bulge formed on a very short timescale with a quite high star formation efficiency and an initial mass function more skewed toward high masses than the one suitable for the solar neighbourhood. A certain amount of primary nitrogen from massive stars might be required to reproduce the nitrogen data at low and intermediate metallicities.
[155]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610832  [pdf] - 86256
Chemical Evolution Models of Ellipticals and Bulges
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figure, to appear on "The Metal Rich Universe" Conference Proceedings
Submitted: 2006-10-27
We review some of the models of chemical evolution of ellipticals and bulges of spirals. In particular, we focuse on the star formationn histories of ellipticals and their influence on chemical properties such as the [alpha/Fe] versus [Fe/H], galactic mass and visual magnitudes. By comparing models with observational properties, we can constrain the timescales for the formation of these galaxies. The observational properties of stellar populations suggest that the more massive ellipticals formed on a shorter timescale than less massive ones, in the sense that both the star formation rate and the mass assembly rate, strictly linked properties, were more efficient in the most massive objects. Observational properties of true bulges seem to suggest that they are very similar to ellipticals and that they formed on a very short timescale: for the bulge of the Milky Way we suggest a timescale of 0.1 Gyr. This leads us to conclude that the Bulge evolved in a quite independent way from the galactic Disk.
[156]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610831  [pdf] - 86255
The metallicity distribution of the stars in elliptical galaxies
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, to appear on "The Metal Rich Universe" Conference Proceedings
Submitted: 2006-10-27
Elliptical galaxies probably host the most metal rich stellar populations in the Universe. The processes leading to both the formation and the evolution of such stars are discussed by means of a new multi-zone photo-chemical evolution model, taking into account detailed nucleosynthetic yields, feedback from supernovae, Pop III stars and an initial infall episode. Moreover, the radial variations in the metallicity distribution of these stars are investigated by means of G-dwarf-like diagrams. By comparing model predictions with observations, we derive a picture of galaxy formation in which the higher is the mass of the galaxy, the shorter are the infall and the star formation timescales. Therefore, the stellar component of the most massive and luminous galaxies might attain a metallicity Z > Z_sun in only 0.5 Gyr. Each galaxy is created outside-in, i.e. the outermost regions accrete gas, form stars and develop a galactic wind very quickly, compared to the central core in which the star formation can last up to ~1.3 Gyr. This finding will be discussed at the light of recent observations of the galaxy NGC 4697 which clearly show a strong radial gradient in the mean stellar [<Mg/Fe>] ratio.
[157]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0609813  [pdf] - 85405
Abundance gradients in the Milky Way for alpha elements, Iron peak elements, Barium, Lanthanum and Europium
Comments: 11 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2006-09-29
We model the abundance gradients in the disk of the Milky Way for several chemical elements (O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, Co, V, Fe, Ni, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cr, Ba, La and Eu), and compare our results with the most recent and homogeneous observational data. We adopt a chemical evolution model able to well reproduce the main properties of the solar vicinity. We compute, for the first time, the abundance gradients for all the above mentioned elements in the galactocentric distance range 4 - 22 kpc. The comparison with the observed data on Cepheids in the galactocentric distance range 5-17 kpc gives a very good agreement for many of the studied elements. In addition, we fit very well the data for the evolution of Lanthanum in the solar vicinity for which we present results here for the first time. We explore, also for the first time, the behaviour of the abundance gradients at large galactocentric distances by comparing our results with data relative to distant open clusters and red giants and select the best chemical evolution model model on the basis of that. We find a very good fit to the observed abundance gradients, as traced by Cepheids, for most of the elements, thus confirming the validity of the inside-out scenario for the formation of the Milky Way disk as well as the adopted nucleosynthesis prescriptions.
[158]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0608598  [pdf] - 84475
Early spectral evolution of Nova Sgr 2004 (V5114 Sgr)
Comments: accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics, 16 pages and 8 figures
Submitted: 2006-08-28
We present optical and near-infrared spectral evolution of the Galactic nova V5114 Sgr (2004) during few months after the outburst. We use multi-band photometry and line intensities derived from spectroscopy to put constrains on the distance and the physical conditions of the ejecta of V5114 Sgr. The nova showed a fast decline (t_2 \simeq 11 days) and spectral features of FeII spectroscopic class. It reached M_V = -8.7 \pm 0.2 mag at maximum light, from which we derive a distance of 7700 \pm 700 kpc and a distance from the galactic plane of about 800 pc. Hydrogen and Oxygen mass of the ejecta are measured from emission lines, leading to 10^{-6} and 10^{-7} M_\odot, respectively. We compute the filling factor of the ejecta to be in the range 0.1 -- 10^{-3} . We found the value of the filling factor to decrease with time. The same is also observed in other novae, then giving support to the idea that nova shells are not homogeneously filled in, rather being the material clumped in relatively higher density blobs less affected by the general expanding motion of the ejecta.
[159]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0607674  [pdf] - 83877
Cosmic Supernova Rates and the Hubble Sequence
Comments: ApJ, accepted for publication. 17 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2006-07-31
We compute the type Ia, Ib/c and II supernova (SN) rates as functions of the cosmic time for galaxies of different morphological types. We use four different chemical evolution models, each one reproducing the features of a particular morphological type: E/S0, S0a/b, Sbc/d and Irr galaxies. We essentially describe the Hubble sequence by means of decreasing efficiency of star formation and increasing infall timescale. These models are used to study the evolution of the SN rates per unit luminosity and per unit mass as functions of cosmic time and as functions of the Hubble type. Our results indicate that: (i) the observed increase of the SN rate per unit luminosity and unit mass from early to late galaxy types is accounted for by our models. Our explanation of this effect is related to the fact that the latest Hubble types have the highest star formation rate per unit mass; (ii) By adopting a Scalo (1986) initial mass function in spiral disks, we find that massive single stars ending their lives as Wolf-Rayet objects are not sufficient to account for the observed type Ib/c SN rate per unit mass. Less massive stars in close binary systems can give instead a significant contribution to the local Ib/c SN rates. On the other hand, with the assumption of a Salpeter (1955) IMF for all galaxy types, single massive WR stars are sufficient to account for the observed type Ib/c SN rate. (iii) Our models allow us to reproduce the observed type Ia SN rate density up to redshift z~1. We predict an increasing type Ia SN rate density with redshift, reaching a peak at redshift z >= 3, because of the contribution of massive spheroids.
[160]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0607504  [pdf] - 83707
A new formulation of the Type Ia SN rate and its consequences on galactic chemical evolution
Comments: 11 pages, 11 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2006-07-21
In recent papers Mannucci et al. (2005, 2006) suggested, on the basis of observational arguments, that there is a bimodal distribution of delay times for the explosion of Type Ia SNe. In this paper, we test this hypothesis in models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type: ellipticals, spirals and irregulars. We show that this proposed scenario is compatible also with the main chemical properties of galaxies. When the new rate is introduced in the two-infall model for the Milky Way, the derived Type Ia SN rate as a function of cosmic time shows a high and broad peak at very early epochs thus influencing the chemical evolution of the galactic halo more than in the previous widely adopted formulations for the SNIa rate. As a consequence of this, the [O/Fe] ratio decreases faster for [Fe/H] > -2.0 dex, relative to the old models. For a typical elliptical of 10^11 M_sun of luminous mass, the new rate produces average [alpha/ Fe] ratios in the dominant stellar population still in agreement with observations. The Type Ia SN rate also in this case shows an earlier peak and a subsequent faster decline relative to the previous results, but the differences are smaller than in the case of our Galaxy. We have also checked the effects of the new Type Ia SN rate on the evolution of the Fe content in the ICM, as a consequence of its production from cluster ellipticals and we found that less Fe in the ICM is produced with the new rate, due to the higher fraction of Fe synthesized at early times and remaining locked into the stars in ellipticals. For dwarf irregular galaxies suffering few bursts of star formation we obtain [O/Fe] ratios larger by 0.2 dex relative to the previous models.
[161]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603816  [pdf] - 81025
SNe feedback and the formation of elliptical galaxies
Comments: 3 pages, 2 figures, contributed paper to be published in the proceedings of" Origin of Matter and Evolution of Galaxies - New Horizon of Nuclear Astrophysics and Cosmology", Ed.S.Kubono
Submitted: 2006-03-30
The processes governing both the formation and evolution of elliptical galaxies are discussed by means of a new multi-zone photo-chemical evolution model for elliptical galaxies, taking into account detailed nucleosynthetic yields, feedback from supernovae, Pop III stars and an initial infall episode. By comparing model predictions with observations, we derive a picture of galaxy formation in which the higher is the mass of the galaxy, the shorter are the infall and the star formation timescales. In particular, by means of our model, we are able to reproduce the overabundance of Mg relative to Fe, observed in the nuclei of bright ellipticals, and its increase with galactic mass. This is a clear sign of an anti-hierarchical formation process. Therefore, in this scenario, the most massive objects are older than the less massive ones, in the sense that larger galaxies stop forming stars at earlier times. Each galaxy is created outside-in, i.e. the outermost regions accrete gas, form stars and develop a galactic wind very quickly, compared to the central core in which the star formation can last up to ~1.3 Gyr. This finding will be discussed at the light of recent observations of the galaxy NGC 4697 which clearly show a strong radial gradient in the mean stellar [<Mg/Fe>] ratio. The role of galactic winds in the IGM/ICM enrichment will also be discussed.
[162]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603820  [pdf] - 81029
The chemical evolution of the Milky Way: from light to heavy elements
Comments: 8 pages, 7 figures, invited talk to be published in the proceedings of" Origin of Matter and Evolution of Galaxies - New Horizon of Nuclear Astrophysics and Cosmology", Ed.S.Kubono
Submitted: 2006-03-30
We present results for the chemical evolution of the Milky Way including predictions for elements from Deuterium to Europium. A comparison with the most accurate and recent data allows us to draw important conclusions on stellar nucleosynthesis processes as well as on mechanisms of galaxy formation.
[163]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0602311  [pdf] - 79887
Cosmic evolution of metal densities: the enrichment of the Inter-Galactic Medium
Comments: 18 pages, 8 figures, MNRAS, accepted for publication. Minor changes after referee report
Submitted: 2006-02-14, last modified: 2006-03-21
By means of chemo-photometric models for galaxies of different morhological types, we have carried out a detailed study of the history of element production by spheroidal and dwarf irregular galaxies. Spheroidal galaxies suffer a strong and intense star formation episode at early times. In dwarf irregulars, the SFR proceeds at a low regime but continuously. Both galactic types enrich the IGM with metals, by means of galactic winds. We have assumed that the galaxy number density is fixed and normalized to the value of the optical luminosity function observed in the local universe. Our models allow us to investigate in detail how the metal fractions locked up in spheroid and dwarf irregular stars, in the ISM and ejected into the IGM have changed with cosmic time. By relaxing the instantaneous recycling approximation and taking into account stellar lifetimes, for the first time we have studied the evolution of the chemical abundance ratios in the IGM and compared our predictions with a set of observations by various authors. Our results indicate that the bulk of the IGM enrichment is due to spheroids, with dwarf irregular galaxies playing a negligible role. Our predictions grossly account for the [O/H] observed in the IGM at high redshift, but overestimate the [C/H]. Furthermore, it appears hard to reproduce the abundance ratios observed in the high-redshift IGM. Some possible explanations are discussed in the text. This is the first attempt to study the abundance ratios in the IGM by means of detailed chemical evolution models which take into account the stellar lifetimes. Numerical simulations adopting our chemical evolution prescriptions could be useful to improve our understanding of the IGM chemical enrichment.
[164]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603577  [pdf] - 80786
Detailed Chemical Evolution of Carina and Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in Asttronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2006-03-21
In order to verify the effects of the most recent data on the evolution of Carina and Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies (dSph) and to set tight constraints on the main parameters of chemical evolution models, we study in detail the chemical evolution of these galaxies through comparisons between the new data and the predictions of a model, already tested to reproduce the main observational constraints in dSphs. Several abundance ratios, such as [$\alpha$/Fe], [Ba/Fe] and [Eu/Fe], and the metallicity distribution of stars are compared to the predictions of our models adopting the observationally derived star formation histories in these galaxies. These new comparisons confirm our previously suggested scenario for the evolution of these galaxies, and allow us to better fix the star formation and wind parameters. In particular, for Carina the comparisons indicate that the best efficiency of star formation is $\nu = 0.15 Gyr^{-1}$, that the best wind efficiency parameter is $w_i$ = 5 (the wind rate is five times stronger than the star formation rate), and that the star formation history, which produces the best fit to the observed metallicity distribution of stars is characterized by several episodes of activity. In the case of Sagittarius our results suggest that $\nu=3 Gyr^{-1}$ and $w_i=9$, again in agreement with our previous work. Finally, we show new predictions for [N/Fe] and [C/Fe] ratios for the two galaxies suggesting a scenario for Sagittarius very similar to the one of the solar vicinity in the Milky Way, except for a slight decrease of [N/Fe] ratio at high metallicities due to the galactic wind. For Carina we predict a larger [N/Fe] ratio at low metallicities, reflecting the lower star formation efficiency of this galaxy relative to Sagittarius and the Milky Way.
[165]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603261  [pdf] - 80470
Metals and dust in high redshift AGNs
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, invited talk at the Workshop "AGN and galaxy evolution", Specola Vaticana, Castel Gandolfo, Italy, 3-6 October 2005
Submitted: 2006-03-10
We summarize some recent results on the metallicity and dust properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at high redshift (1<z<6.4). By using the spectra of more than 5000 QSOs from the SDSS we find no evidence for any metallicity evolution in the redshift range 2<z<4.5, while there is a significant luminosity-metallicity dependence. These results are confirmed by the spectra of a smaller sample of narrow line AGNs at high-z (QSO2s and radio galaxies). The lack of metallicity evolution is interpreted both as a consequence of the cosmic downsizing and as a selection effect resulting from the joint QSO-galaxy evolution. The luminosity-metallicity relation is interpreted as a consequence of the mass-metallicity relation in the host galaxies of QSOs, but a relationship with the accretion rate is also possible. The lack of metallicity evolution is observed even in the spectra of the most distant QSOs known (z~6). This result is particularly surprising for elements such as Fe, C and Si, which are subject to a delayed enrichment, and requires that the hosts of these QSOs formed in short bursts and at very high redshift (z>10). The properties of dust in high-z QSOs are discussed within the context of the dust production mechanisms in the early universe. The dust extinction curve is observed to evolve beyond z>4, and by z~6 it is well described by the properties expected for dust produced by SNe, suggesting that the latter is the main mechanism of dust production in the early universe. We also show that the huge dust masses observed in distant QSOs can be accounted for by SN dust within the observational constraints currently available. Finally, we show that QSO winds, which have been proposed as an alternative mechanism of dust production, may also contribute significantly to the total dust budget at high redshift.
[166]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603190  [pdf] - 80399
Deuterium astration in the local disc and beyond
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2006-03-08
(Abridged) Estimates of the interstellar deuterium abundance span a wide range of values. Here we study the evolution of deuterium in the framework of successful models for the chemical evolution of the Milky Way able to reproduce the majority of the observational constraints for the solar neighbourhood and for the Galactic disc. We show that, in the framework of our models, the lowest D/H values observed locally cannot be explained in terms of simple astration processes occurring during the Galaxy evolution. Indeed, the combination of a mild star formation and a continuous infall of unprocessed gas required to fit all the available observational data allows only a modest variation of the deuterium abundance from its primordial value.
[167]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0602459  [pdf] - 80035
A strong case for fast stellar rotation at very low metallicities
Comments: 4 pages, A&A Letters (accepted)
Submitted: 2006-02-21
We investigate the effect of new stellar models, which take rotation into account, computed for a metallicity Z = 10^{-8} on the chemical evolution of the earliest phases of the Milky Way. These models are computed under the assumption that the ratio of the initial rotation velocity to the critical velocity of stars is roughly constant with metallicity. This naturally leads to faster rotation at lower metallicity, as metal poor stars are more compact than metal rich ones. We find that the new Z = 10^{-8} stellar yields have a tremendous impact on the interstellar medium nitrogen enrichment for log(O/H)+12 < 7 (or [Fe/H]< -3).We show that upon the inclusion of the Z = 10^{-8} stellar yields in chemical evolution models, both high N/O and C/O ratios are obtained in the very-metal poor metallicity range in agreement with observations. Our results give further support to the idea that stars at very low metallicities could have rotational velocities of the order of 600-800 km s^{-1}.
[168]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0511031  [pdf] - 77389
A new comprehensive set of elemental abundances in DLAs - II. Data analysis and chemical variation studies
Comments: 45 pages, 33 figures (high-resolution figures available on request from the authors or in the A&A journal). Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2005-11-01
We present new elemental abundance studies of seven damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs). Together with the four DLAs analyzed in Dessauges-Zavadsky et al. (2004), we have a sample of eleven DLA galaxies with uniquely comprehensive and homogeneous abundance measurements. These observations allow one to study the abundance patterns of 22 elements and the chemical variations in the interstellar medium of galaxies outside the Local Group. Comparing the gas-phase abundance ratios of these high redshift galaxies, we found that they show low RMS dispersions, reaching only up 2-3 times the statistical errors for the majority of elements. This uniformity is remarkable given that the quasar sightlines cross gaseous regions with HI column densities spanning over one order of magnitude and metallicities ranging from 1/55 to 1/5 solar. The gas-phase abundance patterns of interstellar medium clouds within the DLA galaxies detected along the velocity profiles show, on the other hand, a high dispersion in several abundance ratios, indicating that chemical variations seem to be more confined to individual clouds within the DLA galaxies than to integrated profiles. The analysis of the cloud-to-cloud chemical variations within seven individual DLAs reveals that five of them show statistically significant variations, higher than 0.2 dex at more than 3 sigma. The sources of these variations are both the differential dust depletion and/or ionization effects; however, no evidence for variations due to different star formation histories could be highlighted. These observations place large constraints on the mixing timescales of protogalaxies and on scenarios of galaxy formation within the CDM hierarchical theory. Finally, we provide an astrophysical determination of the oscillator strength of the NiII 1317 transition.
[169]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510556  [pdf] - 77052
The outside-in formation of elliptical galaxies
Comments: 15 pages, 10 figures, ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2005-10-19, last modified: 2005-10-21
In this paper we compare the predictions of a detailed multi-zone chemical evolution model for elliptical galaxies with the very recent observations of the galaxy NGC 4697. As a consequence of the earlier development of the wind in the outer regions with respect to the inner ones, we predict an increase of the mean stellar [<Mg/Fe>] ratio with radius, in very good agreement with the data for NGC4697. This finding strongly supports the proposed outside-in formation scenario for ellipticals. We show that, in spite of the good agreement found for the [<Mg/Fe>] ratio, the predicted slope of the mass-weighted metallicity gradient does not reproduce the one derived from observations, once a calibration to convert indices into abundances is applied. This is explained as the consequence of the different behaviour with metallicity of the line-strength indices as predicted by a Single Stellar Population (SSP) and those derived by averaging over a Composite Stellar Population (CSP). In order to better address this issue, we calculate the theoretical ``G-dwarf'' distributions of stars as functions of both metallicity ([Z/H]) and [Fe/H], showing that they are broad and asymmetric that a SSP cannot correctly mimick the mixture of stellar populations at any given radius. We find that these distributions differ from the ``G-dwarf'' distributions especially at large radii,except for the one as a function of [Mg/Fe]. Therefore, we conclude that in ellipticals the [Mg/Fe] ratio is the most reliable quantity to be compared with observations and is the best estimator of the star formation timescale at each radius.(abridged)
[170]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510609  [pdf] - 77105
Photo-chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies II. The impact of merging-induced starbursts
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2005-10-20
The effects of late gas accretion episodes and subsequent merger-induced starbursts on the photo-chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies are studied and compared to the picture of galaxy formation occurring at high redshift with an unique and intense starburst modulated by a very short infall, as suggested by Pipino & Matteucci (2004, Paper I). By means of the comparison with the the colour-magnitude relations and the [<Mg/Fe>_V]-sigma relation observed in ellipticals, we conclude that either bursts involving a gas mass comparable to the mass already transformed into stars during the first episode of star formation and occurring at any redshift, or bursts occurring at low redshift (i.e. z<0.2) and with a large range of accreted mass, are ruled out. These models fail in matching the above relations even if the initial infall hypothesis is relaxed, and the galaxies form either by means of more complicated star formation histories or by means of the classical monolithic model. On the other hand, galaxies accreting a small amount of gas at high redshift (i.e. z>3) produce a spread in the model results, with respect to Paper I best model, which is consistent with the observational scatter of the color-magnitude relations, although there is only marginal agreement with the [<Mg/Fe>_V]-sigma relation. Therefore, only small perturbations to the standard scenario seem to be allowed. We stress that the strongest constraints to galaxy formation mechanisms are represented by the chemical abundances, whereas the colours can be reproduced under several different hypotheses.
[171]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510496  [pdf] - 76992
The chemical evolution of Barium and Europium in the Milky Way
Comments: 14 pages, 17 figures, accepted for pubblication in A&A
Submitted: 2005-10-17
We compute the evolution of the abundances of barium and europium in the Milky Way and we compare our results with the observed abundances from the recent UVES Large Program "First Stars". We use a chemical evolution model which already reproduces the majority of observational constraints. We confirm that barium is a neutron capture element mainly produced in the low mass AGB stars during the thermal-pulsing phase by the 13C neutron source, in a slow neutron capture process. However, in order to reproduce the [Ba/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] as well as the Ba solar abundance, we suggest that Ba should be also produced as an r-process element by massive stars in the range 10-30 solar masses. On the other hand, europium should be only an r-process element produced in the same range of masses (10-30 solar masses), at variance with previous suggestions indicating a smaller mass range for the Eu producers. As it is well known, there is a large spread in the [Ba/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] ratios at low metallicities, although smaller in the newest data. With our model we estimate for both elements (Ba and Eu) the ranges for the r-process yields from massive stars which better reproduce the trend of the data. We find that with the same yields which are able to explain the observed trends, the large spread in the [Ba/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] ratios cannot be explained even in the context of an inhomogeneous models for the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. We therefore derive the amount by which the yields should be modified to fully account for the observed spread. We then discuss several possibilities to explain the size of the spread. We finally suggest that the production ratio of [Ba/Eu] could be almost constant in the massive stars.
[172]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510113  [pdf] - 1468969
Formation and evolution of late-type dwarf galaxies. I. NGC 1705 and NGC 1569
Comments: 20 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication on MNRAS
Submitted: 2005-10-05
(Abridged.) We present one-zone chemical evolution models for two dwarf starburst galaxies, NGC 1705 and NGC 1569. Using information about the past star formation history and initial mass function of the systems previously obtained from Hubble Space Telescope colour-magnitude diagrams, we identify possible scenarios of chemical enrichment and development of galactic winds. In order not to overestimate the current metallicity of the interstellar gas inferred from H II region spectroscopy, we suggest that the winds efficiently remove from the galaxies the metal-rich ejecta of dying stars. Conversely, requiring the final mass of neutral gas to match the value inferred from 21-cm observations implies a relatively low efficiency of interstellar medium entrainment in the outflow, thus confirming previous findings that the winds driving the evolution of typical starbursts are differential. These conclusions could be different only if the galaxies accrete huge fractions of unprocessed gas at late times. By assuming standard stellar yields we obtain a good fit to the observed nitrogen to oxygen ratio of NGC 1569, while the mean N/O ratio in NGC 1705 is overestimated by the models. Reducing the extent of hot bottom burning in low-metallicity intermediate-mass stars does not suffice to solve the problem. Localized self-pollution from stars more massive than 60 MSun in NGC 1705 and/or funneling of larger fractions of nitrogen through its winds are then left to explain the discrepancy between model predictions and observations. Inspection of the log(N/O) vs. log(O/H)+12 diagram for a sample of dwarf irregular and blue compact dwarf galaxies in the literature favours the latter hypothesis.
[173]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510142  [pdf] - 76638
The Evolution of Barium and Europium in Local Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies
Comments: 13 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2005-10-05
By means of a detailed chemical evolution model, we follow the evolution of barium and europium in four Local Group Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies, in order to set constraints on the nucleosynthesis of these elements and on the evolution of this type of galaxies compared with the Milky Way. The model, which is able to reproduce several observed abundance ratios and the present day total mass and gas mass content of these galaxies, adopts up to date nucleosynthesis and takes into account the role played by supernovae of different types (II, Ia) allowing us to follow in detail the evolution of several chemical elements (H, D, He, C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, Ba and Eu). By assuming that barium is a neutron capture element produced in low mass AGB stars by s-process but also in massive stars (in the mass range 10 - 30 $M_{\odot}$) by r-process, during the explosive event of supernovae of type II, and that europium is a pure r-process element synthesized in massive stars also in the range of masses 10 - 30 $M_{\odot}$, we are able to reproduce the observed [Ba/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] as functions of [Fe/H] in all four galaxies studied. We confirm also the important role played by the very low star formation efficiencies ($\nu$ = 0.005 - 0.5 Gyr$^{-1}$) and by the intense galactic winds (6-13 times the star formation rate) in the evolution of these galaxies. These low star formation efficiencies (compared to the one for the Milky Way disc) adopted for the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies are the main reason for the differences between the trends of [Ba/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] predicted and observed in these galaxies and in the metal-poor stars of our Galaxy. Finally, we provide predictions for Sagittarius galaxy for which data of only two stars are available.
[174]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0509381  [pdf] - 75963
Dynamical and chemical evolution of NGC1569
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, A&A accepted
Submitted: 2005-09-14
Blue Compact Dwarf and Dwarf Irregular galaxies are generally believed to be unevolved objects, due to their blue colors, compact appearance and large gas fractions. Many of these objects show an ongoing intense burst of star formation or have experienced it in the recent past. By means of 2-D hydrodynamical simulations, coupled with detailed chemical yields originating from SNeII, SNeIa, and intermediate-mass stars, we study the dynamical and chemical evolution of model galaxies with structural parameters similar to NGC1569, a prototypical starburst galaxy. A burst of star formation with short duration is not able to account for the chemical and morphological properties of this galaxy. The best way to reproduce the chemical composition of this object is by assuming long-lasting episodes of star formation and a more recent burst, separated from the previous episodes by a short quiescent period. The last burst of star formation, in most of the explored cases, does not affect the chemical composition of the galaxy, since the enriched gas produced by young stars is in a too hot phase to be detectable with the optical spectroscopy. Models assuming the infall of a big cloud towards the center of the galaxy reproduce the chemical composition of the NGC1569, but the pressure exercised by the cloud hampers the expansion of the galactic wind, at variance with what observed in NGC1569.
[175]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0508526  [pdf] - 75415
The effects of Population III stars and variable IMF on the chemical evolution of the Galaxy
Comments: 30 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in New Astronomy
Submitted: 2005-08-24
We studied the effects of a hypothetical initial stellar generation (PopIII) of only massive and very massive stars (VMS) on the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. We adopted the two-infall chemical evolution model of Chiappini et al. and tested several sets of yields for primordial VMS (Pair-Creation SNe), which produce different amounts of heavy elements than lower mass stars. We focused on the evolution of alpha-elements, C, N, Fe. The effects of PopIII stars on the Galactic evolution of these elements is negligible if a few generations of such stars occurred, whereas they produce different results from the standard models if they formed for a longer period. Also the effects of a more strongly variable IMF were discussed, making use of suggestions appeared in the literature to explain the lack of metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo with respect to model predictions. The predicted variations in abundances, SN rates, G-dwarf [Fe/H] distribution are here more dramatic and in contrast with observations; we concluded that a constant or slightly varying IMF is the best solution. Our main conclusion is that if VMS existed they must have formed only for a very short period of time (until the halo gas reached the threshold metallicity for the formation of very massive objects); in this case, their effects on the evolution of the studied elements was negligible also in the earliest phases. We thus cannot prove or disprove the existence of such stars on the basis of the available data. Due to their large metal production and short lives, primordial VMS should have enriched the halo gas beyond the metallicity of the most metal poor stars known in a few Myrs. This constrains the number of Pair-Creation SNe: we find that a number of 2-20 of such SNe occurred in our Galaxy depending on the stellar yields.
[176]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0502487  [pdf] - 71278
Early chemical enrichment of the universe and the role of very massive pop III stars
Comments: 8 pages, 2 figures, MNRAS, accepted for publication - typos corrected
Submitted: 2005-02-23, last modified: 2005-04-28
In this paper the role of very massive pop III stars in the chemical enrichment of the early universe is discussed. We first compare our predictions with the abundance ratios measured in the high redshift Lyman-alpha forest to check whether they are compatible with the values predicted by assuming that the early universe was enriched by massive pop III stars. We conclude that to explain the observed C/Si ratio in the intergalactic medium, a contribution from pop II stars to carbon enrichment is necessary, already at redshift z=5. We then evaluate the number of Pair-Instability Supernovae (SN_(gamma gamma)) required to enrich the universe to the critical metallicity Z_cr, i.e. the metallicity value which causes the transition from a very massive star regime (m > 100 M_sun) to a lower mass regime, similar to the one characteristic of the present time (m < 100 M_sun). It is found that between 110 and 115 SN_(gamma gamma) are sufficient to chemically enrich a cubic megaparsec of the intergalactic medium at high redshift for a variety of initial mass functions. The number of ionizing photons provided by these SN_(gamma gamma) and also by the pop III stars ending as black holes was computed and we conclude that there are not enough photons to reionize the universe, being down by at least a factor of ~ 3. Finally, we calculate the abundance ratios generated by pop III stars and compare it with the ones observed in low metallicity Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs). We suggest that pop III stars alone cannot be responsible for the abundance ratios in these objects and that intermediate mass pop II stars must have played an important role especially in enriching DLAs in nitrogen.
[177]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0503492  [pdf] - 71874
The origin of nitrogen: Implications of recent measurements of N/O in Galactic metal-poor stars
Comments: A&A (in press), 9 pages (including 5 figures), references updated after proof corrections
Submitted: 2005-03-23, last modified: 2005-04-26
Recent new high-precision abundance data for Galactic halo stars suggest important primary nitrogen production in very metal-poor massive stars. Here, we compute a new model for the chemical evolution of the Milky Way aimed at explaining these new abundance data. The new data can be explained by adopting: a) the stellar yields obtained from stellar models that take into account rotation and b) an extra production of nitrogen in the very metal-poor massive stars. In particular, we suggest an increase of nearly a factor of 200 in 14N for a star of 60 Msun and 40 for a star of 9Msun, for metallicities below Z=10$^{-5}$, with respect to the yields given in the literature for Z=10$^{-5}$ and rotational velocity of 300 km/s. We show that once we adopt the above prescriptions, our model is able to predict high N/O abundance ratios at low metallicities and still explains the nitrogen abundances observed in thin disk stars in the solar vicinity. The physical motivation for a larger nitrogen production in massive stars in very metal-poor environments could be the fact that some stellar models as well as observational data suggest that at low metallicities stars rotate faster. If this is the case, such large nitrogen production seen in the pristine phases of the halo formation would not necessarily happen in Damped Lyman-alpha systems which have metallicities always above [Fe/H]$\simeq -$2.5, and could have been pre-enriched. We also compute the abundance gradient of N/O along the Galactic disk and show that a negative gradient is predicted once we adopt stellar yields where rotation is taken into account. The latter result implies that intermediate mass stars contribute less to the primary nitrogen than previously thought.
[178]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0501149  [pdf] - 70261
Massive elliptical galaxies in X-rays: the role of late gas accretion
Comments: 16 pages, 9 figures, A&A accepted
Submitted: 2005-01-10
We present a new chemical evolution model meant to be a first step in the self-consistent study of both optical and X-ray properties of elliptical galaxies. Detailed cooling and heating processes in the interstellar medium are taken into account using a mono-phase one-zone treatment which allows a more reliable modelling of the galactic wind regime with respect to previous work. The model successfully reproduces simultaneously the mass-metallicity, colour-magnitude, the L_X - L_B and the L_X - T relations, as well as the observed trend of the [Mg/Fe] ratio as a function of sigma, by adopting the prescriptions of Pipino & Matteucci (2004) for the gas infall and star formation timescales. We found that a late secondary accretion of gas from the environment plays a fundamental role in driving the L_X - L_B and L_X - T relations and can explain their large observational scatter. The iron discrepancy, namely the too high predicted iron abundance in X-ray haloes of ellipticals compared to observations, still persists. On the other hand, we predict [O/Fe] in the ISM which is in good agreement with the most recent observations. We suggest possible mechanisms acting on a galactic scale which may solve the iron discrepancy. In particular, mixing of gas driven by AGNs may preserve the gas mass (and thus the X-ray luminosity) while diluting the iron abundance. New predictions for the amounts of iron, oxygen and energy ejected into the intracluster medium (ICM) are presented and we conclude that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) play a fundamental role in the ICM enrichment. SNe Ia activity, in fact, may power a galactic wind lasting for a considerable amount of the galactic lifetime, even in the case for which the efficiency of energy transfer into the ISM per SN Ia event is less than unity.
[179]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0411729  [pdf] - 69328
The effects of population III stars on the chemical and photometrical evolution of ellipticals
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2004-11-26
We have studied the effects of an hypothetical initial generation containing very massive stars (M > 100 Msun, pair-creation SNe) on the chemical and photometric evolution of elliptical galaxies. To this purpose, we have computed the evolution of a typical elliptical galaxy with luminous mass of the order of 10^11 Msun and adopted chemical evolution models already tested to reproduce the main features of ellipticals. We have tested several sets of yields for very massive zero-metallicity stars: these stars should produce quite different amounts of heavy elements than lower mass stars. We found that the effects of population III stars on the chemical enrichment is negligible if only one or two generations of such stars occurred, whereas they produce quite different results from the standard models if they continuously formed for a period not shorter than 0.1 Gyr. In this case, the results are at variance with the main observational constraints of ellipticals such as the average [<alpha/Fe>] ratio in stars and the integrated colors. Therefore, we conclude that if population III stars ever existed they must have been present for a very short period of time and their effects on the following evolution of the parent galaxy must have been negligible. This effect is minimum if a more realistic model with initial infall of gas rather than the classic monolithic model is adopted. Ultimately, we conclude that there is no need to invoke a generation of very massive stars in ellipticals to explain their chemical and photometric properties.
[180]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0411635  [pdf] - 69234
Chemical Evolution of Late-type Dwarf Galaxies - The windy starburst dwarfs NGC 1569 and NGC 1705
Comments: 7 pages, 2 figures, to appear in the Proceedings of the Conference "Starbursts - From 30 Doradus to Lyman break galaxies", edited by Richard de Grijs and Rosa M. Gonzalez Delgado (Kluwer)
Submitted: 2004-11-23
Thanks to the capabilities of modern telescopes and instrumentation, it is now possible to resolve single stars in external dwarf galaxies, provided they are bright enough. For galactic regions with deep enough photometry, detailed colour-magnitude diagrams are constructed, from which the star formation history and the initial mass function can be inferred by comparison with synthetic diagrams. Both the star formation history and the initial mass function are free parameters of galactic chemical evolution models. In this contribution we show how constraining them through high resolution photometry in principle allows us to better understand the mechanisms of dwarf galaxy formation and evolution.
[181]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0409581  [pdf] - 67662
Interpretation of abundance ratios
Comments: 12 pages (including figures), to appear in PASA
Submitted: 2004-09-24
In this paper we discuss abundance ratios and their relation to stellar nucleosynthesis and other parameters of chemical evolution models, reviewing and clarifying the correct use of the observed abundance ratios in several astrophysical contests. In particular, we start from the well known fact that abundance ratios depend on stellar yields, initial mass function and stellar lifetimes and we show, by means of specific examples, that in some cases it is not correct to infer constraints on the contributions from different SN types (Ia, II), and particularly on different sets of yields, in the absence of a complete chemical evolution model taking into account stellar lifetimes. In spite of the fact that some of these results should be well known, we believe that it is useful to discuss the meaning of abundance ratios in the light of severel recent claims based upon an incorrect interpretation of observed abundance ratios. In particular, the procedure, often used in the recent literature, of deriving directly conclusions about stellar nucleosynthesis, just by relating abundance ratios to yield ratios, implicitly assumes the instantaneous recycling approximation (I.R.A.). This approximation is clearly not correct when one analyzes the contributions of SNIa relative to SNII as functions of cosmic time. In this paper we show that the uncertainty which arises from adopting this oversimplified procedure in a variety of astrophysical objects, such as elliptical galaxies, the intracluster medium and high redshift objects, does not allow us to draw any firm conclusion, and that the differences between abundance ratios predicted by models with I.R.A. and models with detailed stellar lifetimes is of the same order as the differences between different sets of yields. (Abridged)
[182]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0409474  [pdf] - 1308607
Initial mass function and galactic chemical evolution models
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, uses kapproc.cls. Contributed talk presented at the conference on "IMF@50: The Stellar Initial Mass Function Fifty Years Later" held at Abbazia di Spineto, Siena, Italy, May 2004. To be published by Kluwer Academic Publishers, ed. E. Corbelli, F. Palla, and H. Zinnecker
Submitted: 2004-09-20
In this contribution we focus on results from chemical evolution models for the solar neighbourhood obtained by varying the IMF. Results for galaxies of different morphological type are discussed as well. They argue against a universal IMF independent of star forming conditions.
[183]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0409473  [pdf] - 67554
Quantifying the uncertainties of chemical evolution studies. I. The stellar initial mass function and the stellar lifetimes
Comments: 18 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2004-09-20
The stellar initial mass function and the stellar lifetimes are basic ingredients of chemical evolution models, for which different recipes can be found in the literature. In this paper, we quantify the effects on chemical evolution studies of the uncertainties in these two parameters. We concentrate on chemical evolution models for the Milky Way, because of the large number of good observational constraints. Such chemical evolution models have already ruled out significant temporal variations for the stellar initial mass function in our own Galaxy, with the exception perhaps of the very early phases of its evolution. Therefore, here we assume a Galactic initial mass function constant in time. Through an accurate comparison of model predictions for the Milky Way with carefully selected data sets, it is shown that specific prescriptions for the initial mass function in particular mass ranges should be rejected. As far as the stellar lifetimes are concerned, the major differences among existing prescriptions are found in the range of very low-mass stars. Because of this, the model predictions widely differ for those elements which are produced mostly by very long-lived objects, as for instance 3He and 7Li. However, it is concluded that model predictions of several important observed quantities, constraining the plausible Galactic formation scenarios, are fairly robust with respect to changes in both the stellar mass spectrum and the stellar lifetimes. For instance, the metallicity distribution of low-mass stars is nearly unaffected by these changes, since its shape is dictated mostly by the time scale for thin-disk formation.
[184]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0406679  [pdf] - 65836
Metal abundances in extremely distant Galactic old open clusters. I. Berkeley 29 and Saurer 1
Comments: 21 pages, 5 eps figure, accepted for publication in Astronomical Journal (Oct 2004 issue)
Submitted: 2004-06-30
We report on high resolution spectroscopy of four giant stars in the Galactic old open clusters Berkeley~29 and Saurer~1 obtained with HIRES at the Keck telescope. These two clusters possess the largest galactocentric distances insofar known for open star clusters, and therefore are crucial objects to probe the chemical pattern and evolution of the outskirts of the Galactic disk. We find that $[Fe/H]=-0.38\pm0.14$ and $[Fe/H]=-0.44\pm0.18$ for Saurer 1 and Berkeley~29, respectively. Based on these data, we first revise the fundamental parameters of the clusters, and then discuss them in the context of the Galactic disk radial abundance gradients. Both clusters seem to significantly deviate from the general trend, suggesting that the outer part of the Galactic disk underwent a completely different evolution compared to the inner disk. In particular Berkeley~29 is clearly associated with the Monoceros stream, while Saurer~1 exhibits very different properties. The abundance ratios suggest that the chemical evolution of the outer disk was dominated by the Galactic halo.
[185]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0406484  [pdf] - 65641
Continuous star formation in IZw18
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2004-06-22
We study the dynamical and chemical evolution of a galaxy similar to IZw18 under the assumption of a continuous star formation during bursts. We adopt a 2-D hydrocode coupled with detailed chemical yields originating from SNeII, SNeIa and from single intermediate-mass stars. Different nucleosynthetic yields and different IMF slopes are tested. In most of the explored cases, a galactic wind develops, mostly carrying out of the galaxy the metal-enriched gas produced by the burst itself. The chemical species with the largest escape probabilities are Fe and N. Consequently, we predict that the [$\alpha$/Fe] and [$\alpha$/N] ratios outside the galaxy are lower than inside. In order to reproduce the chemical composition of IZw18, the best choice seems to be the adoption of the yields of Meynet & Maeder (2002) which take into account stellar rotation, although these authors do not follow the whole evolution of all the stars. Models with a flat IMF (x=0.5) seem to be able to better reproduce the chemical properties of IZw18, but they inject in the gas a much larger amount of energy and the resulting galactic wind is very strong, at variance with observations. We also predict the evolution of the abundances in the \hi medium and compare them with recent {\sl FUSE} observations.
[186]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0406157  [pdf] - 65314
Cosmic Star Formation: Constraints on the Galaxy Formation Models
Comments: 14 pages, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2004-06-07
We study the evolution of the cosmic star formation by computing the luminosity density (LD) in the UV, B, J, and K bands, and the stellar mass density (MD) of galaxies in two reference models of galaxy evolution: the pure luminosity evolution (PLE) model developed by Calura & Matteucci (2003) and the semi-analytical model (SAM) of hierarchical galaxy formation by Menci et al. (2002). The former includes a detailed description of the chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological types with no density evolution; the latter includes the merging histories of the galactic DM haloes, as predicted by the hierarchical clustering scenario, but it does not contain morphological classification nor chemical evolution. We find that at z< 1.5 both models are consistent with the available data on the LD of galaxies in all the considered bands. At high z, the LDs predicted in the PLE model show a peak due to the formation of ellipticals, whereas the SAM predicts a gradual decrease of the star formation and of the LD for z> 2.5. At such redshifts the PLE predictions tend to overestimate the present data in the B band whereas the SAM tends to underestimate the observed UV LD. As for the stellar MD, the PLE picture predicts that nearly 50% and 85% of the present stellar mass are in place at z=4 and z=1, respectively. According to the SAM, 50% and 60% of the present stellar mass are in place at z=1.2 and z=1, respectively. Both predictions fit the observed MD up to z=1. At z>1, the PLE model and the SAM tend to overestimate and underestimate the observed values, respectively. We discuss the origin of the above model results, and the role of observational uncertainties (such as dust extinction) in comparing models with observations.
[187]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0401499  [pdf] - 62369
The evolution of the Milky Way from its earliest phases : constraints on stellar nucleosynthesis
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures, A&A (in press)
Submitted: 2004-01-23, last modified: 2004-04-16
We computed the evolution of the abundances of O, Mg, Si, Ca, K, Ti, Sc, Ni, Mn, Co, Fe and Zn in the Milky Way. We made use of the most widely adopted nucleosynthesis calculations and compared the model results with observational data with the aim of imposing constraints upon stellar yields. In order to fit at best the data in the solar neighborhood, when adopting the Woosley and Weaver (1995) yields for massive stars and the Iwamoto et al. (1999) ones for type Ia SNe, it is required that: i) the Mg yields should be increased in stars with masses from 11 to 20 M_sun and decreased in masses larger than 20 M_sun. The Mg yield should be also increased in SNe Ia. ii) The Si yields should be slightly increased in stars above 40 M_sun, whereas those of Ti should be increased between 11 and 20 M_sun and above 30 M_sun. iii) The Cr and Mn yields should be increased in stars with masses in the range 11-20 M_sun, iv) the Co yields in SNe Ia should be larger and smaller in stars in the range 11-20 M_sun, v) the Ni yield from type Ia SNe should be decreased, vi) the Zn yield from type Ia SNe should be increased. vii) The yields of O (metallicity dependent SN models), Ca, Fe, Ni, and Zn (the solar abundance case) in massive stars from Woosley and Weaver (1995) are the best to fit the abundance patterns of these elements since they do not need any change. We adopted also the yields by Nomoto et al. (1997) and Limongi and Chieffi (2003) for massive stars and discussed the corrections required in these yields in order to fit the observations. Finally, the small spread in the [el/Fe] ratios in the metallicity range from [Fe/H]=-4.0 up to -3.0 dex (Cayrel et al. 2003) is a clear sign that the halo of the Milky Way was well mixed even in the earliest phases of its evolution.
[188]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0403602  [pdf] - 63793
The Predicted Metallicity Distribution of Stars in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies
Comments: 12 pages, 19 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2004-03-25
We predict the metallicity distribution of stars and the age-metallicity relation for 6 Dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Local Group by means of a chemical evolution model which is able to reproduce several observed abundance ratios and the present day total mass and gas content of these galaxies. The model adopts up to date nucleosynthesis and takes into account the role played by supernovae of different types (II, Ia) allowing us to follow in detail the evolution of several chemical elements (H, D, He, C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Fe). Each galaxy model is specified by the prescriptions of the star formation rate and by the galactic wind efficiency chosen to reproduce the main features of these galaxies. These quantities are constrained by the star formation histories of the galaxies as inferred by the observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMD). The main conclusions are: i) 5 of the 6 dSphs galaxies are characterized by very low star formation efficiencies ($\nu = 0.005 - 0.5 Gyr ^{-1}$) with only Sagittarius having a higher one ($\nu = 1.0 - 5.0 Gyr ^{-1}$); ii) the wind efficiency is high for all galaxies, in the range $w_i$ = 6 - 15; iii) a high wind efficiency is required in order to reproduce the abundance ratios and the present day gas mass of the galaxies; iv) the predicted age-metallicity relation implies that the stars of the dSphs reach solar metallicities in a time-scale of the order of 2 - 6 Gyr; v) the metallicity distributions of stars in dSphs exhibit a peak around [Fe/H] $\sim$ -1.8 to -1.5 dex, with the exception of Sagittarius ([Fe/H] $\sim$ -0.8 dex); iv) the predicted metallicity distributions of stars suggest that the majority of stars in dSphs are formed in a range of metallicity in agreement with the one of the observed stars.
[189]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0401462  [pdf] - 62332
Cosmic metal production and the mean metallicity of the Universe
Comments: 18 pages, 3 figures, MNRAS, in press, only minor revisions (parts in bold, typos)
Submitted: 2004-01-22, last modified: 2004-03-08
By means of detailed chemo-photometric models for elliptical, spiral and irregular galaxies, we evaluate the cosmic history of the production of chemical elements as well as the metal mass density of the present-day universe. We then calculate the mean metal abundances for galaxies of different morphological types, along with the average metallicity of galactic matter in the universe (stars, gas and intergalactic medium). For the average metallicity of galaxies in the local universe, we find Z_gal= 0.0175, i.e. close to the solar value. We find the main metal production in spheroids (ellipticals and bulges) to occur at very early times, implying an early peak in the metal production and a subsequent decrease. On the other hand, the metal production in spirals and irregulars is always increasing with time. We perform a self-consistent census of the baryons and metals in the local universe finding that, while the vast majority of the baryons lies outside galaxies in the inter-galactic medium (IGM), 52 % of the metals (with the exception of the Fe-peak elements) is locked up in stars and in the interstellar medium. We estimate indirectly the amount of baryons which resides in the IGM and we derive its mean Fe abundance, finding a value of X_Fe,IGM=0.05 X_Fe,sun. We believe that this estimate is uncertain by a factor of 2, owing to the normalization of the local luminosity function. This means that the Fe abundance of 0.3 solar inferred from X-ray observations of the hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) is higher than the average Fe abundance of the inter-galactic gas in the field.
[190]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0401576  [pdf] - 62446
Simulating the metal enrichment of the ICM
Comments: to appear in MNRAS Letters
Submitted: 2004-01-27
We present results from Tree+SPH simulations of a galaxy cluster, aimed at studying the metal enrichment of the intra--cluster medium (ICM). The simulation code includes a fairly advanced treatment of star formation, as well as the release of energy feedback and detailed yields from both type-II and type-Ia supernovae, also accurately accounting for the lifetimes of different stellar populations. We perform simulations of a cluster with virial mass ~ 3.9x 10^14 Msun, to investigate the effect of varying the feedback strength and the stellar initial mass function (IMF). Although most of the models are able to produce acceptable amounts of Fe mass, we find that the profiles of the iron abundance are always steeper than observed. The [O/Fe] ratio is found to be sub--solar for a Salpeter IMF, with [O/Fe] -0.2 at R >~ 0.1R200, whereas increasing to super-solar values in central regions, as a result of recent star formation. Using a top--heavier IMF gives a larger [O/Fe] over the whole cluster, at variance with observations. On the other hand, the adoption of a variable IMF, which becomes top-heavier at z>2, provides a roughly solar [O/Fe] ratio. Our results indicate that our simulations still lack a feedback mechanism which should quench star formation at low redshift and transport metals away from the star forming regions.
[191]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0312302  [pdf] - 61515
The role of nova nucleosynthesis in Galactic chemical evolution
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures; poster paper presented at the 47th Meeting of the Italian Astronomical Society, published on Memorie della Societa' Astronomica Italiana - Supplementi Vol.3, p.163
Submitted: 2003-12-11
In this paper we study the impact of nova nucleosynthesis on models for the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. It is found that novae are likely to be the sources of non-negligible fractions of the 7Li and 13C observed in disc stars. Moreover, they might be responsible for the production of important amounts of 17O at late times and probably account for a major fraction of the Galactic 15N.
[192]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0312210  [pdf] - 61423
A comprehensive set of elemental abundances in damped Ly-alpha systems: revealing the nature of these high-redshift galaxies
Comments: 35 pages, 17 figures (high-resolution figures available on request from the authors or in the journal). Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2003-12-08
By combining our UVES-VLT spectra of a sample of four damped Ly-alpha systems (DLAs) toward the quasars Q0100+13, Q1331+17, Q2231-00 and Q2343+12 with the existing HIRES-Keck spectra, we covered the total spectral range from 3150 to 10000 A for the four quasars. This large wavelength coverage and the high quality of the spectra allowed us to measure the column densities of up to 21 ions, namely of 15 elements - N, O, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, Ar, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn. Such a large amount of information is necessary to constrain the photoionization and dust depletion effects, two important steps in order to derive the intrinsic chemical abundance patterns of DLAs. We evaluated the photoionization effects with the help of the Al+/Al++, Fe+/Fe++, N0/N+ and Ar/Si,S ratios, and computed dust corrections. Our analysis revealed that the DLA toward Q2343+12 requires important ionization corrections. The access to the complete series of relatively robust intrinsic elemental abundances in the other three DLAs allowed us to constrain their star formation history, their age and their star formation rate by a detailed comparison with a grid of chemical evolution models for spiral and dwarf irregular galaxies. Our results show that the galaxies associated with these three DLAs in the redshift interval z_abs = 1.7-2.5 are either outer regions of spiral disks (radius >= 8 kpc) or dwarf irregular galaxies (with a bursting or continuous star formation history) with ages varying from some 50 Myr only to >~ 3.5 Gyr and with moderate star formation rates per unit area of -2.1 < log \psi < -1.5 M_{sol} yr^{-1} kpc^{-2}.
[193]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0310251  [pdf] - 59914
Photo-Chemical Evolution of Elliptical Galaxies I. The high-redshift formation scenario
Comments: 19 pages, 14 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2003-10-09
In this paper we compute new multi-zone photo-chemical evolution models for elliptical galaxies, taking into account detailed nucleosynthetic yields, feedback from supernovae and an initial infall episode. By comparing model predictions with observations, we derive a picture of galaxy formation in which the higher is the mass of the galaxy, the shorter are the infall and the star formation timescales. Therefore, in this scenario, the most massive objects are older than the less massive ones, in the sense that larger galaxies stop forming stars at earlier times. Each galaxy is created outside-in, i.e. the outermost regions accrete gas, form stars and develop a galactic wind very quickly, compared to the central core in which the star formation can last up to ~1.3 Gyr. In particular, we suggest that both the duration of the star formation and the infall timescale decrease with galactic radius. (abridged) By means of our model, we are able to match the observed mass-metallicity and color-magnitude relations for the center of the galaxies as well as to reproduce the overabundance of Mg relative to Fe, observed in the nuclei of bright ellipticals, and its increase with galactic mass. Furthermore, we find that the observed Ca underabundance relative to Mg can be real, due to the non-neglibile contribution of type Ia SN to the production of this element. We predict metallicity and color gradients inside the galaxies which are in good agreement with the mean value of the observed ones. (abridged)
[194]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0308181  [pdf] - 58460
Light element evolution resulting from WMAP data
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS. Minor changes (Figure 2: the observationally inferred range of D/H variation in the LISM has been modified - only the most reliable data are shown); some references added
Submitted: 2003-08-11, last modified: 2003-08-22
The recent determination of the baryon-to-photon ratio from WMAP data by Spergel et al. (2003) allows one to fix with unprecedented precision the primordial abundances of the light elements D, 3He, 4He and 7Li in the framework of the standard model of big bang nucleosynthesis. We adopt these primordial abundances and discuss the implications for Galactic chemical evolution, stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis of the light elements. The model predictions on D, 3He and 4He are in excellent agreement with the available data, while a significant depletion of 7Li in low-metallicity stars is required to reproduce the Spite plateau.
[195]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0308067  [pdf] - 58346
Stellar yields with rotation and their effect on chemical evolution models
Comments: 12 pages (including 13 figures), A&A accepted
Submitted: 2003-08-05
We compute the evolution of different abundance ratios in the Milky Way (MW) for two different sets of stellar yields. In one of them stellar rotation is taken into account and we investigate its effects on the chemical evolution model predictions. Moreover, we show that some abundance ratios offer an important tool to investigate the halo-disk discontinuity. For the first time it is shown that the effect of a halt in the star formation between the halo/thick disk and thin disk phases, already suggested from studies based both on Fe/O vs. O/H and Fe/Mg vs. Mg/H, should also be seen in a C/O versus O/H plot if C is produced mainly by low- and intermediate-mass stars (LIMS). The idea that C originates mainly from LIMS is suggested by the flat behavior of the [C/Fe] ratio as a function of metallicity, from [Fe/H]=-2.2 to solar, and by the fact that very recent C/O measurements for stars in the MW halo and disk seem to show a discontinuity around log(O/H)+12=8.4. Finally, a more gentle increase of N abundance with metallicity (or time), relative to models adopting the yields of van den Hoek and Groenewegen (1997), is predicted by using the stellar yields of Meynet and Maeder (2002 - which include stellar rotation but not hot-bottom burning) for intermediate mass stars. This fact has some implications for the timescales of N enrichment and thus for the interpretation of the nature of Damped Lyman Alpha Systems.
[196]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0307014  [pdf] - 57727
The cosmic evolution of the galaxy luminosity density
Comments: 16 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2003-07-01
We reconstruct the history of the cosmic star formation in the universe by means of detailed chemical evolution models for galaxies of different morphological types. We consider a picture of coeval, non-interacting evolving galaxies where ellipticals experience intense and rapid starbursts within the first Gyr after their formation, and spirals and irregulars continue to form stars at lower rates up to the present time. Such models allow one to follow in detail the evolution of the metallicity of the gas out of which the stars are formed. We normalize the galaxy population to the B band luminosity function observed in the local Universe and study the redshift evolution of the luminosity densities in the B, U, I and K bands calculating galaxy colors and evolutionary corrections by means of a detailed synthetic stellar population model. Our predictions indicate that the decline of the galaxy luminosity density between redshift 1 and 0 observed in the U, B and I bands is caused mainly by star-forming spiral galaxies which slowly exhaust their gas reservoirs. Elliptical galaxies have dominated the total luminosity density in all optical bands at early epochs, when all their stars formed by means of rapid and very intense star-bursts. Irregular galaxies bring a negligible contribution to the total luminosity density in any band at any time. (abridged)
[197]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0306463  [pdf] - 57544
Chemical Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal and Blue Compact Galaxies
Comments: 16 pages, 17 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2003-06-23
We studied the chemical evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) and Blue Compact Galaxies (BCGs) by means of comparison between the predictions of chemical evolution models and several observed abundance ratios. Detailed models with up to date nucleosynthesis taking into account the role played by supernovae of different types (II, Ia) were developed for both types of galaxies allowing us to follow the evolution of several chemical elements. The models are specified by the prescriptions of the star formation (SF) and galactic wind efficiencies chosen to reproduce the main features of these galaxies. We also investigated a possible connection in the evolution of dSph and BCGs and compared the predictions of the models to the abundance ratios observed in Damped Lyman alpha Systems (DLAs). The main conclusions are: i) the observed distribution of [alpha/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] in dSph is mainly a result of the SF rate coupled with the wind efficiency; ii) a low SF efficiency and a high wind efficiency are required to reproduce the observational data for dSph; iii) the low gas content of these galaxies is the result of the combined action of gas consumption by SF and gas removal by galactic winds; iv) the BCGs abundance ratios are reproduced by models with 2 to 7 bursts of SF with low efficiencies ; v) the low values of N/O observed in BCGs are the natural result of a bursting SF; vi) a connection between dSph and BCGs in an unified evolutionary scenario is unlikely; vii) the models for the dSph and BCGs imply different formation scenarios for the DLAs; viii) a suitable amount of primary N produced in massive stars can be perhaps an explanation for the low plateau in the [N/$\alpha$] distribution observed in DLAs, if real.
[198]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0306037  [pdf] - 57118
Chemical Evolution of Damped Lyman Alpha Systems
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, in Carnegie Observatories Astrophysics Series, Vol. 4: Origin and Evolution of the Elements, ed. A. McWilliam and M. Rauch (Pasadena: Carnegie Observatories, http://www.ociw.edu/ociw/symposia/series/symposium4/proceedings.html)
Submitted: 2003-06-02
By means of detailed chemical evolution models for galaxies of different morphological types (i.e. spirals, irregular/starburst galaxies and ellipticals) we study the nature of Damped Lyman-Alpha systems. Our concern is to infer which systems represent likely candidates for the DLA population and which do not. By focusing on individual systems, we can derive some constraints on both the nature of the associated galaxy and its age. Our results indicate that, owing to their high metallicities and [alpha/Fe] ratios, big spheroids represent unlikely DLA candidates whereas spirals (observed at different galactocentric distances) and irregulars are ideal sites where DLA absorptions can occur.
[199]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0306034  [pdf] - 57115
Models of Chemical Evolution
Comments: 14 pages, 7 figures, To appear in Carnegie Observatories Astrophysics Series, Vol. 4: Origin and Evolution of the Elements, ed. A. McWilliam and M. Rauch
Submitted: 2003-06-02
The basic principles underlying galactic chemical evolution and the most important results of chemical evolution models are discussed. In particular, the chemical evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, for which we possess the majority of observational constraints, is described. Then, it is shown how different star formation histories influence the chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type. Finally, the role of abundances and abundance ratios as cosmic clocks is emphasized and a comparison between model predictions and abundance patterns in high redshift objects is used to infer the nature and the age of these systems.
[200]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0304123  [pdf] - 56031
Modelling the nova rate in galaxies
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures, Astronomy and Astrophysics accepted
Submitted: 2003-04-07
We compute theoretical nova rates as well as type Ia SN rates in galaxies of different morphological type (Milky Way, ellipticals and irregulars) by means of detailed chemical evolution models, and compare them with the most recent observations. The main difference among the different galaxies is the assumed history of star formation. In particular, we predict that the nova rates in giant ellipticals such as M87 are 100-300 nova/yr, about a factor of ten larger than in our Galaxy (25 nova/yr), in agreement with very recent estimates from HST data. The best agreement with the observed rates is obtained if the recurrence time of novae in ellipticals is assumed to be longer than in the Milky Way. This result indicates that the star formation rate in ellipticals, and in particular in M87, must have been very efficient at early cosmic epochs. We predict a nova rate for the LMC of 1.7 nova/yr, again in agreement with observations. We compute also the K- and B-band luminosities for ellipticals of different luminous mass and conclude that there is not a clear trend for the luminosity specific nova rate with luminosity among these galaxies. However, firm conclusions about ellipticals cannot be drawn because of possible observational biases in observing these objects. The comparison between the specific nova rates in the Milky Way and the LMC indicates a trend of increasing nova rate passing from the Galaxy towards late-type spirals and Magellanic irregulars.
[201]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302575  [pdf] - 55202
Cooling and heating the ICM in hydrodynamical simulations
Comments: To appear in MNRAS: 18 pages, 13 figures. Paper with high-resolution figures available at http://www.daut.univ.trieste.it/borgani
Submitted: 2003-02-27
We discuss Tree+SPH simulations of galaxy clusters and groups, aimed at studying the effect of cooling and non-gravitational heating on observable properties of the ICM. We simulate at high resolution four halos,with masses in the range (0.2-4)10^{14}M_sol. We discuss the effects of using different SPH implementations and show that high resolution is mandatory to correctly follow the cooling pattern of the ICM. All of our heating schemes which correctly reproduce the X-ray scaling properties of clusters and groups do not succeed in reducing the fraction of collapsed gas below a level of 20 (30) per cent at the cluster (group) scale. Finally, gas compression in cooling cluster regions causes an increase of the temperature and a steepening of the temperature profiles, independent of the presence of non-gravitational heating processes. This is inconsistent with recent observational evidence for a decrease of gas temperature towards the center of relaxed clusters. Provided these discrepancies persist even for a more refined modeling of energy feedback, they may indicate that some basic physical process is still missing in hydrodynamical simulations.
[202]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302233  [pdf] - 54860
Nova nucleosynthesis and Galactic evolution of the CNO isotopes
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2003-02-12
We study the role played both by novae and single stars in enriching the ISM of the Galaxy with CNO group nuclei, in the framework of a detailed successful model for the chemical evolution of both the Galactic halo and disc. Once all the nucleosynthesis sources of CNO elements are taken into account, we conclude that 13C, 15N and 17O are likely to have both a primary and a secondary origin, in contrast to previous beliefs. Given the uncertainties still present in the computation of theoretical stellar yields, our results can be used to put constraints on stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis models.
[203]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0211163  [pdf] - 52898
The evolution of cosmic star formation, metals and gas
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, to appear in the proceedings of: The Evolution of Galaxies. III: From simple approaches to self-consistent models (Kiel, Gemany, July 2002)
Submitted: 2002-11-08
We reconstruct the history of the cosmic star formation as well as the cosmic production of metals in the universe by means of detailed chemical evolution models for galaxies of different morphological types. We consider a picture of coeval, non-interacting evolving galaxies where ellipticals experience intense and rapid starbursts within the first Gyr after their formation, and spirals and irregulars continue to form stars at lower rates up to the present time. We show that spirals are the main contributors to the decline of the luminosity density in all bands between z=1 and z=0.
[204]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0211153  [pdf] - 52888
Chemical evolution and nature of Damped Lyman-Alpha systems
Comments: MNRAS, accepted for publication, 19 pages, 14 figs
Submitted: 2002-11-07
We study the nature of Damped Lyman -Alpha systems (DLAs) by means of a comparison between observed abundances and models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type. In particular, we compare for the first time the abundance ratios as functions of metallicity and redshift with dust-corrected data. We have developed detailed models following the evolution of several chemical elements (H, D, He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Fe, Ni and Zn) for elliptical, spiral and irregular galaxies. Each of the models is calibrated to reproduce the main features of a massive elliptical, the Milky Way and the LMC, respectively. In addition, we run some models also for dwarf irregular starburst galaxies. All the models share the same uptodate nucleosynthesis prescriptions but differ in their star formation histories. The role of SNe of different type (II, Ia) is studied in each galaxy model together with detailed and up to date nucleosynthesis prescriptions. Our main conclusions are: 1) when dust depletion is taken into account most of the claimed alpha/Fe overabundances disappear and DLAs show solar or subsolar abundance ratios. 2) The majority of DLAs can be explained either by disks of spirals observed at large galactocentric distances or by irregular galaxies like the LMC or by starburst dwarf irregulars observed at different times after the last burst of star formation. 3) Elliptical galaxies cannot be DLA systems since they reach a too high metallicity at early times and their abundance ratios show overabundances of $\alpha$-elements relative to Fe over a large range of [Fe/H]. 4) The observed neutral gas cosmic evolution is compared with our predictions but no firm conclusions can be drawn in the light of the available data.
[205]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0210540  [pdf] - 52578
What determines galactic evolution?
Comments: 10 pages, 2 figures, to appear in the''Proceedings of The evolution of galaxies III. From simple approaches to self-consistent models'', Kiel (Germany), 2002
Submitted: 2002-10-24
We are briefly introducing the most important ingredients to study galactic evolution. In particular the roles of star formation, nucleosynthesis and gas flows. Then we are discussing the two different approaches to galactic evolution: the stellar population approach (chemical evolution models) and the hierarchical clustering scenario for galaxy formation. It is shown that there are still some controversial points in the two approaches, as evident in the brief summary of the discussion.
[206]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0210542  [pdf] - 52580
Chemical evolution of Elliptical Galaxies and the ICM
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, to appear in the ''Proceedings of The evolution of galaxies III. From simple approaches to self-consistent models'', Kiel (Germany), 2002
Submitted: 2002-10-24
We present a new model for the chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies taking into account SN feedback, detailed nucleosynthesis and galactic winds. We discuss the effect of galactic winds on the chemical enrichment of the ICM and compute the energy per particle injected by the galaxies into the ICM.
[207]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0209240  [pdf] - 51646
Evolution of Deuterium, 3He and 4He in the Galaxy
Comments: 21 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics (minor proof corrections + corrections in Table 6, Figs.8 and 9)
Submitted: 2002-09-12, last modified: 2002-10-16
In this work we present the predictions of the ``two-infall model'' concerning the evolution of D, 3He and 4He in the solar vicinity, as well as their distribution along the Galactic disk. Our results show that, when adopting detailed yields taking into account the extra-mixing process in low and intermediate mass stars, the problem of the overproduction of 3He by the chemical evolution models is solved. The predicted distribution of 3He along the disk is also in agreement with the observations. We also predict the distributions of D/H, D/O and D/N along the disk, in particular D abundances close to the primordial value are predicted in the outer regions of the Galaxy. The predicted D/H, D/O and D/N abundances in the local interstellar medium are in agreement with the mean values observed by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer mission, although a large spread in the D abundance is present in the data. Finally, by means of our chemical evolution model, we can constrain the primordial value of the deuterium abundance, and we find a value of (D/H)_p < 4 10(-5) which implies Omega_b h^2 > 0.017, in agreement with the values from the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation analysis. This value in turn implies a primordial 4He abundance Y_p > 0.244.
[208]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0209627  [pdf] - 52033
Oxygen, Carbon and Nitrogen evolution in galaxies
Comments: 40 pages, 16 figures, MNRAS accepted (minor changes - color figures can be seen in the pdf version)
Submitted: 2002-09-30, last modified: 2002-10-16
We discuss the evolution of oxygen, carbon and nitrogen in galaxies of different morphological type by adopting detailed chemical evolution models with different star formation histories (continuous star formation or starbursts). We start by computing chemical evolution models for the Milky Way with different stellar nucleosynthesis prescriptions. Then, a comparison between model results and ``key'' observational constraints allows us to choose the best set of stellar yields. Once the best set of yields is identified for the Milky Way, we apply the same nucleosynthesis prescriptions to other spirals (in particular M101) and dwarf irregular galaxies. We compare our model predictions with the [C,N,O/Fe] vs. [Fe/H], log(C/O) vs. 12+ log(O/H), log(N/O) vs. 12+ log(O/H) and [C/O] vs. [Fe/H] relations observed in the solar vicinity, along the disk and in other galaxies. By taking into account the results obtained for all the studied galaxies (Milky Way, M101, dwarf galaxies and DLAs) our main conclusions are: a) once the available observational data are properly interpreted, there is no compelling evidence for requiring the production of primary N in massive stars (M>10Msun); b) both C and N we see today in the ISM come mainly from low- and intermediate-mass stars. In particular, there is no need to invoke strong stellar winds in massive stars in order to explain the evolution of C/O ratio in the solar neighborhood, as often claimed in the literature (abridged).
[209]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0209130  [pdf] - 51536
Outflows from ellipticals: the role of supernovae
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, to appear in the Proceedings of IAU Symposium No. 212 'A Massive Star Odissey, from Main Sequence to Supernova'
Submitted: 2002-09-07
Models of SN driven galactic winds for ellipticals are presented. We assume that ellipticals formed at high redshift and suffered an intense burst of star formation. The role of supernovae of type II and Ia in the chemical enrichment and in triggering galactic winds is studied. In particular, several recipes for SN feed-back together with detailed nucleosynthesis prescriptions are considered. It is shown that SNe of type II have a dominant role in enriching the interstellar medium of elliptical galaxies whereas type Ia SNe dominate the enrichment and the energetics of the intracluster medium.
[210]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0206446  [pdf] - 50077
K dwarfs and the chemical evolution of the Solar cylinder
Comments: 14 pages, 15 figures, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2002-06-25
K-dwarfs have life-times older than the present age of the Galactic disc, and are thus ideal stars to investigate the disc's chemical evolution. We have developed several photometric metallicity indicators for K dwarfs, based an a sample of accurate spectroscopic metallicities for 34 disc and halo G and K dwarfs. The photometric metallicities lead us to develop a metallicity index for K dwarfs based only on their position in the colour absolute-magnitude diagram. Metallicities have been determined for 431 single K dwarfs drawn from the Hipparcos catalog, selecting the stars by absolute magnitude and removing multiple systems. The sample is essentially a complete reckoning of the metal content in nearby K dwarfs. We use stellar isochrones to mark the stars by mass, and select a subset of 220 of the stars which is complete in a narrow mass interval. We fit the data with a model of the chemical evolution of the Solar cylinder. We find that only a modest cosmic scatter is required to fit our age metallicity relation. The model assumes two main infall episodes for the formation of the halo-thick disc and thin disc respectively. The new data confirms that the solar neighbourhood formed on a long timescale of order 7 Gyr.
[211]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0204161  [pdf] - 48706
SNe heating and the chemical evolution of the intra-cluster medium
Comments: 29 pages, 7 figures, New Astronomy accepted
Submitted: 2002-04-09
We compute the chemical and thermal history of the intra-cluster medium in rich and poor clusters under the assumption that supernovae (I, II) are the major responsible both for the chemical enrichment and the heating of the intra-cluster gas. We assume that only ellipticals and S0 galaxies contribute to the enrichment and heating of the intra-cluster gas through supernova driven winds and explore several prescriptions for describing the feed-back between supernovae and the interstellar medium in galaxies. We integrate then the chemical and energetical contributions from single cluster galaxies over the cluster luminosity function and derive the variations of these quantities as functions of the cosmic time. We reach the following conclusions: i) while type II supernovae dominates the chemical enrichment and energetics inside the galaxies, type Ia supernovae play a predominant role in the intra-cluster medium, ii) galaxy models, which reproduce the observed chemical abundances and abundance ratios in the intra-cluster medium, predict a maximum of 0.3-0.4 keV per particle of energy input, a result obtained by assuming that type Ia supernovae contribute 100% of their initial blast wave energy whereas type II supernovae contribute only by a few percents of their initial energy.
[212]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0203506  [pdf] - 48527
Chemical evolution in a model for the joint formation of quasars and spheroids
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2002-03-28
Direct and indirect pieces of observational evidence point to a strong connection between high-redshift quasars and their host galaxies. In the framework of a model where the shining of the quasar is the episode that stops the formation of the galactic spheroid inside a virialized halo, it has been proven possible to explain the submillimetre source counts together with their related statistics and the local luminosity function of spheroidal galaxies. The time delay between the virialization and the quasar manifestation required to fit the counts is short and incresing with decresing the host galaxy mass. In this paper we compute the detailed chemical evolution of gas and stars inside virialized haloes in the framework of the same model, taking into account the combined effects of cooling and stellar feedback. Under the assumption of negligible angular momentum, we are able to reproduce the main observed chemical properties of local ellipticals. In particular, by using the same duration of the bursts which are required in order to fit the submillimetre source counts, we recover the observed increase of the Mg/Fe ratio with galactic mass. Since for the most massive objects the assumed duration of the burst is Tburst < 0.6 Gyr, we end up with a picture for elliptical galaxy formation in which massive spheroids complete their assembly at early times, thus resembling a monolithic collapse, whereas smaller galaxies are allowed for a more prolonged star formation, thus allowing for a more complicated evolutionary history.
[213]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0203329  [pdf] - 48350
Lyman-break galaxies: are they young spheroids?
Comments: 13 pages, 4 figures, ApJ Letters accepted
Submitted: 2002-03-20
We have compared the results from a model for the chemical evolution of an elliptical galaxy with initial luminous mass of 2x10^10 M_sun and effective radius of 2 kpc with the recent abundance determinations for the Lyman-break galaxy MS 1512-cB58 at a redshift z=2.7276. After correcting the iron abundance determination for the presence of dust we concluded that the observed [Si/Fe], [Mg/Fe], [N/Fe] are consistent with our model when a galactic age between 20 and 35 Myr is assumed. Moreover, the [N/O] ratio also suggests the same age. This age is in very good agreement with other independent studies based on the analysis of the spectral energy distribution suggesting that this object is younger than 35 Myr. Therefore, we suggest that MS 1512-cB58 is a truly young normal elliptical galaxy experiencing its main episode of star formation and galactic wind.
[214]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0203340  [pdf] - 48361
Chemical Evolution of Galaxies and Intracluster Medium
Comments: 40 pages, 12 figures, to be published in the proceedings of the XII Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics,on "Cosmochemistry: the melting pot of elements"., November 19th-30th 2001, Tenerife, Spain
Submitted: 2002-03-20
In this series of lectures I discuss the basic principles and the modelling of the chemical evolution of galaxies. In particular, I present models for the chemical evolution of the Milky Way galaxy and compare them with the available observational data. From this comparison one can infer important constraints on the mechanism of formation of the Milky Way as well as on stellar nucleosynthesis and supernova progenitors. Models for the chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies are also shown in the framework of the two competing scenarios for galaxy formation: monolithic and hierachical. The evolution of dwarf starbursting galaxies is also presented and the connection of these objects with Damped Lyman-alpha systems is briefly discussed. The roles of supernovae of different type (I, II) is discussed in the general framework of galactic evolution and in connection with the interpretation of high redshift objects. Finally, the chemical enrichment of the intracluster medium as due mainly to ellipticals and S0 galaxies is discussed.
[215]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0112450  [pdf] - 46823
Multiple starbursts in Blue Compact Galaxies
Comments: 24 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in A & A
Submitted: 2001-12-19
In this paper we present some results concerning the effects of two instantaneous starbursts, separated by a quiescent period, on the dynamical and chemical evolution of blue compact dwarf galaxies. In particular, we compare the model results to the galaxy IZw18, which is a very metal-poor, gas-rich dwarf galaxy, possibly experiencing its first or second burst of star formation. We follow the evolution of a first weak burst of star formation followed by a second more intense one occurring after several hundreds million years. We find that a galactic wind develops only during the second burst and that metals produced in the burst are preferentially lost relative to the hydrogen gas. We predict the evolution of several chemical abundances (H, He, C, N, O, \alpha-elements, Fe) in the gas inside and outside the galaxy, by taking into account in detail the chemical and energetical contributions from type II and Ia supernovae. We find that the abundances predicted for the star forming region are in good agreement with the HII region abundances derived for IZw18. We also predict the abundances of C, N and O expected for the HI gas to be compared with future FUSE abundance determinations. We conclude that IZw18 must have experienced two bursts of star formation, one occurred \sim 300 Myr ago and a present one with an age between 4-7 Myr. However, by taking into account also other independent estimates, such as the color-magnitude diagram and the spectral energy distribution of stars in IZw18, and the fact that real starbursts are not instantaneous, we suggest that it is more likely that the burst age is between 4 and 15 Myr.
[216]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0110008  [pdf] - 45066
The Origin of Blue Cores in Hubble Deep Fields E/S0 galaxies
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures. Uses emulateapj5.sty. To appear in ApJL. Article can also be retrieved as http://www.ociw.edu/~felipe/blue-cores
Submitted: 2001-09-29
In this letter we address the problem of the origin of blue cores and inverse color gradients in early-type galaxies reported in the Hubble Deep Field North and South (HDFs) by Menanteau, Abraham & Ellis 2001. We use a multi-zone single collapse model. This model accounts for the observed blue cores by adopting a broad spread in formation redshifts for ellipticals, allowing some of these galaxies begin forming no more than ~1 Gyr before the redshift of observation. The single-zone collapse model then produces cores that are bluer than the outer regions because of the increase of the local potential well toward the center which makes star-formation more extended in the central region of the galaxy. We compare the predicted V-I(r) color gradients with the observed ones using the redshift of formation ($z_F$) of the elliptical as the only free parameter. We find that the model can account with relatively good agreement for the blue cores and inverse color gradients found in many spheroidals and at the same time for the red and smooth colors profiles reported. Based on the model our analysis suggests two populations of field ellipticals, one formed recently, within $\lesssim1$Gyr and another much older formed $\gtrsim4$Gyr since the redshift of observation.
[217]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0109471  [pdf] - 44970
Chemical Enrichment and Energetics of the ICM with Redshift
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures, to be published in "Chemical Enrichment of the ICM and the IGM" (Vulcano, Italy), ASP Conference Series
Submitted: 2001-09-26
In this paper we show preliminary results concerning the chemical and energetic enrichment of the ICM by means of supernova-driven wind models in elliptical galaxies. These models are obtained by taking into account new prescriptions about supernova remnant evolution in the interstellar medium. We find that models, which can reproduce the Fe abundance and the [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios observed in the ICM, predict that the SN energy input can provide about 0.3 keV per ICM particle. We have obtained this result by assuming that each SN explosion inject on the average into the ISM no more than 20% of its initial blast wave energy. The predicted energy per particle is not enough to break the cluster self-similarity but is more than predicted in previous models.
[218]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0107561  [pdf] - 43932
Galactic Winds in Starburst Irregular Galaxies
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, proceedings of the Workshop "Chemical Enrichment of Intracluster and Intergalactic Medium", Vulcano, Italy, 14-18 May 2001
Submitted: 2001-07-30
In this paper we present some results of numerical simulations concerning the development of galactic winds in starburst galaxies. In particular, we focus on a galaxy similar to IZw18, the most metal-poor galaxy locally known. We compute the chemio-dynamical evolution of this galaxy, considering the energetic input and the chemical yields originating from Supernovae (SNe) of Type II and Ia and from intermediate-mass stars. We consider both single, instantaneous starburst and two starbursts separated by a quiescent period. In all considered cases a metal enriched winds develops and in particular the metals produced by Type Ia SNe are ejected more efficiently than the other metals. We suggest that two burst of star formation, the first being weaker and the last having an age of some tenth of Myr, can satisfactorily reproduce the abundances and abundance ratios found in literature for IZw18
[219]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0107068  [pdf] - 43439
Chemical Evolution of Elliptical Galaxies as a Constraint to Galaxy Formation Scenarios
Comments: 7 pages, latex, 2 figures. To appear in the Proceedings of the Workshop "Chemical Enrichment of the ICM and IGM", Vulcano, May 2001
Submitted: 2001-07-04
Elliptical galaxies are the main contributors to the chemical enrichment of the intracluster and intergalactic medium; understanding how they form and evolve enables us to get important hints on the amounts of energy and processed matter that they eject into the ICM/IGM. Recent pieces of observational evidence point to a strong connection between high redshift quasars and their host galaxies. The aim of this paper is to prove that the main aspects of the chemical evolution of the spheroids can be reproduced in the framework of a model where the shining of the quasar is intimately related to the formation of the galactic nucleus. A key assumption is that the quasars shone in an inverted order with respect to the hierarchical one (i.e., stars and black holes in bigger dark halos formed before those in smaller ones) during an early episode of vigorous star formation. This scenario closely resembles the so-called `inverse wind' model invoked to explain the observed increase of the [Mg/Fe] ratio in the nuclei of ellipticals with increasing the galactic mass, the only difference being that now the time for the occurrence of a galactic wind is not determined by the energy input from supernovae, but is indeed the energy injected by the quasar which regulates the onset of the wind phase.
[220]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0105483  [pdf] - 1468262
The stellar origin of 7Li - Do AGB stars contribute a substantial fraction of the local Galactic lithium abundance?
Comments: 11 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2001-05-28
We adopt up-to-date 7Li yields from asymptotic giant branch stars in order to study the temporal evolution of 7Li in the solar neighbourhood in the context of a revised version of the two-infall model for the chemical evolution of our galaxy. We consider several lithium stellar sources besides the asymptotic giant branch stars such as Type II supernovae, novae, low-mass giants as well as Galactic cosmic rays and low-mass X-ray binaries. We conclude that asymptotic giant branch stars cannot be considered as important 7Li producers as believed in so far and that the contribution of low-mass giants and novae is necessary to reproduce the steep rise of the 7Li abundance in disk stars as well as the meteoritic 7Li abundance. Lithium production in low-mass X-ray binaries hardly affects the temporal evolution of 7Li in the solar neighbourhood.
[221]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0105074  [pdf] - 253441
On the typical timescale for the chemical enrichment from SNeIa in Galaxies
Comments: 25 pages, 6 figures, accepted for pubblication from ApJ
Submitted: 2001-05-04
We calculate the type Ia supernova rate for different star formation histories in galaxies by adopting the most popular and recent progenitor models. We show that the timescale for the maximum in the type Ia supernova rate, which corresponds also to time of the maximum enrichment, is not unique but is a strong function of the adopted stellar lifetimes, initial mass function and star formation rate. This timescale varies from $\sim 40-50$ Myr for an instantaneous starburst to $\sim$ 0.3 Gyr for a typical elliptical galaxy to $\sim 4.0-5.0$ Gyr for a disk of a spiral Galaxy like the Milky Way. We also show that the typical timescale of 1 Gyr, often quoted as the typical timescale for the type Ia supernovae, is just the time at which, in the solar neighbourhood, the Fe production from supernovae Ia starts to become important and not the time at which SNe Ia start to explode. As a cosequence of this, a change in slope in the [O/Fe] ratio is expected in correspondance of this timescale. We conclude that the suggested lack of supernovae Ia at low metallicities produces results at variance with the observed [O/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relation in the solar region. We also compute the supernova Ia rates for different galaxies as a function of redshift and predict an extended maximum between redshift $z \sim 3.6$ and $z \sim 1.6$ for elliptical galaxies, and two maxima, one at $z \sim 3$ and the other at $z \sim 1$, for spiral galaxies, under the assumption that galaxies start forming stars at $z_f \sim 5$ and $\Omega_M = 0.3$, $\Omega_{\Lambda} = 0.7$.
[222]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0102134  [pdf] - 40845
Abundance Gradients and the Formation of the Milky Way
Comments: 41 pages (including the figures), To be published in ApJ
Submitted: 2001-02-08
In this paper we adopt a chemical evolution model, which is an improved version of the Chiappini, Matteucci and Gratton (1997) model, assuming two main accretion episodes for the formation of the Galaxy. The present model takes into account in more detail than previously the halo density distribution and explores the effects of a threshold density in the star formation process, during both the halo and disk phases. In the comparison between model predictions and available data, we have focused our attention on abundance gradients as well as gas, stellar and star formation rate distributions along the disk. We suggest that the mechanism for the formation of the halo leaves detectable imprints on the chemical properties of the outer regions of the disk, whereas the evolution of the halo and the inner disk are almost completely disentangled. This is due to the fact that the halo and disk densities are comparable at large Galactocentric distances and therefore the gas lost from the halo can substantially contribute to building up the outer disk. We also show that the existence of a threshold density for the star formation rate, both in the halo and disk phase, is necessary to reproduce the majority of observational data in the solar vicinity and in the whole disk. Moreover, we predict that the abundance gradients along the Galactic disk must have increased with time and that the average [alpha/Fe] ratio in stars (halo plus disk) slightly decrease going from 4 to 10 Kpcs from the Galactic center. We also show that the same ratios increase substantially towards the outermost disk regions and the expected scatter in the stellar ages decreases, because the outermost regions are dominated by halo stars.
[223]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0101284  [pdf] - 1507857
Galactic Winds in Irregular Starburst Galaxies
Comments: 3 pages, 1 figure, to appear in the Proceedings of the Conference "Cosmic Evolution", Paris, November 2000
Submitted: 2001-01-17
In this paper we present some results concerning the study of the development of galactic winds in blue compact galaxies. In particular, we model a situation very similar to that of the galaxy IZw18, the most metal poor and unevolved galaxy known locally. To do that we compute the chemo-dynamical evolution of a galaxy in the case of one istantaneous isolated starburst as well as in the case of two successive instantaneous starbursts. We show that in both cases a metal enriched wind develops and that the metals produced by the type Ia SNe are lost more efficiently than those produced by type II SNe. We also find that one single burst is able to enrich chemically the surrounding region in few Myr. Both these results are the effect of the assumed efficiency of energy transfer from SNe to ISM and to the consideration of type Ia SNe in this kind of problem. The comparison with observed abundances of IZw18 suggests that this galaxy is likely to have suffered two bursts in its life, with the previous being less intense than the last one.
[224]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0101263  [pdf] - 1507856
Evolution of Lithium in the Milky Way
Comments: 2 pages, latex, 1 figure. To appear in the Proceedings of the Conference "Cosmic Evolution", Paris, November 2000
Submitted: 2001-01-16
We adopt up-to-date 7Li yields from asymptotic giant branch stars in order to study the temporal evolution of this element in the solar neighbourhood. Several lithium stellar sources are considered besides the AGBs: Type II supernovae, novae, low-mass giants. Galactic cosmic ray nucleosynthesis is taken into account as well. We conclude that AGB stars do not substantially contribute to 7Li enrichment on a Galactic scale. Therefore, a significant 7Li production from novae and low-mass stars is needed to explain the late, steep rise of the 7Li abundance in disk stars and the meteoritic 7Li abundance.
[225]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0002370  [pdf] - 34713
Dynamical and chemical evolution of gas-rich dwarf galaxies
Comments: 25 pages, Latex, 18 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2000-02-18, last modified: 2000-11-09
We study the effect of a single, instantaneous starburst on the dynamical and chemical evolution of a gas-rich dwarf galaxy, whose potential well is dominated by a dark matter halo. We follow the dynamical and chemical evolution of the ISM by means of an improved 2-D hydrodynamical code coupled with detailed chemical yields originating from type II SNe, type Ia SNe and single low and intermediate mass stars (IMS). In particular we follow the evolution of the abundances of H, He, C, N, O, Mg, Si and Fe. We find that for a galaxy resembling IZw18, a galactic wind develops as a consequence of the starburst and it carries out of the galaxy mostly the metal-enriched gas. In addition, we find that different metals are lost differentially in the sense that the elements produced by type Ia SNe are more efficiently lost than others. As a consequence of that we predict larger [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios for the gas inside the galaxy than for the gas leaving the galaxy. A comparison of our predicted abundances of C, N, O and Si in the case of a burst occurring in a primordial gas shows a very good agreement with the observed abundances in IZw18 as long as the burst has an age of $\sim 31$ Myr and IMS produce some primary nitrogen. However, we cannot exclude that a previous burst of star formation had occurred in IZw18 especially if the preenrichment produced by the older burst was lower than $Z=0.01$ Z$_{\odot}$. Finally, at variance with previous studies, we find that most of the metals reside in the cold gas phase already after few Myr. This result is mainly due to the assumed low SNII heating efficiency, and justifies the generally adopted homogeneous and instantaneous mixing of gas in chemical evolution models.
[226]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0010411  [pdf] - 38758
Abundances and Evolution of Lithium in the Galactic Halo and Disk
Comments: 41 pages including 7 figures 2001, ApJ, 548, xxx (20 February)
Submitted: 2000-10-20
We have measured the Li abundance of 18 stars with -2 <~ [Fe/H] ~< -1 and 6000 K <~ Teff <~ 6400 K, a parameter range that was poorly represented in previous studies. We examine the Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) of this element, combining these data with previous samples of turnoff stars over the full range of halo metallicities. We find that A(Li) increases from a level of \~2.10 at [Fe/H] = -3.5, to ~2.40 at [Fe/H] = -1.0, where A(Li) = log_10 (n(Li)/n(H)) + 12.00. We compare the observations with several GCE calculations, including existing one-zone models, and a new model developed in the framework of inhomogeneous evolution of the Galactic halo. We show that Li evolved at a constant rate relative to iron throughout the halo and old-disk epochs, but that during the formation of young-disk stars, the production of Li relative to iron increased significantly. These observations can be understood in the context of models in which post-primordial Li evolution during the halo and old-disk epochs is dominated by Galactic cosmic ray fusion and spallation reactions, with some contribution from the $\nu$-process in supernovae. The onset of more efficient Li production (relative to iron) in the young disk coincides with the appearance of Li from novae and AGB stars. The major challenge facing the models is to reconcile the mild evolution of Li during the halo and old-disk phases with the more efficient production (relative to iron) at [Fe/H] > -0.5. We speculate that cool-bottom processing (production) of Li in low-mass stars may provide an important late-appearing source of Li, without attendant Fe production, that might explain the Li production in the young disk.
[227]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0010388  [pdf] - 38735
The Chemical Evolution of Galaxy Disks
Comments: 9 pages, 1 figure, Invited review to appear in the proceedings of "Galaxy Disks and Disk Galaxies", J.G. Funes and E.M. Corsini eds
Submitted: 2000-10-19
We discuss the main ingredients necessary to build models of chemical evolution of spiral galaxies and in particular the Milky Way galaxy. These ingredients include: the star formation rate, the initial mass function, the stellar yields and the gas flows. Then we discuss models for the chemical evolution of galaxy disks and compare their predictions with the main observational constraints available for the Milky Way and other spirals. We conclude that it is very likely that the disk of our Galaxy and other spirals formed through an ``inside-out'' mechanism, where the central parts collapsed much faster than the external ones. This mechanism has important consequences for the appearance of galaxy disks as a function of redshift.
[228]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0009269  [pdf] - 38111
The Best Observables from the Point of View of a Model Maker
Comments: 12 pages, LaTeX, 3 figures, to be published in "The Evolution of Galaxies. I- Observational Clues"
Submitted: 2000-09-18
We select and discuss the best observables to be used to constrain models of galactic chemical evolution. To this purpose, we discuss the observables in our Galaxy, which is the best studied system, as well as in external galaxies.
[229]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0009215  [pdf] - 38057
The Formation of the Milky Way Disk
Comments: 2 pages, to appear in "Galaxy Disks and Disk Galaxies", J.G. Funes and E.M. Corsini, M. eds, ASP Conf.Ser., in press
Submitted: 2000-09-13
We present theoretical results on the galactic abundance gradients of several chemical species for the Milky Way disk, obtained using an improved version of the two-infall model of Chiappini, Matteucci, & Gratton (1997) that incorporates a more realistic model of the galactic halo and disk. This improved model provides a satisfactory fit to the elemental abundance gradients as inferred from the observations and also to other radial features of our galaxy (i.e., gas, star formation rate and star density profiles). We discuss the implications these results may have for theories of the formation of the Milky Way and make some predictions that could in principle be tested by future observations.
[230]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0004030  [pdf] - 35390
The Evolution of 3He, 4He and D in the Galaxy
Comments: 6 pages, to appear in "The Light Elements and Their Evolution", IAU Symp. 198, L. da Silva, M. Spite, J.R. Medeiros eds, ASP Conf.Ser., in press; Figure 3 corrected, typos corrected and 1 reference added/subtracted
Submitted: 2000-04-03, last modified: 2000-04-17
In this work we present the predictions of a modified version of the ``two-infall model'' (Chiappini et al. 1997) for the evolution of 3He, 4He and D in the solar vicinity, as well as their distributions along the Galactic disk. In particular, we show that when allowing for extra-mixing process in low mass stars, as predicted by Charbonnel and do Nascimento (1998), a long standing problem in chemical evolution is solved, namely: the overproduction of 3He by the chemical evolution models as compared to the observed values in the sun and in the interstellar medium. Moreover, we show that chemical evolution models can constrain the primordial value of the deuterium abundance and that a value of primordial D/H < 3 x 10(-5) is suggested by the present model. Finally, adopting the primordial 4He abundance suggested by Viegas et al. (1999), we obtain a value for dY/dZ around 2 and a better agreement with the solar He abundance.
[231]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0004157  [pdf] - 35516
Abundances of light elements in metal-poor stars. IV. [Fe/O] and [Fe/Mg] and the history of star formation in the solar neighborhood
Comments: 13 pages, 9 encapsulated figures. LaTeX, uses l-aa.sty. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2000-04-12
The accurate O, Mg and Fe abundances derived in previous papers of this series from a homogenous reanalysis of high quality data for a large sample of stars are combined with stellar kinematics in order to discuss the history of star formation in the solar neighborhood. We found that the Fe/O and Fe/Mg abundance ratios are roughly constant in the (inner) halo and the thick disk; this means that the timescale of halo collapse was shorter than or of the same order of typical lifetime of progenitors of type Ia SNe (~ 1 Gyr), this conclusion being somewhat relaxed (referring to star formation in the individual fragments) in an accretion model for the Galaxy formation. Both Fe/O and Fe/Mg ratios raised by ~ 0.2 dex while the O/H and Mg/H ratios hold constant during the transition from the thick to thin disk phases, indicating a sudden decrease in star formation in the solar neighbourhood at that epoch. These results are discussed in the framework of current views of Galaxy formation; they fit in a scenario where both dissipational collapse and accretions were active on a quite similar timescale.
[232]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0004029  [pdf] - 1348025
The effects of a Variable IMF on the Chemical Evolution of the Galaxy
Comments: 7 pages, to appear in "The Chemical Evolution of the Milky Way: Stars vs Clusters", Vulcano, September 1999, F. Giovannelli and F. Matteucci eds. (Kluwer, Dordrecht) in press
Submitted: 2000-04-03
In this work we explore the effects of adopting an initial mass function (IMF) variable in time on the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. In order to do that we adopt a chemical evolution model which assumes two main infall episodes for the formation of the Galaxy. We study the effects on such a model of different IMFs. First, we use a theoretical one based on the statistical description of the density field arising from random motions in the gas. This IMF is a function of time as it depends on physical conditions of the site of star formation. We also investigate the behaviour of the model predictions using other variable IMFs, parameterized as a function of metallicity. Our results show that the theoretical IMF when applied to our model depends on time but such time variation is important only in the early phases of the Galactic evolution, when the IMF is biased towards massive stars. We also show that the use of an IMF which is a stronger function of time does not lead to a good agreement with the observational constraints suggesting that if the IMF varied this variation should have been small. Our main conclusion is that the G-dwarf metallicity distribution is best explained by infall with a large timescale and a constant IMF, since it is possible to find variable IMFs of the kind studied here, reproducing the G-dwarf metallicity but this worsens the agreement with other observational constraints.
[233]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0003130  [pdf] - 35004
The mass surface density in the local disk and the chemical evolution of the Galaxy
Comments: 6 pages, LaTeX, 3 figures, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal, uses emulateapj.sty
Submitted: 2000-03-09
We have studied the effect of adopting different values of the total baryonic mass surface density in the local disk at the present time in a model for the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. We have compared our model results with the G-dwarf metallicity distribution, the amounts of gas, stars, stellar remnants, infall rate and SN rate in the solar vicinity, and with the radial abundance gradients and gas distribution in the disk. This comparison strongly suggests that the value of the total baryonic mass surface density in the local disk which best fits the observational properties should lie in the range 50-75 Msun pc-2, and that values outside this range should be ruled out.
[234]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0002371  [pdf] - 34714
Chemical and dynamical evolution in gas-rich dwarf galaxies
Comments: 4 pages, Latex, 2 figures, to be published in "Cosmic Evolution and Galaxy Formation: Structure, Interactions and Feedback", ASP Conference Series
Submitted: 2000-02-18
We study the effect of a single, instantaneous starburst in a gas-rich dwarf galaxy on the dynamical and chemical evolution of its interstellar medium. We consider the energetic input and the chemical yields originating from SNeII, SNeIa and intermediate-mass stars. We find that a galaxy resembling IZw18 develops a galactic wind carrying out mostly the metal-rich gas. The various metals are lost differentially and the metals produced by the SNeIa are lost more efficiently than the others. As a consequence, we find larger [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios for the gas inside the galaxy than for the gas leaving the galaxy. Finally we find that a single burst occurring in primordial gas (without pre-enrichment), gives chemical abundances and dynamical structures in good agreement with what observed in IZw18 after $\sim$ 29 Myr from the beginning of star formation.
[235]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0002224  [pdf] - 1943514
An X-ray and optical study of the cluster A33
Comments: 9 pages, 6 Figures, Latex (using psfig,l-aa), to appear in Astronomy and Astrophysics S. (To get better quality copies of Figs.1-3 send an email to: cola@coma.mporzio.astro.it). A&AS, in press
Submitted: 2000-02-10
We report the first detailed X-ray and optical observations of the medium-distant cluster A33 obtained with the Beppo-SAX satellite and with the UH 2.2m and Keck II telescopes at Mauna Kea. The information deduced from X-ray and optical imaging and spectroscopic data allowed us to identify the X-ray source 1SAXJ0027.2-1930 as the X-ray counterpart of the A33 cluster. The faint, $F_{2-10 keV} \approx 2.4 \times 10^{-13} \ergscm2$, X-ray source 1SAXJ0027.2-1930, $\sim 2$ arcmin away from the optical position of the cluster as given in the Abell catalogue, is identified with the central region of A33. Based on six cluster galaxy redshifts, we determine the redshift of A33, $z=0.2409$; this is lower than the value derived by Leir and Van Den Bergh (1977). The source X-ray luminosity, $L_{2-10 keV} = 7.7 \times 10^{43} \ergs$, and intracluster gas temperature, $T = 2.9$ keV, make this cluster interesting for cosmological studies of the cluster $L_X-T$ relation at intermediate redshifts. Two other X-ray sources in the A33 field are identified. An AGN at z$=$0.2274, and an M-type star, whose emission are blended to form an extended X-ray emission $\sim 4$ arcmin north of the A33 cluster. A third possibly point-like X-ray source detected $\sim 3$ arcmin north-west of A33 lies close to a spiral galaxy at z$=$0.2863 and to an elliptical galaxy at the same redshift as the cluster.
[236]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0001253  [pdf] - 1348013
The influence of nova nucleosynthesis on the chemical evolution of the Galaxy
Comments: 8 pages, latex, 3 figures. To appear in "The Chemical Evolution of the Milky Way: Stars versus Clusters", eds. F. Giovannelli and F. Matteucci (Kluwer: Dordrecht)
Submitted: 2000-01-14
We adopt up-to-date yields of 7Li, 13C, 15N from classical novae and use a well tested model for the chemical evolution of the Milky Way in order to predict the temporal evolution of these elemental species in the solar neighborhood. In spite of major uncertainties due to our lack of knowledge of metallicity effects on the final products of explosive nucleosynthesis in nova outbursts, we find a satisfactory agreement between theoretical predictions and observations for 7Li and 13C. On the contrary, 15N turns out to be overproduced by about an order of magnitude.
[237]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9910279  [pdf] - 108833
Proto-Galactic Starbursts at High Redshift
Comments: Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 1999-10-14
We have computed the evolving ultraviolet-millimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) produced by proto-galactic starbursts at high redshift, incorporating the chemical evolution of the interstellar medium in a consistent manner. Dust extinction is calculated in a novel way, that is not based on empirical calibrations of extinction curves, but rather on the lifetime of molecular clouds which delays the emergence of each successive generation of stars at ultraviolet wavelengths by typically 15 Myr. The predicted rest-frame far-infrared to millimeter-wave emission includes the calculation of molecular emission-line luminosities ($^{12}$CO and O$_{2}$ among other molecules) consistent with the evolving chemical abundances. Here we present details of this new model, along with the results of comparing its predictions with several high-redshift observables, namely: the ultraviolet SEDs of Lyman-limit galaxies, the high-redshift radiogalaxies 4C41.17 and 8C1435, the SCUBA sub-millimeter survey of the Hubble Deep Field (HDF), and the SEDs of intermediate-redshift elliptical galaxies. With our new reddening method, we are able to fit the spectrum of the Lyman-limit galaxy 1512-cB58, and we find an extinction of about 1.9 magnitudes at 1600 {\AA}. The model also predicts that most Lyman-limit galaxies should have a value of $\alpha$ inside that range, as it is observed. The 850 $\mu$m flux density of a typical Lyman-limit galaxy is expected to be only $\simeq 0.5$ mJy, and therefore the optical counterparts of the most luminous sub-mm sources in the HDF (or any other currently feasible sub-mm survey) are unlikely to be Lyman-break galaxies.
[238]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9910151  [pdf] - 363318
The Galactic Lithium Evolution Revisited
Comments: 23 pages, LaTeX, 8 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics (Main Journal)
Submitted: 1999-10-08
The evolution of the 7Li abundance in the Galaxy has been computed by taking into account several 7Li sources: novae, massive AGB stars, C-stars, Type II SNe and GCRs. The theoretical predictions for the evolution of the 7Li abundance in the solar neighborhood have been compared to a new compilation of data. A critical analysis of extant observations revealed a possible extension of the Li plateau towards higher metallicities (up to [Fe/H] = -0.5 or even -0.3) with a steep rise afterwards. We conclude that 1) the 7Li contribution from novae is required in order to reproduce the shape of the growth of A(Li) versus [Fe/H], 2) the contribution from Type II SNe should be lowered by at least a factor of two, and 3) the 7Li production from GCRs is probably more important than previously estimated, in particular at the highest metallicities.
[239]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9908207  [pdf] - 107879
The Chemical Evolution of the Galaxy with Variable IMFs
Comments: 34 pages, 13 figures, ApJ (in press)
Submitted: 1999-08-18
In this work we explore the effects of adopting initial mass functions (IMFs) variable in time on the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. In order to do that we adopt a chemical evolution model which assumes two main infall episodes for the formation of the Galaxy and which proved to be successful in reproducing the majority of the observational constraints, at least for the case of a constant IMF. Different variable IMFs are tested with this model, all assuming that massive stars are preferentially formed in ambients of low metallicity. This implies that massive stars are formed preferentially at early times and at large galactocentric distances. Our numerical results have shown that all the variable IMFs proposed so far are unable to reproduce all the relevant observational constraints in the Galaxy and that a constant IMF still reproduces better the observations. In particular, variable IMFs of the kind explored here are unable to reproduce the observed abundance gradients even when allowing for changes in other chemical evolution model parameters as, for instance, the star formation rate. As a consequence of this we conclude that the G-dwarf metallicity distribution is best explained by infall with a large timescale and a constant IMF, since it is possible to find variable IMFs of the kind studied here, reproducing the G-dwarf metallicity but this worsen the agreement with other observational constraints.
[240]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9907008  [pdf] - 107233
A possible solution of the G-dwarf problem in the frame-work of closed models with a time-dependent IMF
Comments: 8 pages, 9 figures, Latex, Astronomy and Astrophysics accepted
Submitted: 1999-07-01
In this paper we present a method to solve the G-dwarf problem in the frame-work of analytical models (based on the instantaneous recycling approximation, IRA). We consider a one-zone closed model without inflows or outflows. We suppose a time-dependent Initial Mass Function (IMF) and we find an integral-differential equation which must be satisfied in order to honour the G-dwarf metallicity distribution as a function of the oxygen abundance. IMFs with one and two slopes are given and discussed also in the framework of a numerical chemical evolution model without IRA. We conclude that it is difficult to reproduce other observational constraints besides the G-dwarf distribution (such as $[\frac{O}{Fe}]$ vs $[\frac{Fe}{H}]$), and that an IMF with two slopes, with time-dependent shape at the low mass end, would be required. However, even in this case the predicted oxygen gradient along the disk is flat and radial flows would be required to reproduce the observed gradient.
[241]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9905138  [pdf] - 106464
Evolution with redshift of the ICM abundances
Comments: 8 pages, 7 figures, Latex, uses l-aa.sty and psfig.tex, Astronomy and Astrophysics submitted
Submitted: 1999-05-12
We predict the behaviour of the abundances of $\alpha$-elements and iron in the intracluster medium as a function of redshift in poor and rich clusters. In order to do that we calculate the detailed chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies by means of one-zone and multi-zone models and then we integrate the contributions to the total gas and single elements by ellipticals over the cluster mass function at any given cosmic time which is then transformed into redshift according to the considered cosmological model. We refer to the one-zone model for ellipticals as to burst model and to the multi-zone model as to continuous model. We find that in the case of the burst model the ICM abundances should be quite constant starting from high redshifts ($z > 2$) up to now, whereas in the continuous model the ICM abundances should increase up to $z \sim 1$ and are almost constant from $z \sim 1$ up to $z=0$. Particular attention is devoted to the predictions of the $[\alpha/Fe]_{ICM}$ ratio in the ICM: for the burst model we predict $[\alpha/Fe]_{ICM}>0$ over the whole range of redshifts and in particular at $z =0$, whereas in the case of the continuous model we predict a decreasing $[\alpha/Fe]_{ICM}$ ratio with decreasing $z$ and $[\alpha/Fe]_{ICM} \le 0$ at $z= 0$. In particular, we predict $[O/Fe]_{ICM}(z=0) \le +0.35$ dex and $[Si/Fe]_{ICM}(z=0) \le +0.15$ dex for the bursts models and $[O/Fe]_{ICM}(z=0) \le -0.05$ dex and $[Si/Fe]_{ICM}(z=0) \le +0.13$ dex for the continuous models, the precise values depending on the assumed cosmology. Finally, we discuss the influence of different cosmologies on the results.
[242]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9902021  [pdf] - 1943619
Diffuse Thermal Emission from Very Hot Gas in Starburst Galaxies: Spatial Results
Comments: 5 Latex pages, 4 figures, uses psfig.sty. Accepted for publication in Advances in Space Research, in Proceedings of 32nd Sci. Ass. of COSPAR
Submitted: 1999-02-01
New BeppoSAX observations of the nearby prototypical starburst galaxies NGC 253 and M82 are presented. A companion paper (Cappi et al. 1998;astro-ph/9809325) shows that the hard (2-10 keV) spectrum of both galaxies, extracted from the source central regions, is best described by a thermal emission model with kT ~ 6-9 keV and abundances ~ 0.1-0.3 solar. The spatial analysis yields clear evidence that this emission is extended in NGC 253, and possibly also in M82. This quite clearly rules out a LLAGN as the main responsible for their hard X-ray emission. Significant contribution from point-sources (i.e. X-ray binaries (XRBs) and Supernovae Remnants (SNRs)) cannot be excluded; neither can we at present reliably estimate the level of Compton emission. However, we argue that such contributions shouldn't affect our main conclusion, i.e., that the BeppoSAX results show, altogether, compelling evidence for the existence of a very hot, metal-poor interstellar plasma in both galaxies.
[243]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9812315  [pdf] - 104422
Abundance Gradients in the Galactic Disk: a clue to Galaxy Formation
Comments: 10 pages, invited review, ESO Conference "Chemical Evolution from Zero to High Redshift", held in Garching in October 1998
Submitted: 1998-12-16
We review the observational evidences and the possible theoretical explanations for the abundance gradients in the Galactic disk. In particular, we discuss the implications of abundance gradients and gradients of abundance ratios on the mechanism for the formation of the Galaxy. We conclude that an {\bf inside-out} formation of the Galaxy, and in particular of the Galactic disk, where the innermost regions are assumed to have formed much faster than the outermost ones, represents the most likely explanation for abundance gradients and we predict that the abundance gradients along the Galactic disk have increased with time.
[244]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9812040  [pdf] - 104147
On the origin of Damped Lyman-alpha systems: a case for LSB galaxies?
Comments: Submitted to ApJ Letters
Submitted: 1998-12-02
We use a model of galaxy disk formation to explore the metallicities, dust content, and neutral-gas mass density of damped Lyman-$\alpha$ (D\lya) absorbers. We find that the [Zn/H] abundance measurements of D\lya systems now available can be reproduced either by a population of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies forming at redshifts $z > 3$, whose chemical contents evolve slowly with time and whose star formation rates are described by continuous bursts, or by high surface brightness (HSB) galaxies which form continuously over an interval of $z \sim 0.5-3$ (and no higher). Although, in reality, a mixture of galaxy types may be responsible for low-z D\lya systems, our models predict that HSB galaxies form more dust, more rapidly, than LSB galaxies, and that HSB galaxies may therefore obscure background QSOs and not give rise to D\lya lines, as suggested by other researchers. Significantly, we find that the rate at which HSB disks consume neutral gas is too fast to explain the observed evolution in the neutral gas mass density with redshift, and that the consumption of hydrogen by LSB galaxies better fits the data. This further suggests that LSB disks may dominate the D\lya population at high-redshift.
[245]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9810422  [pdf] - 1469706
The Earliest Phases of Galaxy Evolution
Comments: 32 pages, 9 figures, to be published in ApJ
Submitted: 1998-10-26
In this paper we study the very early phases of the evolution of our Galaxy by means of a chemical evolution model which reproduces most of the observational constraints in the solar vicinity and in the disk. We have restricted our analysis to the solar neighborhood and present the predicted abundances of several elements (C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe) over an extended range of metallicities $[Fe/H] = -4.0$ to $[Fe/H] = 0.0$ compared to previous models. We adopted the most recent yield calculations for massive stars taken from different authors (Woosley & Weaver 1995 and Thielemann et al. 1996) and compared the results with a very large sample of data, one of the largest ever used to this purpose. These data have been analysed with a new and powerful statistical method which allows us to quantify the observational spread in measured elemental abundances and obtain a more meaningful comparison with the predictions from our chemical evolution model. Our analysis shows that the ``plateau'' observed for the [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios at low metallicities ($-3.0< [Fe/H] <-1.0$) is not perfectly constant but it shows a slope, especially for oxygen. This slope is very well reproduced by our model with both sets of yields. This is not surprising since realistic chemical evolution models, taking into account in detail stellar lifetimes, never predicted a completely flat plateau. This is due either to the fact that massive stars of different mass produce a slightly different O/Fe ratio or to the often forgotten fact that supernovae of type Ia, originating from white dwarfs, start appearing already at a galactic age of 30 million years and reach their maximum at 1 Gyr.
[246]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9810125  [pdf] - 103241
Light and Heavy Elements in the Galactic Bulge
Comments: 11 pages, LaTeX, 10 Postscript figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 1998-10-08
The chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge is treated here in the context of an inside-out model for the Galaxy formation. We assume that this central region evolved even faster than the Galactic halo and test the effect of changing the slope of the IMF on the predicted stellar metallicity distribution for bulge stars. An IMF favoring the formation of massive stars is found to improve the agreement with the most recently observed metallicity distribution of bulge K giants. Then, we make specific predictions about temporal evolution of several light and heavy species in the Galactic bulge. We predict that alpha-elements should be enhanced relative to Fe for most of the [Fe/H] range, with different degrees of enhancement due to the different nucleosynthetic history of each element, and show that Lithium abundance should follow a trend with metallicity similar to that found for the solar neighbourhood. Several possible stellar Li sources are discussed.
[247]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809325  [pdf] - 103029
Diffuse Thermal Emission from Very Hot Gas in Starburst Galaxies: Spectral Results
Comments: 4 LateX pages, 4 postscript figures and memsait.sty included, to appear in proceedings of ``Dal nano- al tera-eV: tutti i colori degli AGN'', third Italian conference on AGNs, Roma, Memorie S.A.It
Submitted: 1998-09-25
New BeppoSAX observations of the nearby archetypical starburst galaxies (SBGs) NGC253 and M82 are presented. The main observational result is the unambiguous evidence that the hard (2-10 keV) component is (mostly) produced in both galaxies by thermal emission from a metal-poor (~ 0.1-0.3 solar), hot (kT \~ 6- 9 keV) and extended (see companion paper: Cappi et al. 1998) plasma. Possible origins of this newly discovered component are briefly discussed. A remarkable similarity with the (Milky Way) Galactic Ridge's X-ray emission suggests, nevertheless, a common physical mechanism.
[248]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809256  [pdf] - 102960
BeppoSAX detection of the Fe K line in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253
Comments: LaTeX file (6 pages), 2 ps figures, accepted for publications in Astronomy & Astrophysics Letters
Submitted: 1998-09-21
We present BeppoSAX results on the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253. Although extended, a large fraction of the X-ray emission comes from the nuclear region. Preliminary analysis of the LECS/MECS/PDS ~0.2-60 keV data from the central 4' region indicates that the continuum is well fitted by two thermal models: a ``soft'' component with kT ~ 0.9 keV, and a ``hard'' component with kT ~ 6 keV absorbed by a column density of ~ 1.2 x10**22 cm-2. For the first time in this object, the Fe K line at 6.7 keV is detected, with an equivalent width of ~ 300 eV. This detection, together with the shape of the 2--60 keV continuum, implies that most of the hard X-ray emission is thermal in origin, and constrains the iron abundances of this component to be ~0.25 of solar. Other lines clearly detected are Si, S and Fe L/Ne, in agreement with previous ASCA results. We discuss our results in the context of the starburst-driven galactic superwind model.
[249]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9804049  [pdf] - 100930
Galaxy Formation and Evolution: Low Surface Brightness Galaxies
Comments: To appear in MNRAS
Submitted: 1998-04-05
We investigate in detail the hypothesis that low surface brightness galaxies (LSB) differ from ordinary galaxies simply because they form in halos with large spin parameters. We compute star formation rates using the Schmidt law, assuming the same gas infall dependence on surface density as used in models of the Milky Way. We build stellar population models, predicting colours, spectra, and chemical abundances. We compare our predictions with observed values of metallicity and colours for LSB galaxies and find excellent agreement with all observables. In particular, integrated colours, colour gradients, surface brightness and metallicity match very well to the observed values of LSBs for models with ages larger than 7 Gyr and high values ($\lambda > 0.05$) for the spin parameter of the halos. We also compute the global star formation rate (SFR) in the Universe due to LSBs and show that it has a flatter evolution with redshift than the corresponding SFR for normal discs. We furthermore compare the evolution in redshift of $[Zn/H]$ for our models to those observed in Damped Lyman $\alpha$ systems by \scite{Pettini+97} and show that Damped Lyman $\alpha$ systems abundances are consistent with the predicted abundances at different radii for LSBs. Finally, we show how the required late redshift of collapse of the halo may constrain the power spectrum of fluctuations.
[250]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9803126  [pdf] - 100661
On the Trend of [Mg/Fe] among Giant Elliptical Galaxies
Comments: 13 pages with 15 figures, LaTeX2e, l-aa.sty, accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 1998-03-11
We revisit the problem of the flat slope of the Mg2 versus <Fe> relationship found for nuclei of elliptical galaxies (Faber et al. 1992; Worthey et al. 1992; Carollo et al. 1993; Davies et al. 1993), indicating that the Mg/Fe ratio should increase with galactic luminosity and mass. We transform the abundance of Fe, as predicted by classic wind models and alternative models for the chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies, into the metallicity indices Mg2 and <Fe>, by means of the more recent index calibrations and show that none of the current models for the chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies is able to reproduce exactly the observed slope of the <Fe> versus Mg2 relation, although the existing spread in the data makes this comparison quite difficult. In other words, we can not clearly discriminate between models predicting a decrease (classic wind model) or an increase of such a ratio with galactic mass. The reason for this resides in the fact that the available observations show a large spread due mostly to the errors in the derivation of the <Fe> index. In our opinion this fact prevents us from drawing any firm conclusion on the behaviour of Mg and Fe in these galaxies.
[251]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9801131  [pdf] - 99980
The Influence of Stellar Energetics and Dark Matter on the Chemical Evolution of Dwarf Irregulars
Comments: LaTeX2e, 13 pages with 11 figures, submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 1998-01-14
A chemical evolution model following the evolution of the abundances of H, He, C, N, O and Fe for dwarf irregular and blue compact galaxies is presented. This model takes into account detailed nucleosynthesis and computes in detail the rates of supernovae of type II and I. The star formation is assumed to have proceeded in short but intense bursts. The novelty relative to previous models is that the development of a galactic wind is studied in detail by taking into account the energy injected into the interstellar medium (ISM) from both supernovae and stellar winds from massive stars as well as the presence of dark matter halos. Both metal enriched and normal winds have been considered. Our main conclusions are: i) a substantial amount of dark matter (from 1 to 50 times larger than the luminous matter) is required in order to avoid the complete destruction of such galaxies during strong starbursts, and ii) the energy injected by stellar winds and type Ia supernovae into the ISM is negligible relative to the total thermal energy, and in particular to the type II supernovae, which in fact, dominate the energetics during starbursts.
[252]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9801130  [pdf] - 99979
BeppoSAX detection of the Fe K line in the starburst galaxy NGC253
Comments: 4 pages, LateX, 2 figures (included). Uses espcrc2.sty (included) To appear in The Active X-ray Sky: Results from BeppoSAX and Rossi-XTE, Rome, Italy, 21-24 October, 1997. Eds.: L. Scarsi, H. Bradt, P. Giommi and F. Fiore
Submitted: 1998-01-14
Preliminary results obtained from BeppoSAX observation of the starburst galaxy NGC253 are presented. X-ray emission from the object is clearly extended but most of the emission is concentrated on the optical nucleus. Preliminary analysis of the LECS and MECS data obtained using the central 4' region indicates that the continuum is well fitted by two thermal components at 0.9 keV and 7 keV. Fe K line at 6.7 keV is detected for the first time in this galaxy; the line has an equivalent width of ~300eV. The line energy and the shape of the 2-10 keV continuum strongly support thermal origin of the hard X-ray emission of NGC253. From the measurement of the Fe K line the abundances can be unambiguously constrained to ~0.25 the solar value. Other lines clearly detected are Si, S and Fe XVIII/Ne, in agreement with ASCA results.
[253]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9706114  [pdf] - 97635
Is High Primordial Deuterium Consistent With Galactic Evolution?
Comments: ApJ accepted; revised to the version which will appear in the ApJ. More discussion but conclusions unchanged. 25 pages, 1 table, 7 postscript figures
Submitted: 1997-06-11, last modified: 1997-12-11
Galactic destruction of primordial deuterium is inevitably linked through star formation to the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. The relatively high present gas content and low metallicity suggest only modest D-destruction. In concert with deuterium abundances derived from solar system and/or interstellar observations this suggests a primordial deuterium abundance in possible conflict with data from some high-redshift, low-metallicity QSO absorbers. We have explored a variety of chemical evolution models including infall of processed material and early, supernovae-driven winds with the aim of identifying models with large D-destruction which are consistent with the observations of stellar-produced heavy elements. When such models are confronted with data we reconfirm that only modest destruction of deuterium (less than a factor of 3) is permitted. When combined with solar system and interstellar data these results favor the low deuterium abundances derived for the QSO absorbers observed by Tytler et al (1996) and by Burles & Tytler (1996).
[254]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9710056  [pdf] - 98815
A possible theoretical explanation of metallicity gradients in elliptical galaxies
Comments: 18 pages, LaTeX file with 4 figures using mn.sty, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 1997-10-06
Models of chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies taking into account different escape velocities at different galactocentric radii are presented. As a consequence of this, the chemical evolution develops differently in different galactic regions; in particular, we find that the galactic wind, powered by supernovae (of type II and I) starts, under suitable conditions, in the outer regions and successively develops in the central ones. The rate of star formation (SFR) is assumed to stop after the onset of the galactic wind in each region. The main result found in the present work is that this mechanism is able to reproduce metallicity gradients, namely the gradients in the $Mg_2$ index, in good agreement with observational data. We also find that in order to honor the constant [Mg/Fe] ratio with galactocentric distance, as inferred from metallicity indices, a variable initial mass function as a function of galactocentric distance is required. This is only a suggestion since trends on abundances inferred just from metallicity indices are still uncertain.
[255]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9707314  [pdf] - 1339339
Infall Models of Elliptical Galaxies: Further Evidence for a Top-Heavy Initial Mass Function
Comments: 6 pages, LaTeX, also available at http://msowww.anu.edu.au/~gibson/publications.html, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 1997-07-29
Chemical and photometric models of elliptical galaxies with infall of primordial gas, and subsequent ejection of processed material via galactic winds, are described. Ensuring that these models are consistent with the present-day colour-luminosity relation and the measured intracluster medium (ICM) abundances, we demonstrate that the initial mass function (IMF) must be significantly flatter (i.e., x<=0.80) than the canonical Salpeter slope (i.e., x=1.35). Such a ``top-heavy'' IMF is in agreement with the earlier conclusions based upon closed-box models for elliptical galaxy evolution. On the other hand, the top-heavy IMF, in conjunction with these semi-analytic infall models, predicts an ICM gas mass which exceeds that observed by up to a factor three, in contrast with the canonical closed-box models. Time and position-dependent IMF formalisms may prove to be a fruitful avenue for future research, but those presently available in the literature are shown to be inconsistent with several important observational constraints.
[256]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9702205  [pdf] - 96724
A New Approach to Determine the Initial Mass Function in the Solar Neighborhood
Comments: 13 pages LaTex, 4 PostScript figures, to appear in ApJ (July 1, Vol.483)
Submitted: 1997-02-23, last modified: 1997-02-25
Oxygen to iron abundance ratios of metal-poor stars provide information on nucleosynthesis yields from massive stars which end in Type II supernova explosions. Using a standard model of chemical evolution of the Galaxy we have reproduced the solar neighborhood abundance data and estimated the oxygen and iron yields of genuine SN II origin. The estimated yields are compared with the theoretical yields to derive the relation between the lower and upper mass limits in each generation of stars and the IMF slope. Independently of this relation, we furthermore derive the relation between the lower mass limit and the IMF slope from the stellar mass to light ratio in the solar neighborhood. These independent relations unambiguously determine the upper mass limit of $m_u=50 \pm 10 M_sun$ and the IMF slope index of 1.3 - 1.6 above 1 M_sun. This upper mass limit corresponds to the mass beyond which stars end as black holes without ejecting processed matter into the interstellar medium. We also find that the IMF slope index below 0.5 M_sun cannot be much shallower than 0.8.
[257]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9612131  [pdf] - 96159
The Enrichment of the Intracluster Medium
Comments: 2 pages, TeX, also available at http://msowww.anu.edu.au/~gibson/publications.html, to appear in the Proceedings of the Second Stromlo Symposium
Submitted: 1996-12-13
The enrichment of the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters, within the framework of the supernovae-driven wind model for elliptical galaxies, has been considered under two extreme assumptions regarding the binding energy-mass-radius relations. Unless the binding energy at the time of wind commencement, for a given galactic mass, was a factor of approximately five lower than that predicted by the present-day relation, at most 20% of the ICM gas could have originated within the cluster ellipticals themselves, the remainder being of primordial origin.
[258]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9612132  [pdf] - 96160
On Dwarf Galaxies as the Source of Intracluster Gas
Comments: 43 pages, 8 figures, LaTeX, also available at http://msowww.anu.edu.au/~gibson/publications.html, to appear in ApJ, Vol 473, 1997, in press
Submitted: 1996-12-13
Recent observational evidence for steep dwarf galaxy luminosity functions in several rich clusters has led to speculation that their precursors may be the source of the majority of gas and metals inferred from intracluster medium (ICM) x-ray observations. Their deposition into the ICM is presumed to occur through early supernovae-driven winds, the resultant systems reflecting the photometric and chemical properties of the low luminosity dwarf spheroidals and ellipticals we observe locally. We consider this scenario, utilising a self-consistent model for spheroidal photo-chemical evolution and gas ejection via galactic superwinds. Insisting that post-wind dwarfs obey the observed colour-luminosity-metallicity relations, we conclude that the bulk of the ICM gas and metals does not originate within their precursors.
[259]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9610059  [pdf] - 95583
Galaxy evolution: the effect of dark matter on the chemical evolution of ellipticals and galaxy clusters
Comments: 12 pages, 3 Postscript figures, paspconf.sty to appear on the proc. of "Dark and Visible Matter in Galaxies" Persic and Salucci eds., ASP Conf. Series
Submitted: 1996-10-09
In this paper we discuss the chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies and its consequences on the evolution of the intracluster medium (ICM). We use chemical evolution models taking into account dark matter halos and compare the results with previous models where dark matter was not considered. In particular, we examine the evolution of the abundances of some relevant heavy elements such as oxygen, magnesium and iron and conclude that models including dark matter halos and an initial mass function (IMF) containing more massive stars than the Salpeter (1955) IMF, better reproduce the observed abundances of Mg and Fe both in the stellar populations and in the ICM (ASCA results). We also discuss the origin of gas in galaxy clusters and conclude that most of it should have a primordial origin.
[260]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9609199  [pdf] - 95519
The Chemical Evolution of the Galaxy: the two-infall model
Comments: 48 pages, 20 Postscript figures, AASTex v.4.0, to be published in Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 1996-09-30
In this paper we present a new chemical evolution model for the Galaxy which assumes two main infall episodes for the formation of halo-thick disk and thin disk, respectively. We do not try to take into account explicitly the evolution of the halo but we implicitly assume that the timescale for the formation of the halo was of the same order as the timescale for the formation of the thick disk. The formation of the thin-disk is much longer than that of the thick disk, implying that the infalling gas forming the thin-disk comes not only from the thick disk but mainly from the intergalactic medium. The timescale for the formation of the thin-disk is assumed to be a function of the galactocentric distance, leading to an inside-out picture for the Galaxy building. The model takes into account the most up to date nucleosynthesis prescriptions and adopts a threshold in the star formation process which naturally produces a hiatus in the star formation rate at the end of the thick disk phase, as suggested by recent observations. The model results are compared with an extended set of observational constraints. Among these constraints, the tightest one is the metallicity distribution of the G-dwarf stars for which new data are now available. Our model fits very well these new data. We show that in order to reproduce most of these constraints a timescale $\le 1$ Gyr for the (halo)-thick-disk and of 8 Gyr for the thin-disk formation in the solar vicinity are required. We predict that the radial abundance gradients in the inner regions of the disk ($R< R_{\odot}$) are steeper than in the outer regions, a result confirmed by recent abundance determinations, and that the inner ones steepen in time during the Galactic lifetime.
[261]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9605039  [pdf] - 94595
Chemical evolution of DLA systems
Comments: 10 pages, 5 Postscript figures, uses laa.sty
Submitted: 1996-05-09
High redshift DLA systems suggest that the relative abundances of elements might be roughly solar, although with absolute abundances of more than two orders of magnitude below solar. The result comes from observations of the [SII/ZnII] ratio, which is a reliable diagnostic of the true abundance, and from DLA absorbers with small dust depletion and negligible HII contamination. In particular, in two DLA systems nitrogen is detected and at remarkably high levels (Vladilo et al. 1995, Molaro et al. 1995, Green et al. 1995, Kulkarni et al. 1996). Here we compare the predictions from chemical evolution models of galaxies of different morphological type with the abundances and abundance ratios derived for such systems. We conclude that solar ratios and relatively high nitrogen abundances can be obtained in the framework of a chemical evolution model assuming short but intense bursts of star formation, which in turn trigger enriched galactic winds, and a primary origin for nitrogen in massive stars. Such a model is the most successful in describing the chemical abundances of dwarf irregular galaxies and in particular of the peculiar galaxy IZw18. Thus, solar ratios at very low absolute abundances, if confirmed, seem to favour dwarf galaxies rather than spirals as the progenitors of at least some of the DLA systems.
[262]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9503120  [pdf] - 92536
26Al and 60Fe From Supernova Explosions
Comments: uuencoded compressed postscript, includes 5 figures. In press, ApJ.
Submitted: 1995-04-01
Using recently calculated yields for Type II supernovae, along with models for chemical evolution and the distribution of mass in the interstellar medium, the current abundances and spatial distributions of two key gamma-ray radioactivities, $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe, are determined. The estimated steady state production rates are 2.0 $\pm$ 1.0 M\sun \ Myr$^{-1}$ for $^{26}$Al and 0.75 $\pm$ 0.4 M\sun \ Myr$^{-1}$ for $^{60}$Fe. This corresponds to 2.2 $\pm$ 1.1 M\sun \ of $^{26}$Al and 1.7 $\pm$ 0.9 M\sun \ of $^{60}$Fe in the present interstellar medium. Sources of uncertainty are discussed, one of the more important being the current rate of core collapse supernovae in the Galaxy. Our simple model gives three per century, but reasonable changes in the star formation rate could easily accommodate a core collapse rate one-half as large, and thus one-half the yields. When these stellar and chemical evolution results are mapped into a three dimensional model of the Galaxy, the calculated 1809 keV gamma-ray flux map is consistent with the {\it Compton Gamma Ray Observatory} observations of a steep decline in the flux outside a longitude of $\pm$ 50$^\circ$ from the Galactic center, and the slight flux enhancements observed in the vicinity of spiral arms. Other potential stellar sources of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe are mentioned, especially the possibility of $^{60}$Fe synthesis in Type Ia supernovae. Predictions for the $^{60}$Fe mass distribution, total mass, and flux map are given.
[263]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9503057  [pdf] - 1469246
CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES
Comments: 25 pages of uuencoded compressed PostScript. 4 PostScript figures and 4 PostScript tables available from http://www-astro.physics.ox.ac.uk/~bkg/gibson.html Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics.
Submitted: 1995-03-14
We study the origin of iron and alpha-elements (O, Mg, Si) in clusters of galaxies. In particular, we discuss the [O/Fe] ratio and the iron mass-to-luminosity ratio in the intracluster medium (ICM) and their link to the chemical and dynamical evolution of elliptical and lenticular galaxies. We adopt a detailed model of galactic evolution incorporating the development of supernovae- driven galactic winds which pollute the ICM with enriched ejecta. We demonstrate \it quantitatively \rm the crucial dependence upon the assumed stellar initial mass function in determining the evolution of the mass and abundances ratios of heavy elements in typical model ICMs. We show that completely opposite behaviours of [alpha/Fe] ratios (\ie positive versus negative ratios) can be obtained by varying the initial mass function without altering the classic assumptions regarding type Ia supernovae progenitors or their nucleosynthesis. Our results indicate that models incorporating somewhat flatter-than-Salpeter initial mass functions (ie x approx 1, as opposed to x=1.35) are preferred, provided the intracluster medium iron mass-to-luminosity ratio, preliminary [alpha/Fe]>0 ASCA results, and present-day type Ia supernovae rates, are to be matched. A simple Virgo cluster simulation which adheres to these constraints shows that approx 70% of the measured ICM iron mass has its origin in type II supernovae, with the remainder being synthesized in type Ia systems.
[264]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9312051  [pdf] - 91152
Synthetic metal line indices for elliptical galaxies from super metal rich alpha-enhanced stellar models
Comments: 28 pages, postscript, MPA preprint, A&A, submitted, MPA - WPM
Submitted: 1993-12-21
There are strong indications from recent papers (e.g. Worthey et al. 1992) that the abundance ratio of Mg/Fe, and consequently also O/Fe in giant elliptical galaxies is not solar. The line strengths of two Fe lines at 5270 and 5335 A are weaker than one expects from the strength of the Mg b line if [Mg/Fe] = 0. We have synthesized absorption line indices to derive the Mg and Fe abundances of these galaxies. For these models we have calculated new evolutionary tracks of high metallicity stars with a range of Mg/Fe abundances. This is the first time that such tracks have been generated. Integrating along isochrones to synthesize metal line strengths we find that for a typical bright giant elliptical [Mg/Fe] has to be between +0.3 and +0.7. We show that this result is independent of other parameters such as age, total metal content and mixing length parameter. The total metal content is super-solar, but the iron metallicity of elliptical galaxies not necessarily has to be larger than solar. For the formation of elliptical galaxies our result on the Mg and Fe abundances has the implication that most of the enrichment of the gas has to come from SNe II, which have more massive progenitors and as such produce relatively more O and Mg than Fe. It means that most of the stars have to be formed within a period of $3 \times 10^8$ years, so that there can only be one major collapse phase of the galaxy.