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Manzotti, Alessandro

Normalized to: Manzotti, A.

22 article(s) in total. 251 co-authors, from 1 to 17 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 28,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.07157  [pdf] - 2042222
Constraints on Cosmological Parameters from the 500 deg$^2$ SPTpol Lensing Power Spectrum
Comments: 16 pages, 8 figures, 3 tables, updated to match the version published on ApJ
Submitted: 2019-10-15, last modified: 2020-02-04
We present cosmological constraints based on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing potential power spectrum measurement from the recent 500 deg$^2$ SPTpol survey, the most precise CMB lensing measurement from the ground to date. We fit a flat $\Lambda$CDM model to the reconstructed lensing power spectrum alone and in addition with other data sets: baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) as well as primary CMB spectra from Planck and SPTpol. The cosmological constraints based on SPTpol and Planck lensing band powers are in good agreement when analysed alone and in combination with Planck full-sky primary CMB data. With weak priors on the baryon density and other parameters, the CMB lensing data alone provide a 4\% constraint on $\sigma_8\Omega_m^{0.25} = 0.0593 \pm 0.025$.. Jointly fitting with BAO data, we find $\sigma_8=0.779 \pm 0.023$, $\Omega_m = 0.368^{+0.032}_{-0.037}$, and $H_0 = 72.0^{+2.1}_{-2.5}\,\text{km}\,\text{s}^{-1}\,\text{Mpc}^{-1} $, up to $2\,\sigma$ away from the central values preferred by Planck lensing + BAO. However, we recover good agreement between SPTpol and Planck when restricting the analysis to similar scales. We also consider single-parameter extensions to the flat $\Lambda$CDM model. The SPTpol lensing spectrum constrains the spatial curvature to be $\Omega_K = -0.0007 \pm 0.0025$ and the sum of the neutrino masses to be $\sum m_{\nu} < 0.23$ eV at 95\% C.L. (with Planck primary CMB and BAO data), in good agreement with the Planck lensing results. With the differences in the $S/N$ of the lensing modes and the angular scales covered in the lensing spectra, this analysis represents an important independent check on the full-sky Planck lensing measurement.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.02156  [pdf] - 2032804
Fractional Polarisation of Extragalactic Sources in the 500-square-degree SPTpol Survey
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-03, last modified: 2020-01-17
We study the polarisation properties of extragalactic sources at 95 and 150 GHz in the SPTpol 500 deg$^2$ survey. We estimate the polarised power by stacking maps at known source positions, and correct for noise bias by subtracting the mean polarised power at random positions in the maps. We show that the method is unbiased using a set of simulated maps with similar noise properties to the real SPTpol maps. We find a flux-weighted mean-squared polarisation fraction $\langle p^2 \rangle= [8.9\pm1.1] \times 10^{-4}$ at 95 GHz and $[6.9\pm1.1] \times 10^{-4}$ at 150~GHz for the full sample. This is consistent with the values obtained for a sub-sample of active galactic nuclei. For dusty sources, we find 95 per cent upper limits of $\langle p^2 \rangle_{\rm 95}<16.9 \times 10^{-3}$ and $\langle p^2 \rangle_{\rm 150}<2.6 \times 10^{-3}$. We find no evidence that the polarisation fraction depends on the source flux or observing frequency. The 1-$\sigma$ upper limit on measured mean squared polarisation fraction at 150 GHz implies that extragalactic foregrounds will be subdominant to the CMB E and B mode polarisation power spectra out to at least $\ell\lesssim5700$ ($\ell\lesssim4700$) and $\ell\lesssim5300$ ($\ell\lesssim3600$), respectively at 95 (150) GHz.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.05777  [pdf] - 1983858
A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Lensing Potential and Power Spectrum from 500 deg$^2$ of SPTpol Temperature and Polarization Data
Comments: 18 pages, 8 figures; updated to match published version
Submitted: 2019-05-14, last modified: 2019-10-22
We present a measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing potential using 500 deg$^2$ of 150 GHz data from the SPTpol receiver on the South Pole Telescope. The lensing potential is reconstructed with signal-to-noise per mode greater than unity at lensing multipoles $L \lesssim 250$, using a quadratic estimator on a combination of CMB temperature and polarization maps. We report measurements of the lensing potential power spectrum in the multipole range of $100< L < 2000$ from sets of temperature-only, polarization-only, and minimum-variance estimators. We measure the lensing amplitude by taking the ratio of the measured spectrum to the expected spectrum from the best-fit $\Lambda$CDM model to the $\textit{Planck}$ 2015 TT+lowP+lensing dataset. For the minimum-variance estimator, we find $A_{\rm{MV}} = 0.944 \pm 0.058{\rm (Stat.)}\pm0.025{\rm (Sys.)}$; restricting to only polarization data, we find $A_{\rm{POL}} = 0.906 \pm 0.090 {\rm (Stat.)} \pm 0.040 {\rm (Sys.)}$. Considering statistical uncertainties alone, this is the most precise polarization-only lensing amplitude constraint to date (10.1 $\sigma$), and is more precise than our temperature-only constraint. We perform null tests and consistency checks and find no evidence for significant contamination.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02212  [pdf] - 1922933
Cosmological lensing ratios with DES Y1, SPT and Planck
Prat, J.; Baxter, E. J.; Shin, T.; Sánchez, C.; Chang, C.; Jain, B.; Miquel, R.; Alarcon, A.; Bacon, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Cawthon, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; Dodelson, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Friedrich, O.; Gatti, M.; Gruen, D.; Hartley, W. G.; Holder, G. P.; Hoyle, B.; Jarvis, M.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Mawdsley, B.; Nicola, A.; Omori, Y.; Pujol, A.; Rau, M. M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Samuroff, S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vielzeuf, P.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Avila, S.; Aylor, K.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bleem, L. E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Chown, R.; Crites, A. T.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Doel, P.; Everett, W. B.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; George, E. M.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; de Haan, T.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Knox, L.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lima, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Maia, M. A. G.; Manzotti, A.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. J.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Simard, G.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-04, last modified: 2019-07-25
Correlations between tracers of the matter density field and gravitational lensing are sensitive to the evolution of the matter power spectrum and the expansion rate across cosmic time. Appropriately defined ratios of such correlation functions, on the other hand, depend only on the angular diameter distances to the tracer objects and to the gravitational lensing source planes. Because of their simple cosmological dependence, such ratios can exploit available signal-to-noise down to small angular scales, even where directly modeling the correlation functions is difficult. We present a measurement of lensing ratios using galaxy position and lensing data from the Dark Energy Survey, and CMB lensing data from the South Pole Telescope and Planck, obtaining the highest precision lensing ratio measurements to date. Relative to the concordance $\Lambda$CDM model, we find a best fit lensing ratio amplitude of $A = 1.1 \pm 0.1$. We use the ratio measurements to generate cosmological constraints, focusing on the curvature parameter. We demonstrate that photometrically selected galaxies can be used to measure lensing ratios, and argue that future lensing ratio measurements with data from a combination of LSST and Stage-4 CMB experiments can be used to place interesting cosmological constraints, even after considering the systematic uncertainties associated with photometric redshift and galaxy shear estimation.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02342  [pdf] - 1929685
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: tomographic cross-correlations between DES galaxies and CMB lensing from SPT+Planck
Omori, Y.; Giannantonio, T.; Porredon, A.; Baxter, E.; Chang, C.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Alarcon, A.; Banik, N.; Blazek, J.; Bleem, L. E.; Bridle, S. L.; Cawthon, R.; Choi, A.; Chown, R.; Crawford, T.; Dodelson, S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Friedrich, O.; Gruen, D.; Holder, G. P.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Kirk, D.; Kokron, N.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Muir, J.; Prat, J.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sánchez, C.; Secco, L. F.; Simard, G.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Avila, S.; Aylor, K.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Bianchini, F.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Crites, A. T.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; de Haan, T.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Everett, W. B.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; George, E. M.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hartley, W. G.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; Hoyle, B.; Hrubes, J. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lima, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Manzotti, A.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schubnell, M.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Walker, A. R.; Wu, W. L. K.; Zahn, O.
Comments: 17 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-04
We measure the cross-correlation between redMaGiC galaxies selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year-1 data and gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) reconstructed from South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck data over 1289 sq. deg. When combining measurements across multiple galaxy redshift bins spanning the redshift range of $0.15<z<0.90$, we reject the hypothesis of no correlation at 19.9$\sigma$ significance. When removing small-scale data points where thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal and nonlinear galaxy bias could potentially bias our results, the detection significance is reduced to 9.9$\sigma$. We perform a joint analysis of galaxy-CMB lensing cross-correlations and galaxy clustering to constrain cosmology, finding $\Omega_{\rm m} = 0.276^{+0.029}_{-0.030}$ and $S_{8}=\sigma_{8}\sqrt{\mathstrut \Omega_{\rm m}/0.3} = 0.800^{+0.090}_{-0.094}$. We also perform two alternate analyses aimed at constraining only the growth rate of cosmic structure as a function of redshift, finding consistency with predictions from the concordance $\Lambda$CDM model. The measurements presented here are part of a joint cosmological analysis that combines galaxy clustering, galaxy lensing and CMB lensing using data from DES, SPT and Planck.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02441  [pdf] - 1945701
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Cross-correlation between DES Y1 galaxy weak lensing and SPT+Planck CMB weak lensing
Omori, Y.; Baxter, E.; Chang, C.; Kirk, D.; Alarcon, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bleem, L. E.; Cawthon, R.; Choi, A.; Chown, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; DeRose, J.; Dodelson, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Fosalba, P.; Friedrich, O.; Gatti, M.; Gaztanaga, E.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Hartley, W. G.; Holder, G. P.; Hoyle, B.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Miquel, R.; Prat, J.; Rau, M. M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rozo, E.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Secco, L. F.; Sheldon, E.; Simard, G.; Troxel, M. A.; Vielzeuf, P.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Avila, S.; Aylor, K.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Crites, A. T.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Everett, W. B.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; George, E. M.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hollowood, D. L.; Honscheid, K.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Luong-Van, D.; Maia, M. A. G.; Manzotti, A.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Natoli, T.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schindler, R.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Williamson, R.; Wu, W. L. K.; Zahn, O.
Comments: 15 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-04
We cross-correlate galaxy weak lensing measurements from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) year-one (Y1) data with a cosmic microwave background (CMB) weak lensing map derived from South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck data, with an effective overlapping area of 1289 deg$^{2}$. With the combined measurements from four source galaxy redshift bins, we reject the hypothesis of no lensing with a significance of $10.8\sigma$. When employing angular scale cuts, this significance is reduced to $6.8\sigma$, which remains the highest signal-to-noise measurement of its kind to date. We fit the amplitude of the correlation functions while fixing the cosmological parameters to a fiducial $\Lambda$CDM model, finding $A = 0.99 \pm 0.17$. We additionally use the correlation function measurements to constrain shear calibration bias, obtaining constraints that are consistent with previous DES analyses. Finally, when performing a cosmological analysis under the $\Lambda$CDM model, we obtain the marginalized constraints of $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.261^{+0.070}_{-0.051}$ and $S_{8}\equiv \sigma_{8}\sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3} = 0.660^{+0.085}_{-0.100}$. These measurements are used in a companion work that presents cosmological constraints from the joint analysis of two-point functions among galaxies, galaxy shears, and CMB lensing using DES, SPT and Planck data.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02322  [pdf] - 1924924
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Joint Analysis of Galaxy Clustering, Galaxy Lensing, and CMB Lensing Two-point Functions
Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Alarcon, A.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Avila, S.; Aylor, K.; Banerji, M.; Banik, N.; Baxter, E. J.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Bianchini, F.; Blazek, J.; Bleem, L.; Bleem, L. E.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Choi, A.; Chown, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; de Haan, T.; DeRose, J.; Desai, S.; De Vicente, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Everett, W. B.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Friedrich, O.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gatti, M.; Gaztanaga, E.; George, E. M.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hartley, W. G.; Holder, G. P.; Hollowood, D. L.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, Z.; Hoyle, B.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kent, S.; Kirk, D.; Knox, L.; Kokron, N.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Luong-Van, D.; MacCrann, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Manzotti, A.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, J. J.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Muir, J.; Natoli, T.; Nicola, A.; Nord, B.; Omori, Y.; Padin, S.; Pandey, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Porredon, A.; Prat, J.; Pryke, C.; Rau, M. M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rollins, R. P.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Secco, L. F.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Shirokoff, E.; Simard, G.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vielzeuf, P.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Williamson, R.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yanny, B.; Zahn, O.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: 20 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-10-04
We perform a joint analysis of the auto and cross-correlations between three cosmic fields: the galaxy density field, the galaxy weak lensing shear field, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) weak lensing convergence field. These three fields are measured using roughly 1300 sq. deg. of overlapping optical imaging data from first year observations of the Dark Energy Survey and millimeter-wave observations of the CMB from both the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich survey and Planck. We present cosmological constraints from the joint analysis of the two-point correlation functions between galaxy density and galaxy shear with CMB lensing. We test for consistency between these measurements and the DES-only two-point function measurements, finding no evidence for inconsistency in the context of flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmological models. Performing a joint analysis of five of the possible correlation functions between these fields (excluding only the CMB lensing autospectrum) yields $S_{8}\equiv \sigma_8\sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3} = 0.782^{+0.019}_{-0.025}$ and $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.260^{+0.029}_{-0.019}$. We test for consistency between these five correlation function measurements and the Planck-only measurement of the CMB lensing autospectrum, again finding no evidence for inconsistency in the context of flat $\Lambda$CDM models. Combining constraints from all six two-point functions yields $S_{8}=0.776^{+0.014}_{-0.021}$ and $\Omega_{\rm m}= 0.271^{+0.022}_{-0.016}$. These results provide a powerful test and confirmation of the results from the first year DES joint-probes analysis.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.09353  [pdf] - 1664889
Measurements of the Temperature and E-Mode Polarization of the CMB from 500 Square Degrees of SPTpol Data
Comments: Updated to match version accepted to ApJ. 34 pages, 17 figures, 6 tables
Submitted: 2017-07-28, last modified: 2018-04-11
We present measurements of the $E$-mode polarization angular auto-power spectrum ($EE$) and temperature-$E$-mode cross-power spectrum ($TE$) of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using 150 GHz data from three seasons of SPTpol observations. We report the power spectra over the spherical harmonic multipole range $50 < \ell \leq 8000$, and detect nine acoustic peaks in the $EE$ spectrum with high signal-to-noise ratio. These measurements are the most sensitive to date of the $EE$ and $TE$ power spectra at $\ell > 1050$ and $\ell > 1475$, respectively. The observations cover 500 deg$^2$, a fivefold increase in area compared to previous SPTpol analyses, which increases our sensitivity to the photon diffusion damping tail of the CMB power spectra enabling tighter constraints on \LCDM model extensions. After masking all sources with unpolarized flux $>50$ mJy we place a 95% confidence upper limit on residual polarized point-source power of $D_\ell = \ell(\ell+1)C_\ell/2\pi <0.107\,\mu{\rm K}^2$ at $\ell=3000$, suggesting that the $EE$ damping tail dominates foregrounds to at least $\ell = 4050$ with modest source masking. We find that the SPTpol dataset is in mild tension with the $\Lambda CDM$ model ($2.1\,\sigma$), and different data splits prefer parameter values that differ at the $\sim 1\,\sigma$ level. When fitting SPTpol data at $\ell < 1000$ we find cosmological parameter constraints consistent with those for $Planck$ temperature. Including SPTpol data at $\ell > 1000$ results in a preference for a higher value of the expansion rate ($H_0 = 71.3 \pm 2.1\,\mbox{km}\,s^{-1}\mbox{Mpc}^{-1}$ ) and a lower value for present-day density fluctuations ($\sigma_8 = 0.77 \pm 0.02$).
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.3409  [pdf] - 1659486
CosmoSIS: modular cosmological parameter estimation
Comments: Finally got around to updating to refereed version. 31 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2014-09-11, last modified: 2018-04-03
Cosmological parameter estimation is entering a new era. Large collaborations need to coordinate high-stakes analyses using multiple methods; furthermore such analyses have grown in complexity due to sophisticated models of cosmology and systematic uncertainties. In this paper we argue that modularity is the key to addressing these challenges: calculations should be broken up into interchangeable modular units with inputs and outputs clearly defined. We present a new framework for cosmological parameter estimation, CosmoSIS, designed to connect together, share, and advance development of inference tools across the community. We describe the modules already available in CosmoSIS, including CAMB, Planck, cosmic shear calculations, and a suite of samplers. We illustrate it using demonstration code that you can run out-of-the-box with the installer available at http://bitbucket.org/joezuntz/cosmosis
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.11038  [pdf] - 1641314
Future cosmic microwave background delensing with galaxy surveys
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures. This is part of a dissertation submitted for the degree Doctor of Philosophy in Astrophysics at the University of Chicago
Submitted: 2017-10-30, last modified: 2018-02-27
The primordial B-modes component of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is a promising experimental dataset to probe the inflationary paradigm. B-modes are indeed a direct consequence of the presence of gravitational waves in the early universe. However, several secondary effects in the low redshift universe will produce \textit{non-primordial} B-modes. In particular, the gravitational interactions of CMB photons with large-scale structures will distort the primordial E-modes, adding a lensing B-mode component to the primordial signal. Removing the lensing component ("delensing") will then be necessary to constrain the amplitude of the primordial gravitational waves. Here we examine the role of current and future large-scale structure surveys in a multi-tracers approach to CMB delensing. We find that, in general, galaxy surveys should be split into tomographic bins as this can increase the reduction of lensing B-modes by $\sim 25\%$ in power in the most futuristic case. Ongoing or recently completed CMB experiments (CMB-S2) will particularly benefit from large-scale structure tracers that, once properly combined, will have a better performance than a CMB internal reconstruction. With the decrease of instrumental noise, the lensing B-modes power removed using CMB internal reconstruction alone will rapidly increase. Nevertheless, optical galaxy surveys will still play an important role even for CMB S4. In particular, an LSST-like survey can a achieve a delensing performance comparable to a 3G CMB experiment but with entirely different systematics. This redundancy will be essential to demonstrate the robustness against systematics of an eventual detection of primordial B-modes.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.01360  [pdf] - 1641262
A Measurement of CMB Cluster Lensing with SPT and DES Year 1 Data
Baxter, E. J.; Raghunathan, S.; Crawford, T. M.; Fosalba, P.; Hou, Z.; Holder, G. P.; Omori, Y.; Patil, S.; Rozo, E.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Annis, J.; Aylor, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bleem, L.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carlstrom, J.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H-M.; Crites, A. T.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Davis, C.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dodelson, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Estrada, J.; Everett, W. B.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; George, E. M.; Gaztanaga, E.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hartley, W. G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jeltema, T.; Knox, L.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Manzotti, A.; March, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, J. J.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Natoli, T.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Padin, S.; Plazas, A. A.; Pryke, C.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Rykoff, E.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Sayre, J. T.; Scarpine, V.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Staniszewski, F. Z.; Stark, A.; Story, K.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Walker, A. R.; Williamson, R.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: 16 pages, 5 figures; replaced to match version accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-08-03, last modified: 2018-02-16
Clusters of galaxies gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, resulting in a distinct imprint in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurement of this effect offers a promising way to constrain the masses of galaxy clusters, particularly those at high redshift. We use CMB maps from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) survey to measure the CMB lensing signal around galaxy clusters identified in optical imaging from first year observations of the Dark Energy Survey. The cluster catalog used in this analysis contains 3697 members with mean redshift of $\bar{z} = 0.45$. We detect lensing of the CMB by the galaxy clusters at $8.1\sigma$ significance. Using the measured lensing signal, we constrain the amplitude of the relation between cluster mass and optical richness to roughly $17\%$ precision, finding good agreement with recent constraints obtained with galaxy lensing. The error budget is dominated by statistical noise but includes significant contributions from systematic biases due to the thermal SZ effect and cluster miscentering.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.07541  [pdf] - 1709302
Constraints on Cosmological Parameters from the Angular Power Spectrum of a Combined 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ and Planck Gravitational Lensing Map
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, submitted to ApJ, typo in bandpower table corrected
Submitted: 2017-12-20, last modified: 2018-01-23
We report constraints on cosmological parameters from the angular power spectrum of a cosmic microwave background (CMB) gravitational lensing potential map created using temperature data from 2500 deg$^2$ of South Pole Telescope (SPT) data supplemented with data from Planck in the same sky region, with the statistical power in the combined map primarily from the SPT data. We fit the corresponding lensing angular power spectrum to a model including cold dark matter and a cosmological constant ($\Lambda$CDM), and to models with single-parameter extensions to $\Lambda$CDM. We find constraints that are comparable to and consistent with constraints found using the full-sky Planck CMB lensing data. Specifically, we find $\sigma_8 \Omega_{\rm m}^{0.25}=0.598 \pm 0.024$ from the lensing data alone with relatively weak priors placed on the other $\Lambda$CDM parameters. In combination with primary CMB data from Planck, we explore single-parameter extensions to the $\Lambda$CDM model. We find $\Omega_k = -0.012^{+0.021}_{-0.023}$ or $M_{\nu}< 0.70$eV both at 95% confidence, all in good agreement with results that include the lensing potential as measured by Planck over the full sky. We include two independent free parameters that scale the effect of lensing on the CMB: $A_{L}$, which scales the lensing power spectrum in both the lens reconstruction power and in the smearing of the acoustic peaks, and $A^{\phi \phi}$, which scales only the amplitude of the CMB lensing reconstruction power spectrum. We find $A^{\phi \phi} \times A_{L} =1.01 \pm 0.08$ for the lensing map made from combined SPT and Planck temperature data, indicating that the amount of lensing is in excellent agreement with what is expected from the observed CMB angular power spectrum when not including the information from smearing of the acoustic peaks.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.04396  [pdf] - 1581178
CMB Polarization B-mode Delensing with SPTpol and Herschel
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures. Comments are welcomed
Submitted: 2017-01-16, last modified: 2017-11-04
We present a demonstration of delensing the observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization anisotropy. This process of reducing the gravitational-lensing generated B-mode component will become increasingly important for improving searches for the B modes produced by primordial gravitational waves. In this work, we delens B-mode maps constructed from multi-frequency SPTpol observations of a 90 deg$^2$ patch of sky by subtracting a B-mode template constructed from two inputs: SPTpol E-mode maps and a lensing potential map estimated from the $\textit{Herschel}$ $500\,\mu m$ map of the CIB. We find that our delensing procedure reduces the measured B-mode power spectrum by 28% in the multipole range $300 < \ell < 2300$; this is shown to be consistent with expectations from theory and simulations and to be robust against systematics. The null hypothesis of no delensing is rejected at $6.9 \sigma$. Furthermore, we build and use a suite of realistic simulations to study the general properties of the delensing process and find that the delensing efficiency achieved in this work is limited primarily by the noise in the lensing potential map. We demonstrate the importance of including realistic experimental non-idealities in the delensing forecasts used to inform instrument and survey-strategy planning of upcoming lower-noise experiments, such as CMB-S4.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.00403  [pdf] - 1739830
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: A Precise H0 Measurement from DES Y1, BAO, and D/H Data
Comments: 11 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2017-11-01
We combine Dark Energy Survey Year 1 clustering and weak lensing data with Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) experiments to constrain the Hubble constant. Assuming a flat $\Lambda$CDM model with minimal neutrino mass ($\sum m_\nu = 0.06$ eV) we find $H_0=67.2^{+1.2}_{-1.0}$ km/s/Mpc (68% CL). This result is completely independent of Hubble constant measurements based on the distance ladder, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies (both temperature and polarization), and strong lensing constraints. There are now five data sets that: a) have no shared observational systematics; and b) each constrain the Hubble constant with a few percent level precision. We compare these five independent measurements, and find that, as a set, the differences between them are significant at the $2.1\sigma$ level ($\chi^2/dof=20.1/11$, probability to exceed=4%). This difference is low enough that we consider the data sets statistically consistent with each other. The best fit Hubble constant obtained by combining all five data sets is $H_0 = 69.1^{+0.4}_{-0.6}$ km/s/Mpc.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00411  [pdf] - 1582979
Measuring galaxy cluster masses with CMB lensing using a Maximum Likelihood estimator: Statistical and systematic error budgets for future experiments
Comments: 28 pages, 5 figures: figs 2, 3 updated, references added: accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2017-04-30, last modified: 2017-08-17
We develop a Maximum Likelihood estimator (MLE) to measure the masses of galaxy clusters through the impact of gravitational lensing on the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We show that, at low noise levels in temperature, this optimal estimator outperforms the standard quadratic estimator by a factor of two. For polarization, we show that the Stokes Q/U maps can be used instead of the traditional E- and B-mode maps without losing information. We test and quantify the bias in the recovered lensing mass for a comprehensive list of potential systematic errors. Using realistic simulations, we examine the cluster mass uncertainties from CMB-cluster lensing as a function of an experiment's beam size and noise level. We predict the cluster mass uncertainties will be 3 - 6% for SPT-3G, AdvACT, and Simons Array experiments with 10,000 clusters and less than 1% for the CMB-S4 experiment with a sample containing 100,000 clusters. The mass constraints from CMB polarization are very sensitive to the experimental beam size and map noise level: for a factor of three reduction in either the beam size or noise level, the lensing signal-to-noise improves by roughly a factor of two.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.03004  [pdf] - 1581453
Cross-correlating 2D and 3D galaxy surveys
Comments: Revised version, new table with absolute cosmological constraints. Accepted in Phys. Rev. D
Submitted: 2017-02-09, last modified: 2017-06-15
Galaxy surveys probe both structure formation and the expansion rate, making them promising avenues for understanding the dark universe. Photometric surveys accurately map the 2D distribution of galaxy positions and shapes in a given redshift range, while spectroscopic surveys provide sparser 3D maps of the galaxy distribution. We present a way to analyse overlapping 2D and 3D maps jointly and without loss of information. We represent 3D maps using spherical Fourier-Bessel (sFB) modes, which preserve radial coverage while accounting for the spherical sky geometry, and we decompose 2D maps in a spherical harmonic basis. In these bases, a simple expression exists for the cross-correlation of the two fields. One very powerful application is the ability to simultaneously constrain the redshift distribution of the photometric sample, the sample biases, and cosmological parameters. We use our framework to show that combined analysis of DESI and LSST can improve cosmological constraints by factors of ${\sim}1.2$ to ${\sim}1.8$ on the region where they overlap relative to identically sized disjoint regions. We also show that in the overlap of DES and SDSS-III in Stripe 82, cross-correlating improves photo-$z$ parameter constraints by factors of ${\sim}2$ to ${\sim}12$ over internal photo-$z$ reconstructions.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00743  [pdf] - 1583013
A 2500 square-degree CMB lensing map from combined South Pole Telescope and Planck data
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2017-05-01
We present a cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing map produced from a linear combination of South Pole Telescope (SPT) and \emph{Planck} temperature data. The 150 GHz temperature data from the $2500\ {\rm deg}^{2}$ SPT-SZ survey is combined with the \emph{Planck} 143 GHz data in harmonic space, to obtain a temperature map that has a broader $\ell$ coverage and less noise than either individual map. Using a quadratic estimator technique on this combined temperature map, we produce a map of the gravitational lensing potential projected along the line of sight. We measure the auto-spectrum of the lensing potential $C_{L}^{\phi\phi}$, and compare it to the theoretical prediction for a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology consistent with the \emph{Planck} 2015 data set, finding a best-fit amplitude of $0.95_{-0.06}^{+0.06}({\rm Stat.})\! _{-0.01}^{+0.01}({\rm Sys.})$. The null hypothesis of no lensing is rejected at a significance of $24\,\sigma$. One important use of such a lensing potential map is in cross-correlations with other dark matter tracers. We demonstrate this cross-correlation in practice by calculating the cross-spectrum, $C_{L}^{\phi G}$, between the SPT+\emph{Planck} lensing map and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (\emph{WISE}) galaxies. We fit $C_{L}^{\phi G}$ to a power law of the form $p_{L}=a(L/L_{0})^{-b}$ with $a=2.15 \times 10^{-8}$, $b=1.35$, $L_{0}=490$, and find $\eta^{\phi G}=0.94^{+0.04}_{-0.04}$, which is marginally lower, but in good agreement with $\eta^{\phi G}=1.00^{+0.02}_{-0.01}$, the best-fit amplitude for the cross-correlation of \emph{Planck}-2015 CMB lensing and \emph{WISE} galaxies over $\sim67\%$ of the sky. The lensing potential map presented here will be used for cross-correlation studies with the Dark Energy Survey (DES), whose footprint nearly completely covers the SPT $2500\ {\rm deg}^2$ field.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.02654  [pdf] - 1382087
External priors for the next generation of CMB experiments
Comments: Revised version, new x-axis in the figures. Accepted in Phys. Rev. D
Submitted: 2015-12-08, last modified: 2016-03-29
Planned cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments can dramatically improve what we know about neutrino physics, inflation, and dark energy. The low level of noise, together with improved angular resolution, will increase the signal to noise of the CMB polarized signal as well as the reconstructed lensing potential of high redshift large scale structure. Projected constraints on cosmological parameters are extremely tight, but these can be improved even further with information from external experiments. Here, we examine quantitatively the extent to which external priors can lead to improvement in projected constraints from a CMB-Stage IV (S4) experiment on neutrino and dark energy properties. We find that CMB S4 constraints on neutrino mass could be strongly enhanced by external constraints on the cold dark matter density $\Omega_{c}h^{2}$ and the Hubble constant $H_{0}$. If polarization on the largest scales ($\ell<50$) will not be measured, an external prior on the primordial amplitude $A_{s}$ or the optical depth $\tau$ will also be important. A CMB constraint on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom, $N_{\rm eff}$, will benefit from an external prior on the spectral index $n_{s}$ and the baryon energy density $\Omega_{b}h^{2}$. Finally, an external prior on $H_{0}$ will help constrain the dark energy equation of state ($w$).
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.5623  [pdf] - 915465
Mapping the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe Effect
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2014-07-21, last modified: 2014-12-30
On large scales, the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) reflect not only the primordial field but also the energy gain when photons traverse decaying gravitational potentials of large scales structure, the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. Decomposing the anisotropy signal into a primordial piece and an ISW component is more urgent than ever as cosmologists strive to understand the Universe on the largest of scales. Here we present a likelihood technique for extracting the ISW signal from measurements of the CMB, the distribution of galaxies, and maps of gravitational lensing. We test this technique first to simulated data and then we apply it to the combination of temperature anisotropies, the lensing map made by the Planck satellite, and the NVSS galaxy survey. We also show projections for upcoming surveys.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.1342  [pdf] - 1215421
A coarse grained perturbation theory for the Large Scale Structure, with cosmology and time independence in the UV
Comments: 37 pages, 9 figures; published on JCAP
Submitted: 2014-07-04, last modified: 2014-11-30
Standard cosmological perturbation theory (SPT) for the Large Scale Structure (LSS) of the Universe fails at small scales (UV) due to strong nonlinearities and to multistreaming effects. In Pietroni et al. 2011 a new framework was proposed in which the large scales (IR) are treated perturbatively while the information on the UV, mainly small scale velocity dispersion, is obtained by nonlinear methods like N-body simulations. Here we develop this approach, showing that it is possible to reproduce the fully nonlinear power spectrum (PS) by combining a simple (and fast) 1-loop computation for the IR scales and the measurement of a single, dominant, correlator from N-body simulations for the UV ones. We measure this correlator for a suite of seven different cosmologies, and we show that its inclusion in our perturbation scheme reproduces the fully non-linear PS with percent level accuracy, for wave numbers up to $k\sim 0.4\, h~{\rm Mpc^{-1}}$ down to $z=0$. We then show that, once this correlator has been measured in a given cosmology, there is no need to run a new simulation for a different cosmology in the suite. Indeed, by rescaling this correlator by a proper function computable in SPT, the reconstruction procedure works also for the other cosmologies and for all redshifts, with comparable accuracy. Finally, we clarify the relation of this approach to the Effective Field Theory methods recently proposed in the LSS context.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.7992  [pdf] - 848109
Super-Sample CMB Lensing
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2014-01-30
Lensing of the CMB by modes that are larger than the size of the survey dilates intrinsic scales in the temperature and polarization fields and coherently shifts their observed power spectra with respect to the ensemble or all-sky mean. The effect can be simply encapsulated as a contribution to the power spectrum covariance matrix in accordance with the lensing trispectrum or as an additional parameter, the mean convergence in the field, for parameter estimation. It should be included for upcoming surveys that precisely measure acoustic polarization features deep into the damping tail at multipoles of $\ell \gtrsim 1500$ with less than $10\%$ of sky. Its omission may lead to seemingly conflicting values for the angular scale of the sound horizon which may then provide erroneous cosmological parameters when compared to baryon acoustic oscillation measurements.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.4031  [pdf] - 483896
Prospects for early localization of gravitational-wave signals from compact binary coalescences with advanced detectors
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures. revised content
Submitted: 2012-02-17, last modified: 2012-03-05
A leading candidate source of detectable gravitational waves is the inspiral and merger of pairs of stellar-mass compact objects. The advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo detectors will allow scientists to detect inspiral signals from more massive systems and at earlier times in the detector band, than with first generation detectors. The signal from a coalescence of two neutron stars is expected to stay in the sensitive band of advanced detectors for several minutes, thus allowing detection before the final coalescence of the system. In this work, the prospects of detecting inspiral signals prior to coalescence, and the possibility to derive a suitable sky area for source locations are investigated. As a large fraction of the signal is accumulated in the last ~10 seconds prior to coalescence, bandwidth and timing accuracy are largely accrued in the very last moments prior to coalescence. We use Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the accuracy of sky localization through networks of ground-based interferometers such as aLIGO and aVirgo. With the addition of the Japanese KAGRA detector, it is shown that the detection and triangulation before coalescence may be feasible.