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Lorenz, D.

Normalized to: Lorenz, D.

17 article(s) in total. 846 co-authors, from 1 to 10 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 14,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.02035  [pdf] - 1767420
Gaia Data Release 2: The first Gaia catalogue of long-period variable candidates
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. 29 pages, 52 figures
Submitted: 2018-05-05, last modified: 2018-07-27
Gaia DR2 provides a unique all-sky catalogue of 550'737 variable stars, of which 151'761 are long-period variable (LPV) candidates with G variability amplitudes larger than 0.2 mag (5-95% quantile range). About one-fifth of the LPV candidates are Mira candidates, the majority of the rest are semi-regular variable candidates. For each source, G, BP , and RP photometric time-series are published, together with some LPV-specific attributes for the subset of 89'617 candidates with periods in G longer than 60 days. We describe this first Gaia catalogue of LPV candidates, and present various validation checks. Various samples of LPVs were used to validate the catalogue: a sample of well-studied very bright LPVs with light curves from the AAVSO that are partly contemporaneous with Gaia light curves, a sample of Gaia LPV candidates with good parallaxes, the ASAS_SN catalogue of LPVs, and the OGLE catalogues of LPVs towards the Magellanic Clouds and the Galactic bulge. The analyses of these samples show a good agreement between Gaia DR2 and literature periods. The same is globally true for bolometric corrections of M-type stars. The main contaminant of our DR2 catalogue comes from young stellar objects (YSOs) in the solar vicinity (within ~1 kpc), although their number in the whole catalogue is only at the percent level. A cautionary note is provided about parallax-dependent LPV attributes published in the catalogue. This first Gaia catalogue of LPVs approximately doubles the number of known LPVs with amplitudes larger than 0.2 mag, despite the conservative candidate selection criteria that prioritise low contamination over high completeness, and despite the limited DR2 time coverage compared to the long periods characteristic of LPVs. It also contains a small set of YSO candidates, which offers the serendipitous opportunity to study these objects at an early stage of the Gaia data releases.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09373  [pdf] - 1767409
Gaia Data Release 2: Summary of the variability processing & analysis results
Comments: 21 pages, 10 figures, 5 tables, accepted by Astronomy & Astrophysics, added several language corrections, and expanded Gaia archive query examples
Submitted: 2018-04-25, last modified: 2018-07-06
The Gaia Data Release 2 (DR2): we summarise the processing and results of the identification of variable source candidates of RR Lyrae stars, Cepheids, long period variables (LPVs), rotation modulation (BY Dra-type) stars, delta Scuti & SX Phoenicis stars, and short-timescale variables. In this release we aim to provide useful but not necessarily complete samples of candidates. The processed Gaia data consist of the G, BP, and RP photometry during the first 22 months of operations as well as positions and parallaxes. Various methods from classical statistics, data mining and time series analysis were applied and tailored to the specific properties of Gaia data, as well as various visualisation tools. The DR2 variability release contains: 228'904 RR Lyrae stars, 11'438 Cepheids, 151'761 LPVs, 147'535 stars with rotation modulation, 8'882 delta Scuti & SX Phoenicis stars, and 3'018 short-timescale variables. These results are distributed over a classification and various Specific Object Studies (SOS) tables in the Gaia archive, along with the three-band time series and associated statistics for the underlying 550'737 unique sources. We estimate that about half of them are newly identified variables. The variability type completeness varies strongly as function of sky position due to the non-uniform sky coverage and intermediate calibration level of this data. The probabilistic and automated nature of this work implies certain completeness and contamination rates which are quantified so that users can anticipate their effects. This means that even well-known variable sources can be missed or misidentified in the published data. The DR2 variability release only represents a small subset of the processed data. Future releases will include more variable sources and data products; however, DR2 shows the (already) very high quality of the data and great promise for variability studies.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00688  [pdf] - 1583007
Gaia Data Release 1. Testing the parallaxes with local Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars
Gaia Collaboration; Clementini, G.; Eyer, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Muraveva, T.; Garofalo, A.; Sarro, L. M.; Palmer, M.; Luri, X.; Molinaro, R.; Rimoldini, L.; Szabados, L.; Musella, I.; Anderson, R. I.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Azntoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernánde, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: 29 pages, 25 figures. Accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2017-05-01
Parallaxes for 331 classical Cepheids, 31 Type II Cepheids and 364 RR Lyrae stars in common between Gaia and the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1) as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). In order to test these first parallax measurements of the primary standard candles of the cosmological distance ladder, that involve astrometry collected by Gaia during the initial 14 months of science operation, we compared them with literature estimates and derived new period-luminosity ($PL$), period-Wesenheit ($PW$) relations for classical and Type II Cepheids and infrared $PL$, $PL$-metallicity ($PLZ$) and optical luminosity-metallicity ($M_V$-[Fe/H]) relations for the RR Lyrae stars, with zero points based on TGAS. The new relations were computed using multi-band ($V,I,J,K_{\mathrm{s}},W_{1}$) photometry and spectroscopic metal abundances available in the literature, and applying three alternative approaches: (i) by linear least squares fitting the absolute magnitudes inferred from direct transformation of the TGAS parallaxes, (ii) by adopting astrometric-based luminosities, and (iii) using a Bayesian fitting approach. TGAS parallaxes bring a significant added value to the previous Hipparcos estimates. The relations presented in this paper represent first Gaia-calibrated relations and form a "work-in-progress" milestone report in the wait for Gaia-only parallaxes of which a first solution will become available with Gaia's Data Release 2 (DR2) in 2018.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.06456  [pdf] - 1578075
A comprehensive study of young B stars in NGC 2264: I. Space photometry and asteroseismology
Comments: 19 pages, 20 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2017-03-19
Space photometric time series of the most massive members of the young open cluster NGC 2264 allow us to study their different sources of variability down to the millimagnitude level and permits a search for Slowly Pulsating B (SPB) type pulsation among objects that are only a few million years old. Our goal is to conduct a homogeneous study of young B type stars in the cluster NGC 2264 using photometric time series from space in combination with high-resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry obtained from the ground. The latter will be presented in a separate follow-up article. We performed frequency analyses for eleven B stars in the field of the young cluster NGC 2264 using photometric time series from the MOST, CoRoT and Spitzer space telescopes and the routines Period04 and SigSpec. We employ the MESA stellar evolution code in combination with the oscillation code GYRE to identify the pulsation modes for two SPB stars which exhibit short period spacing series. From our analysis we identify four objects that show SPB pulsations, five stars that show rotational modulation of their light curves caused by spots, one star that is identified to be a binary, and one object in the field of the cluster that is found to be a non-member Be star. In two SPB stars we detect a number of regularly spaced pulsation modes that are compatible with being members of a g mode period series. Despite NGC 2264's young age, our analysis illustrates that its B type members have already arrived on the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS). Our asteroseismic analysis yields masses between 4 and 6 Msun and ages between 1 and 6 million years, which agree well to the overall cluster age.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.01131  [pdf] - 1567701
Gaia Data Release 1. Open cluster astrometry: performance, limitations, and future prospects
Gaia Collaboration; van Leeuwen, F.; Vallenari, A.; Jordi, C.; Lindegren, L.; Bastian, U.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Martino, D.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffer, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegrio, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Rimoldini, L.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingril, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernsteiny, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclarky, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardio, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Palmer, M.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poelsy, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: Accepted for publication by A&A. 21 pages main text plus 46 pages appendices. 34 figures main text, 38 figures appendices. 8 table in main text, 19 tables in appendices
Submitted: 2017-03-03
Context. The first Gaia Data Release contains the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). This is a subset of about 2 million stars for which, besides the position and photometry, the proper motion and parallax are calculated using Hipparcos and Tycho-2 positions in 1991.25 as prior information. Aims. We investigate the scientific potential and limitations of the TGAS component by means of the astrometric data for open clusters. Methods. Mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are derived taking into account the error correlations within the astrometric solutions for individual stars, an estimate of the internal velocity dispersion in the cluster, and, where relevant, the effects of the depth of the cluster along the line of sight. Internal consistency of the TGAS data is assessed. Results. Values given for standard uncertainties are still inaccurate and may lead to unrealistic unit-weight standard deviations of least squares solutions for cluster parameters. Reconstructed mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are generally in very good agreement with earlier Hipparcos-based determination, although the Gaia mean parallax for the Pleiades is a significant exception. We have no current explanation for that discrepancy. Most clusters are observed to extend to nearly 15 pc from the cluster centre, and it will be up to future Gaia releases to establish whether those potential cluster-member stars are still dynamically bound to the clusters. Conclusions. The Gaia DR1 provides the means to examine open clusters far beyond their more easily visible cores, and can provide membership assessments based on proper motions and parallaxes. A combined HR diagram shows the same features as observed before using the Hipparcos data, with clearly increased luminosities for older A and F dwarfs.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.06981  [pdf] - 1581595
OSIRIS-REx: Sample Return from Asteroid (101955) Bennu
Comments: 89 pages, 39 figures, submitted to Space Science Reviews - OSIRIS-REx special issue
Submitted: 2017-02-22
In May of 2011, NASA selected the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) asteroid sample return mission as the third mission in the New Frontiers program. The other two New Frontiers missions are New Horizons, which explored Pluto during a flyby in July 2015 and is on its way for a flyby of Kuiper Belt object 2014 MU69 on Jan. 1, 2019, and Juno, an orbiting mission that is studying the origin, evolution, and internal structure of Jupiter. The spacecraft departed for near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu aboard an United Launch Alliance Atlas V 411 evolved expendable launch vehicle at 7:05 p.m. EDT on September 8, 2016, on a seven-year journey to return samples from Bennu. The spacecraft is on an outbound-cruise trajectory that will result in a rendezvous with Bennu in August 2018. The science instruments on the spacecraft will survey Bennu to measure its physical, geological, and chemical properties, and the team will use these data to select a site on the surface to collect at least 60 g of asteroid regolith. The team will also analyze the remote-sensing data to perform a detailed study of the sample site for context, assess Bennus resource potential, refine estimates of its impact probability with Earth, and provide ground-truth data for the extensive astronomical data set collected on this asteroid. The spacecraft will leave Bennu in 2021 and return the sample to the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) on September 24, 2023.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.03295  [pdf] - 1535694
Gaia Data Release 1: The variability processing & analysis and its application to the south ecliptic pole region
Comments: 40 pages, 46 figures. Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2017-02-10
The ESA Gaia mission provides a unique time-domain survey for more than one billion sources brighter than G=20.7 mag. Gaia offers the unprecedented opportunity to study variability phenomena in the Universe thanks to multi-epoch G-magnitude photometry in addition to astrometry, blue and red spectro-photometry, and spectroscopy. Within the Gaia Consortium, Coordination Unit 7 has the responsibility to detect variable objects, classify them, derive characteristic parameters for specific variability classes, and provide global descriptions of variable phenomena. We describe the variability processing and analysis that we plan to apply to the successive data releases, and we present its application to the G-band photometry results of the first 14 months of Gaia operations that comprises 28 days of Ecliptic Pole Scanning Law and 13 months of Nominal Scanning Law. Out of the 694 million, all-sky, sources that have calibrated G-band photometry in this first stage of the mission, about 2.3 million sources that have at least 20 observations are located within 38 degrees from the South Ecliptic Pole. We detect about 14% of them as variable candidates, among which the automated classification identified 9347 Cepheid and RR Lyrae candidates. Additional visual inspections and selection criteria led to the publication of 3194 Cepheid and RR Lyrae stars, described in Clementini et al. (2016). Under the restrictive conditions for DR1, the completenesses of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars are estimated at 67% and 58%, respectively, numbers that will significantly increase with subsequent Gaia data releases. Data processing within the Gaia Consortium is iterative, the quality of the data and the results being improved at each iteration. The results presented in this article show a glimpse of the exceptional harvest that is to be expected from the Gaia mission for variability phenomena. [abridged]
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.05250  [pdf] - 1284966
The 2003-4 multisite photometric campaign for the Beta Cephei and eclipsing star 16 (EN) Lacertae with an Appendix on 2 Andromedae, the variable comparison star
Comments: 18 pages, 19 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-08-21
A multisite photometric campaign for the Beta Cephei and eclipsing variable 16 Lacertae is reported. 749 h of high-quality differential photoelectric Stromgren, Johnson and Geneva time-series photometry were obtained with ten telescopes during 185 nights. After removing the pulsation contribution, an attempt was made to solve the resulting eclipse light curve by means of the computer program EBOP. Although a unique solution was not obtained, the range of solutions could be constrained by comparing computed positions of the secondary component in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with evolutionary tracks. For three high-amplitude pulsation modes, the uvy and the Geneva UBG amplitude ratios are derived and compared with the theoretical ones for spherical-harmonic degrees l <= 4. The highest degree, l = 4, is shown to be incompatible with the observations. One mode is found to be radial, one is l = 1, while in the remaining case l = 2 or 3. The present multisite observations are combined with the archival photometry in order to investigate the long-term variation of the amplitudes and phases of the three high-amplitude pulsation modes. The radial mode shows a non-sinusoidal variation on a time-scale of 73 yr. The l = 1 mode is a triplet with unequal frequency spacing, giving rise to two beat-periods, 720.7 d and 29.1 yr. The amplitude and phase of the l = 2 or 3 mode vary on time-scales of 380.5 d and 43 yr. The light variation of 2 And, one of the comparison stars, is discussed in the Appendix.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.4928  [pdf] - 853736
Echography of young stars reveals their evolution
Comments: 23 pages, 9 figures, includes Supplementary Material. Science, published in Science Express on July 3, 2014
Submitted: 2014-07-18
We demonstrate that a seismic analysis of stars in their earliest evolutionary phases is a powerful method to identify young stars and distinguish their evolutionary states. The early star that is born from the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud reaches at some point sufficient temperature, mass and luminosity to be detected. Accretion stops and the pre-main sequence star that emerges is nearly fully convective and chemically homogeneous. It will continue to contract gravitationally until the density and temperature in the core are high enough to start nuclear burning of hydrogen. We show that there is a relationship between detected pulsation properties for a sample of young stars and their evolutionary status illustrating the potential of asteroseismology for the early evolutionary phases.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.5494  [pdf] - 1202917
Two spotted and magnetic early B-type stars in the young open cluster NGC2264 discovered by MOST and ESPaDOnS
Comments: 13 pages, accepted for publication on A&A
Submitted: 2014-01-21
Star clusters are known as superb tools for understanding stellar evolution. In a quest for understanding the physical origin of magnetism and chemical peculiarity in about 7% of the massive main-sequence stars, we analysed two of the ten brightest members of the ~10 Myr old Galactic open cluster NGC 2264, the early B-dwarfs HD47887 and HD47777. We find accurate rotation periods of 1.95 and 2.64 days, respectively, from MOST photometry. We obtained ESPaDOnS spectropolarimetric observations, through which we determined stellar parameters, detailed chemical surface abundances, projected rotational velocities, and the inclination angles of the rotation axis. Because we found only small (<5 km/s) radial velocity variations, most likely caused by spots, we can rule out that HD47887 and HD47777 are close binaries. Finally, using the least-squares deconvolution technique, we found that both stars possess a large-scale magnetic field with an average longitudinal field strength of about 400 G. From a simultaneous fit of the stellar parameters we determine the evolutionary masses of HD47887 and HD47777 to be 9.4+/-0.7 M0 and 7.6+/-0.5 M0. Interestingly, HD47777 shows a remarkable helium underabundance, typical of helium-weak chemically peculiar stars, while the abundances of HD47887 are normal, which might imply that diffusion is operating in the lower mass star but not in the slightly more massive one. Furthermore, we argue that the rather slow rotation, as well as the lack of nitrogen enrichment in both stars, can be consistent with both the fossil and the binary hypothesis for the origin of the magnetic field. However, the presence of two magnetic and apparently single stars near the top of the cluster mass-function may speak in favour of the latter.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.6401  [pdf] - 1123732
A multisite photometric study of two unusual Beta Cep stars: the magnetic V2052 Oph and the massive rapid rotator V986 Oph
Comments: 12 pages, 8 figures, MNRAS, in press
Submitted: 2012-05-29
We report a multisite photometric campaign for the Beta Cep stars V2052 Oph and V986 Oph. 670 hours of high-quality differential photoelectric Stromgren, Johnson and Geneva time-series photometry were obtained with eight telescopes on five continents during 182 nights. Frequency analyses of the V2052 Oph data enabled the detection of three pulsation frequencies, the first harmonic of the strongest signal, and the rotation frequency with its first harmonic. Pulsational mode identification from analysing the colour amplitude ratios confirms the dominant mode as being radial, whereas the other two oscillations are most likely l=4. Combining seismic constraints on the inclination of the rotation axis with published magnetic field analyses we conclude that the radial mode must be the fundamental. The rotational light modulation is in phase with published spectroscopic variability, and consistent with an oblique rotator for which both magnetic poles pass through the line of sight. The inclination of the rotation axis is 54o <i< 58o and the magnetic obliquity 58o <beta< 66o. The possibility that V2052 Oph has a magnetically confined wind is discussed. The photometric amplitudes of the single oscillation of V986 Oph are most consistent with an l=3 mode, but this identification is uncertain. Additional intrinsic, apparently temporally incoherent, light variations of V986 Oph are reported. Different interpretations thereof cannot be distinguished at this point, but this kind of variability appears to be present in many OB stars. The prospects of obtaining asteroseismic information for more rapidly rotating Beta Cep stars, which appear to prefer modes of higher l, are briefly discussed.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.5280  [pdf] - 1077560
Long-period variables in NGC147 and NGC185
Comments: 10 pages (excluding online tables) and 9 figures
Submitted: 2011-06-26
Previous studies on the stellar content of the two nearby dwarf galaxies NGC147 and NGC185 reveal a rich population of late-type giants in both systems, including a large number of carbon-rich objects. These stars are known to show pronounced photometric variability, which can be used for a more detailed characterisation of these highly evolved stars. Owing to their well-studied parameters, these Local Group members are ideal candidates for comparative studies. Trough photometric monitoring, we attempt to provide a catalogue of long-period variables (LPVs), including Mira variables, semi-regular variables, and even irregular variables in NGC 147 and NGC185. We investigate the light variations and compare the characteristics of these two LPV populations with the results found for other galaxies such as the LMC. We carried out time-series photometry in the i-band of the two target galaxies with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), covering a time span of \approx2.5 years. These data were then combined with single-epoch K-band photometry, also obtained with the NOT. Narrow-band photometry data from the literature was used to distinguish between O-rich and C-rich stars. We report the detection of 513 LPVs in NGC185 and 213 LPVs in NGC147, showing i-amplitudes of up to \approx 2mag and periods ranging between 90 and 800 days. The period-luminosity diagram for each of our target galaxies exhibits a well populated sequence of fundamental mode pulsators. The resulting period-luminosity relations we obtained are compared to relations from the literature. We discuss the universality of those relations because of which, as a side result, a correction of the distance modulus of NGC185 may be necessary. Only one of our two galaxies, namely NGC185, has a significant fraction of possibly first overtone pulsators. An interpretation of this finding in terms of differences in the star-formation histories is suggested.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1004.2853  [pdf] - 255615
Towards ensemble asteroseismology of the young open clusters Chi Persei and NGC 6910
Comments: 4 pages, Astronomische Nachrichten, HELAS IV Conference, Arecife, Lanzarote, Feb 2010, submitted
Submitted: 2010-04-16
As a result of the variability survey in Chi Persei and NGC6910, the number of Beta Cep stars that are members of these two open clusters is increased to twenty stars, nine in NGC6910 and eleven in Chi Persei. We compare pulsational properties, in particular the frequency spectra, of Beta Cep stars in both clusters and explain the differences in terms of the global parameters of the clusters. We also indicate that the more complicated pattern of the variability among B type stars in Chi Persei is very likely caused by higher rotational velocities of stars in this cluster. We conclude that the sample of pulsating stars in the two open clusters constitutes a very good starting point for the ensemble asteroseismology of Beta Cep-type stars and maybe also for other B-type pulsators.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.1116  [pdf] - 1019049
Photometric multi-site campaign on the open cluster NGC 884 I. Detection of the variable stars
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics, 21 pages, 14 figures, 4 tables. The full appendix is available at http://www.ster.kuleuven.be/~sophies/Appendix.pdf (74 MB, 169 pages, 343 figures, 1 table)
Submitted: 2010-01-07
CONTEXT: Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field beta Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physics in the stellar structure and evolution models of massive stars. Further asteroseismic constraints can be obtained from studying ensembles of stars in a young open cluster, which all have similar age, distance and chemical composition. AIMS: To improve our comprehension of the beta Cep stars, we studied the young open cluster NGC 884 to discover new B-type pulsators, besides the two known beta Cep stars, and other variable stars. METHODS: An extensive multi-site campaign was set up to gather accurate CCD photometry time series in four filters (U, B, V, I) of a field of NGC884. Fifteen different instruments collected almost 77500 CCD images in 1286 hours. The images were calibrated and reduced to transform the CCD frames into interpretable differential light curves. Various variability indicators and frequency analyses were applied to detect variable stars in the field. Absolute photometry was taken to deduce some general cluster and stellar properties. RESULTS: We achieved an accuracy for the brightest stars of 5.7 mmag in V, 6.9 mmag in B, 5.0 mmag in I and 5.3 mmag in U. The noise level in the amplitude spectra is 50 micromag in the V band. Our campaign confirms the previously known pulsators, and we report more than one hundred new multi- and mono-periodic B-, A- and F-type stars. Their interpretation in terms of classical instability domains is not straightforward, pointing to imperfections in theoretical instability computations. In addition, we have discovered six new eclipsing binaries and four candidates as well as other irregular variable stars in the observed field.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.0768  [pdf] - 315282
2006 Whole Earth Telescope Observations of GD358: A New Look at the Prototype DBV
Comments: 18 pages, 20 figures, 5 tables, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2008-11-05
We report on the analysis of 436.1 hrs of nearly continuous high-speed photometry on the pulsating DB white dwarf GD358 acquired with the Whole Earth Telescope (WET) during the 2006 international observing run, designated XCOV25. The Fourier transform (FT) of the light curve contains power between 1000 to 4000 microHz, with the dominant peak at 1234 microHz. We find 27 independent frequencies distributed in 10 modes, as well as numerous combination frequencies. Our discussion focuses on a new asteroseismological analysis of GD358, incorporating the 2006 data set and drawing on 24 years of archival observations. Our results reveal that, while the general frequency locations of the identified modes are consistent throughout the years, the multiplet structure is complex and cannot be interpreted simply as l=1 modes in the limit of slow rotation. The high k multiplets exhibit significant variability in structure, amplitude and frequency. Any identification of the m components for the high k multiplets is highly suspect. The k=9 and 8 modes typically do show triplet structure more consistent with theoretical expectations. The frequencies and amplitudes exhibit some variability, but much less than the high k modes. Analysis of the k=9 and 8 multiplet splittings from 1990 to 2008 reveal a long-term change in multiplet splittings coinciding with the 1996 "sforzando" event, where GD358 dramatically altered its pulsation characteristics on a timescale of hours. We explore potential implications, including the possible connections between convection and/or magnetic fields and pulsations. We suggest future investigations, including theoretical investigations of the relationship between magnetic fields, pulsation, growth rates, and convection.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603754  [pdf] - 80963
Photometric studies of three multiperiodic Beta Cephei stars: Beta CMa, 15 CMa and KZ Mus
Comments: 12 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2006-03-28
We have carried out single and multi-site photometry of the three Beta Cephei stars Beta and 15 CMa as well as KZ Mus. For the two stars in CMa, we obtained 270 h of measurement in the Stromgren uvy and Johnson V filters, while 150 h of time-resolved Stromgren uvy photometry was acquired for KZ Mus. All three stars are multi-periodic variables, with three (Beta CMa) and four (15 CMa, KZ Mus) independent pulsation modes. Two of the mode frequencies of 15 CMa are new discoveries and one of the known modes showed amplitude variations over the last 33 years. Taken together, this explains the star's diverse behaviour reported in the literature fully. Mode identification by means of the amplitude ratios in the different passbands suggests one radial mode for each star. In addition, Beta CMa has a dominant l=2 mode while its third mode is nonradial with unknown l. The nonradial modes of 15 CMa, which are l <= 3, form an almost equally split triplet that, if physical, would imply that we see the star under an inclination angle larger than 55 degrees. The strongest nonradial mode of KZ Mus is l=2, followed by the radial mode and a dipole mode. Its weakest known mode is nonradial with unknown l, confirming previous mode identifications for the star's pulsations. The phased light curve for the strongest mode of 15 CMa has a descending branch steeper than the rising branch. A stillstand phenomenon during the rise to maximum light is indicated. Given the low photometric amplitude of this nonradial mode this is at first sight surprising, but it can be explained by the mode's aspect angle.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510326  [pdf] - 76822
Asteroseismology of the Beta Cephei star 12 (DD) Lacertae: photometric observations, pulsational frequency analysis and mode identification
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, MNRAS, in press
Submitted: 2005-10-11
We report a multisite photometric campaign for the Beta Cephei star 12 Lacertae. 750 hours of high-quality differential photoelectric Stromgren, Johnson and Geneva time-series photometry were obtained with 9 telescopes during 190 nights. Our frequency analysis results in the detection of 23 sinusoidal signals in the light curves. Eleven of those correspond to independent pulsation modes, and the remainder are combination frequencies. We find some slow aperiodic variability such as that seemingly present in several Beta Cephei stars. We perform mode identification from our colour photometry, derive the spherical degree l for the five strongest modes unambiguously and provide constraints on l for the weaker modes. We find a mixture of modes of 0 <= l <= 4. In particular, we prove that the previously suspected rotationally split triplet within the modes of 12 Lac consists of modes of different l; their equal frequency splitting must thus be accidental. One of the periodic signals we detected in the light curves is argued to be a linearly stable mode excited to visible amplitude by nonlinear mode coupling via a 2:1 resonance. We also find a low-frequency signal in the light variations whose physical nature is unclear; it could be a parent or daughter mode resonantly coupled. The remaining combination frequencies are consistent with simple light-curve distortions. The range of excited pulsation frequencies of 12 Lac may be sufficiently large that it cannot be reproduced by standard models. We suspect that the star has a larger metal abundance in the pulsational driving zone, a hypothesis also capable of explaining the presence of Beta Cephei stars in the LMC.