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Loomis, C.

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24 article(s) in total. 635 co-authors, from 1 to 18 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 19,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.08584  [pdf] - 1607148
Pioneering high contrast science instruments for planet characterization on giant segmented mirror telescopes
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures, AO4ELTs4 conference
Submitted: 2017-12-22
A suite of science instruments is critical to any high contrast imaging facility, as it defines the science capabilities and observing modes available. SCExAO uses a modular approach which allows for state-of-the-art visitor modules to be tested within an observatory environment on an 8-m class telescope. This allows for rapid prototyping of new and innovative imaging techniques that otherwise take much longer in traditional instrument design. With the aim of maturing science modules for an advanced high contrast imager on an giant segmented mirror telescopes (GSMTs) that will be capable of imaging terrestrial planets, we offer an overview and status update on the various science modules currently under test within the SCExAO instrument.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.03067  [pdf] - 1584483
Data Reduction Pipeline for the CHARIS Integral-Field Spectrograph I: Detector Readout Calibration and Data Cube Extraction
Comments: 18 pages, 15 figures, 3 tables, replaced with JATIS accepted version (emulateapj formatted here). Software at https://github.com/PrincetonUniversity/charis-dep and documentation at http://princetonuniversity.github.io/charis-dep
Submitted: 2017-06-09, last modified: 2017-10-28
We present the data reduction pipeline for CHARIS, a high-contrast integral-field spectrograph for the Subaru Telescope. The pipeline constructs a ramp from the raw reads using the measured nonlinear pixel response, and reconstructs the data cube using one of three extraction algorithms: aperture photometry, optimal extraction, or $\chi^2$ fitting. We measure and apply both a detector flatfield and a lenslet flatfield and reconstruct the wavelength- and position-dependent lenslet point-spread function (PSF) from images taken with a tunable laser. We use these measured PSFs to implement a $\chi^2$-based extraction of the data cube, with typical residuals of ~5% due to imperfect models of the undersampled lenslet PSFs. The full two-dimensional residual of the $\chi^2$ extraction allows us to model and remove correlated read noise, dramatically improving CHARIS' performance. The $\chi^2$ extraction produces a data cube that has been deconvolved with the line-spread function, and never performs any interpolations of either the data or the individual lenslet spectra. The extracted data cube also includes uncertainties for each spatial and spectral measurement. CHARIS' software is parallelized, written in Python and Cython, and freely available on github with a separate documentation page. Astrometric and spectrophotometric calibrations of the data cubes and PSF subtraction will be treated in a forthcoming paper.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.01196  [pdf] - 1531178
Visible camera cryostat design and performance for the SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS)
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-08-03
We describe the design and performance of the SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) visible camera cryostats. SuMIRe PFS is a massively multi-plexed ground-based spectrograph consisting of four identical spectrograph modules, each receiving roughly 600 fibers from a 2394 fiber robotic positioner at the prime focus. Each spectrograph module has three channels covering wavelength ranges 380~nm -- 640~nm, 640~nm -- 955~nm, and 955~nm -- 1.26~um, with the dispersed light being imaged in each channel by a f/1.07 vacuum Schmidt camera. The cameras are very large, having a clear aperture of 300~mm at the entrance window, and a mass of $\sim$280~kg. In this paper we describe the design of the visible camera cryostats and discuss various aspects of cryostat performance.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.01287  [pdf] - 1531180
SUBARU prime focus spectrograph: integration, testing and performance for the first spectrograph
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-08-03
The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) of the Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts (SuMIRe) project for Subaru telescope consists in four identical spectrographs fed by 600 fibers each. Each spectrograph is composed by an optical entrance unit that creates a collimated beam and distributes the light to three channels, two visibles and one near infrared. This paper presents the on-going effort for the tests & integration process for the first spectrograph channel: we have developed a detailed Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) plan, as well as the methods, detailed processes and I&T tools. We describe the tools we designed to assemble the parts and to test the performance of the spectrograph. We also report on the thermal acceptance tests we performed on the first visible camera unit. We also report on and discuss the technical difficulties that did appear during this integration phase. Finally, we detail the important logistic process that is require to transport the components from other country to Marseille.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.01163  [pdf] - 1528133
The survey operation software system development for Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) on Subaru Telescope
Comments: 9 pages, 5 figures; SPIE (2016) 9913-88
Submitted: 2016-08-03
The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a wide-field, multi-object spectrograph accommodating 2394 fibers to observe the sky at the prime focus of the Subaru telescope. The software system to operate a spectroscopic survey is structured by the four packages: Instrument control software, exposure targeting software, data reduction pipeline, and survey planning and tracking software. In addition, we operate a database system where various information such as properties of target objects, instrument configurations, and observation conditions is stored and is organized via a standardized data model for future references to update survey plans and to scientific researches. In this article, we present an overview of the software system and describe the workflows that need to be performed in the PFS operation, with some highlights on the database that organizes various information from sub-processes in the survey operation, and on the process of fiber configuration from the software perspectives.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.01075  [pdf] - 1531175
Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) for the Subaru Telescope: Overview, recent progress, and future perspectives
Tamura, Naoyuki; Takato, Naruhisa; Shimono, Atsushi; Moritani, Yuki; Yabe, Kiyoto; Ishizuka, Yuki; Ueda, Akitoshi; Kamata, Yukiko; Aghazarian, Hrand; Arnouts, Stephane; Barban, Gabriel; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Borges, Renato C.; Braun, David F.; Carr, Michael A.; Chabaud, Pierre-Yves; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Chiba, Masashi; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Chu, You-Hua; Cohen, Judith G.; de Almeida, Rodrigo P.; de Oliveira, Antonio C.; de Oliveira, Ligia S.; Dekany, Richard G.; Dohlen, Kjetil; Santos, Jesulino B. dos; Santos, Leandro H. dos; Ellis, Richard S.; Fabricius, Maximilian; Ferrand, Didier; Ferreira, Decio; Golebiowski, Mirek; Greene, Jenny E.; Gross, Johannes; Gunn, James E.; Hammond, Randolph; Harding, Albert; Hart, Murdock; Heckman, Timothy M.; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Paul; Hope, Stephen C.; Hovland, Larry; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Hu, Yen-Shan; Huang, Ping-Jie; Jaquet, Marc; Jing, Yipeng; Karr, Jennifer; Kimura, Masahiko; King, Matthew E.; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Brun, Vincent Le; Fevre, Olivier Le; Fur, Arnaud Le; Mignant, David Le; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Loomis, Craig P.; Lupton, Robert H.; Madec, Fabrice; Mao, Peter; Marrara, Lucas S.; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; Minowa, Yosuke; Morantz, Chaz N.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Murray, Graham J.; Ohyama, Youichi; Orndorff, Joseph; Pascal, Sandrine; Pereira, Jefferson M.; Reiley, Daniel J.; Reinecke, Martin; Ritter, Andreas; Roberts, Mitsuko; Schwochert, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Smee, Stephen A.; Sodre, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Steinkraus, Aaron J.; Strauss, Michael A.; Surace, Christian; Suto, Yasushi; Suzuki, Nao; Swinbank, John; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Tamura, Tomonori; Tanaka, Yoko; Tresse, Laurence; Verducci, Orlando; Vibert, Didier; Vidal, Clement; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Yan, Chi-Hung; Yasuda, Naoki
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures. Proceeding of SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2016
Submitted: 2016-08-03
PFS (Prime Focus Spectrograph), a next generation facility instrument on the 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope, is a very wide-field, massively multiplexed, optical and near-infrared spectrograph. Exploiting the Subaru prime focus, 2394 reconfigurable fibers will be distributed over the 1.3 deg field of view. The spectrograph has been designed with 3 arms of blue, red, and near-infrared cameras to simultaneously observe spectra from 380nm to 1260nm in one exposure at a resolution of ~1.6-2.7A. An international collaboration is developing this instrument under the initiative of Kavli IPMU. The project is now going into the construction phase aiming at undertaking system integration in 2017-2018 and subsequently carrying out engineering operations in 2018-2019. This article gives an overview of the instrument, current project status and future paths forward.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.00725  [pdf] - 1241387
Prime Focus Spectrograph for the Subaru telescope: massively multiplexed optical and near-infrared fiber spectrograph
Sugai, Hajime; Tamura, Naoyuki; Karoji, Hiroshi; Shimono, Atsushi; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Ueda, Akitoshi; Aghazarian, Hrand; de Arruda, Marcio Vital; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Bennett, Charles L.; Bickerton, Steve; Bozier, Alexandre; Braun, David F.; Bui, Khanh; Capocasale, Christopher M.; Carr, Michael A.; Castilho, Bruno; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Dawson, Olivia R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ek, Eric M.; Ellis, Richard S.; English, Robin J.; Ferrand, Didier; Ferreira, Décio; Fisher, Charles D.; Golebiowski, Mirek; Gunn, James E.; Hart, Murdock; Heckman, Timothy M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hope, Stephen; Hovland, Larry E.; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Hu, Yen-Shan; Huang, Pin Jie; Jaquet, Marc; Karr, Jennifer E.; Kempenaar, Jason G.; King, Matthew E.; Fèvre, Olivier Le; Mignant, David Le; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Loomis, Craig; Lupton, Robert H.; Madec, Fabrice; Mao, Peter; Marrara, Lucas Souza; Ménard, Brice; Morantz, Chaz; Murayama, Hitoshi; Murray, Graham J.; de Oliveira, Antonio Cesar; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; de Oliveira, Ligia Souza; Orndorff, Joe D.; Vilaça, Rodrigo de Paiva; Partos, Eamon J.; Pascal, Sandrine; Pegot-Ogier, Thomas; Reiley, Daniel J.; Riddle, Reed; Santos, Leandro; Santos, Jesulino Bispo dos; Schwochert, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Smee, Stephen A.; Smith, Roger M.; Steinkraus, Ronald E.; Sodré, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Surace, Christian; Tresse, Laurence; Vidal, Clément; Vives, Sebastien; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Wu, Amy C.; Wyse, Rosie; Yan, Chi-Hung
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2015-07-02
The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is an optical/near-infrared multifiber spectrograph with 2394 science fibers distributed across a 1.3-deg diameter field of view at the Subaru 8.2-m telescope. The wide wavelength coverage from 0.38 {\mu}m to 1.26 {\mu}m, with a resolving power of 3000, simultaneously strengthens its ability to target three main survey programs: cosmology, galactic archaeology and galaxy/AGN evolution. A medium resolution mode with a resolving power of 5000 for 0.71 {\mu}m to 0.89 {\mu}m will also be available by simply exchanging dispersers. We highlight some of the technological aspects of the design. To transform the telescope focal ratio, a broad-band coated microlens is glued to each fiber tip. A higher transmission fiber is selected for the longest part of the cable system, optimizing overall throughput; a fiber with low focal ratio degradation is selected for the fiber-positioner and fiber-slit components, minimizing the effects of fiber movements and fiber bending. Fiber positioning will be performed by a positioner consisting of two stages of piezo-electric rotary motors. The positions of these motors are measured by taking an image of artificially back-illuminated fibers with the metrology camera located in the Cassegrain container; the fibers are placed in the proper location by iteratively measuring and then adjusting the positions of the motors. Target light reaches one of the four identical fast-Schmidt spectrograph modules, each with three arms. The PFS project has passed several project-wide design reviews and is now in the construction phase.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3401  [pdf] - 1216308
CCD Readout Electronics for the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph
Comments: 14 pages, 15 figures, SPIE ATI 2014, Montreal
Submitted: 2014-08-14
We present details of the design for the CCD readout electronics for the Subaru Telescope Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS). The spectrograph is comprised of four identical spectrograph modules, each collecting roughly 600 spectra. The spectrograph modules provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over the entire band from 380 nm to 1260 nm through the use of three separate optical channels: blue, red, and near infrared (NIR). A camera in each channel images the multi-object spectra onto a 4k x 4k, 15 um pixel, detector format. The two visible cameras use a pair of Hamamatsu 2k x 4k CCDs with readout provided by custom electronics, while the NIR camera uses a single Teledyne HgCdTe 4k x 4k detector and ASIC Sidecar to read the device. The CCD readout system is a custom design comprised of three electrical subsystems: the Back End Electronics (BEE), the Front End Electronics (FEE), and a Pre-amplifier. The BEE is an off-the-shelf PC104 computer, with an auxiliary Xilinx FPGA module. The computer serves as the main interface to the Subaru messaging hub and controls other peripheral devices associated with the camera, while the FPGA is used to generate the necessary clocks and transfer image data from the CCDs. The FEE board sets clock biases, substrate bias, and CDS offsets. It also monitors bias voltages, offset voltages, power rail voltage, substrate voltage and CCD temperature. The board translates LVDS clock signals to biased clocks and returns digitized analog data via LVDS. Monitoring and control messages are sent from the BEE to the FEE using a standard serial interface. The Pre-amplifier board resides behind the detectors and acts as an interface to the two Hamamatsu CCDs. The Pre-amplifier passes clocks and biases to the CCDs, and analog CCD data is buffered and amplified prior to being returned to the FEE.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3284  [pdf] - 1216305
The near infrared camera for the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph
Comments: Submitted to the 2014 SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation conference, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Submitted: 2014-08-12
We present the detailed design of the near infrared camera for the SuMIRe (Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts) Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) being developed for the Subaru Telescope. The PFS spectrograph is designed to collect spectra from 2394 objects simultaneously, covering wavelengths that extend from 380 nm - 1.26 um. The spectrograph is comprised of four identical spectrograph modules, with each module collecting roughly 600 spectra from a robotic fiber positioner at the telescope prime focus. Each spectrograph module will have two visible channels covering wavelength ranges 380 nm - 640 nm and 640 nm - 955 nm, and one near infrared (NIR) channel with a wavelength range 955 nm - 1.26 um. Dispersed light in each channel is imaged by a 300 mm focal length, f/1.07, vacuum Schmidt camera onto a 4k x 4k, 15 um pixel, detector format. For the NIR channel a HgCdTe substrate-removed Teledyne 1.7 um cutoff device is used. In the visible channels, CCDs from Hamamatsu are used. These cameras are large, having a clear aperture of 300 mm at the entrance window, and a mass of ~ 250 kg. Like the two visible channel cameras, the NIR camera contains just four optical elements: a two-element refractive corrector, a Mangin mirror, and a field flattening lens. This simple design produces very good imaging performance considering the wide field and wavelength range, and it does so in large part due to the use of a Mangin mirror (a lens with a reflecting rear surface) for the Schmidt primary. In the case of the NIR camera, the rear reflecting surface is a dichroic, which reflects in-band wavelengths and transmits wavelengths beyond 1.26 um. This, combined with a thermal rejection filter coating on the rear surface of the second corrector element, greatly reduces the out-of-band thermal radiation that reaches the detector.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.2825  [pdf] - 1216260
Progress with the Prime Focus Spectrograph for the Subaru Telescope: a massively multiplexed optical and near-infrared fiber spectrograph
Sugai, Hajime; Tamura, Naoyuki; Karoji, Hiroshi; Shimono, Atsushi; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Ueda, Akitoshi; Aghazarian, Hrand; de Arruda, Marcio Vital; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Bennett, Charles L.; Bickerton, Steve; Bozier, Alexandre; Braun, David F.; Bui, Khanh; Capocasale, Christopher M.; Carr, Michael A.; Castilho, Bruno; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Dawson, Olivia R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ek, Eric M.; Ellis, Richard S.; English, Robin J.; Ferrand, Didier; Ferreira, Décio; Fisher, Charles D.; Golebiowski, Mirek; Gunn, James E.; Hart, Murdock; Heckman, Timothy M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hope, Stephen; Hovland, Larry E.; Hsuc, Shu-Fu; Hu, Yen-Shan; Huang, Pin Jie; Jaquet, Marc; Karr, Jennifer E.; Kempenaar, Jason G.; King, Matthew E.; Fèvre, Olivier Le; Mignant, David Le; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Loomis, Craig; Lupton, Robert H.; Madec, Fabrice; Mao, Peter; Marrara, Lucas Souza; Ménard, Brice; Morantz, Chaz; Murayama, Hitoshi; Murray, Graham J.; de Oliveira, Antonio Cesar; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; de Oliveira, Ligia Souza; Orndorff, Joe D.; Vilaça, Rodrigo de Paiva; Partos, Eamon J.; Pascal, Sandrine; Pegot-Ogier, Thomas; Reiley, Daniel J.; Riddle, Reed; Santos, Leandro; Santos, Jesulino Bispo dos; Schwochert, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Smee, Stephen A.; Smith, Roger M.; Steinkraus, Ronald E.; Sodré, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Surace, Christian; Tresse, Laurence; Vidal, Clément; Vives, Sebastien; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Wu, Amy C.; Wyse, Rosie; Yan, Chi-Hung
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, submitted to "Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy V, Suzanne K. Ramsay, Ian S. McLean, Hideki Takami, Editors, Proc. SPIE 9147 (2014)"
Submitted: 2014-08-12
The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is an optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph with 2394 science fibers, which are distributed in 1.3 degree diameter field of view at Subaru 8.2-meter telescope. The simultaneous wide wavelength coverage from 0.38 um to 1.26 um, with the resolving power of 3000, strengthens its ability to target three main survey programs: cosmology, Galactic archaeology, and galaxy/AGN evolution. A medium resolution mode with resolving power of 5000 for 0.71 um to 0.89 um also will be available by simply exchanging dispersers. PFS takes the role for the spectroscopic part of the Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts project, while Hyper Suprime-Cam works on the imaging part. To transform the telescope plus WFC focal ratio, a 3-mm thick broad-band coated glass-molded microlens is glued to each fiber tip. A higher transmission fiber is selected for the longest part of cable system, while one with a better FRD performance is selected for the fiber-positioner and fiber-slit components, given the more frequent fiber movements and tightly curved structure. Each Fiber positioner consists of two stages of piezo-electric rotary motors. Its engineering model has been produced and tested. Fiber positioning will be performed iteratively by taking an image of artificially back-illuminated fibers with the Metrology camera located in the Cassegrain container. The camera is carefully designed so that fiber position measurements are unaffected by small amounts of high special-frequency inaccuracies in WFC lens surface shapes. Target light carried through the fiber system reaches one of four identical fast-Schmidt spectrograph modules, each with three arms. Prototype VPH gratings have been optically tested. CCD production is complete, with standard fully-depleted CCDs for red arms and more-challenging thinner fully-depleted CCDs with blue-optimized coating for blue arms.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.7735  [pdf] - 1173047
The Tenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment
Ahn, Christopher P.; Alexandroff, Rachael; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Bautista, Julian E.; Beers, Timothy C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Borde, Arnaud; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, Alaina Shelden; Brandt, W. N.; Brauer, Dorothée; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Busca, Nicolás G.; Carithers, William; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Carnero, Aurelio R.; Carr, Michael A.; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Crepp, Justin R.; Cristiani, Stefano; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Cunha, Katia; da Costa, Luiz N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; De Lee, Nathan; Dean, Janice D. R.; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Epstein, Courtney R.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fabbian, D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Favole, Ginevra; Castellá, Bruno Femenía; Alvar, Emma Fernández; Feuillet, Diane; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbraith-Frew, J. G.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, Ana E. García; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; Hernández, Jonay I. González; Gott, J. Richard; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Halverson, Samuel; Harding, Paul; Harris, David W.; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Frederick R.; Davó, Artemio Herrero; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Ivans, Inese I.; Jackson, Kelly M.; Jiang, Peng; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kirkby, David; Kinemuchi, K.; Klaene, Mark A.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koesterke, Lars; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Long, Daniel C.; Loomis, Craig P.; Lucatello, Sara; Lupton, Robert H.; Ma, Bo; Mack, Claude E.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Mészáros, Sz.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Montesano, Francesco; More, Surhud; Morrison, Heather L.; Muna, Demitri; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Myers, Adam D.; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; O'Connell, Julia E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; O'Connell, Ross; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Pâris, Isabelle; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Perottoni, Hélio Dotto; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Rebolo, Rafael; Reid, Beth A.; Richards, Jonathan C.; Riffel, Rogério; Robin, Annie C.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Roy, Arpita; Rubiño-Martin, J. A.; Sabiu, Cristiano G.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Simmons, Audrey E.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sobreira, Flavia; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Terrien, Ryan C.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Vandenberg, Jan; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; White, Martin; White, Simon D. M.; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun
Comments: 15 figures; 1 table. Accepted to ApJS. DR10 is available at http://www.sdss3.org/dr10 v3 fixed 3 diacritic markings in the arXiv HTML listing of the author names
Submitted: 2013-07-29, last modified: 2014-01-17
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has been in operation since 2000 April. This paper presents the tenth public data release (DR10) from its current incarnation, SDSS-III. This data release includes the first spectroscopic data from the Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), along with spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) taken through 2012 July. The APOGEE instrument is a near-infrared R~22,500 300-fiber spectrograph covering 1.514--1.696 microns. The APOGEE survey is studying the chemical abundances and radial velocities of roughly 100,000 red giant star candidates in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. DR10 includes 178,397 spectra of 57,454 stars, each typically observed three or more times, from APOGEE. Derived quantities from these spectra (radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities) are also included.DR10 also roughly doubles the number of BOSS spectra over those included in the ninth data release. DR10 includes a total of 1,507,954 BOSS spectra, comprising 927,844 galaxy spectra; 182,009 quasar spectra; and 159,327 stellar spectra, selected over 6373.2 square degrees.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.2233  [pdf] - 1150639
The Multi-Object, Fiber-Fed Spectrographs for SDSS and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey
Comments: 43 pages, 42 figures, revised according to referee report and accepted by AJ. Provides background for the instrument responsible for SDSS and BOSS spectra. 4th in a series of survey technical papers released in Summer 2012, including arXiv:1207.7137 (DR9), arXiv:1207.7326 (Spectral Classification), and arXiv:1208.0022 (BOSS Overview)
Submitted: 2012-08-10, last modified: 2013-05-21
We present the design and performance of the multi-object fiber spectrographs for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and their upgrade for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Originally commissioned in Fall 1999 on the 2.5-m aperture Sloan Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, the spectrographs produced more than 1.5 million spectra for the SDSS and SDSS-II surveys, enabling a wide variety of Galactic and extra-galactic science including the first observation of baryon acoustic oscillations in 2005. The spectrographs were upgraded in 2009 and are currently in use for BOSS, the flagship survey of the third-generation SDSS-III project. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.35 million massive galaxies to redshift 0.7 and Lyman-alpha absorption of 160,000 high redshift quasars over 10,000 square degrees of sky, making percent level measurements of the absolute cosmic distance scale of the Universe and placing tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy. The twin multi-object fiber spectrographs utilize a simple optical layout with reflective collimators, gratings, all-refractive cameras, and state-of-the-art CCD detectors to produce hundreds of spectra simultaneously in two channels over a bandpass covering the near ultraviolet to the near infrared, with a resolving power R = \lambda/FWHM ~ 2000. Building on proven heritage, the spectrographs were upgraded for BOSS with volume-phase holographic gratings and modern CCD detectors, improving the peak throughput by nearly a factor of two, extending the bandpass to cover 360 < \lambda < 1000 nm, and increasing the number of fibers from 640 to 1000 per exposure. In this paper we describe the original SDSS spectrograph design and the upgrades implemented for BOSS, and document the predicted and measured performances.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.0022  [pdf] - 1125226
The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of SDSS-III
Dawson, Kyle S.; Schlegel, David J.; Ahn, Christopher P.; Anderson, Scott F.; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Bautista, Julian E.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Borde, Arnaud; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, W. N.; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, Jon; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Busca, N. G.; Carithers, William; Carnero, Aurelio R.; Carr, Michael A.; Chen, Yanmei; Comparat, Johan; Connolly, Natalia; Cope, Frances; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Davenport, James R. A.; Delubac, Timothée; de Putter, Roland; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, S.; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, N. Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Génova-Santos, R.; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Haggard, Daryl; Hall, Patrick B.; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Harris, Ben; Harris, David W.; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holder, Diana; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, Joe; Jordan, Beatrice; Jordan, Wendell P.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kazin, Eyal A.; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark A.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Khee-Gan; Long, Daniel C.; Loomis, Craig P.; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Makler, Martin; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McDonald, Patrick; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard; Mena, Olga; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Montesano, Francesco; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam D.; Naugle, Tracy; Nichol, Robert C.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Pâris, Isabelle; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pfaffenberger, Robert; Pforr, Janine; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rebolo, Rafael; Rich, James; Richards, Gordon T.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martin, J. A.; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Sayres, Conor; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, C. G.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shelden, Alaina; Sheldon, Erin; Shen, Yue; Shu, Yiping; Slosar, Anže; Smee, Stephen A.; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Stauffer, Fritz; Steele, Oliver; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tal, Tomer; Tanaka, Masayuki; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy A.; Magana, M. Vargas; Verde, Licia; Viel, Matteo; Wake, David A.; Watson, Mike; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; West, Andrew A.; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yeche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng
Comments: 49 pages, 16 figures, accepted by AJ
Submitted: 2012-07-31, last modified: 2012-11-07
The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) is designed to measure the scale of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the clustering of matter over a larger volume than the combined efforts of all previous spectroscopic surveys of large scale structure. BOSS uses 1.5 million luminous galaxies as faint as i=19.9 over 10,000 square degrees to measure BAO to redshifts z<0.7. Observations of neutral hydrogen in the Lyman alpha forest in more than 150,000 quasar spectra (g<22) will constrain BAO over the redshift range 2.15<z<3.5. Early results from BOSS include the first detection of the large-scale three-dimensional clustering of the Lyman alpha forest and a strong detection from the Data Release 9 data set of the BAO in the clustering of massive galaxies at an effective redshift z = 0.57. We project that BOSS will yield measurements of the angular diameter distance D_A to an accuracy of 1.0% at redshifts z=0.3 and z=0.57 and measurements of H(z) to 1.8% and 1.7% at the same redshifts. Forecasts for Lyman alpha forest constraints predict a measurement of an overall dilation factor that scales the highly degenerate D_A(z) and H^{-1}(z) parameters to an accuracy of 1.9% at z~2.5 when the survey is complete. Here, we provide an overview of the selection of spectroscopic targets, planning of observations, and analysis of data and data quality of BOSS.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.2719  [pdf] - 574579
Prime Focus Spectrograph - Subaru's future -
Comments: 13 pages, 11 figures, submitted to "Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV, Ian S. McLean, Suzanne K. Ramsay, Hideki Takami, Editors, Proc. SPIE 8446 (2012)"
Submitted: 2012-10-09
The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) of the Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts (SuMIRe) project has been endorsed by Japanese community as one of the main future instruments of the Subaru 8.2-meter telescope at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. This optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph targets cosmology with galaxy surveys, Galactic archaeology, and studies of galaxy/AGN evolution. Taking advantage of Subaru's wide field of view, which is further extended with the recently completed Wide Field Corrector, PFS will enable us to carry out multi-fiber spectroscopy of 2400 targets within 1.3 degree diameter. A microlens is attached at each fiber entrance for F-ratio transformation into a larger one so that difficulties of spectrograph design are eased. Fibers are accurately placed onto target positions by positioners, each of which consists of two stages of piezo-electric rotary motors, through iterations by using back-illuminated fiber position measurements with a wide-field metrology camera. Fibers then carry light to a set of four identical fast-Schmidt spectrographs with three color arms each: the wavelength ranges from 0.38 {\mu}m to 1.3 {\mu}m will be simultaneously observed with an average resolving power of 3000. Before and during the era of extremely large telescopes, PFS will provide the unique capability of obtaining spectra of 2400 cosmological/astrophysical targets simultaneously with an 8-10 meter class telescope. The PFS collaboration, led by IPMU, consists of USP/LNA in Brazil, Caltech/JPL, Princeton, & JHU in USA, LAM in France, ASIAA in Taiwan, and NAOJ/Subaru.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.7326  [pdf] - 1125213
Spectral Classification and Redshift Measurement for the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey
Comments: 20 pages, multiple figures. Minor changes relative to version 1. Accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2012-07-31, last modified: 2012-09-10
(abridged) We describe the automated spectral classification, redshift determination, and parameter measurement pipeline in use for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) as of Data Release 9, encompassing 831,000 moderate-resolution optical spectra. We give a review of the algorithms employed, and describe the changes to the pipeline that have been implemented for BOSS relative to previous SDSS-I/II versions, including new sets of stellar, galaxy, and quasar redshift templates. For the color-selected CMASS sample of massive galaxies at redshift 0.4 <~ z <~ 0.8 targeted by BOSS for the purposes of large-scale cosmological measurements, the pipeline achieves an automated classification success rate of 98.7% and confirms 95.4% of unique CMASS targets as galaxies (with the balance being mostly M stars). Based on visual inspections of a subset of BOSS galaxies, we find that ~0.2% of confidently reported CMASS sample classifications and redshifts are incorrect, and ~0.4% of all CMASS spectra are objects unclassified by the current algorithm which are potentially recoverable. The BOSS pipeline confirms that ~51.5% of the quasar targets have quasar spectra, with the balance mainly consisting of stars. Statistical (as opposed to systematic) redshift errors propagated from photon noise are typically a few tens of km/s for both galaxies and quasars, with a significant tail to a few hundreds of km/s for quasars. We test the accuracy of these statistical redshift error estimates using repeat observations, finding them underestimated by a factor of 1.19 to 1.34 for galaxies, and by a factor of 2 for quasars. We assess the impact of sky-subtraction quality, S/N, and other factors on galaxy redshift success. Finally, we document known issues, and describe directions of ongoing development.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.7137  [pdf] - 1125200
The Ninth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey
Collaboration, SDSS-III; :; Ahn, Christopher P.; Alexandroff, Rachael; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Bailey, Éric Aubourg Stephen; Barnes, Rory; Bautista, Julian; Beers, Timothy C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Borde, Arnaud; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, W. N.; Brinkmann, J.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Busca, N. G.; Carithers, William; Carnero, Aurelio R.; Carr, Michael A.; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Chen, Yanmei; Chiappini, Cristina; Comparat, Johan; Connolly, Natalia; Crepp, Justin R.; Cristiani, Stefano; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Davenport, James R. A.; Dawson, Kyle S.; de Putter, Roland; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, S.; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Castellá, Bruno Femení a; Alvar, Emma Fernández; Ferreira, Leticia D.; Ak, N. Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, A. E. García; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; Hernández, Jonay I. González; Grebel, Eva K.; Gunn, James E.; Haggard, Daryl; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Harris, David W.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Frederick R.; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, J.; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivezić, Zeljko; Jacobson, Heather R.; Jiang, Linhua; Johansson, Jonas; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A.; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Long, Daniel C.; Loomis, Craig P.; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H.; Ma, Bo; Ma, Zhibo; MacDonald, Nicholas; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Makler, Martin; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Meszaros, Sz.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Montesano, Francesco; Morrison, Heather L.; Muna, Demitri; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Myers, Adam D.; Neto, A. F.; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Parihar, Prachi; Pâris, Isabelle; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Pérez-Ráfols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pforr, Janine; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; de Mello, G. F. Porto; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rebolo, Rafael; Rich, James; Richards, Gordon T.; Robin, Annie C.; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rubiño-Martin, J. A.; Samushia, Lado; Almeida, J. Sanchez; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schlegel, David J.; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schwope, Axel D.; Scóccola, C. G.; Seljak, Uros; Sheldon, Erin; Shen, Yue; Shu, Yiping; Simmerer, Jennifer; Simmons, Audrey E.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Slosar, A.; Sobreira, Flavia; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tal, Tomer; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy A.; Magaña, M. Vargas; Verde, Licia; Viel, Matteo; Vikas, Shailendra K.; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; West, Andrew A.; White, Martin; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yanny, Brian; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun; Zinn, Joel C.
Comments: 9 figures; 2 tables. Submitted to ApJS. DR9 is available at http://www.sdss3.org/dr9
Submitted: 2012-07-30
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) presents the first spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This ninth data release (DR9) of the SDSS project includes 535,995 new galaxy spectra (median z=0.52), 102,100 new quasar spectra (median z=2.32), and 90,897 new stellar spectra, along with the data presented in previous data releases. These spectra were obtained with the new BOSS spectrograph and were taken between 2009 December and 2011 July. In addition, the stellar parameters pipeline, which determines radial velocities, surface temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities of stars, has been updated and refined with improvements in temperature estimates for stars with T_eff<5000 K and in metallicity estimates for stars with [Fe/H]>-0.5. DR9 includes new stellar parameters for all stars presented in DR8, including stars from SDSS-I and II, as well as those observed as part of the SDSS-III Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration-2 (SEGUE-2). The astrometry error introduced in the DR8 imaging catalogs has been corrected in the DR9 data products. The next data release for SDSS-III will be in Summer 2013, which will present the first data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) along with another year of data from BOSS, followed by the final SDSS-III data release in December 2014.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1203.6594  [pdf] - 1117643
The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Data Release 9 Spectroscopic Galaxy Sample
Comments: 33 pages
Submitted: 2012-03-29
We present measurements of galaxy clustering from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III). These use the Data Release 9 (DR9) CMASS sample, which contains 264,283 massive galaxies covering 3275 square degrees with an effective redshift z=0.57 and redshift range 0.43 < z < 0.7. Assuming a concordance Lambda-CDM cosmological model, this sample covers an effective volume of 2.2 Gpc^3, and represents the largest sample of the Universe ever surveyed at this density, n = 3 x 10^-4 h^-3 Mpc^3. We measure the angle-averaged galaxy correlation function and power spectrum, including density-field reconstruction of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature. The acoustic features are detected at a significance of 5\sigma in both the correlation function and power spectrum. Combining with the SDSS-II Luminous Red Galaxy Sample, the detection significance increases to 6.7\sigma. Fitting for the position of the acoustic features measures the distance to z=0.57 relative to the sound horizon DV /rs = 13.67 +/- 0.22 at z=0.57. Assuming a fiducial sound horizon of 153.19 Mpc, which matches cosmic microwave background constraints, this corresponds to a distance DV(z=0.57) = 2094 +/- 34 Mpc. At 1.7 per cent, this is the most precise distance constraint ever obtained from a galaxy survey. We place this result alongside previous BAO measurements in a cosmological distance ladder and find excellent agreement with the current supernova measurements. We use these distance measurements to constrain various cosmological models, finding continuing support for a flat Universe with a cosmological constant.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.1529  [pdf] - 955906
SDSS-III: Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe, the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems
Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Weinberg, David H.; Agol, Eric; Aihara, Hiroaki; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anderson, Scott F.; Arns, James A.; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Balbinot, Eduardo; Barkhouser, Robert; Beers, Timothy C.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bickerton, Steven J.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R.; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Bosman, Casey T.; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard J.; Brandt, W. N.; Breslauer, Ben; Brinkmann, J.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burger, Dan; Busca, Nicolas G.; Campbell, Heather; Cargile, Phillip A.; Carithers, William C.; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Carr, Michael A.; Chen, Yanmei; Chiappini, Cristina; Comparat, Johan; Connolly, Natalia; Cortes, Marina; Croft, Rupert A. C.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Cunha, Katia; Davenport, James R. A.; Dawson, Kyle; De Lee, Nathan; de Mello, Gustavo F. Porto; de Simoni, Fernando; Dean, Janice; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eiting, Jacob M.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Castella, Bruno Femenia; Ferreira, Leticia Dutra; Fitzgerald, Greg; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ford, Eric B.; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Perez, Ana Elia Garcia; Gaudi, B. Scott; Ge, Jian; Ghezzi, Luan; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Gilmore, G.; Girardi, Leo; Gott, J. Richard; Gould, Andrew; Grebel, Eva K.; Gunn, James E.; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Harding, Paul; Harris, David W.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Frederick R.; Hernandez, Jonay I. Gonzalez; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Inada, Naohisa; Ivans, Inese I.; Jiang, Linhua; Jiang, Peng; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jordan, Cathy; Jordan, Wendell P.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kazin, Eyal; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark A.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Knapp, G. R.; Kochanek, C. S.; Koesterke, Lars; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Kron, Richard G.; Lang, Dustin; Lawler, James E.; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Brian L.; Lee, Young Sun; Leisenring, Jarron M.; Lin, Yen-Ting; Liu, Jian; Long, Daniel C.; Loomis, Craig P.; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H.; Ma, Bo; Ma, Zhibo; MacDonald, Nicholas; Mack, Claude; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Majewski, Steven R.; Makler, Martin; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Maseman, Paul; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McDonald, Patrick; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Requejo, Olga Mena; Menard, Brice; Miralda-Escude, Jordi; Morrison, Heather L.; Mullally, Fergal; Muna, Demitri; Murayama, Hitoshi; Myers, Adam D.; Naugle, Tracy; Neto, Angelo Fausti; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Paegert, Martin; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pandey, Parul; Parejko, John K.; Paris, Isabelle; Pellegrini, Paulo; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Pfaffenberger, Robert; Pforr, Janine; Phleps, Stefanie; Pichon, Christophe; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Ramos, Beatriz H. F.; Ryle, Celine; Reid, I. Neill; Rich, James; Richards, Gordon T.; Rieke, George H.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie A.; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossetto, Bruno; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basilio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo; Schlegel, David J.; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Sellgren, Kris; Shelden, Alaina; Sheldon, Erin; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Silverman, John D.; Simmerer, Jennifer; Simmons, Audrey E.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anze; Smee, Stephen; Smith, Verne V.; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stockett, Mark H.; Stollberg, Todd; Strauss, Michael A.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tofflemire, Benjamin M.; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy A.; Magana, Mariana Vargas; Verde, Licia; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Wan, Xiaoke; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A.; White, Martin; White, Simon D. M.; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Yanny, Brian; Yasuda, Naoki; Yeche, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Young, Erick; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Bo
Comments: Revised to version published in The Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2011-01-07, last modified: 2011-08-17
Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. In keeping with SDSS tradition, SDSS-III will provide regular public releases of all its data, beginning with SDSS DR8 (which occurred in Jan 2011). This paper presents an overview of the four SDSS-III surveys. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Lya forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the BAO feature of large scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z<0.7 and at z~2.5. SEGUE-2, which is now completed, measured medium-resolution (R=1800) optical spectra of 118,000 stars in a variety of target categories, probing chemical evolution, stellar kinematics and substructure, and the mass profile of the dark matter halo from the solar neighborhood to distances of 100 kpc. APOGEE will obtain high-resolution (R~30,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N>100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51-1.70 micron) spectra of 10^5 evolved, late-type stars, measuring separate abundances for ~15 elements per star and creating the first high-precision spectroscopic survey of all Galactic stellar populations (bulge, bar, disks, halo) with a uniform set of stellar tracers and spectral diagnostics. MARVELS will monitor radial velocities of more than 8000 FGK stars with the sensitivity and cadence (10-40 m/s, ~24 visits per star) needed to detect giant planets with periods up to two years, providing an unprecedented data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. (Abridged)
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.1559  [pdf] - 1051258
The Eighth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Data from SDSS-III
collaboration, SDSS-III; :; Aihara, Hiroaki; Prieto, Carlos Allende; An, Deokkeun; Anderson, Scott F.; Aubourg, Éric; Balbinot, Eduardo; Beers, Timothy C.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bickerton, Steven J.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R.; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, W. N.; Brinkmann, J.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Busca, Nicolas G.; Campbell, Heather; Carr, Michael A.; Chen, Yanmei; Chiappini, Cristina; Comparat, Johan; Connolly, Natalia; Cortes, Marina; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Davenport, James R. A.; Dawson, Kyle; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Castellá, Bruno Femení a; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Ge, Jian; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Gilmore, G.; Hernández, Jonay I. González; Gott, J. Richard; Gould, Andrew; Grebel, Eva K.; Gunn, James E.; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Harding, Paul; Harris, David W.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Frederick R.; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Inada, Naohisa; Ivans, Inese I.; Jiang, Linhua; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jordan, Cathy; Jordan, Wendell P.; Kazin, Eyal A.; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapp, G. R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kochanek, C. S.; Koesterke, Lars; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Kron, Richard G.; Lampeitl, Hubert; Lang, Dustin; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Young Sun; Lin, Yen-Ting; Long, Daniel C.; Loomis, Craig P.; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H.; Ma, Zhibo; MacDonald, Nicholas; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Makler, Martin; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McGehee, Peregrine M.; McGreer, Ian D.; Ménard, Brice; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Morrison, Heather L.; Mullally, F.; Muna, Demitri; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Myers, Adam D.; Naugle, Tracy; Neto, Angelo Fausti; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pandey, Parul; Pâris, Isabelle; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Pfaffenberger, Robert; Pforr, Janine; Phleps, Stefanie; Pichon, Christophe; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Ramos, Beatriz H. F.; Reylé, Céline; Rich, James; Richards, Gordon T.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie A.; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossetto, Bruno M.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Sayres, Conor; Schlegel, David J.; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Sheldon, Erin; Shu, Yiping; Simmerer, Jennifer; Simmons, Audrey E.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tofflemire, Benjamin M.; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy A.; Vandenberg, Jan; Magaña, M. Vargas; Verde, Licia; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; White, Simon D. M.; Yanny, Brian; Yasuda, Naoki; Yeche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit
Comments: Astrophysical Journal Supplements, in press (minor updates from submitted version)
Submitted: 2011-01-07, last modified: 2011-02-25
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) started a new phase in August 2008, with new instrumentation and new surveys focused on Galactic structure and chemical evolution, measurements of the baryon oscillation feature in the clustering of galaxies and the quasar Ly alpha forest, and a radial velocity search for planets around ~8000 stars. This paper describes the first data release of SDSS-III (and the eighth counting from the beginning of the SDSS). The release includes five-band imaging of roughly 5200 deg^2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, bringing the total footprint of the SDSS imaging to 14,555 deg^2, or over a third of the Celestial Sphere. All the imaging data have been reprocessed with an improved sky-subtraction algorithm and a final, self-consistent photometric recalibration and flat-field determination. This release also includes all data from the second phase of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Evolution (SEGUE-2), consisting of spectroscopy of approximately 118,000 stars at both high and low Galactic latitudes. All the more than half a million stellar spectra obtained with the SDSS spectrograph have been reprocessed through an improved stellar parameters pipeline, which has better determination of metallicity for high metallicity stars.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1008.1959  [pdf] - 320287
The SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. IV. Validation with an Extended Sample of Galactic Globular and Open Clusters
Comments: 98 pages, 31 figures; accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2010-08-11, last modified: 2010-10-14
Spectroscopic and photometric data for likely member stars of five Galactic globular clusters (M3, M53, M71, M92, and NGC 5053) and three open clusters (M35, NGC 2158, and NGC 6791) are processed by the current version of the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP), in order to determine estimates of metallicities and radial velocities for the clusters. These results are then compared to values from the literature. We find that the mean metallicity (<[Fe/H]>) and mean radial velocity (<RV>) estimates for each cluster are almost all within 2{\sigma} of the adopted literature values; most are within 1{\sigma}. We also demonstrate that the new version of the SSPP achieves small, but noteworthy, improvements in <[Fe/H]> estimates at the extrema of the cluster metallicity range, as compared to a previous version of the pipeline software. These results provide additional confidence in the application of the SSPP for studies of the abundances and kinematics of stellar populations in the Galaxy.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:0911.2712  [pdf] - 902425
Chromospheric Variability in SDSS M Dwarfs. II. Short-Timescale H-alpha Variability
Comments: Submitted to ApJ; 20 pages, 15 figures
Submitted: 2009-11-13
[Abridged] We present the first comprehensive study of short-timescale chromospheric H-alpha variability in M dwarfs using the individual 15 min spectroscopic exposures for 52,392 objects from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our sample contains about 10^3-10^4 objects per spectral type bin in the range M0-M9, with a total of about 206,000 spectra and a typical number of 3 exposures per object (ranging up to a maximum of 30 exposures). Using this extensive data set we find that about 16% of the sources exhibit H-alpha emission in at least one exposure, and of those about 45% exhibit H-alpha emission in all of the available exposures. Within the sample of objects with H-alpha emission, only 26% are consistent with non-variable emission, independent of spectral type. The H-alpha variability, quantified in terms of the ratio of maximum to minimum H-alpha equivalent width (R_EW), and the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean (sigma_EW/<EW>), exhibits a rapid rise from M0 to M5, followed by a plateau and a possible decline in M9 objects. In particular, R_EW increases from a median value of about 1.8 for M0-M3 to about 2.5 for M7-M9, and variability with R_EW>10 is only observed in objects later than M5. For the combined sample we find that the R_EW values follow an exponential distribution with N(R_EW) exp[-(R_EW-1)/2]; for M5-M9 objects the characteristic scale is R_EW-1\approx 2.7, indicative of stronger variability. In addition, we find that objects with persistent H-alpha emission exhibit smaller values of R_EW than those with intermittent H-alpha emission. Based on these results we conclude that H-alpha variability in M dwarfs on timescales of 15 min to 1 hr increases with later spectral type, and that the variability is larger for intermittent sources.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.2522  [pdf] - 14559
The Second-Generation Guide Star Catalog: Description and Properties
Comments: 52 pages, 33 figures, to be published in AJ August 2008
Submitted: 2008-07-16
The GSC-II is an all-sky database of objects derived from the uncompressed DSS that the STScI has created from the Palomar and UK Schmidt survey plates and made available to the community. Like its predecessor (GSC-I), the GSC-II was primarily created to provide guide star information and observation planning support for HST. This version, however, is already employed at some of the ground-based new-technology telescopes such as GEMINI, VLT, and TNG, and will also be used to provide support for the JWST and Gaia space missions as well as LAMOST, one of the major ongoing scientific projects in China. Two catalogs have already been extracted from the GSC-II database and released to the astronomical community. A magnitude-limited (R=18.0) version, GSC2.2, was distributed soon after its production in 2001, while the GSC2.3 release has been available for general access since 2007. The GSC2.3 catalog described in this paper contains astrometry, photometry, and classification for 945,592,683 objects down to the magnitude limit of the plates. Positions are tied to the ICRS; for stellar sources, the all-sky average absolute error per coordinate ranges from 0.2" to 0.28" depending on magnitude. When dealing with extended objects, astrometric errors are 20% worse in the case of galaxies and approximately a factor of 2 worse for blended images. Stellar photometry is determined to 0.13-0.22 mag as a function of magnitude and photographic passbands (B,R,I). Outside of the galactic plane, stellar classification is reliable to at least 90% confidence for magnitudes brighter than R=19.5, and the catalog is complete to R=20.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0703454  [pdf] - 90263
An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data
Comments: 16 pages, 17 figures, matches version accepted in ApJ. These calibrations are available at http://www.sdss.org/dr6
Submitted: 2007-03-19, last modified: 2007-10-19
We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative" calibrations, from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve ~1% relative calibration errors across 8500 sq.deg. in griz; the errors are ~2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory. These calibrations, dubbed "ubercalibration", are now public with SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS data releases.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0411348  [pdf] - 68947
Structure Function Analysis of Long Term Quasar Variability
Comments: 23 pages, 18 figures. Accepted for publication in Astronomical Journal, Feb 2005 issue
Submitted: 2004-11-12
In our second paper on long-term quasar variability, we employ a much larger database of quasars than in de Vries, Becker & White. This expanded sample, containing 35165 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2, and 6413 additional quasars in the same area of the sky taken from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, allows us to significantly improve on our earlier conclusions. As before, all the historic quasar photometry has been calibrated onto the SDSS scale by using large numbers of calibration stars around each quasar position. We find the following: (1) the outbursts have an asymmetric light-curve profile, with a fast-rise, slow-decline shape; this argues against a scenario in which micro-lensing events along the line-of-sight to the quasars are dominating the long-term variations in quasars; (2) there is no turnover in the Structure Function of the quasars up to time-scales of ~40 years, and the increase in variability with increasing time-lags is monotonic and constant; and consequently, (3) there is not a single preferred characteristic outburst time-scale for the quasars, but most likely a continuum of outburst time-scales, (4) the magnitude of the quasar variability is a function of wavelength: variability increases toward the blue part of the spectrum, (5) high-luminosity quasars vary less than low-luminosity quasars, consistent with a scenario in which variations have limited absolute magnitude. Based on this, we conclude that quasar variability is intrinsic to the Active Galactic Nucleus, is caused by chromatic outbursts / flares with a limited luminosity range and varying time-scales, and which have an overall asymmetric light-curve shape. Currently the model that has the most promise of fitting the observations is based on accretion disk instabilities.