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Liddle, Andrew R.

Normalized to: Liddle, A.

250 article(s) in total. 1072 co-authors, from 1 to 37 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 2,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.03687  [pdf] - 2011375
The Cosmological Parameters (2019)
Comments: 21 pages TeX file with two figures. Article for The Review of Particle Physics 2020 (aka the Particle Data Book), on-line version at http://pdg.lbl.gov/2019/astrophysics-cosmology/astro-cosmo.html . This article supersedes arXiv:1401.1389, arXiv:1002.3488, arXiv:astro-ph/0601168, arXiv:astro-ph/0406681
Submitted: 2019-12-08
This is a review article for The Review of Particle Physics 2020 (aka the Particle Data Book). It forms a compact review of knowledge of the cosmological parameters at the end of 2019. Topics included are Parametrizing the Universe; Extensions to the standard model; Probes; Bringing observations together; Outlook for the future.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.08813  [pdf] - 2000186
Stellar mass as a galaxy cluster mass proxy: application to the Dark Energy Survey redMaPPer clusters
Comments: 14 pages, 7 figures, addressing MNRAS referee comments
Submitted: 2019-03-20, last modified: 2019-11-18
We introduce a galaxy cluster mass observable, $\mu_\star$, based on the stellar masses of cluster members, and we present results for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 observations. Stellar masses are computed using a Bayesian Model Averaging method, and are validated for DES data using simulations and COSMOS data. We show that $\mu_\star$ works as a promising mass proxy by comparing our predictions to X-ray measurements. We measure the X-ray temperature-$\mu_\star$ relation for a total of 150 clusters matched between the wide-field DES Year 1 redMaPPer catalogue, and Chandra and XMM archival observations, spanning the redshift range $0.1<z<0.7$. For a scaling relation which is linear in logarithmic space, we find a slope of $\alpha = 0.488\pm0.043$ and a scatter in the X-ray temperature at fixed $\mu_\star$ of $\sigma_{{\rm ln} T_X|\mu_\star}=0.266^{+0.019}_{-0.020}$ for the joint sample. By using the halo mass scaling relations of the X-ray temperature from the Weighing the Giants program, we further derive the $\mu_\star$-conditioned scatter in mass, finding $\sigma_{{\rm ln} M|\mu_\star}=0.26^{+ 0.15}_{- 0.10}$. These results are competitive with well-established cluster mass proxies used for cosmological analyses, showing that $\mu_\star$ can be used as a reliable and physically motivated mass proxy to derive cosmological constraints.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.02499  [pdf] - 1995367
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Constraints on Extended Cosmological Models from Galaxy Clustering and Weak Lensing
DES Collaboration; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Avila, S.; Banerji, M.; Baxter, E.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M. R.; Bertin, E.; Blazek, J.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Brout, D.; Burke, D. L.; Campos, A.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Chen, A.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; DeRose, J.; Desai, S.; Di Valentino, E.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Ferté, A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Hollowood, D. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kim, A. G.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lee, S.; Lemos, P.; Leonard, C. D.; Li, T. S.; Liddle, A. R.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Miranda, V.; Mohr, J. J.; Muir, J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Raveri, M.; Rollins, R. P.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosenfeld, R.; Samuroff, S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Secco, L. F.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weaverdyck, N.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: 22 pages, 7 figures, matches the published version
Submitted: 2018-10-04, last modified: 2019-11-08
We present constraints on extensions of the minimal cosmological models dominated by dark matter and dark energy, $\Lambda$CDM and $w$CDM, by using a combined analysis of galaxy clustering and weak gravitational lensing from the first-year data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES Y1) in combination with external data. We consider four extensions of the minimal dark energy-dominated scenarios: 1) nonzero curvature $\Omega_k$, 2) number of relativistic species $N_{\rm eff}$ different from the standard value of 3.046, 3) time-varying equation-of-state of dark energy described by the parameters $w_0$ and $w_a$ (alternatively quoted by the values at the pivot redshift, $w_p$, and $w_a$), and 4) modified gravity described by the parameters $\mu_0$ and $\Sigma_0$ that modify the metric potentials. We also consider external information from Planck CMB measurements; BAO measurements from SDSS, 6dF, and BOSS; RSD measurements from BOSS; and SNIa information from the Pantheon compilation. Constraints on curvature and the number of relativistic species are dominated by the external data; when these are combined with DES Y1, we find $\Omega_k=0.0020^{+0.0037}_{-0.0032}$ at the 68% confidence level, and $N_{\rm eff}<3.28\, (3.55)$ at 68% (95%) confidence. For the time-varying equation-of-state, we find the pivot value $(w_p, w_a)=(-0.91^{+0.19}_{-0.23}, -0.57^{+0.93}_{-1.11})$ at pivot redshift $z_p=0.27$ from DES alone, and $(w_p, w_a)=(-1.01^{+0.04}_{-0.04}, -0.28^{+0.37}_{-0.48})$ at $z_p=0.20$ from DES Y1 combined with external data; in either case we find no evidence for the temporal variation of the equation of state. For modified gravity, we find the present-day value of the relevant parameters to be $\Sigma_0= 0.43^{+0.28}_{-0.29}$ from DES Y1 alone, and $(\Sigma_0, \mu_0)=(0.06^{+0.08}_{-0.07}, -0.11^{+0.42}_{-0.46})$ from DES Y1 combined with external data, consistent with predictions from GR.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.10380  [pdf] - 1975273
A Zero-Parameter Extension of General Relativity with Varying Cosmological Constant
Comments: Companion paper to arXiv:1905.10382. Minor updates to match published version
Submitted: 2019-05-24, last modified: 2019-10-04
We provide a new extension of general relativity (GR) which has the remarkable property of being more constrained than GR plus a cosmological constant, having one less free parameter. This is implemented by allowing the cosmological constant to have a consistent space-time variation, through coding its dynamics in the torsion tensor. We demonstrate this mechanism by adding a `quasi-topological' term to the Einstein action, which naturally realizes a dynamical torsion with an automatic satisfaction of the Bianchi identities. Moreover, variation of the action with respect to this dynamical $\Lambda$ fixes it in terms of other variables, thus providing a scenario with less freedom than general relativity with a cosmological constant. Once matter is introduced, at least in the homogeneous and isotropic reduction, $\Lambda$ is uniquely determined by the field content of the model. We make an explicit construction using the Palatini formulation of GR and describe the striking properties of this new theory. We also highlight some possible extensions to the theory. A companion paper [1] explores the Friedmann--Robertson--Walker reduction for cosmology, and future work will study Solar System tests of the theory.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.10382  [pdf] - 1973678
The cosmology of minimal varying Lambda theories
Comments: Companion paper to arXiv:1905.10380. Minor updates to match published version
Submitted: 2019-05-24, last modified: 2019-10-04
Inserting a varying Lambda in Einstein's field equations can be made consistent with the Bianchi identities by allowing for torsion, without the need to add scalar field degrees of freedom. In the minimal such theory, Lambda is totally free and undetermined by the field equations in the absence of matter. Inclusion of matter ties Lambda algebraically to it, at least when homogeneity and isotropy are assumed, i.e. when there is no Weyl curvature. We show that Lambda is proportional to the matter density, with a proportionality constant depending on the equation of state. Unfortunately, the proportionality constant becomes infinite for pure radiation, ruling out the minimal theory prima facie despite of its novel internal consistency. It is possible to generalize the theory still without the addition of kinetic terms, leading to a new algebraically-enforced proportionality between Lambda and the matter density. Lambda and radiation may now coexist in a form consistent with Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, though this places strict constraints on the single free parameter of the theory, $\theta$. In the matter epoch Lambda behaves just like a dark matter component. Its density is proportional to the baryonic and/or dark matter, and its presence and gravitational effects would need to be included in accounting for the necessary dark matter in our Universe. This is a companion paper to Ref. [1] where the underlying gravitational theory is developed in detail.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.05908  [pdf] - 1908558
Galaxies in X-ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data II: Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling of the Red-Sequence Galaxy Luminosity Function
Comments: Updated to match the accepted version
Submitted: 2017-10-16, last modified: 2019-06-29
Using $\sim 100$ X-ray selected clusters in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data, we constrain the luminosity function (LF) of cluster red sequence galaxies as a function of redshift. This is the first homogeneous optical/X-ray sample large enough to constrain the evolution of the luminosity function simultaneously in redshift ($0.1<z<1.05$) and cluster mass ($13.5 \le \rm{log_{10}}(M_{200crit}) \sim< 15.0$). We pay particular attention to completeness issues and the detection limit of the galaxy sample. We then apply a hierarchical Bayesian model to fit the cluster galaxy LFs via a Schecter function, including its characteristic break ($m^*$) to a faint end power-law slope ($\alpha$). Our method enables us to avoid known issues in similar analyses based on stacking or binning the clusters. We find weak and statistically insignificant ($\sim 1.9 \sigma$) evolution in the faint end slope $\alpha$ versus redshift. We also find no dependence in $\alpha$ or $m^*$ with the X-ray inferred cluster masses. However, the amplitude of the LF as a function of cluster mass is constrained to $\sim 20\%$ precision. As a by-product of our algorithm, we utilize the correlation between the LF and cluster mass to provide an improved estimate of the individual cluster masses as well as the scatter in true mass given the X-ray inferred masses. This technique can be applied to a larger sample of X-ray or optically selected clusters from the Dark Energy Survey, significantly improving the sensitivity of the analysis.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.01846  [pdf] - 1873732
Testing gravity on cosmological scales with cosmic shear, cosmic microwave background anisotropies, and redshift-space distortions
Comments: 12 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2017-12-05, last modified: 2019-04-25
We use a range of cosmological data to constrain phenomenological modifications to general relativity on cosmological scales, through modifications to the Poisson and lensing equations. We include cosmic microwave background anisotropy measurements from the Planck satellite, cosmic shear from CFHTLenS and DES-SV, and redshift-space distortions from BOSS data release 12 and the 6dF galaxy survey. We find no evidence of departures from general relativity, with the modified gravity parameters constrained to $\Sigma_0 = 0.05^{+0.05}_{-0.07}$ and $\mu_0 = -0.10^{+0.20}_{-0.16}$, where $\Sigma_0$ and $\mu_0$ refer to deviations from general relativity today and are defined to be zero in general relativity. We also forecast the sensitivity to those parameters of the full five-year Dark Energy Survey and of an experiment like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, showing a substantial expected improvement in the constraint on $\Sigma_0$.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.03181  [pdf] - 1871376
The Dark Energy Survey Data Release 1
Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Amara, A.; Annis, J.; Asorey, J.; Avila, S.; Ballester, O.; Banerji, M.; Barkhouse, W.; Baruah, L.; Baumer, M.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M . R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Blazek, J.; Bocquet, S.; Brooks, D.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Busti, V.; Campisano, R.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Rosell, A. C arnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Chen, X.; Conselice, C.; Costa, G.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Das, R.; Daues, G.; Davis, T. M.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; DePoy, D. L.; DeRose, J.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elliott, A. E.; Evrard, A. E.; Farahi, A.; Neto, A. Fausti; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Fitzpatrick, M.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fosalba, P.; Friedel, D. N.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; tanaga, E. Gaz; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gill, M. S. S.; Glazebrook, K.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gower, M.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gupta, R. R.; Gutierrez, G.; Hamilton, S.; Hartley, W. G.; Hinton, S. R.; Hislop, J. M.; Hollowood, D.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Juneau, S.; Kacprzak, T.; Kent, S.; Khullar, G.; Klein, M.; Kovacs, A.; Koziol, A. M. G.; Krause, E.; Kremin, A.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lasker, J.; Li, T. S.; Li, R. T.; Liddle, A. R.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; López-Reyes, P.; MacCrann, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Maloney, J. D.; Manera, M.; March, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McClintock, T.; McKay, T.; McMahon, R . G.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Morganson, E.; Mould, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nidever, D.; Nikutta, R.; Nogueira, F.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Nunes, L.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Old, L.; Olsen, K.; Pace, A. B.; Palmese, A.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Peiris, H. V.; Percival, W. J.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Poh, J.; Pond, C.; redon, A. Por; Pujol, A.; Refregier, A.; Reil, K.; Ricker, P. M.; Rollins, R. P.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rooney, P.; Ross, A. J.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, M. L.; Santiago, B.; Saro, A.; Scarpine, V.; Scolnic, D.; Scott, A.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Shipp, N.; Silveira, M. L.; Smith, R. C.; Smith, J. A.; Smith, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; ira, F. Sobre; Song, J.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Sullivan, M.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Vivas, A. K.; ker, A. R. Wal; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; Wolf, R. C.; Wu, H.; Yanny, B.; Zenteno, A.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: 30 pages, 20 Figures. Release page found at this url https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/dr1
Submitted: 2018-01-09, last modified: 2019-04-23
We describe the first public data release of the Dark Energy Survey, DES DR1, consisting of reduced single epoch images, coadded images, coadded source catalogs, and associated products and services assembled over the first three years of DES science operations. DES DR1 is based on optical/near-infrared imaging from 345 distinct nights (August 2013 to February 2016) by the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the 4-m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. We release data from the DES wide-area survey covering ~5,000 sq. deg. of the southern Galactic cap in five broad photometric bands, grizY. DES DR1 has a median delivered point-spread function of g = 1.12, r = 0.96, i = 0.88, z = 0.84, and Y = 0.90 arcsec FWHM, a photometric precision of < 1% in all bands, and an astrometric precision of 151 mas. The median coadded catalog depth for a 1.95" diameter aperture at S/N = 10 is g = 24.33, r = 24.08, i = 23.44, z = 22.69, and Y = 21.44 mag. DES DR1 includes nearly 400M distinct astronomical objects detected in ~10,000 coadd tiles of size 0.534 sq. deg. produced from ~39,000 individual exposures. Benchmark galaxy and stellar samples contain ~310M and ~ 80M objects, respectively, following a basic object quality selection. These data are accessible through a range of interfaces, including query web clients, image cutout servers, jupyter notebooks, and an interactive coadd image visualization tool. DES DR1 constitutes the largest photometric data set to date at the achieved depth and photometric precision.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.06891  [pdf] - 1866960
Correlations between X-ray properties and Black Hole Mass in AGN: towards a new method to estimate black hole mass from short exposure X-ray observations
Comments: 19 pages, 20 figures
Submitted: 2018-03-19, last modified: 2019-04-12
Several investigations of the X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei (AGN) using the normalised excess variance (${\sigma^2_{\rm NXS}}$) parameter have shown that variability has a strong anti-correlation with black hole mass ($M_{\rm BH}$) and X-ray luminosity ($L_{\rm X}$). In this study we confirm these previous correlations and find no evidence of a redshift evolution. Using observations from XMM-Newton, we determine the ${\sigma^2_{\rm NXS}}$ and $L_{\rm X}$ for a sample of 1091 AGN drawn from the XMM-Newton Cluster Survey (XCS) - making this the largest study of X-ray spectral properties of AGNs. We created light-curves in three time-scales; 10 ks, 20 ks and 40 ks and used these to derive scaling relations between ${\sigma^2_{\rm NXS}}$, $L_{\rm X}$ (2.0-10 keV range) and literature estimates of $M_{\rm BH}$ from reverberation mapping. We confirm the anti-correlation between $M_{\rm BH}$ and ${\sigma^2_{\rm NXS}}$ and find a positive correlation between $M_{\rm BH}$ and $L_{\rm X}$. The use of ${\sigma^2_{\rm NXS}}$ is practical only for pointed observations where the observation time is tens of kiloseconds. For much shorter observations one cannot accurately quantify variability to estimate $M_{\rm BH}$. Here we describe a method to derive $L_{\rm X}$ from short duration observations and used these results as an estimate for $M_{\rm BH}$. We find that it is possible to estimate $L_{\rm X}$ from observations of just a few hundred seconds and that when correlated with $M_{\rm BH}$, the relation is statistically similar to the relation of $M_{\rm BH}$-$L_{\rm X}$ derived from a spectroscopic analysis of full XMM observations. This method may be particularly useful to the eROSITA mission, an all-sky survey, which will detect $>$10$^{6}$ AGN.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.08042  [pdf] - 1971206
Mass Variance from Archival X-ray Properties of Dark Energy Survey Year-1 Galaxy Clusters
Comments: 14 pages. Main results are Figure 3, 5, and 6, Table 2, and Equation 9. Submitted to MNRAS. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2019-03-19
Using archival X-ray observations and a log-normal population model, we estimate constraints on the intrinsic scatter in halo mass at fixed optical richness for a galaxy cluster sample identified in Dark Energy Survey Year-One (DES-Y1) data with the redMaPPer algorithm. We examine the scaling behavior of X-ray temperatures, $T_X$, with optical richness, $\lambda_{RM}$, for clusters in the redshift range $0.2<z<0.7$. X-ray temperatures are obtained from Chandra and XMM observations for 58 and 110 redMaPPer systems, respectively. Despite non-uniform sky coverage, the $T_X$ measurements are $> 50\%$ complete for clusters with $\lambda_{RM} > 130$. Regression analysis on the two samples produces consistent posterior scaling parameters, from which we derive a combined constraint on the residual scatter, $\sigma_{\ln Tx | \lambda} = 0.275 \pm 0.019$. Joined with constraints for $T_X$ scaling with halo mass from the Weighing the Giants program and richness--temperature covariance estimates from the LoCuSS sample, we derive the richness-conditioned scatter in mass, $\sigma_{\ln M | \lambda} = 0.30 \pm 0.04\, _{({\rm stat})} \pm 0.09\, _{({\rm sys})}$, at an optical richness of approximately 70. Uncertainties in external parameters, particularly the slope and variance of the $T_X$--mass relation and the covariance of $T_X$ and $\lambda_{RM}$ at fixed mass, dominate the systematic error. The $95\%$ confidence region from joint sample analysis is relatively broad, $\sigma_{\ln M | \lambda} \in [0.14, \, 0.55]$, or a factor ten in variance.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.01530  [pdf] - 1840662
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Clustering and Weak Lensing
DES Collaboration; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Alarcon, A.; Aleksić, J.; Allam, S.; Allen, S.; Amara, A.; Annis, J.; Asorey, J.; Avila, S.; Bacon, D.; Balbinot, E.; Banerji, M.; Banik, N.; Barkhouse, W.; Baumer, M.; Baxter, E.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M. R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Blazek, J.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Busha, M. T.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Chen, N.; Childress, M.; Choi, A.; Conselice, C.; Crittenden, R.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Das, R.; Davis, T. M.; Davis, C.; De Vicente, J.; DePoy, D. L.; DeRose, J.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Elliott, A. E.; Elsner, F.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fang, Y.; Fernandez, E.; Ferté, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Friedrich, O.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Garcia-Fernandez, M.; Gatti, M.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gill, M. S. S.; Glazebrook, K.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Hamilton, S.; Hartley, W. G.; Hinton, S. R.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. D.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Kacprzak, T.; Kent, S.; Kim, A. G.; King, A.; Kirk, D.; Kokron, N.; Kovacs, A.; Krause, E.; Krawiec, C.; Kremin, A.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lacasa, F.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Liddle, A. R.; Lidman, C.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Manera, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Miranda, V.; Mudd, D.; Muir, J.; Möller, A.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Palmese, A.; Peacock, J.; Peiris, H. V.; Peoples, J.; Percival, W. J.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Porredon, A.; Prat, J.; Pujol, A.; Rau, M. M.; Refregier, A.; Ricker, P. M.; Roe, N.; Rollins, R. P.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rosenfeld, R.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Salvador, A. I.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Scolnic, D.; Secco, L. F.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, R. C.; Smith, M.; Smith, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Tucker, B. E.; Uddin, S. A.; Varga, T. N.; Vielzeuf, P.; Vikram, V.; Vivas, A. K.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, M.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; Wolf, R. C.; Yanny, B.; Yuan, F.; Zenteno, A.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.
Comments: Matches published version. Results essentially unchanged, except updated covariance matrix leads to improved chi^2 (colored text removed)
Submitted: 2017-08-04, last modified: 2019-03-01
We present cosmological results from a combined analysis of galaxy clustering and weak gravitational lensing, using 1321 deg$^2$ of $griz$ imaging data from the first year of the Dark Energy Survey (DES Y1). We combine three two-point functions: (i) the cosmic shear correlation function of 26 million source galaxies in four redshift bins, (ii) the galaxy angular autocorrelation function of 650,000 luminous red galaxies in five redshift bins, and (iii) the galaxy-shear cross-correlation of luminous red galaxy positions and source galaxy shears. To demonstrate the robustness of these results, we use independent pairs of galaxy shape, photometric redshift estimation and validation, and likelihood analysis pipelines. To prevent confirmation bias, the bulk of the analysis was carried out while blind to the true results; we describe an extensive suite of systematics checks performed and passed during this blinded phase. The data are modeled in flat $\Lambda$CDM and $w$CDM cosmologies, marginalizing over 20 nuisance parameters, varying 6 (for $\Lambda$CDM) or 7 (for $w$CDM) cosmological parameters including the neutrino mass density and including the 457 $\times$ 457 element analytic covariance matrix. We find consistent cosmological results from these three two-point functions, and from their combination obtain $S_8 \equiv \sigma_8 (\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.5} = 0.783^{+0.021}_{-0.025}$ and $\Omega_m = 0.264^{+0.032}_{-0.019}$ for $\Lambda$CDM for $w$CDM, we find $S_8 = 0.794^{+0.029}_{-0.027}$, $\Omega_m = 0.279^{+0.043}_{-0.022}$, and $w=-0.80^{+0.20}_{-0.22}$ at 68% CL. The precision of these DES Y1 results rivals that from the Planck cosmic microwave background measurements, allowing a comparison of structure in the very early and late Universe on equal terms. Although the DES Y1 best-fit values for $S_8$ and $\Omega_m$ are lower than the central values from Planck ...
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.03465  [pdf] - 1679924
The ${\it XMM}$ Cluster Survey: joint modelling of the $L_{\rm X}-T$ scaling relation for clusters and groups of galaxies
Comments: 19 pages, 29 figures, 7 tables, submitted to MNRAS. Comments are welcome
Submitted: 2018-05-09
We characterize the X-ray luminosity--temperature ($L_{\rm X}-T$) relation using a sample of 353 clusters and groups of galaxies with temperatures in excess of 1 keV, spanning the redshift range $0.1 < z < 0.6$, the largest ever assembled for this purpose. All systems are part of the ${\it XMM-Newton}$ Cluster Survey (XCS), and have also been independently identified in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data using the redMaPPer algorithm. We allow for redshift evolution of the normalisation and intrinsic scatter of the $L_{\rm X}-T$ relation, as well as, for the first time, the possibility of a temperature-dependent change-point in the exponent of such relation. However, we do not find strong statistical support for deviations from the usual modelling of the $L_{\rm X}-T$ relation as a single power-law, where the normalisation evolves self-similarly and the scatter remains constant with time. Nevertheless, assuming {\it a priori} the existence of the type of deviations considered, then faster evolution than the self-similar expectation for the normalisation of the $L_{\rm X}-T$ relation is favoured, as well as a decrease with redshift in the scatter about the $L_{\rm X}-T$ relation. Further, the preferred location for a change-point is then close to 2 keV, possibly marking the transition between the group and cluster regimes. Our results also indicate an increase in the power-law exponent of the $L_{\rm X}-T$ relation when moving from the group to the cluster regime, and faster evolution in the former with respect to the later, driving the temperature-dependent change-point towards higher values with redshift.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.01538  [pdf] - 1747812
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Cosmological Constraints from Cosmic Shear
Troxel, M. A.; MacCrann, N.; Zuntz, J.; Eifler, T. F.; Krause, E.; Dodelson, S.; Gruen, D.; Blazek, J.; Friedrich, O.; Samuroff, S.; Prat, J.; Secco, L. F.; Davis, C.; Ferté, A.; DeRose, J.; Alarcon, A.; Amara, A.; Baxter, E.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S. L.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Choi, A.; De Vicente, J.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Elvin-Poole, J.; Frieman, J.; Gatti, M.; Hartley, W. G.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; Huff, E. M.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Kirk, D.; Kokron, N.; Krawiec, C.; Lahav, O.; Liddle, A. R.; Peacock, J.; Rau, M. M.; Refregier, A.; Rollins, R. P.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sánchez, C.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Stebbins, A.; Varga, T. N.; Vielzeuf, P.; Wang, M.; Wechsler, R. H.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Zhang, Y.
Comments: 32 pages, 19 figures; matches PRD referee response version
Submitted: 2017-08-04, last modified: 2018-04-30
We use 26 million galaxies from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 shape catalogs over 1321 deg$^2$ of the sky to produce the most significant measurement of cosmic shear in a galaxy survey to date. We constrain cosmological parameters in both the flat $\Lambda$CDM and $w$CDM models, while also varying the neutrino mass density. These results are shown to be robust using two independent shape catalogs, two independent \photoz\ calibration methods, and two independent analysis pipelines in a blind analysis. We find a 3.5\% fractional uncertainty on $\sigma_8(\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.5} = 0.782^{+0.027}_{-0.027}$ at 68\% CL, which is a factor of 2.5 improvement over the fractional constraining power of our DES Science Verification results. In $w$CDM, we find a 4.8\% fractional uncertainty on $\sigma_8(\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.5} = 0.777^{+0.036}_{-0.038}$ and a dark energy equation-of-state $w=-0.95^{+0.33}_{-0.39}$. We find results that are consistent with previous cosmic shear constraints in $\sigma_8$ -- $\Omega_m$, and see no evidence for disagreement of our weak lensing data with data from the CMB. Finally, we find no evidence preferring a $w$CDM model allowing $w\ne -1$. We expect further significant improvements with subsequent years of DES data, which will more than triple the sky coverage of our shape catalogs and double the effective integrated exposure time per galaxy.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.00403  [pdf] - 1739830
Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: A Precise H0 Measurement from DES Y1, BAO, and D/H Data
Comments: 11 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2017-11-01
We combine Dark Energy Survey Year 1 clustering and weak lensing data with Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) experiments to constrain the Hubble constant. Assuming a flat $\Lambda$CDM model with minimal neutrino mass ($\sum m_\nu = 0.06$ eV) we find $H_0=67.2^{+1.2}_{-1.0}$ km/s/Mpc (68% CL). This result is completely independent of Hubble constant measurements based on the distance ladder, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies (both temperature and polarization), and strong lensing constraints. There are now five data sets that: a) have no shared observational systematics; and b) each constrain the Hubble constant with a few percent level precision. We compare these five independent measurements, and find that, as a set, the differences between them are significant at the $2.1\sigma$ level ($\chi^2/dof=20.1/11$, probability to exceed=4%). This difference is low enough that we consider the data sets statistically consistent with each other. The best fit Hubble constant obtained by combining all five data sets is $H_0 = 69.1^{+0.4}_{-0.6}$ km/s/Mpc.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.06100  [pdf] - 1530244
Planck Satellite Constraints on Pseudo-Nambu--Goldstone Boson Quintessence
Comments: Analysis updated to Planck 2015 and JLA supernova data, and new investigations of model priors added
Submitted: 2015-03-20, last modified: 2016-12-03
The Pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Boson (PNGB) potential, defined through the amplitude $M^4$ and width $f$ of its characteristic potential $V(\phi) = M^4[1 + \cos(\phi/f)]$, is one of the best-suited models for the study of thawing quintessence. We analyze its present observational constraints by direct numerical solution of the scalar field equation of motion. Observational bounds are obtained using Supernovae data, cosmic microwave background temperature, polarization and lensing data from {\it Planck}, direct Hubble constant constraints, and baryon acoustic oscillations data. We find the parameter ranges for which PNGB quintessence gives a viable theory for dark energy. This exact approach is contrasted with the use of an approximate equation-of-state parametrization for thawing theories. We also discuss other possible parameterization choices, as well as commenting on the accuracy of the constraints imposed by {\it Planck} alone. Overall our analysis highlights a significant prior dependence to the outcome coming from the choice of modelling methodology, which current data are not sufficient to override.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.02162  [pdf] - 1526280
Curvaton scenarios with inflaton decays into curvatons
Comments: 9 pages PDFLatex with 6 incorporated figures. Minor updates to match PRD published version
Submitted: 2016-08-06, last modified: 2016-12-02
We consider the possible decay of the inflaton into curvaton particles during reheating and analyse its effect on curvaton scenarios. Typical decay curvatons are initially relativistic then become non-relativistic, changing the background history of the Universe. We show that this change to the background is the only way in which observational predictions of the scenario are modified. Moreover, once the required amplitude of perturbations is fixed by observation there are no signatures of such decays in other cosmological observables. The decay curvatons can prevent the Universe from becoming dominated by the curvaton condensate, making it impossible to match observations in parts of parameter space. This constrains the branching ratio of the inflaton to curvaton to be less than of order $0.1$ typically. If the branching ratio is below about $10^{-4}$ it has negligible impact on the model parameter space and can be ignored.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.01256  [pdf] - 1530787
Cosmological signatures of time-asymmetric gravity
Comments: v2 added explanations and definitions; 11 pages
Submitted: 2016-06-03, last modified: 2016-10-24
We develop the model proposed by Cort\^es, Gomes & Smolin, to predict cosmological signatures of time-asymmetric extensions of general relativity they proposed recently. Within this class of models the equation of motion of chiral fermions is modified by a torsion term. This term leads to a dispersion law for neutrinos that associates a new time-varying energy with each particle. We find a new neutrino contribution to the Friedmann equation resulting from the torsion term in the Ashtekar connection. In this note we explore the phenomenology of this term and observational consequences for cosmological evolution. We show that constraints on the critical energy density will ordinarily render this term unobservably small, a maximum of order $10^{-25}$ of the neutrino energy density today. However, if the time-asymmetric dark energy is tuned to cancel the cosmological constant, the torsion effect may be a dark matter candidate.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.03432  [pdf] - 1495819
The XMM Cluster Survey: The Halo Occupation Number of BOSS galaxies in X-ray clusters
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS; 16 pages, 9 figures, 6 tables (1 electronic)
Submitted: 2015-12-10, last modified: 2016-10-11
We present a direct measurement of the mean halo occupation distribution (HOD) of galaxies taken from the eleventh data release (DR11) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The HOD of BOSS low-redshift (LOWZ: $0.2 < z < 0.4$) and Constant-Mass (CMASS: $0.43 <z <0.7$) galaxies is inferred via their association with the dark-matter halos of 174 X-ray-selected galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS). Halo masses are determined for each galaxy cluster based on X-ray temperature measurements, and range between ${\rm log_{10}} (M_{180}/M_{\odot}) = 13-15$. Our directly measured HODs are consistent with the HOD-model fits inferred via the galaxy-clustering analyses of Parejko et al. for the BOSS LOWZ sample and White et al. for the BOSS CMASS sample. Under the simplifying assumption that the other parameters that describe the HOD hold the values measured by these authors, we have determined a best-fit alpha-index of 0.91$\pm$0.08 and $1.27^{+0.03}_{-0.04}$ for the CMASS and LOWZ HOD, respectively. These alpha-index values are consistent with those measured by White et al. and Parejko et al. In summary, our study provides independent support for the HOD models assumed during the development of the BOSS mock-galaxy catalogues that have subsequently been used to derive BOSS cosmological constraints.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.02800  [pdf] - 1451192
The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion -- temperature relation over half a Hubble time
Comments: Accepted to MNRAS (3 August 2016); Paper: 15 pages, 12 figures; Appendix A: 1 table; Appendix B: 34 Tables; Appendix C: 2 Figures
Submitted: 2015-12-09, last modified: 2016-08-03
We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\sigma_{\rm v}$--$T_{\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero ($\sigma_{\rm v} \propto T^{0.86 \pm 0.14} E(z)^{-0.37 \pm 0.33}$). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.02678  [pdf] - 1378547
Reconstructing thawing quintessence with multiple datasets
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures and 1 table. Version 2 with minor changes to match Physical Review D accepted version
Submitted: 2015-01-12, last modified: 2016-02-19
In this work we model the quintessence potential in a Taylor series expansion, up to second order, around the present-day value of the scalar field. The field is evolved in a thawing regime assuming zero initial velocity. We use the latest data from the Planck satellite, baryonic acoustic oscillations observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and Supernovae luminosity distance information from Union2.1 to constrain our models parameters, and also include perturbation growth data from the WiggleZ, BOSS and the 6dF surveys. The supernova data provide the strongest individual constraint on the potential parameters. We show that the growth data performance is competitive with the other datasets in constraining the dark energy parameters we introduce. We also conclude that the combined constraints we obtain for our model parameters, when compared to previous works of nearly a decade ago, have shown only modest improvement, even with new growth of structure data added to previously-existent types of data.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.02983  [pdf] - 1347443
Galaxies in X-ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data I: Stellar Mass Growth of Bright Central Galaxies Since z~1.2
Comments: Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2015-04-12, last modified: 2015-12-02
Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) for a new sample of 106 X-Ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of Bright Central Galaxies (BCGs) since redshift 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, $m_{*}\propto(\frac{M_{200}}{1.5\times 10^{14}M_{\odot}})^{0.24\pm 0.08}(1+z)^{-0.19\pm0.34}$, and compare the observed relation to the model prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since $z = 1.0$ for BCGs hosted by clusters of $M_{200, z}=10^{13.8}M_{\odot}$, at $z=1.0$: $m_{*, BCG}$ appears to have grown by $0.13\pm0.11$ dex, in tension at $\sim 2.5 \sigma$ significance level with the $0.40$ dex growth rate expected from the semi-analytic model. We show that the buildup of extended intra-cluster light after $z=1.0$ may alleviate this tension in BCG growth rates.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.6530  [pdf] - 1276942
Tensors, BICEP2, prior dependence, and dust
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures. v3, minor update to match journal accepted version
Submitted: 2014-09-23, last modified: 2015-08-28
We investigate the prior dependence on the inferred spectrum of primordial tensor perturbations, in light of recent results from BICEP2 and taking into account a possible dust contribution to polarized anisotropies. We highlight an optimized parameterization of the tensor power spectrum, and adoption of a logarithmic prior on its amplitude $A_T$, leading to results that transform more evenly under change of pivot scale. In the absence of foregrounds the tension between the results of BICEP2 and Planck drives the tensor spectral index $n_T$ to be blue-tilted in a joint analysis, which would be in contradiction to the standard inflation prediction ($n_T<0$). When foregrounds are accounted for, the BICEP2 results no longer require non-standard inflationary parameter regions. We present limits on primordial $A_T$ and $n_T$, adopting foreground scenarios put forward by Mortonson & Seljak and motivated by Planck 353 GHz observations, and assess what dust contribution leaves a detectable cosmological signal. We find that if there is sufficient dust for the signal to be compatible with standard inflation, then the primordial signal is too weak to be robustly detected by BICEP2 if Planck+WMAP upper limits from temperature and E-mode polarization are correct.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.03937  [pdf] - 1247072
The XMM Cluster Survey: Testing chameleon gravity using the profiles of clusters
Comments: 14 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2015-04-15, last modified: 2015-07-15
The chameleon gravity model postulates the existence of a scalar field that couples with matter to mediate a fifth force. If it exists, this fifth force would influence the hot X-ray emitting gas filling the potential wells of galaxy clusters. However, it would not influence the clusters' weak lensing signal. Therefore, by comparing X-ray and weak lensing profiles, one can place upper limits on the strength of a fifth force. This technique has been attempted before using a single, nearby cluster (Coma, $z=0.02$). Here we apply the technique to the stacked profiles of 58 clusters at higher redshifts ($0.1<z<1.2$), including 12 new to the literature, using X-ray data from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) and weak lensing data from the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). Using a multi-parameter MCMC analysis, we constrain the two chameleon gravity parameters ($\beta$ and $\phi_{\infty}$). Our fits are consistent with general relativity, not requiring a fifth force. In the special case of $f(R)$ gravity (where $\beta = \sqrt{1/6}$), we set an upper limit on the background field amplitude today of $|f_{\rm{R0}}| < 6 \times 10^{-5}$ (95% CL). This is one of the strongest constraints to date on $|f_{\rm{R0}}|$ on cosmological scales. We hope to improve this constraint in future by extending the study to hundreds of clusters using data from the Dark Energy Survey.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.05864  [pdf] - 1043094
A separate universe view of the asymmetric sky
Comments: 17 pages, 2 figures, v2: changed definition of the parameter A by a factor of 2, v3: published in JCAP
Submitted: 2015-01-23, last modified: 2015-05-19
We provide a unified description of the hemispherical asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background generated by the mechanism proposed by Erickcek, Kamionkowski, and Carroll, using a delta N formalism that consistently accounts for the asymmetry-generating mode throughout. We derive a general form for the power spectrum which explicitly exhibits the broken translational invariance. This can be directly compared to cosmic microwave background observables, including the observed quadrupole and fNL values, automatically incorporating the Grishchuk--Zel'dovich effect. Our calculation unifies and extends previous calculations in the literature, in particular giving the full dependence of observables on the phase of our location in the super-horizon mode that generates the asymmetry. We demonstrate how the apparently different results obtained by previous authors arise as different limiting cases. We confirm the existence of non-linear contributions to the microwave background quadrupole from the super-horizon mode identified by Erickcek et al. and further explored by Kanno et al., and show that those contributions are always significant in parameter regimes capable of explaining the observed asymmetry. We indicate example parameter values capable of explaining the observed power asymmetry without violating other observational bounds.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.00543  [pdf] - 1332916
Planck 2013 results. XXIX. The Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources: Addendum
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Feroz, F.; Ferragamo, A.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; N; Groeneboom, E.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Olamaie, M.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Savini, G.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Streblyanska, A.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2015-02-02
We update the all-sky Planck catalogue of 1227 clusters and cluster candidates (PSZ1) published in March 2013, derived from Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect detections using the first 15.5 months of Planck satellite observations. Addendum. We deliver an updated version of the PSZ1 catalogue, reporting the further confirmation of 86 Planck-discovered clusters. In total, the PSZ1 now contains 947 confirmed clusters, of which 214 were confirmed as newly discovered clusters through follow-up observations undertaken by the Planck Collaboration. The updated PSZ1 contains redshifts for 913 systems, of which 736 (~80.6%) are spectroscopic, and associated mass estimates derived from the Y_z mass proxy. We also provide a new SZ quality flag, derived from a novel artificial neural network classification of the SZ signal, for the remaining 280 candidates. Based on this assessment, the purity of the updated PSZ1 catalogue is estimated to be 94%. In this release, we provide the full updated catalogue and an additional readme file with further information on the Planck SZ detections.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.0407  [pdf] - 1043042
Fitting BICEP2 with defects, primordial gravitational waves and dust
Comments: 6 pages and 3 figures. Prepared for the Spanish Relativity Meetings ERE2014
Submitted: 2014-12-01
In this work we discuss the possibility of cosmic defects being responsible for the B-mode signal measured by the BICEP2 collaboration. We also allow for the presence of other cosmological sources of B-modes such as inflationary gravitational waves and polarized dust foregrounds, which might contribute to or dominate the signal. On the one hand, we find that defects alone give a poor fit to the data points. On the other, we find that defects help to improve the fit at higher multipoles when they are considered alongside inflationary gravitational waves or polarized dust. Finally, we derive new defect constraints from models combining defects and dust. This proceeding is based on previous works [1,2].
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.4126  [pdf] - 894731
Constraining topological defects with temperature and polarization anisotropies
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures. Temperature and polarization anisotropy power spectra for Abelian Higgs strings, semilocal strings and textures are included as ancillary files. Minor changes, matches published version
Submitted: 2014-08-18, last modified: 2014-11-03
We analyse the possible contribution of topological defects to cosmic microwave anisotropies, both temperature and polarisation. We allow for the presence of both inflationary scalars and tensors, and of polarised dust foregrounds that may contribute to or dominate the B-mode polarisation signal. We confirm and quantify our previous statements that topological defects on their own are a poor fit to the B-mode signal. However, adding topological defects to a models with a tensor component or a dust component improves the fit around $\ell=200$. Fitting simultaneously to both temperature and polarisation data, we find that textures fit almost as well as tensors ($\Delta\chi^2 = 2.0$), while Abelian Higgs strings are ruled out as the sole source of the B-mode signal at low $\ell$. The 95% confidence upper limits on models combining defects and dust are $G\mu < 2.7\times 10^{-7}$ (Abelian Higgs strings), $G\mu < 9.8\times 10^{-7}$ (semilocal strings) and $G\mu < 7.3\times 10^{-7}$ (textures), a small reduction on the $Planck$ bounds. The most economical fit overall is obtained by the standard $\Lambda$CDM model with a polarised dust component.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.5768  [pdf] - 1215143
The observational position of simple non-minimally coupled inflationary scenarios
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures. Minor corrections to match JCAP accepted version
Submitted: 2014-06-22, last modified: 2014-09-30
We consider two classes of non-minimally coupled inflation models; those with a quadratic coupling of the inflaton to gravity, and the `Universal Attractor' models where the coupling is connected to the potential. We make a detailed analysis of the attractor structure in the latter case, identifying a shift of the attractor from the Starobinsky point and determining conditions for approach to the attractor. We then assess the viability of the models under different interpretations of the BICEP2 experiment's detection of B-mode polarisation, finding strong constraints on the non-minimal coupling in the case where the B-modes have mostly primordial origin.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.4591  [pdf] - 862579
Comprehensive analysis of the simplest curvaton model
Comments: 7 pages, 9 figures; v2 matches journal accepted version
Submitted: 2014-03-18, last modified: 2014-08-12
We carry out a comprehensive analysis of the simplest curvaton model, which is based on two non-interacting massive fields. Our analysis encompasses cases where the inflaton and curvaton both contribute to observable perturbations, and where the curvaton itself drives a second period of inflation. We consider both power spectrum and non-Gaussianity observables, and focus on presenting constraints in model parameter space. The fully curvaton-dominated regime is in some tension with observational data, while an admixture of inflaton-generated perturbations improves the fit. The inflating curvaton regime mimics the predictions of Nflation. Some parts of parameter space permitted by power spectrum data are excluded by non-Gaussianity constraints. The recent BICEP2 results [1] require that the inflaton perturbations provide a significant fraction of the total perturbation, ruling out the usual curvaton scenario in which the inflaton perturbations are negligible, though not the admixture regime where both inflaton and curvaton contribute to the spectrum.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.5062  [pdf] - 832330
Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bourdin, H.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carr, R.; Carvalho, P.; Casale, M.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Falgarone, E.; Falvella, M. C.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Frommert, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Galli, S.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jasche, J.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A.; Räth, C.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Riazuelo, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schiavon, F.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smith, K.; Smoot, G. F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Taylor, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J. -P.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Tuttlebee, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vibert, L.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, C.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Winkel, B.; Xia, J. -Q.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2013-03-20, last modified: 2014-06-05
The ESA's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the CMB and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the SZ effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter LCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25 sigma. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations derived from CMB data and that derived from SZ data. The Planck and WMAP power spectra are offset from each other by an average level of about 2% around the first acoustic peak.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.4924  [pdf] - 818879
Can topological defects mimic the BICEP2 B-mode signal?
Comments: 3 pages, 4 figures; Minor changes, matches published version
Submitted: 2014-03-19, last modified: 2014-04-07
We show that the B-mode polarization signal detected at low multipoles by BICEP2 cannot be entirely due to topological defects. This would be incompatible with the high-multipole B-mode polarization data and also with existing temperature anisotropy data. Adding cosmic strings to a model with tensors, we find that B-modes on their own provide a comparable limit on the defects to that already coming from Planck satellite temperature data. We note that strings at this limit give a modest improvement to the best-fit of the B-mode data, at a somewhat lower tensor-to-scalar ratio of $r \simeq 0.15$.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.5080  [pdf] - 1165434
Planck 2013 results. XX. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chiang, H. C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 20 pages, accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2013-03-20, last modified: 2014-03-28
We present constraints on cosmological parameters using number counts as a function of redshift for a sub-sample of 189 galaxy clusters from the Planck SZ (PSZ) catalogue. The PSZ is selected through the signature of the Sunyaev--Zeldovich (SZ) effect, and the sub-sample used here has a signal-to-noise threshold of seven, with each object confirmed as a cluster and all but one with a redshift estimate. We discuss the completeness of the sample and our construction of a likelihood analysis. Using a relation between mass $M$ and SZ signal $Y$ calibrated to X-ray measurements, we derive constraints on the power spectrum amplitude $\sigma_8$ and matter density parameter $\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}$ in a flat $\Lambda$CDM model. We test the robustness of our estimates and find that possible biases in the $Y$--$M$ relation and the halo mass function are larger than the statistical uncertainties from the cluster sample. Assuming the X-ray determined mass to be biased low relative to the true mass by between zero and 30%, motivated by comparison of the observed mass scaling relations to those from a set of numerical simulations, we find that $\sigma_8=0.75\pm 0.03$, $\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}=0.29\pm 0.02$, and $\sigma_8(\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}/0.27)^{0.3} = 0.764 \pm 0.025$. The value of $\sigma_8$ is degenerate with the mass bias; if the latter is fixed to a value of 20% we find $\sigma_8(\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}/0.27)^{0.3}=0.78\pm 0.01$ and a tighter one-dimensional range $\sigma_8=0.77\pm 0.02$. We find that the larger values of $\sigma_8$ and $\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}$ preferred by Planck's measurements of the primary CMB anisotropies can be accommodated by a mass bias of about 40%. Alternatively, consistency with the primary CMB constraints can be achieved by inclusion of processes that suppress power on small scales relative to the $\Lambda$CDM model, such as a component of massive neutrinos (abridged).
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.5089  [pdf] - 1165439
Planck 2013 results. XXIX. Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; N; Groeneboom, E.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Olamaie, M.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Savini, G.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 42 pages, accepted for publication by A&A, catalogue available at ESA's Planck Legacy Archive and at SZ cluster database http://szcluster-db.ias.u-psud.fr
Submitted: 2013-03-20, last modified: 2014-03-28
We describe the all-sky Planck catalogue of clusters and cluster candidates derived from Sunyaev--Zeldovich (SZ) effect detections using the first 15.5 months of Planck satellite observations. The catalogue contains 1227 entries, making it over six times the size of the Planck Early SZ (ESZ) sample and the largest SZ-selected catalogue to date. It contains 861 confirmed clusters, of which 178 have been confirmed as clusters, mostly through follow-up observations, and a further 683 are previously-known clusters. The remaining 366 have the status of cluster candidates, and we divide them into three classes according to the quality of evidence that they are likely to be true clusters. The Planck SZ catalogue is the deepest all-sky cluster catalogue, with redshifts up to about one, and spans the broadest cluster mass range from (0.1 to 1.6) 10^{15}Msun. Confirmation of cluster candidates through comparison with existing surveys or cluster catalogues is extensively described, as is the statistical characterization of the catalogue in terms of completeness and statistical reliability. The outputs of the validation process are provided as additional information. This gives, in particular, an ensemble of 813 cluster redshifts, and for all these Planck clusters we also include a mass estimated from a newly-proposed SZ-mass proxy. A refined measure of the SZ Compton parameter for the clusters with X-ray counter-parts is provided, as is an X-ray flux for all the Planck clusters not previously detected in X-ray surveys.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.4664  [pdf] - 1180814
Observational constraints on tachyon and DBI inflation
Comments: 36 pages, 3 figures. Revisions to title, additional motivation, inclusion of some numerical tests of our results
Submitted: 2013-11-19, last modified: 2014-02-26
We present a systematic method for evaluation of perturbation observables in non-canonical single-field inflation models within the slow-roll approximation, which allied with field redefinitions enables predictions to be established for a wide range of models. We use this to investigate various non-canonical inflation models, including Tachyon inflation and DBI inflation. The Lambert $W$ function will be used extensively in our method for the evaluation of observables. In the Tachyon case, in the slow-roll approximation the model can be approximated by a canonical field with a redefined potential, which yields predictions in better agreement with observations than the canonical equivalents. For DBI inflation models we consider contributions from both the scalar potential and the warp geometry. In the case of a quartic potential, we find a formula for the observables under both non-relativistic and relativistic behaviour of the scalar DBI inflaton. For a quadratic potential we find two branches in the non-relativistic case, determined by the competition of model parameters, while for the relativistic case we find consistency with results already in the literature. We present a comparison to the latest Planck satellite observations. Most of the non-canonical models we investigate, including the Tachyon, are better fits to data than canonical models with the same potential, but we find that DBI models in the slow-roll regime have difficulty in matching the data.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.1389  [pdf] - 767227
The Cosmological Parameters 2014
Comments: 21 pages TeX file. Article for The Review of Particle Physics 2014 (aka the Particle Data Book), on-line version at http://pdg.lbl.gov/2013/reviews/contents_sports.html . This article supersedes arXiv:1002.3488 and other earlier versions
Submitted: 2014-01-07
This is a review article for The Review of Particle Physics 2014 (aka the Particle Data Book). It forms a compact review of knowledge of the cosmological parameters at the beginning of 2014. Topics included are Parametrizing the Universe; Extensions to the standard model; Probes; Bringing observations together; Outlook for the future.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.1657  [pdf] - 840463
Planck intermediate results. XVI. Profile likelihoods for cosmological parameters
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B. Rouillé; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Starck, J. -L.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Updated list of authors
Submitted: 2013-11-07, last modified: 2013-12-06
We explore the 2013 Planck likelihood function with a high-precision multi-dimensional minimizer (Minuit). This allows a refinement of the Lambda-cdm best-fit solution with respect to previously-released results, and the construction of frequentist confidence intervals using profile likelihoods. The agreement with the cosmological results from the Bayesian framework is excellent, demonstrating the robustness of the Planck results to the statistical methodology. We investigate the inclusion of neutrino masses, where more significant differences may appear due to the non-Gaussian nature of the posterior mass distribution. By applying the Feldman--Cousins prescription, we again obtain results very similar to those of the Bayesian methodology. However, the profile-likelihood analysis of the CMB combination (Planck+WP+highL) reveals a minimum well within the unphysical negative-mass region. We show that inclusion of the Planck CMB-lensing information regularizes this issue, and provide a robust frequentist upper limit $M_\nu < 0.26 eV$ ($95%$ confidence) from the CMB+lensing+BAO data combination.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.1613  [pdf] - 710881
Linear perturbations in viable f(R) theories
Comments: 14 pages, 16 figures. Version 3 with minor changes to match version published in Physical Review D
Submitted: 2013-07-05, last modified: 2013-08-25
We describe the cosmological evolution predicted by three distinct $f(R)$ theories, with emphasis on the evolution of linear perturbations. The most promising observational tools for distinguishing $f(R)$ theories from $\Lambda$CDM are those intrinsically related to the growth of structure, such as weak lensing. At the linear level, the enhancement in the gravitational potential provided by the additional $f(R)$ `fifth force' can separate the theories, whereas at the background level they can be indistinguishable. Under the stringent constraints imposed on the models by Solar System tests and galaxy-formation criteria, we show that the relative difference between the models' linear evolution of the lensing potential will be extremely hard to detect even with future space-based experiments such as {\it Euclid}, with a maximum value of approximately 4% for small scales. We also show the evolution of the gravitational potentials under more relaxed local constraint conditions, where the relative difference between these models and $\Lambda$CDM could prove discriminating.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.5698  [pdf] - 891935
Cosmic microwave background anomalies in an open universe
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX, no figures
Submitted: 2013-06-24
We argue that the observed large-scale cosmic microwave anomalies, discovered by WMAP and confirmed by the Planck satellite, are most naturally explained in the context of a marginally-open universe. Particular focus is placed on the dipole power asymmetry, via an open universe implementation of the large-scale gradient mechanism of Erickcek et al. Open inflation models, which are motivated by the string landscape and which can excite `super-curvature' perturbation modes, can explain the presence of a very-large-scale perturbation that leads to a dipole modulation of the power spectrum measured by a typical observer. We provide a specific implementation of the scenario which appears compatible with all existing constraints.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1203.3792  [pdf] - 1117362
Multifield consequences for D-brane inflation
Comments: 31 + 9 pages, an erratum has been added
Submitted: 2012-03-16, last modified: 2013-03-18
We analyse the multifield behaviour in D-brane inflation when contributions from the bulk are taken into account. For this purpose, we study a large number of realisations of the potential; we find the nature of the inflationary trajectory to be very consistent despite the complex construction. Inflation is always canonical and occurs in the vicinity of an inflection point. Extending the transport method to non-slow-roll and to calculate the running, we obtain distributions for observables. The spectral index is typically blue and the running positive, putting the model under moderate pressure from WMAP7 constraints. The local f_NL and tensor-to-scalar ratio are typically unobservably small, though we find approximately 0.5% of realisations to give observably large local f_NL. Approximating the potential as sum-separable, we are able to give fully analytic explanations for the trends in observed behaviour. Finally we find the model suffers from the persistence of isocurvature perturbations, which can be expected to cause further evolution of adiabatic perturbations after inflation. We argue this is a typical problem for models of multifield inflation involving inflection points and renders models of this type technically unpredictive without a description of reheating.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.1721  [pdf] - 624371
Bayesian Model Averaging in Astrophysics: A Review
Comments: 16 pages, 5 figures. Invited review article for special issue on Astrostatistics
Submitted: 2013-02-07
We review the use of Bayesian Model Averaging in astrophysics. We first introduce the statistical basis of Bayesian Model Selection and Model Averaging. We discuss methods to calculate the model-averaged posteriors, including Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), nested sampling, Population Monte Carlo, and Reversible Jump MCMC. We then review some applications of Bayesian Model Averaging in astrophysics, including measurements of the dark energy and primordial power spectrum parameters in cosmology, cluster weak lensing and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect data, estimating distances to Cepheids, and classifying variable stars.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.4061  [pdf] - 1124899
Planck Intermediate Results. V. Pressure profiles of galaxy clusters from the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Boehringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borgani, S.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Cayon, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Democles, J.; Desert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Dorl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschaines, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; White, S. D. M.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 24 pages, 15 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2012-07-17, last modified: 2012-11-08
Taking advantage of the all-sky coverage and broad frequency range of the Planck satellite, we study the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) and pressure profiles of 62 nearby massive clusters detected at high significance in the 14-month nominal survey. Careful reconstruction of the SZ signal indicates that most clusters are individually detected at least out to R500. By stacking the radial profiles, we have statistically detected the radial SZ signal out to 3 x R500, i.e., at a density contrast of about 50-100, though the dispersion about the mean profile dominates the statistical errors across the whole radial range. Our measurement is fully consistent with previous Planck results on integrated SZ fluxes, further strengthening the agreement between SZ and X-ray measurements inside R500. Correcting for the effects of the Planck beam, we have calculated the corresponding pressure profiles. This new constraint from SZ measurements is consistent with the X-ray constraints from XMM-Newton in the region in which the profiles overlap (i.e., [0.1-1]R500), and is in fairly good agreement with theoretical predictions within the expected dispersion. At larger radii the average pressure profile is slightly flatter than most predictions from numerical simulations. Combining the SZ and X-ray observed profiles into a joint fit to a generalised pressure profile gives best-fit parameters [P0, c500, gamma, alpha, beta] = [6.41, 1.81, 0.31, 1.33, 4.13]. Using a reasonable hypothesis for the gas temperature in the cluster outskirts we reconstruct from our stacked pressure profile the gas mass fraction profile out to 3 x R500. Within the temperature driven uncertainties, our Planck constraints are compatible with the cosmic baryon fraction and expected gas fraction in halos.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.2743  [pdf] - 968286
Planck intermediate results. III. The relation between galaxy cluster mass and Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borgani, S.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Coulais, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jagemann, T.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Munshi, D.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 19 pages, 9 figures, matches accepted version
Submitted: 2012-04-12, last modified: 2012-09-14
We examine the relation between the galaxy cluster mass M and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect signal D_A^2 Y for a sample of 19 objects for which weak lensing (WL) mass measurements obtained from Subaru Telescope data are available in the literature. Hydrostatic X-ray masses are derived from XMM-Newton archive data and the SZ effect signal is measured from Planck all-sky survey data. We find an M_WL-D_A^2 Y relation that is consistent in slope and normalisation with previous determinations using weak lensing masses; however, there is a normalisation offset with respect to previous measures based on hydrostatic X-ray mass-proxy relations. We verify that our SZ effect measurements are in excellent agreement with previous determinations from Planck data. For the present sample, the hydrostatic X-ray masses at R_500 are on average ~ 20 per cent larger than the corresponding weak lensing masses, at odds with expectations. We show that the mass discrepancy is driven by a difference in mass concentration as measured by the two methods, and, for the present sample, the mass discrepancy and difference in mass concentration is especially large for disturbed systems. The mass discrepancy is also linked to the offset in centres used by the X-ray and weak lensing analyses, which again is most important in disturbed systems. We outline several approaches that are needed to help achieve convergence in cluster mass measurement with X-ray and weak lensing observations.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.3376  [pdf] - 1453902
Planck Intermediate Results. IV. The XMM-Newton validation programme for new Planck galaxy clusters
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borgani, S.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Brown, M. L.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cabella, P.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; González-Riestra, R.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Stanford, A.; Stivoli, F.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2012-05-15, last modified: 2012-08-20
We present the final results from the XMM-Newton validation follow-up of new Planck galaxy cluster candidates. We observed 15 new candidates, detected with signal-to-noise ratios between 4.0 and 6.1 in the 15.5-month nominal Planck survey. The candidates were selected using ancillary data flags derived from the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) and Digitized Sky Survey all-sky maps, with the aim of pushing into the low SZ flux, high-z regime and testing RASS flags as indicators of candidate reliability. 14 new clusters were detected by XMM, including 2 double systems. Redshifts lie in the range 0.2 to 0.9, with 6 clusters at z>0.5. Estimated M500 range from 2.5 10^14 to 8 10^14 Msun. We discuss our results in the context of the full XMM validation programme, in which 51 new clusters have been detected. This includes 4 double and 2 triple systems, some of which are chance projections on the sky of clusters at different z. We find that association with a RASS-BSC source is a robust indicator of the reliability of a candidate, whereas association with a FSC source does not guarantee that the SZ candidate is a bona fide cluster. Nevertheless, most Planck clusters appear in RASS maps, with a significance greater than 2 sigma being a good indication that the candidate is a real cluster. The full sample gives a Planck sensitivity threshold of Y500 ~ 4 10^-4 arcmin^2, with indication for Malmquist bias in the YX-Y500 relation below this level. The corresponding mass threshold depends on z. Systems with M500 > 5 10^14 Msun at z > 0.5 are easily detectable with Planck. The newly-detected clusters follow the YX-Y500 relation derived from X-ray selected samples. Compared to X-ray selected clusters, the new SZ clusters have a lower X-ray luminosity on average for their mass. There is no indication of departure from standard self-similar evolution in the X-ray versus SZ scaling properties. (abridged)
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.4450  [pdf] - 1116761
The XMM Cluster Survey: The Stellar Mass Assembly of Fossil Galaxies
Comments: 30 pages, 50 figures. ApJ published version, online FS catalog added: http://www.astro.ljmu.ac.uk/~xcs/Harrison2012/XCSFSCat.html
Submitted: 2012-02-20, last modified: 2012-07-26
This paper presents both the result of a search for fossil systems (FSs) within the XMM Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the results of a study of the stellar mass assembly and stellar populations of their fossil galaxies. In total, 17 groups and clusters are identified at z < 0.25 with large magnitude gaps between the first and fourth brightest galaxies. All the information necessary to classify these systems as fossils is provided. For both groups and clusters, the total and fractional luminosity of the brightest galaxy is positively correlated with the magnitude gap. The brightest galaxies in FSs (called fossil galaxies) have stellar populations and star formation histories which are similar to normal brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). However, at fixed group/cluster mass, the stellar masses of the fossil galaxies are larger compared to normal BCGs, a fact that holds true over a wide range of group/cluster masses. Moreover, the fossil galaxies are found to contain a significant fraction of the total optical luminosity of the group/cluster within 0.5R200, as much as 85%, compared to the non-fossils, which can have as little as 10%. Our results suggest that FSs formed early and in the highest density regions of the universe and that fossil galaxies represent the end products of galaxy mergers in groups and clusters. The online FS catalog can be found at http://www.astro.ljmu.ac.uk/~xcs/Harrison2012/XCSFSCat.html.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.6214  [pdf] - 1118328
Observational constraints on K-inflation models
Comments: 20 pages, 11 incorporated figures. Parameter range explored by MCMC analysis enhanced, other minor changes
Submitted: 2012-04-27, last modified: 2012-07-24
We extend the ModeCode software of Mortonson, Peiris and Easther to enable numerical computation of perturbations in K-inflation models, where the scalar field no longer has a canonical kinetic term. Focussing on models where the kinetic and potential terms can be separated into a sum, we compute slow-roll predictions for various models and use these to verify the numerical code. A Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis is then used to impose constraints from WMAP7 data on the addition of a term quadratic in the kinetic energy to the Lagrangian of simple chaotic inflation models. For a quadratic potential, the data do not discriminate against addition of such a term, while for a quartic (\lambda \phi^4) potential inclusion of such a term is actually favoured. Overall, constraints on such a term from present data are found to be extremely weak.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.5570  [pdf] - 1123657
The XMM Cluster Survey: Evidence for energy injection at high redshift from evolution of the X-ray luminosity-temperature relation
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS; 12 pages, 6 figures; added references to match published version
Submitted: 2012-05-24, last modified: 2012-07-04
We measure the evolution of the X-ray luminosity-temperature (L_X-T) relation since z~1.5 using a sample of 211 serendipitously detected galaxy clusters with spectroscopic redshifts drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey first data release (XCS-DR1). This is the first study spanning this redshift range using a single, large, homogeneous cluster sample. Using an orthogonal regression technique, we find no evidence for evolution in the slope or intrinsic scatter of the relation since z~1.5, finding both to be consistent with previous measurements at z~0.1. However, the normalisation is seen to evolve negatively with respect to the self-similar expectation: we find E(z)^{-1} L_X = 10^{44.67 +/- 0.09} (T/5)^{3.04 +/- 0.16} (1+z)^{-1.5 +/- 0.5}, which is within 2 sigma of the zero evolution case. We see milder, but still negative, evolution with respect to self-similar when using a bisector regression technique. We compare our results to numerical simulations, where we fit simulated cluster samples using the same methods used on the XCS data. Our data favour models in which the majority of the excess entropy required to explain the slope of the L_X-T relation is injected at high redshift. Simulations in which AGN feedback is implemented using prescriptions from current semi-analytic galaxy formation models predict positive evolution of the normalisation, and differ from our data at more than 5 sigma. This suggests that more efficient feedback at high redshift may be needed in these models.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.1318  [pdf] - 1117800
Planck Intermediate Results II: Comparison of Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements from Planck and from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager for 11 galaxy clusters
Planck; Collaborations, AMI; :; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cabella, P.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jagemann, T.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Olamaie, M.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, C.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Savini, G.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Shimwell, T. W.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: update to metadata author list only
Submitted: 2012-04-05, last modified: 2012-05-22
A comparison is presented of Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements for 11 galaxy clusters as obtained by Planck and by the ground-based interferometer, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager. Assuming a universal spherically-symmetric Generalised Navarro, Frenk & White (GNFW) model for the cluster gas pressure profile, we jointly constrain the integrated Compton-Y parameter (Y_500) and the scale radius (theta_500) of each cluster. Our resulting constraints in the Y_500-theta_500 2D parameter space derived from the two instruments overlap significantly for eight of the clusters, although, overall, there is a tendency for AMI to find the Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal to be smaller in angular size and fainter than Planck. Significant discrepancies exist for the three remaining clusters in the sample, namely A1413, A1914, and the newly-discovered Planck cluster PLCKESZ G139.59+24.18. The robustness of the analysis of both the Planck and AMI data is demonstrated through the use of detailed simulations, which also discount confusion from residual point (radio) sources and from diffuse astrophysical foregrounds as possible explanations for the discrepancies found. For a subset of our cluster sample, we have investigated the dependence of our results on the assumed pressure profile by repeating the analysis adopting the best-fitting GNFW profile shape which best matches X-ray observations. Adopting the best-fitting profile shape from the X-ray data does not, in general, resolve the discrepancies found in this subset of five clusters. Though based on a small sample, our results suggest that the adopted GNFW model may not be sufficiently flexible to describe clusters universally.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.5595  [pdf] - 1453894
Planck Intermediate Results. I. Further validation of new Planck clusters with XMM-Newton
The Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; González-Riestra, R.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jagemann, T.; Jasche, J.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Osborne, S.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Stivoli, F.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 14 pages, 11 figures, accepted for publication in A&A on April 15; minor modifications following referee comments
Submitted: 2011-12-23, last modified: 2012-05-10
We present further results from the ongoing XMM-Newton validation follow-up of Planck cluster candidates, detailing X-ray observations of eleven candidates detected at a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.5<S/N<5.3 in the same 10-month survey maps used in the construction of the Early SZ sample. The sample was selected in order to test internal SZ quality flags, and the pertinence of these flags is discussed in light of the validation results. Ten of the candidates are found to be bona fide clusters lying below the RASS flux limit. Redshift estimates are available for all confirmed systems via X-ray Fe-line spectroscopy. They lie in the redshift range 0.19<z<0.94, demonstrating Planck's capability to detect clusters up to high z. The X-ray properties of the new clusters appear to be similar to previous new detections by Planck at lower z and higher SZ flux: the majority are X-ray underluminous for their mass, estimated using Y_X as mass proxy, and many have a disturbed morphology. We find tentative indication for Malmquist bias in the Y_SZ-Y_X relation, with a turnover at Y_SZ \sim 4 e-4 arcmin^2. We present additional new optical redshift determinations with ENO and ESO telescopes of candidates previously confirmed with XMM-Newton. The X-ray and optical redshifts for a total of 20 clusters are found to be in excellent agreement. We also show that useful lower limits can be put on cluster redshifts using X-ray data only via the use of the Y_X vs. Y_SZ and X-ray flux F_X vs. Y_SZ relations.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.3787  [pdf] - 713239
The XMM Cluster Survey: The interplay between the brightest cluster galaxy and the intra-cluster medium via AGN feedback
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS - replaced to match corrected proof
Submitted: 2012-02-16, last modified: 2012-03-08
Using a sample of 123 X-ray clusters and groups drawn from the XMM-Cluster Survey first data release, we investigate the interplay between the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), its black hole, and the intra-cluster/group medium (ICM). It appears that for groups and clusters with a BCG likely to host significant AGN feedback, gas cooling dominates in those with Tx > 2 keV while AGN feedback dominates below. This may be understood through the sub-unity exponent found in the scaling relation we derive between the BCG mass and cluster mass over the halo mass range 10^13 < M500 < 10^15Msol and the lack of correlation between radio luminosity and cluster mass, such that BCG AGN in groups can have relatively more energetic influence on the ICM. The Lx - Tx relation for systems with the most massive BCGs, or those with BCGs co-located with the peak of the ICM emission, is steeper than that for those with the least massive and most offset, which instead follows self-similarity. This is evidence that a combination of central gas cooling and powerful, well fuelled AGN causes the departure of the ICM from pure gravitational heating, with the steepened relation crossing self-similarity at Tx = 2 keV. Importantly, regardless of their black hole mass, BCGs are more likely to host radio-loud AGN if they are in a massive cluster (Tx > 2 keV) and again co-located with an effective fuel supply of dense, cooling gas. This demonstrates that the most massive black holes appear to know more about their host cluster than they do about their host galaxy. The results lead us to propose a physically motivated, empirical definition of 'cluster' and 'group', delineated at 2 keV.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.1828  [pdf] - 1083935
The XMM Cluster Survey: Predicted overlap with the Planck Cluster Catalogue
Comments: Closely matches the version accepted for publication by MNRAS, 7 pages, 3 figures. The XCS-DR1 catalogue, together with optical and X-ray (colour-composite and greyscale) images for each cluster, is publicly available from http://xcs-home.org/datareleases
Submitted: 2011-09-08, last modified: 2012-03-02
We present a list of 15 clusters of galaxies, serendipitously detected by the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS), that have a high probability of detection by the Planck satellite. Three of them already appear in the Planck Early Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (ESZ) catalogue. The estimation of the Planck detection probability assumes the flat Lambda cold dark matter (LambdaCDM) cosmology most compatible with 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) data. It takes into account the XCS selection function and Planck sensitivity, as well as the covariance of the cluster X-ray luminosity, temperature, and integrated comptonization parameter, as a function of cluster mass and redshift, determined by the Millennium Gas Simulations. We also characterize the properties of the galaxy clusters in the final data release of the XCS that we expect Planck will have detected by the end of its extended mission. Finally, we briefly discuss possible joint applications of the XCS and Planck data.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1107.5669  [pdf] - 672848
Unification models with reheating via primordial black holes
Comments: Updated to match version accepted by PRD
Submitted: 2011-07-28, last modified: 2012-02-19
We study the possibility of reheating the universe through the evaporation of primordial black holes created at the end of inflation. This is shown to allow for the unification of inflation and dark matter under the dynamics of a single scalar field. We determine the necessary conditions to recover the standard Big Bang by the time of nucleosynthesis after reheating through black holes.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.3769  [pdf] - 1092427
Sunyaev-Zel'dovich clusters in Millennium Gas simulations
Comments: 28 pages, 24 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS following minor revision. Now includes figure showing log-normal scatter in Y-M relation
Submitted: 2011-12-16, last modified: 2012-01-30
We have exploited the large-volume Millennium Gas cosmological N-body hydrodynamics simulations to study the SZ cluster population at low and high redshift, for three models with varying gas physics. We confirm previous results using smaller samples that the intrinsic (spherical) Y_{500}-M_{500} relation has very little scatter (sigma_{log_{10}Y}~0.04), is insensitive to cluster gas physics and evolves to redshift one in accord with self-similar expectations. Our pre-heating and feedback models predict scaling relations that are in excellent agreement with the recent analysis from combined Planck and XMM-Newton data by the Planck Collaboration. This agreement is largely preserved when r_{500} and M_{500} are derived using the hydrostatic mass proxy, Y_{X,500}, albeit with significantly reduced scatter (sigma_{log_{10}Y}~0.02), a result that is due to the tight correlation between Y_{500} and Y_{X,500}. Interestingly, this assumption also hides any bias in the relation due to dynamical activity. We also assess the importance of projection effects from large-scale structure along the line-of-sight, by extracting cluster Y_{500} values from fifty simulated 5x5 square degree sky maps. Once the (model-dependent) mean signal is subtracted from the maps we find that the integrated SZ signal is unbiased with respect to the underlying clusters, although the scatter in the (cylindrical) Y_{500}-M_{500} relation increases in the pre-heating case, where a significant amount of energy was injected into the intergalactic medium at high redshift. Finally, we study the hot gas pressure profiles to investigate the origin of the SZ signal and find that the largest contribution comes from radii close to r_{500} in all cases. The profiles themselves are well described by generalised Navarro, Frenk & White profiles but there is significant cluster-to-cluster scatter.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.6646  [pdf] - 1091970
Multi-field inflation with random potentials: field dimension, feature scale and non-Gaussianity
Comments: 22 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2011-11-28
We explore the super-horizon evolution of the two-point and three-point correlation functions of the primordial density perturbation in randomly-generated multi-field potentials. We use the Transport method to evolve perturbations and give full evolutionary histories for observables. Identifying the separate universe assumption as being analogous to a geometrical description of light rays, we give an expression for the width of the bundle, thereby allowing us to monitor evolution towards the adiabatic limit, as well as providing a useful means of understanding the behaviour in $f_NL$. Finally, viewing our random potential as a toy model of inflation in the string landscape, we build distributions for observables by evolving trajectories for a large number of realisations of the potential and comment on the prospects for testing such models. We find the distributions for observables to be insensitive to the number of fields over the range 2 to 6, but that these distributions are highly sensitive to the scale of features in the potential. Most sensitive to the scale of features is the spectral index, with more than an order of magnitude increase in the dispersion of predictions over the range of feature scales investigated. Least sensitive was the non-Gaussianity parameter $f_NL$, which was consistently small; we found no examples of realisations whose non-Gaussianity is capable of being observed by any planned experiment.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.1870  [pdf] - 1091482
Optimizing future dark energy surveys for model selection goals
Comments: 12 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2011-11-08
We demonstrate a methodology for optimizing the ability of future dark energy surveys to answer model selection questions, such as `Is acceleration due to a cosmological constant or a dynamical dark energy model?'. Model selection Figures of Merit are defined, exploiting the Bayes factor, and surveys optimized over their design parameter space via a Monte Carlo method. As a specific example we apply our methods to generic multi-fibre baryon acoustic oscillation spectroscopic surveys, comparable to that proposed for SuMIRe PFS, and present implementations based on the Savage-Dickey Density Ratio that are both accurate and practical for use in optimization. It is shown that whilst the optimal surveys using model selection agree with those found using the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) Figure of Merit, they provide better informed flexibility of survey configuration and an absolute scale for performance; for example, we find survey configurations with close to optimal model selection performance despite their corresponding DETF Figure of Merit being at only 50% of its maximum. This Bayes factor approach allows us to interpret the survey configurations that will be good enough for the task at hand, vital especially when wanting to add extra science goals and in dealing with time restrictions or multiple probes within the same project.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1107.2673  [pdf] - 416832
On the prior dependence of constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio
Comments: 14 pages, 6 figures. v2: added references. v3: minor clarifications; added reference; matches version accepted by JCAP
Submitted: 2011-07-13, last modified: 2011-09-22
We investigate the prior dependence of constraints on cosmic tensor perturbations. Commonly imposed is the strong prior of the single-field inflationary consistency equation, relating the tensor spectral index nT to the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. Dropping it leads to significantly different constraints on nT, with both positive and negative values allowed with comparable likelihood, and substantially increases the upper limit on r on scales k = 0.01 Mpc^-1 to 0.05 Mpc^-1, by a factor of ten or more. Even if the consistency equation is adopted, a uniform prior on r on one scale does not correspond to a uniform one on another; constraints therefore depend on the pivot scale chosen. We assess the size of this effect and determine the optimal scale for constraining the tensor amplitude, both with and without the consistency relation.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.2026  [pdf] - 955971
Planck Early Results XI: Calibration of the local galaxy cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich scaling relations
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chiang, C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Finelli, F.; Flores, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lanoux, J.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J. -P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 14 pages, 6 figures, to appear in A&A; final version corrects values for A1413 and A3921 in Table 1
Submitted: 2011-01-11, last modified: 2011-09-15
We present precise Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect measurements in the direction of 62 nearby galaxy clusters (z <0.5) detected at high signal-to-noise in the first Planck all-sky dataset. The sample spans approximately a decade in total mass, 10^14 < M_500 < 10^15, where M_500 is the mass corresponding to a total density contrast of 500. Combining these high quality Planck measurements with deep XMM-Newton X-ray data, we investigate the relations between D_A^2 Y_500, the integrated Compton parameter due to the SZ effect, and the X-ray-derived gas mass M_g,500, temperature T_X, luminosity L_X, SZ signal analogue Y_X,500 = M_g,500 * T_X, and total mass M_500. After correction for the effect of selection bias on the scaling relations, we find results that are in excellent agreement with both X-ray predictions and recently-published ground-based data derived from smaller samples. The present data yield an exceptionally robust, high-quality local reference, and illustrate Planck's unique capabilities for all-sky statistical studies of galaxy clusters.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1108.2944  [pdf] - 672853
Non-gaussianity in axion N-flation models: detailed predictions and mass spectra
Comments: 9 pages, 12 fgures
Submitted: 2011-08-15
We have recently shown that multi-field axion N-flation can lead to observable non-gaussianity in much of its parameter range, with the assisted inflation mechanism ensuring that the density perturbations are sufficiently close to scale invariance. In this paper we extend our analysis in several directions. In the case of equal-mass axions, we compute the probability distributions of observables and their correlations across the parameter space. We examine the case of unequal masses, and show that the mass spectrum must be very densely packed if the model is to remain in agreement with observations. The model makes specific testable predictions for all major perturbative observables, namely the spectral index, tensor-to-scalar ratio, bispectrum, and trispectrum.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.1376  [pdf] - 1077123
Planck Early Results XXVI: Detection with Planck and confirmation by XMM-Newton of PLCK G266.6-27.3, an exceptionally X-ray luminous and massive galaxy cluster at z~1
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borgani, S.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Brown, M. L.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cantalupo, C. M.; Cappellini, B.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chiang, C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; González-Riestra, R.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Heinämäki, P.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marleau, F.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nevalainen, J.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Paladini, R.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Saar, E.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Sutton, D.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures; final version accepted for publication in A&A ; minor changes in Sec.2.,3.2 and 4.1; Table 1: misprint on R500 error corrected; abundance value added
Submitted: 2011-06-07, last modified: 2011-07-27
We present first results on PLCK G266.6-27.3, a galaxy cluster candidate detected at a signal-to-noise ratio of 5 in the Planck All Sky survey. An XMM-Newton validation observation has allowed us to confirm that the candidate is a bona fide galaxy cluster. With these X-ray data we measure an accurate redshift, z = 0.94 +/- 0.02, and estimate the cluster mass to be M_500 = (7.8 +/- 0.8)e+14 solar masses. PLCK G266.6-27.3 is an exceptional system: its luminosity of L_X(0.5-2.0 keV)=(1.4 +/- 0.05)e+45 erg/s, equals that of the two most luminous known clusters in the z > 0.5 universe, and it is one of the most massive clusters at z~1. Moreover, unlike the majority of high-redshift clusters, PLCK G266.6-27.3 appears to be highly relaxed. This observation confirms Planck's capability of detecting high-redshift, high-mass clusters, and opens the way to the systematic study of population evolution in the exponential tail of the mass function.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.2024  [pdf] - 1453863
Planck Early Results VIII: The all-sky Early Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster sample
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cantalupo, C. M.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chiang, C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P.; Enßlin, T. A.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Flores, I.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; González-Riestra, R.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Harrison, D.; Heinämäki, P.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamie, M.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Saar, E.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Stanford, A.; Starck, J. -L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Taburet, N.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J. -P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Accepted for publication in a special issue of A&A, 26 pages, this paper is part of a package of papers describing first results of the Planck mission
Submitted: 2011-01-11, last modified: 2011-07-07
We present the first all-sky sample of galaxy clusters detected blindly by the Planck satellite through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect from its six highest frequencies. This early SZ (ESZ) sample is comprised of 189 candidates, which have a high signal-to-noise ratio ranging from 6 to 29. Its high reliability (purity above 95%) is further ensured by an extensive validation process based on Planck internal quality assessments and by external cross-identification and follow-up observations. Planck provides the first measured SZ signal for about 80% of the 169 previously-known ESZ clusters. Planck furthermore releases 30 new cluster candidates, amongst which 20 meet the ESZ signal-to-noise selection criterion. At the submission date, twelve of the 20 ESZ candidates were confirmed as new clusters, with eleven confirmed using XMM-Newton snapshot observations, most of them with disturbed morphologies and low luminosities. The ESZ clusters are mostly at moderate redshifts (86% with z below 0.3) and span more than a decade in mass, up to the rarest and most massive clusters with masses above 10^15 Msol.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.3056  [pdf] - 1077311
The XMM Cluster Survey: Optical analysis methodology and the first data release
Comments: MNRAS submitted, 30 pages, 20 figures, 3 electronic tables. The X-ray analysis methodology used to construct and analyse the XCS-DR1 cluster sample is presented in the companion paper, Lloyd-Davies et al. (2010). The XCS-DR1 catalogue, together with optical and X-ray (colour-composite and greyscale) images for each cluster, is publicly available from http://xcs-home.org/datareleases
Submitted: 2011-06-15, last modified: 2011-06-17
The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is a serendipitous search for galaxy clusters using all publicly available data in the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Its main aims are to measure cosmological parameters and trace the evolution of X-ray scaling relations. In this paper we present the first data release from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS-DR1). This consists of 503 optically confirmed, serendipitously detected, X-ray clusters. Of these clusters, 255 are new to the literature and 356 are new X-ray discoveries. We present 464 clusters with a redshift estimate (0.06 < z < 1.46), including 261 clusters with spectroscopic redshifts. In addition, we have measured X-ray temperatures (Tx) for 402 clusters (0.4 < Tx < 14.7 keV). We highlight seven interesting subsamples of XCS-DR1 clusters: (i) 10 clusters at high redshift (z > 1.0, including a new spectroscopically-confirmed cluster at z = 1.01); (ii) 67 clusters with high Tx (> 5 keV); (iii) 131 clusters/groups with low Tx (< 2 keV); (iv) 27 clusters with measured Tx values in the SDSS `Stripe 82' co-add region; (v) 78 clusters with measured Tx values in the Dark Energy Survey region; (vi) 40 clusters detected with sufficient counts to permit mass measurements (under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium); (vii) 105 clusters that can be used for applications such as the derivation of cosmological parameters and the measurement of cluster scaling relations. The X-ray analysis methodology used to construct and analyse the XCS-DR1 cluster sample has been presented in a companion paper, Lloyd-Davies et al. (2010).
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.0677  [pdf] - 1041050
The XMM Cluster Survey: X-ray analysis methodology
Comments: MNRAS accepted, 45 pages, 38 figures. Our companion paper describing our optical analysis methodology and presenting a first set of confirmed clusters has now been submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-10-04, last modified: 2011-06-15
The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is a serendipitous search for galaxy clusters using all publicly available data in the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Its main aims are to measure cosmological parameters and trace the evolution of X-ray scaling relations. In this paper we describe the data processing methodology applied to the 5,776 XMM observations used to construct the current XCS source catalogue. A total of 3,675 > 4-sigma cluster candidates with > 50 background-subtracted X-ray counts are extracted from a total non-overlapping area suitable for cluster searching of 410 deg^2. Of these, 993 candidates are detected with > 300 background-subtracted X-ray photon counts, and we demonstrate that robust temperature measurements can be obtained down to this count limit. We describe in detail the automated pipelines used to perform the spectral and surface brightness fitting for these candidates, as well as to estimate redshifts from the X-ray data alone. A total of 587 (122) X-ray temperatures to a typical accuracy of < 40 (< 10) per cent have been measured to date. We also present the methodology adopted for determining the selection function of the survey, and show that the extended source detection algorithm is robust to a range of cluster morphologies by inserting mock clusters derived from hydrodynamical simulations into real XMM images. These tests show that the simple isothermal beta-profiles is sufficient to capture the essential details of the cluster population detected in the archival XMM observations. The redshift follow-up of the XCS cluster sample is presented in a companion paper, together with a first data release of 503 optically-confirmed clusters.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.2181  [pdf] - 958427
COrE (Cosmic Origins Explorer) A White Paper
Comments: 90 pages Latex 15 figures (revised 28 April 2011, references added, minor errors corrected)
Submitted: 2011-02-10, last modified: 2011-04-29
COrE (Cosmic Origins Explorer) is a fourth-generation full-sky, microwave-band satellite recently proposed to ESA within Cosmic Vision 2015-2025. COrE will provide maps of the microwave sky in polarization and temperature in 15 frequency bands, ranging from 45 GHz to 795 GHz, with an angular resolution ranging from 23 arcmin (45 GHz) and 1.3 arcmin (795 GHz) and sensitivities roughly 10 to 30 times better than PLANCK (depending on the frequency channel). The COrE mission will lead to breakthrough science in a wide range of areas, ranging from primordial cosmology to galactic and extragalactic science. COrE is designed to detect the primordial gravitational waves generated during the epoch of cosmic inflation at more than $3\sigma $ for $r=(T/S)>=10^{-3}$. It will also measure the CMB gravitational lensing deflection power spectrum to the cosmic variance limit on all linear scales, allowing us to probe absolute neutrino masses better than laboratory experiments and down to plausible values suggested by the neutrino oscillation data. COrE will also search for primordial non-Gaussianity with significant improvements over Planck in its ability to constrain the shape (and amplitude) of non-Gaussianity. In the areas of galactic and extragalactic science, in its highest frequency channels COrE will provide maps of the galactic polarized dust emission allowing us to map the galactic magnetic field in areas of diffuse emission not otherwise accessible to probe the initial conditions for star formation. COrE will also map the galactic synchrotron emission thirty times better than PLANCK. This White Paper reviews the COrE science program, our simulations on foreground subtraction, and the proposed instrumental configuration.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.3195  [pdf] - 1042568
Designing Decisive Detections
Comments: 8 pages, 2 figures, minor changes following referee report; matches accepted version to appear in MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-12-14, last modified: 2011-02-16
We present a general Bayesian formalism for the definition of Figures of Merit (FoMs) quantifying the scientific return of a future experiment. We introduce two new FoMs for future experiments based on their model selection capabilities, called the decisiveness of the experiment and the expected strength of evidence. We illustrate these by considering dark energy probes, and compare the relative merits of stage II, III and IV dark energy probes. We find that probes based on supernovae and on weak lensing perform rather better on model selection tasks than is indicated by their Fisher matrix FoM as defined by the Dark Energy Task Force. We argue that our ability to optimize future experiments for dark energy model selection goals is limited by our current uncertainty over the models and their parameters, which is ignored in the usual Fisher matrix forecasts. Our approach gives a more realistic assessment of the capabilities of future probes and can be applied in a variety of situations.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.1619  [pdf] - 332513
Exploring a string-like landscape
Comments: 24 pages with 8 figures incorporated, matches version accepted by JCAP
Submitted: 2011-01-08, last modified: 2011-02-15
We explore inflationary trajectories within randomly-generated two-dimensional potentials, considered as a toy model of the string landscape. Both the background and perturbation equations are solved numerically, the latter using the two-field formalism of Peterson and Tegmark which fully incorporates the effect of isocurvature perturbations. Sufficient inflation is a rare event, occurring for only roughly one in $10^5$ potentials. For models generating sufficient inflation, we find that the majority of runs satisfy current constraints from WMAP. The scalar spectral index is less than 1 in all runs. The tensor-to-scalar ratio is below the current limit, while typically large enough to be detected by next-generation CMB experiments and perhaps also by Planck. In many cases the inflationary consistency equation is broken by the effect of isocurvature modes.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.1394  [pdf] - 282645
Application of Bayesian model averaging to measurements of the primordial power spectrum
Comments: 7 pages with 7 figures included
Submitted: 2010-09-07, last modified: 2010-12-17
Cosmological parameter uncertainties are often stated assuming a particular model, neglecting the model uncertainty, even when Bayesian model selection is unable to identify a conclusive best model. Bayesian model averaging is a method for assessing parameter uncertainties in situations where there is also uncertainty in the underlying model. We apply model averaging to the estimation of the parameters associated with the primordial power spectra of curvature and tensor perturbations. We use CosmoNest and MultiNest to compute the model Evidences and posteriors, using cosmic microwave data from WMAP, ACBAR, BOOMERanG and CBI, plus large-scale structure data from the SDSS DR7. We find that the model-averaged 95% credible interval for the spectral index using all of the data is 0.940 < n_s < 1.000, where n_s is specified at a pivot scale 0.015 Mpc^{-1}. For the tensors model averaging can tighten the credible upper limit, depending on prior assumptions.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.5662  [pdf] - 319872
Detecting and distinguishing topological defects in future data from the CMBPol satellite
Comments: New version has slightly reworded section III, 10 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2010-10-27, last modified: 2010-11-11
The proposed CMBPol mission will be able to detect the imprint of topological defects on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provided the contribution is sufficiently strong. We quantify the detection threshold for cosmic strings and for textures, and analyse the satellite's ability to distinguish between these different types of defects. We also assess the level of danger of misidentification of a defect signature as from the wrong defect type or as an effect of primordial gravitational waves. A 0.002 fractional contribution of cosmic strings to the CMB temperature spectrum at multipole ten, and similarly a 0.001 fractional contribution of textures, can be detected and correctly identified at the 3{\sigma} level. We also confirm that a tensor contribution of r = 0.0018 can be detected at over 3{\sigma}, in agreement with the CMBpol mission concept study. These results are supported by a model selection analysis.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.4410  [pdf] - 955369
Non-gaussianity in axion Nflation models
Comments: 5 pages with 3 figures incorporated. v2: minor updates, new analytic formulae for spectral index and trispectrum, references added, typo corrections. v3: minor updates to match version accepted by Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2010-05-24, last modified: 2010-10-05
We study perturbations in the multi-field axion Nflation model, taking account of the full cosine potential. We find significant differences with previous analyses which made a quadratic approximation to the potential. The tensor-to-scalar ratio and the scalar spectral index move to lower values, which nevertheless provide an acceptable fit to observation. Most significantly, we find that the bispectrum non-gaussianity parameter f_NL may be large, typically of order 10 for moderate values of the axion decay constant, increasing to of order 100 for decay constants slightly smaller than the Planck scale. Such a non-gaussian fraction is detectable. We argue that this property is generic in multi-field models of hilltop inflation.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1004.3888  [pdf] - 903099
Stability of multi-field cosmological solutions in the presence of a fluid
Comments: 5 pages. Minor changes to match Phys Rev D accepted version
Submitted: 2010-04-22, last modified: 2010-07-27
We explore the stability properties of multi-field solutions in the presence of a perfect fluid, as appropriate to assisted quintessence scenarios. We show that the stability condition for multiple fields $\phi_i$ in identical potentials $V_i$ is simply $d^2V_i/d \phi_i^2 > 0$, exactly as in the absence of a fluid. A possible new instability associated with the fluid is shown not to arise in situations of cosmological interest.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.4681  [pdf] - 1032729
The XMM Cluster Survey: The build up of stellar mass in Brightest Cluster Galaxies at high redshift
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ, 9 pages (updated with additional references)
Submitted: 2010-05-25, last modified: 2010-06-03
We present deep J and Ks band photometry of 20 high redshift galaxy clusters between z=0.8-1.5, 19 of which are observed with the MOIRCS instrument on the Subaru Telescope. By using near-infrared light as a proxy for stellar mass we find the surprising result that the average stellar mass of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) has remained constant at ~9e11MSol since z~1.5. We investigate the effect on this result of differing star formation histories generated by three well known and independent stellar population codes and find it to be robust for reasonable, physically motivated choices of age and metallicity. By performing Monte Carlo simulations we find that the result is unaffected by any correlation between BCG mass and cluster mass in either the observed or model clusters. The large stellar masses imply that the assemblage of these galaxies took place at the same time as the initial burst of star formation. This result leads us to conclude that dry merging has had little effect on the average stellar mass of BCGs over the last 9-10 Gyr in stark contrast to the predictions of semi-analytic models, based on the hierarchical merging of dark matter haloes, which predict a more protracted mass build up over a Hubble time. We discuss however that there is potential for reconciliation between observation and theory if there is a significant growth of material in the intracluster light over the same period.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.4692  [pdf] - 1032735
The XMM Cluster Survey: Active Galactic Nuclei and Starburst Galaxies in XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 at z=1.46
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ, 16 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2010-05-25
We use Chandra X-ray and Spitzer infrared observations to explore the AGN and starburst populations of XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 at z=1.46, one of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters known. The high resolution X-ray imaging reveals that the cluster emission is contaminated by point sources that were not resolved in XMM observations of the system, and have the effect of hardening the spectrum, leading to the previously reported temperature for this system being overestimated. From a joint spectroscopic analysis of the Chandra and XMM data, the cluster is found to have temperature T=4.1_-0.9^+0.6 keV and luminosity L_X=(2.92_-0.35^+0.24)x10^44 erg/s extrapolated to a radius of 2 Mpc. As a result of this revised analysis, the cluster is found to lie on the sigma_v-T relation, but the cluster remains less luminous than would be expected from self-similar evolution of the local L_X-T relation. Two of the newly discovered X-ray AGN are cluster members, while a third object, which is also a prominent 24 micron source, is found to have properties consistent with it being a high redshift, highly obscured object in the background. We find a total of eight >5 sigma 24 micron sources associated with cluster members (four spectroscopically confirmed, and four selected using photometric redshifts), and one additional 24 micron source with two possible optical/near-IR counterparts that may be associated with the cluster. Examining the IRAC colors of these sources, we find one object is likely to be an AGN. Assuming that the other 24 micron sources are powered by star formation, their infrared luminosities imply star formation rates ~100 M_sun/yr. We find that three of these sources are located at projected distances of <250 kpc from the cluster center, suggesting that a large amount of star formation may be taking place in the cluster core, in contrast to clusters at low redshift.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.4196  [pdf] - 902966
A dark energy view of inflation
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures; v2: minor modifications to match published version
Submitted: 2010-02-22, last modified: 2010-05-10
Traditionally, inflationary models are analyzed in terms of parameters such as the scalar spectral index ns and the tensor to scalar ratio r, while dark energy models are studied in terms of the equation of state parameter w. Motivated by the fact that both deal with periods of accelerated expansion, we study the evolution of w during inflation, in order to derive observational constraints on its value during an earlier epoch likely dominated by a dynamic form of dark energy. We find that the cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure data is consistent with w_inflation=-1 and provides an upper limit of 1+w <~ 0.02. Nonetheless, an exact de Sitter expansion with a constant w=-1 is disfavored since this would result in ns=1.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.3703  [pdf] - 152799
On the possibility of braneworld quintessential inflation
Comments: 11 pages RevTex file with 13 figures
Submitted: 2010-02-19
We examine the possibility of achieving quintessential inflation, where the same field serves as both inflaton and quintessence, in the context of a five-dimensional braneworld. Braneworld cosmology provides an appropriate environment as it permits inflation with much steeper potentials than the conventional scenario, which is favourable to a late-time quintessence. We explore a wide space of models, together with contemporary observational data, to determine in which contexts such a picture is possible. We find that such a scenario, although attractive, is in fact impossible to achieve for the potentials studied due to the restrictiveness of current data.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.3488  [pdf] - 122668
The Cosmological Parameters 2010
Comments: 25 pages TeX file. Article for The Review of Particle Physics 2010 (aka the Particle Data Book), on-line version at http://pdg.lbl.gov/ . This article supersedes arXiv:astro-ph/0601168 and arXiv:astro-ph/0406681
Submitted: 2010-02-18
This is a review article for The Review of Particle Physics 2010 (aka the Particle Data Book). It forms a compact review of knowledge of the cosmological parameters at the beginning of 2010. Topics included are Parametrizing the Universe; Extensions to the standard model; Probes; Bringing observations together; Outlook for the future.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.0949  [pdf] - 669473
Unified dark energy and dark matter from a scalar field different from quintessence
Comments: 10 pages RevTeX4 with 5 figures incorporated
Submitted: 2009-12-05
We explore unification of dark matter and dark energy in a theory containing a scalar field of non-Lagrangian type, obtained by direct insertion of a kinetic term into the energy-momentum tensor. This scalar is different from quintessence, having an equation of state between -1 and 0 and a zero sound speed in its rest frame. We solve the equations of motion for an exponential potential via a rewriting as an autonomous system, and demonstrate the observational viability of the scenario, for sufficiently small exponential potential parameter \lambda, by comparison to a compilation of kinematical cosmological data.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:0908.3197  [pdf] - 27533
Constraining the dark fluid
Comments: 5 pages, 5 figures incorporated. Updated to new observational data including SHOES determination of H0; new citations added
Submitted: 2009-08-21, last modified: 2009-10-12
Cosmological observations are normally fit under the assumption that the dark sector can be decomposed into dark matter and dark energy components. However, as long as the probes remain purely gravitational, there is no unique decomposition and observations can only constrain a single dark fluid; this is known as the dark degeneracy. We use observations to directly constrain this dark fluid in a model-independent way, demonstrating in particular that the data cannot be fit by a dark fluid with a single constant equation of state. Parameterizing the dark fluid equation of state by a variety of polynomials in the scale factor $a$, we use current kinematical data to constrain the parameters. While the simplest interpretation of the dark fluid remains that it is comprised of separate dark matter and cosmological constant contributions, our results cover other model types including unified dark energy/matter scenarios.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.3410  [pdf] - 24484
Optimizing baryon acoustic oscillation surveys II: curvature, redshifts, and external datasets
Comments: 15 pages, revised in response to referees remarks, accepted for publication in MNRAS. 2nd paper in a series. Paper 1 is at http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0702040
Submitted: 2009-05-21, last modified: 2009-10-05
We extend our study of the optimization of large baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) surveys to return the best constraints on the dark energy, building on Paper I of this series (Parkinson et al. 2007). The survey galaxies are assumed to be pre-selected active, star-forming galaxies observed by their line emission with a constant number density across the redshift bin. Star-forming galaxies have a redshift desert in the region 1.6 < z < 2, and so this redshift range was excluded from the analysis. We use the Seo & Eisenstein (2007) fitting formula for the accuracies of the BAO measurements, using only the information for the oscillatory part of the power spectrum as distance and expansion rate rulers. We go beyond our earlier analysis by examining the effect of including curvature on the optimal survey configuration and updating the expected `prior' constraints from Planck and SDSS. We once again find that the optimal survey strategy involves minimizing the exposure time and maximizing the survey area (within the instrumental constraints), and that all time should be spent observing in the low-redshift range (z<1.6) rather than beyond the redshift desert, z>2. We find that when assuming a flat universe the optimal survey makes measurements in the redshift range 0.1 < z <0.7, but that including curvature as a nuisance parameter requires us to push the maximum redshift to 1.35, to remove the degeneracy between curvature and evolving dark energy. The inclusion of expected other data sets (such as WiggleZ, BOSS and a stage III SN-Ia survey) removes the necessity of measurements below redshift 0.9, and pushes the maximum redshift up to 1.5. We discuss considerations in determining the best survey strategy in light of uncertainty in the true underlying cosmological model.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.0289  [pdf] - 155028
Viable inflationary models ending with a first-order phase transition
Comments: 9 pages, 7 figures. Revised version: corrections to description of the historical development of the models. v3: Minor corrections to match version accepted by PRD
Submitted: 2009-05-03, last modified: 2009-09-30
We investigate the parameter space of hybrid inflation models where inflation terminates via a first-order phase transition causing nucleation of bubbles. Such models experience a tension from the need to ensure nearly scale invariant density perturbations, while avoiding a near scale-invariant bubble size distribution which would conflict observations. We perform an exact analysis of the different regimes of the models, where the energy density of the inflaton field ranges from being negligible as compared to the vacuum energy to providing most of the energy for inflation. Despite recent microwave anisotropy results favouring a spectral index less than one, we find that there are still viable models that end with bubble production and can match all available observations. As a by-product of our analysis, we also provide an up-to-date assessment of the viable parameter space of Linde's original second-order hybrid model across its full parameter range.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:0905.1956  [pdf] - 24207
An Evolutionary Paradigm for Dusty Active Galaxies at Low Redshift
Comments: ApJ accepted. Comments welcome. We suggest reading section 2 before looking at the figures. 26 pages, 21 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2009-05-12
We apply methods from Bayesian inferencing and graph theory to a dataset of 102 mid-infrared spectra, and archival data from the optical to the millimeter, to construct an evolutionary paradigm for z<0.4 infrared-luminous galaxies (ULIRGs). We propose that the ULIRG lifecycle consists of three phases. The first phase lasts from the initial encounter until approximately coalescence. It is characterized by homogeneous mid-IR spectral shapes, and IR emission mainly from star formation, with a contribution from an AGN in some cases. At the end of this phase, a ULIRG enters one of two evolutionary paths depending on the dynamics of the merger, the available quantities of gas, and the masses of the black holes in the progenitors. On one branch, the contributions from the starburst and the AGN to the total IR luminosity decline and increase respectively. The IR spectral shapes are heterogeneous, likely due to feedback from AGN-driven winds. Some objects go through a brief QSO phase at the end. On the other branch, the decline of the starburst relative to the AGN is less pronounced, and few or no objects go through a QSO phase. We show that the 11.2 micron PAH feature is a remarkably good diagnostic of evolutionary phase, and identify six ULIRGs that may be archetypes of key stages in this lifecycle.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:0802.4462  [pdf] - 1934218
The XMM Cluster Survey: Forecasting cosmological and cluster scaling-relation parameter constraints
Comments: 28 pages, 17 figures. Revised version, as accepted for publication in MNRAS. High-resolution figures available at http://xcs-home.org (under "Publications")
Submitted: 2008-02-29, last modified: 2009-04-26
We forecast the constraints on the values of sigma_8, Omega_m, and cluster scaling relation parameters which we expect to obtain from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS). We assume a flat Lambda-CDM Universe and perform a Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis of the evolution of the number density of galaxy clusters that takes into account a detailed simulated selection function. Comparing our current observed number of clusters shows good agreement with predictions. We determine the expected degradation of the constraints as a result of self-calibrating the luminosity-temperature relation (with scatter), including temperature measurement errors, and relying on photometric methods for the estimation of galaxy cluster redshifts. We examine the effects of systematic errors in scaling relation and measurement error assumptions. Using only (T,z) self-calibration, we expect to measure Omega_m to +-0.03 (and Omega_Lambda to the same accuracy assuming flatness), and sigma_8 to +-0.05, also constraining the normalization and slope of the luminosity-temperature relation to +-6 and +-13 per cent (at 1sigma) respectively in the process. Self-calibration fails to jointly constrain the scatter and redshift evolution of the luminosity-temperature relation significantly. Additional archival and/or follow-up data will improve on this. We do not expect measurement errors or imperfect knowledge of their distribution to degrade constraints significantly. Scaling-relation systematics can easily lead to cosmological constraints 2sigma or more away from the fiducial model. Our treatment is the first exact treatment to this level of detail, and introduces a new `smoothed ML' estimate of expected constraints.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.0006  [pdf] - 150995
Early assembly of the most massive galaxies
Comments: Published in Nature 2nd April 2009. This astro ph version includes main text and supplementary material combined
Submitted: 2009-03-31
The current consensus is that galaxies begin as small density fluctuations in the early Universe and grow by in situ star formation and hierarchical merging. Stars begin to form relatively quickly in sub-galactic sized building blocks called haloes which are subsequently assembled into galaxies. However, exactly when this assembly takes place is a matter of some debate. Here we report that the stellar masses of brightest cluster galaxies, which are the most luminous objects emitting stellar light, some 9 billion years ago are not significantly different from their stellar masses today. Brightest cluster galaxies are almost fully assembled 4-5 Gyrs after the Big Bang, having grown to more than 90% of their final stellar mass by this time. Our data conflict with the most recent galaxy formation models based on the largest simulations of dark matter halo development. These models predict protracted formation of brightest cluster galaxies over a Hubble time, with only 22% of the stellar mass assembled at the epoch probed by our sample. Our findings suggest a new picture in which brightest cluster galaxies experience an early period of rapid growth rather than prolonged hierarchical assembly.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.4210  [pdf] - 22717
Statistical methods for cosmological parameter selection and estimation
Comments: 18 pages, 3 figures. To appear, Annual Reviews of Nuclear and Particle Science (ARNPS), vol 59
Submitted: 2009-03-24
The estimation of cosmological parameters from precision observables is an important industry with crucial ramifications for particle physics. This article discusses the statistical methods presently used in cosmological data analysis, highlighting the main assumptions and uncertainties. The topics covered are parameter estimation, model selection, multi-model inference, and experimental design, all primarily from a Bayesian perspective.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.3919  [pdf] - 18845
CMBPol Mission Concept Study: Probing Inflation with CMB Polarization
Comments: 107 pages, 14 figures, 17 tables; Inflation Working Group contribution to the CMBPol Mission Concept Study; v2: typos fixed and references added
Submitted: 2008-11-24, last modified: 2009-03-13
We summarize the utility of precise cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization measurements as probes of the physics of inflation. We focus on the prospects for using CMB measurements to differentiate various inflationary mechanisms. In particular, a detection of primordial B-mode polarization would demonstrate that inflation occurred at a very high energy scale, and that the inflaton traversed a super-Planckian distance in field space. We explain how such a detection or constraint would illuminate aspects of physics at the Planck scale. Moreover, CMB measurements can constrain the scale-dependence and non-Gaussianity of the primordial fluctuations and limit the possibility of a significant isocurvature contribution. Each such limit provides crucial information on the underlying inflationary dynamics. Finally, we quantify these considerations by presenting forecasts for the sensitivities of a future satellite experiment to the inflationary parameters.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.1731  [pdf] - 315692
The XMM Cluster Survey: Galaxy Morphologies and the Color-Magnitude Relation in XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 at z=1.46
Comments: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2009-03-10
We present a study of the morphological fractions and color-magnitude relation in the most distant X-ray selected galaxy cluster currently known, XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 at z=1.46, using a combination of optical imaging data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys, and infrared data from the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph, mounted on the 8.2m Subaru telescope. We find that the morphological mix of the cluster galaxy population is similar to clusters at z~1: approximately ~62% of the galaxies identified as likely cluster members are ellipticals or S0s; and ~38% are spirals or irregulars. We measure the color-magnitude relations for the early type galaxies, finding that the slope in the z_850-J relation is consistent with that measured in the Coma cluster, some ~9 Gyr earlier, although the uncertainty is large. In contrast, the measured intrinsic scatter about the color-magnitude relation is more than three times the value measured in Coma, after conversion to rest frame U-V. From comparison with stellar population synthesis models, the intrinsic scatter measurements imply mean luminosity weighted ages for the early type galaxies in J2215.9-1738 of ~3 Gyr, corresponding to the major epoch of star formation coming to an end at z_f = 3-5. We find that the cluster exhibits evidence of the `downsizing' phenomenon: the fraction of faint cluster members on the red sequence expressed using the Dwarf-to-Giant Ratio (DGR) is 0.32+/-0.18. This is consistent with extrapolation of the redshift evolution of the DGR seen in cluster samples at z < 1. In contrast to observations of some other z > 1 clusters, we find a lack of very bright galaxies within the cluster.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.0902  [pdf] - 22071
Observing the Evolution of the Universe
Aguirre, James; Amblard, Alexandre; Ashoorioon, Amjad; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Balbi, Amedeo; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Benford, Dominic; Birkinshaw, Mark; Bock, Jamie; Bond, Dick; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, Franois; Bridges, Michael; Bunn, Emory; Calabrese, Erminia; Cantalupo, Christopher; Caramete, Ana; Carbone, Carmelita; Chatterjee, Suchetana; Church, Sarah; Chuss, David; Contaldi, Carlo; Cooray, Asantha; Das, Sudeep; De Bernardis, Francesco; De Bernardis, Paolo; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Dsert, F. -Xavier; Devlin, Mark; Dickinson, Clive; Dicker, Simon; Dobbs, Matt; Dodelson, Scott; Dore, Olivier; Dotson, Jessie; Dunkley, Joanna; Falvella, Maria Cristina; Fixsen, Dale; Fosalba, Pablo; Fowler, Joseph; Gates, Evalyn; Gear, Walter; Golwala, Sunil; Gorski, Krzysztof; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Gundersen, Josh; Halpern, Mark; Hanany, Shaul; Hazumi, Masashi; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hertzberg, Mark; Hinshaw, Gary; Hirata, Christopher; Hivon, Eric; Holmes, Warren; Holzapfel, William; Hu, Wayne; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Irwin, Kent; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, William; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Khoury, Justin; Kinney, Will; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kogut, Alan; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Krauss, Lawrence; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Landau, Susana; Lawrence, Charles; Leach, Samuel; Lee, Adrian; Leitch, Erik; Leonardi, Rodrigo; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liddle, Andrew; Lim, Eugene; Limon, Michele; Loverde, Marilena; Lubin, Philip; Magalhaes, Antonio; Maino, Davide; Marriage, Tobias; Martin, Victoria; Matarrese, Sabino; Mather, John; Mathur, Harsh; Matsumura, Tomotake; Meerburg, Pieter; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Meyer, Stephan; Miller, Amber; Milligan, Michael; Moodley, Kavilan; Neimack, Michael; Nguyen, Hogan; O'Dwyer, Ian; Orlando, Angiola; Pagano, Luca; Page, Lyman; Partridge, Bruce; Pearson, Timothy; Peiris, Hiranya; Piacentini, Francesco; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pietrobon, Davide; Pisano, Giampaolo; Pogosian, Levon; Pogosyan, Dmitri; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Popa, Lucia; Pryke, Clement; Raeth, Christoph; Ray, Subharthi; Reichardt, Christian; Ricciardi, Sara; Richards, Paul; Rocha, Graca; Rudnick, Lawrence; Ruhl, John; Rusholme, Benjamin; Scoccola, Claudia; Scott, Douglas; Sealfon, Carolyn; Sehgal, Neelima; Seiffert, Michael; Senatore, Leonardo; Serra, Paolo; Shandera, Sarah; Shimon, Meir; Shirron, Peter; Sievers, Jonathan; Sigurdson, Kris; Silk, Joe; Silverberg, Robert; Silverstein, Eva; Staggs, Suzanne; Stebbins, Albert; Stivoli, Federico; Stompor, Radek; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Swetz, Daniel; Tartari, Andria; Tegmark, Max; Timbie, Peter; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Urrestilla, Jon; Vaillancourt, John; Veneziani, Marcella; Verde, Licia; Vieira, Joaquin; Watson, Scott; Wandelt, Benjamin; Wilson, Grant; Wollack, Edward; Wyman, Mark; Yadav, Amit; Yannick, Giraud-Heraud; Zahn, Olivier; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zemcov, Michael; Zwart, Jonathan
Comments: Science White Paper submitted to the US Astro2010 Decadal Survey. Full list of 177 author available at http://cmbpol.uchicago.edu
Submitted: 2009-03-04
How did the universe evolve? The fine angular scale (l>1000) temperature and polarization anisotropies in the CMB are a Rosetta stone for understanding the evolution of the universe. Through detailed measurements one may address everything from the physics of the birth of the universe to the history of star formation and the process by which galaxies formed. One may in addition track the evolution of the dark energy and discover the net neutrino mass. We are at the dawn of a new era in which hundreds of square degrees of sky can be mapped with arcminute resolution and sensitivities measured in microKelvin. Acquiring these data requires the use of special purpose telescopes such as the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), located in Chile, and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). These new telescopes are outfitted with a new generation of custom mm-wave kilo-pixel arrays. Additional instruments are in the planning stages.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.4676  [pdf] - 18977
Observational constraints on thawing quintessence models
Comments: 6 pages MNRAS style with 8 figures included. Minor updates to match MNRAS accepted version
Submitted: 2008-11-28, last modified: 2009-02-20
We use a dynamical systems approach to study thawing quintessence models, using a multi-parameter extension of the exponential potential which can approximate the form of typical thawing potentials. We impose observational constraints using a compilation of current data, and forecast the tightening of constraints expected from future dark energy surveys, as well as discussing the relation of our results to analytical constraints already in the literature.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.3764  [pdf] - 1001107
Boson stars in the centre of galaxies?
Comments:
Submitted: 2008-11-23
We investigate the possible gravitational redshift values for boson stars with a self-interaction, studying a wide range of possible masses. We find a limiting value of z_lim \simeq 0.687 for stable boson star configurations. We can exclude the direct observation of boson stars. X-ray spectroscopy is perhaps the most interesting possibility.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:0711.1842  [pdf] - 6941
Cosmic microwave anisotropies from BPS semilocal strings
Comments: 15 pages, 13 figures. Minor correction of numerical results, matches published version
Submitted: 2007-11-12, last modified: 2008-07-11
We present the first ever calculation of cosmic microwave background CMB anisotropy power spectra from semilocal cosmic strings, obtained via simulations of a classical field theory. Semilocal strings are a type of non-topological defect arising in some models of inflation motivated by fundamental physics, and are thought to relax the constraints on the symmetry breaking scale as compared to models with (topological) cosmic strings. We derive constraints on the model parameters, including the string tension parameter mu, from fits to cosmological data, and find that in this regard BPS semilocal strings resemble global textures more than topological strings. The observed microwave anisotropy at l = 10 is reproduced if Gmu = 5.3x10^{-6} (G is Newton's constant). However as with other defects the spectral shape does not match observations, and in models with inflationary perturbations plus semilocal strings the 95% confidence level upper bound is Gmu<2.0x10^{-6} when CMB data, Hubble Key Project and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis data are used (c.f. Gmu<0.9x10^{-6} for cosmic strings). We additionally carry out a Bayesian model comparison of several models with and without defects, showing models with defects are neither conclusively favoured nor disfavoured at present.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.1738  [pdf] - 10880
Planck and reionization history: a model selection view
Comments: 6 pages, 15 figures in MNRAS style, minor changes to match accepted version
Submitted: 2008-03-12, last modified: 2008-07-09
We use Bayesian model selection tools to forecast the Planck satellite's ability to distinguish between different models for the reionization history of the Universe, using the large angular scale signal in the cosmic microwave background polarization spectrum. We find that Planck is not expected to be able to distinguish between an instantaneous reionization model and a two-parameter smooth reionization model, except for extreme values of the additional reionization parameter. If it cannot, then it will be unable to distinguish between different two-parameter models either. However, Bayesian model averaging will be needed to obtain unbiased estimates of the optical depth to reionization. We also generalize our results to a hypothetical future cosmic variance limited microwave anisotropy survey, where the outlook is more optimistic.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.0322  [pdf] - 14129
Oscillations in the inflaton potential?
Comments: 6 pages RevTeX4 with 6 figures incorporated
Submitted: 2008-07-02
We consider a class of inflationary models with small oscillations imprinted on an otherwise smooth inflaton potential. These oscillations are manifest as oscillations in the power spectrum of primordial perturbations, which then give rise to oscillating departures from the standard cosmic microwave background power spectrum. We show that current data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe constrain the amplitude of a sinusoidal variation in the inflaton potential to have an amplitude less than 3 x 10^{-5}. We anticipate that the smallest detectable such oscillations in Planck will be roughly an order of magnitude smaller, with slight improvements possible with a post-Planck cosmic-variance limited experiment.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.2059  [pdf] - 10945
On the degeneracy between primordial tensor modes and cosmic strings in future CMB data from Planck
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures. Minor changes to match published version
Submitted: 2008-03-13, last modified: 2008-06-25
While observations indicate that the predominant source of cosmic inhomogeneities are adiabatic perturbations, there are a variety of candidates to provide auxiliary trace effects, including inflation-generated primordial tensors and cosmic defects which both produce B-mode cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. We investigate whether future experiments may suffer confusion as to the true origin of such effects, focusing on the ability of Planck to distinguish tensors from cosmic strings, and show that there is no significant degeneracy.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:0804.0869  [pdf] - 11518
Triple unification of inflation, dark matter, and dark energy using a single field
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX with 3 figures incorporated
Submitted: 2008-04-05
We construct an explicit scenario whereby the same material driving inflation in the early Universe can comprise dark matter in the present Universe, using a simple quadratic potential. Following inflation and preheating, the density of inflaton/dark matter particles is reduced to the observed level by a period of thermal inflation, of a duration already invoked in the literature for other reasons. Within the context of the string landscape, one can further argue for a non-zero vacuum energy of this field, thus unifying inflation, dark matter and dark energy into a single fundamental field.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:0706.3668  [pdf] - 2534
The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich temperature of the intracluster medium
Comments: This version accepted for publication in MNRAS following minor revision
Submitted: 2007-06-25, last modified: 2008-03-07
The relativistic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect offers a method, independent of X-ray, for measuring the temperature of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the hottest systems. Here, using N-body/hydrodynamic simulations of three galaxy clusters, we compare the two quantities for a non-radiative ICM, and for one that is subject both to radiative cooling and strong energy feedback from galaxies. Our study has yielded two interesting results. Firstly, in all cases, the SZ temperature is hotter than the X-ray temperature and is within ten per cent of the virial temperature of the cluster. Secondly, the mean SZ temperature is less affected by cooling and feedback than the X-ray temperature. Both these results can be explained by the SZ temperature being less sensitive to the distribution of cool gas associated with cluster substructure. A comparison of the SZ and X-ray temperatures (measured for a sample of hot clusters) would therefore yield interesting constraints on the thermodynamic structure of the intracluster gas.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:0711.3360  [pdf] - 7265
Stability of multi-field cosmological solutions
Comments: 6 pages; v2: typos corrected, version accepted by PRD
Submitted: 2007-11-21, last modified: 2007-11-29
We explore the stability properties of multi-field solutions of assisted inflation type, where several fields collectively evolve to the same configuration. In the case of noninteracting fields, we show that the condition for such solutions to be stable is less restrictive than that required for tracking in quintessence models. Our results, which do not rely on the slow-roll approximation, further indicate that to linear order in homogeneous perturbations the fields are in fact unaware of each other's existence. We end by generalizing our results to some cases of interacting fields and to other background solutions and dynamics, including the high-energy braneworld.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:0707.1982  [pdf] - 3053
Nflation: observable predictions from the random matrix mass spectrum
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX with 4 figures. Minor corrections to match version to appear in Physical Review D
Submitted: 2007-07-13, last modified: 2007-09-24
We carry out numerical investigations of the perturbations in Nflation models where the mass spectrum is generated by random matrix theory. The tensor-to-scalar ratio and non-gaussianity are already known to take the single-field values, and so the density perturbation spectral index is the main parameter of interest. We study several types of random field initial conditions, and compute the spectral index as a function of mass spectrum parameters. Comparison with microwave anisotropy data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe shows that the model is currently viable in the majority of its parameter space.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0701481  [pdf] - 88610
When can the Planck satellite measure spectral index running?
Comments: 5 pages with 7 figures included. Full resolution PDF at http://astronomy.susx.ac.uk/~andrewl/planckev2D.pdf Minor updates to match version accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2007-01-16, last modified: 2007-09-04
We use model selection forecasting to assess the ability of the Planck satellite to make a positive detection of spectral index running. We simulate Planck data for a range of assumed cosmological parameter values, and carry out a three-way Bayesian model comparison of a Harrison-Zel'dovich model, a power-law model, and a model including running. We find that Planck will be able to strongly support running only if its true value satisfies |dn/d ln k| > 0.02.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:0708.3258  [pdf] - 4241
The XMM Cluster Survey: The Dynamical State of XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 at z=1.457
Comments: 13 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2007-08-23
We present new spectroscopic observations of the most distant X-ray selected galaxy cluster currently known, XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 at z=1.457, obtained with the DEIMOS instrument at the W. M. Keck Observatory, and the FORS2 instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope. Within the cluster virial radius, as estimated from the cluster X-ray properties, we increase the number of known spectroscopic cluster members to 17 objects, and calculate the line of sight velocity dispersion of the cluster to be 580+/-140 km/s. We find mild evidence that the velocity distribution of galaxies within the virial radius deviates from a single Gaussian. We show that the properties of J2215.9-1738 are inconsistent with self-similar evolution of local X-ray scaling relations, finding that the cluster is underluminous given its X-ray temperature, and that the intracluster medium contains ~2-3 times the kinetic energy per unit mass of the cluster galaxies. These results can perhaps be explained if the cluster is observed in the aftermath of an off-axis merger. Alternatively, heating of the intracluster medium through supernovae and/or Active Galactic Nuclei activity, as is required to explain the observed slope of the local X-ray luminosity-temperature relation, may be responsible.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0702170  [pdf] - 89224
On what scale should inflationary observables be constrained?
Comments: 7 pages RevTeX4 with 9 figures included. v2: References added, new section added analyzing additional datasets alongside WMAP3. v3: Minor corrections to match version accepted by PRD
Submitted: 2007-02-06, last modified: 2007-04-12
We examine the choice of scale at which constraints on inflationary observables are presented. We describe an implementation of the hierarchy of inflationary consistency equations which ensures that they remain enforced on different scales, and then seek to optimize the scale for presentation of constraints on marginalized inflationary parameters from WMAP3 data. For models with spectral index running, we find a strong variation of the constraints through the range of observational scales available, and optimize by finding the scale which decorrelates constraints on the spectral index n_S and the running. This scale is k=0.017 Mpc^{-1}, and gives a reduction by a factor of more than four in the allowed parameter area in the n_S-r plane (r being the tensor-to-scalar ratio) relative to k=0.002 Mpc^{-1}. These optimized constraints are similar to those obtained in the no-running case. We also extend the analysis to a larger compilation of data, finding essentially the same conclusions.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0703285  [pdf] - 90094
Comment on `Tainted evidence: cosmological model selection versus fitting', by Eric V. Linder and Ramon Miquel (astro-ph/0702542v2)
Comments: 6 pages RevTeX4
Submitted: 2007-03-13
In astro-ph/0702542v2, Linder and Miquel seek to criticize the use of Bayesian model selection for data analysis and for survey forecasting and design. Their discussion is based on three serious misunderstandings of the conceptual underpinnings and application of model-level Bayesian inference, which invalidate all their main conclusions. Their paper includes numerous further inaccuracies, including an erroneous calculation of the Bayesian Information Criterion. Here we seek to set the record straight.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0701113  [pdf] - 880943
Information criteria for astrophysical model selection
Comments: 5 pages, no figures. Update to match version accepted by MNRAS Letters. Extra references, minor changes to discussion, no change to conclusions
Submitted: 2007-01-04, last modified: 2007-02-20
Model selection is the problem of distinguishing competing models, perhaps featuring different numbers of parameters. The statistics literature contains two distinct sets of tools, those based on information theory such as the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), and those on Bayesian inference such as the Bayesian evidence and Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). The Deviance Information Criterion combines ideas from both heritages; it is readily computed from Monte Carlo posterior samples and, unlike the AIC and BIC, allows for parameter degeneracy. I describe the properties of the information criteria, and as an example compute them from WMAP3 data for several cosmological models. I find that at present the information theory and Bayesian approaches give significantly different conclusions from that data.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0611017  [pdf] - 86403
The evolution of clusters in the CLEF cosmological simulation: X-ray structural and scaling properties
Comments: 20 pages, 21 figures, MNRAS, accepted with minor modifications to original manuscript
Submitted: 2006-11-01, last modified: 2007-02-09
We present results from a study of the X-ray cluster population that forms within the CLEF cosmological hydrodynamics simulation, a large N-body/SPH simulation of the Lambda CDM cosmology with radiative cooling, star formation and feedback. The scaled projected temperature and entropy profiles at z=0 are in good agreement with recent high-quality observations of cool core clusters, suggesting that the simulation grossly follows the processes that structure the intracluster medium (ICM) in these objects. Cool cores are a ubiquitous phenomenon in the simulation at low and high redshift, regardless of a cluster's dynamical state. This is at odds with the observations and so suggests there is still a heating mechanism missing from the simulation. Using a simple, observable measure of the concentration of the ICM, which correlates with the apparent mass deposition rate in the cluster core, we find a large dispersion within regular clusters at low redshift, but this diminishes at higher redshift, where strong "cooling-flow" systems are absent in our simulation. Consequently, our results predict that the normalisation and scatter of the luminosity-temperature relation should decrease with redshift; if such behaviour turns out to be a correct representation of X-ray cluster evolution, it will have significant consequences for the number of clusters found at high redshift in X-ray flux-limited surveys.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610812  [pdf] - 86236
Quintessence reconstructed: new constraints and tracker viability
Comments: 14 pages RevTeX4, 12 figures included. Minor updates to match version accepted by Phys Rev D
Submitted: 2006-10-27, last modified: 2006-12-20
We update and extend our previous work reconstructing the potential of a quintessence field from current observational data. We extend the cosmological dataset to include new supernova data, plus information from the cosmic microwave background and from baryon acoustic oscillations. We extend the modelling by considering Pad\'e approximant expansions as well as Taylor series, and by using observations to assess the viability of the tracker hypothesis. We find that parameter constraints have improved by a factor of two, with a strengthening of the preference of the cosmological constant over evolving quintessence models. Present data show some signs, though inconclusive, of favouring tracker models over non-tracker models under our assumptions.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610807  [pdf] - 86231
Intermediate inflation in light of the three-year WMAP observations
Comments: 4 pages RevTeX4 with one figure. Minor changes to match PRD accepted version
Submitted: 2006-10-26, last modified: 2006-12-19
The three-year observations from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe have been hailed as giving the first clear indication of a spectral index n_s<1. We point out that the data are equally well explained by retaining the assumption n_s=1 and allowing the tensor-to-scalar ratio r to be non-zero. The combination n_s=1 and r>0 is given (within the slow-roll approximation) by a version of the intermediate inflation model with expansion rate H(t) \propto t^{-1/3}. We assess the status of this model in light of the WMAP3 data.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0610126  [pdf] - 85550
Present and future evidence for evolving dark energy
Comments: 10 pages RevTex4, 3 figures included. Minor changes to match version accepted by PRD
Submitted: 2006-10-04, last modified: 2006-12-04
We compute the Bayesian evidences for one- and two-parameter models of evolving dark energy, and compare them to the evidence for a cosmological constant, using current data from Type Ia supernova, baryon acoustic oscillations, and the cosmic microwave background. We use only distance information, ignoring dark energy perturbations. We find that, under various priors on the dark energy parameters, LambdaCDM is currently favoured as compared to the dark energy models. We consider the parameter constraints that arise under Bayesian model averaging, and discuss the implication of our results for future dark energy projects seeking to detect dark energy evolution. The model selection approach complements and extends the figure-of-merit approach of the Dark Energy Task Force in assessing future experiments, and suggests a significantly-modified interpretation of that statistic.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0601168  [pdf] - 79026
The Cosmological Parameters 2006
Comments: 25 pages TeX file. Article for The Review of Particle Physics 2006 (aka the Particle Data Book), published version at http://pdg.lbl.gov/ . This article supersedes astro-ph/0406681. Updated to match published version. Includes WMAP3 results
Submitted: 2006-01-09, last modified: 2006-10-18
This is a review article for The Review of Particle Physics 2006 (aka the Particle Data Book). It forms a compact review of knowledge of the cosmological parameters as at May 2006. Topics included are Parametrizing the Universe; Extensions to the standard model; Probes; Bringing observations together; Outlook for the future.
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605205  [pdf] - 81893
Inflation, dark matter and dark energy in the string landscape
Comments: 4 pages RevTex4. Updated to include a toy model of reheating. Matches version accepted by Phys Rev Lett
Submitted: 2006-05-09, last modified: 2006-10-05
We consider the conditions needed to unify the description of dark matter, dark energy and inflation in the context of the string landscape. We find that incomplete decay of the inflaton field gives the possibility that a single field is responsible for all three phenomena. By contrast, unifying dark matter and dark energy into a single field, separate from the inflaton, appears rather difficult.
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606003  [pdf] - 82443
Tachyon dark energy models: dynamics and constraints
Comments: 10 pages, 4 figures. v2: references added, matches the published version
Submitted: 2006-06-01, last modified: 2006-08-21
We explore the dynamics of dark energy models based on a Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) tachyonic action, studying a range of potentials. We numerically investigate the existence of tracking behaviour and determine the present-day value of the equation of state parameter and its running, which are compared with observational bounds. We find that tachyon models have quite similar phenomenology to canonical quintessence models. While some potentials can be selected amongst many possibilities and fine-tuned to give viable scenarios, there is no apparent advantage in choosing a DBI scalar field instead of a Klein-Gordon one.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0608186  [pdf] - 84063
Nflation: non-gaussianity in the horizon-crossing approximation
Comments: 3 pages RevTeX4, no figures
Submitted: 2006-08-09
We analyze the cosmic non-gaussianity produced in inflation models with multiple uncoupled fields with monomial potentials, such as Nflation. Using the horizon-crossing approximation to compute the non-gaussianity, we show that when each field has the same form of potential, the prediction is independent the number of fields, their initial conditions, and the spectrum of masses/couplings. It depends only on the number of e-foldings after the horizon crossing of observable perturbations. We also provide a further generalization to the case where the fields can have monomial potentials with different powers. Unless the horizon-crossing approximation is substantially violated, the predicted non-gaussianity is too small to ever be observed.
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0608184  [pdf] - 84061
Cosmological model selection
Comments: Semi-technical overview article (10 pages) for RAS house publication A&G. Code at http://cosmonest.org and described in astro-ph/0605003
Submitted: 2006-08-09
Model selection aims to determine which theoretical models are most plausible given some data, without necessarily asking about the preferred values of the model parameters. A common model selection question is to ask when new data require introduction of an additional parameter, describing a newly-discovered physical effect. We review several model selection statistics, and then focus on use of the Bayesian evidence, which implements the usual Bayesian analysis framework at the level of models rather than parameters. We describe our CosmoNest code, which is the first computationally-efficient implementation of Bayesian model selection in a cosmological context. We apply it to recent WMAP satellite data, examining the need for a perturbation spectral index differing from the scale-invariant (Harrison-Zel'dovich) case.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0607275  [pdf] - 83478
The WMAP normalization of inflationary cosmologies
Comments: 4 pages RevTex4 with two figures
Submitted: 2006-07-13
We use the three-year WMAP observations to determine the normalization of the matter power spectrum in inflationary cosmologies. In this context, the quantity of interest is not the normalization marginalized over all parameters, but rather the normalization as a function of the inflationary parameters n and r with marginalization over the remaining cosmological parameters. We compute this normalization and provide an accurate fitting function. The statistical uncertainty in the normalization is 3 percent, roughly half that achieved by COBE. We use the k-l relation for the standard cosmological model to identify the pivot scale for the WMAP normalization. We also quote the inflationary energy scale corresponding to the WMAP normalization.
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605604  [pdf] - 82291
Nflation: multi-field inflationary dynamics and perturbations
Comments: 6 pages RevTeX4, 4 figures included. Updated to match PRD accepted version. Analysis and conclusions unchanged. New references, especially astro-ph/0510441 which was first to give the general r=8/N result
Submitted: 2006-05-24, last modified: 2006-07-06
We carry out numerical investigations of the dynamics and perturbations in the Nflation model of Dimopoulos et al. (2005). This model features large numbers of scalar fields with different masses, which can cooperate to drive inflation according to the assisted inflation mechanism. We extend previous work to include random initial conditions for the scalar fields, and explore the predictions for density perturbations and the tensor-to-scalar ratio. The tensor-to-scalar ratio depends only on the number of e-foldings and is independent of the number of fields, their masses, and their initial conditions. It therefore always has the same value as for a single massive field. By contrast, the scalar spectral index has significant dependence on model parameters. While normally multi-field inflation models make predictions for observable quantities which depend also on the unknown field initial conditions, we find evidence of a `thermodynamic' regime whereby the predicted spectral index becomes independent of initial conditions if there are enough fields. Only in parts of parameter space where the mass spectrum of the fields is extremely densely packed is the model capable of satisfying the tight observational constraints from WMAP3 observations.
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605003  [pdf] - 81691
A Bayesian model selection analysis of WMAP3
Comments: 7 pages RevTex with 4 figures included. Updated to match PRD accepted version. Main results unchanged. CosmoNest code now version 1.0 and includes calculation of the Information. Code available at http://www.cosmonest.org
Submitted: 2006-05-01, last modified: 2006-06-19
We present a Bayesian model selection analysis of WMAP3 data using our code CosmoNest. We focus on the density perturbation spectral index $n_S$ and the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$, which define the plane of slow-roll inflationary models. We find that while the Bayesian evidence supports the conclusion that $n_S \neq 1$, the data are not yet powerful enough to do so at a strong or decisive level. If tensors are assumed absent, the current odds are approximately 8 to 1 in favour of $n_S \neq 1$ under our assumptions, when WMAP3 data is used together with external data sets. WMAP3 data on its own is unable to distinguish between the two models. Further, inclusion of $r$ as a parameter weakens the conclusion against the Harrison-Zel'dovich case (n_S = 1, r=0), albeit in a prior-dependent way. In appendices we describe the CosmoNest code in detail, noting its ability to supply posterior samples as well as to accurately compute the Bayesian evidence. We make a first public release of CosmoNest, now available at http://www.cosmonest.org.
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605004  [pdf] - 81692
Model selection forecasts for the spectral index from the Planck satellite
Comments: 4 pages RevTeX with one figure included. Updated to match PRD accepted version. Improved likelihood function implementation; no qualitative change to results but some tiny numerical shifts
Submitted: 2006-05-01, last modified: 2006-06-19
The recent WMAP3 results have placed measurements of the spectral index n_S in an interesting position. While parameter estimation techniques indicate that the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum n_S=1 is strongly excluded (in the absence of tensor perturbations), Bayesian model selection techniques reveal that the case against n_S=1 is not yet conclusive. In this paper, we forecast the ability of the Planck satellite mission to use Bayesian model selection to convincingly exclude (or favour) the Harrison-Zel'dovich model.
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606075  [pdf] - 82515
The XMM Cluster Survey: A Massive Galaxy Cluster at z=1.45
Comments: Accepted for publication in the The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 5 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2006-06-04, last modified: 2006-06-05
We report the discovery of XMMXCS J2215.9-1738, a massive galaxy cluster at z =1.45, which was found in the XMM Cluster Survey. The cluster candidate was initially identified as an extended X-ray source in archival XMM data. Optical spectroscopy shows that 6 galaxies within a 60 arcsec diameter region lie at z = 1.45 +/- 0.01. Model fits to the X-ray spectra of the extended emission yield kT = 7.4 (+2.7,-1.8) keV (90 % confidence); if there is an undetected central X-ray point source then kT = 6.5 (+2.6,-1.8) keV. The bolometric X-ray luminosity is Lx = 4.4 (+0.8,-0.6) x 10^44 ergs/s over a 2 Mpc radial region. The measured Tx, which is the highest known for a cluster at z > 1, suggests that this cluster is relatively massive for such a high redshift. The redshift of XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 is the highest currently known for a spectroscopically-confirmed cluster of galaxies.
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606090  [pdf] - 82530
Cosmic reionization constraints on the nature of cosmological perturbations
Comments: 5 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2006-06-05
We study the reionization history of the Universe in cosmological models with non-Gaussian density fluctuations, taking them to have a renormalized $\chi^2$ probability distribution function parametrized by the number of degrees of freedom, $\nu$. We compute the ionization history using a simple semi-analytical model, considering various possibilities for the astrophysics of reionization. In all our models we require that reionization is completed prior to $z=6$, as required by the measurement of the Gunn--Peterson optical depth from the spectra of high-redshift quasars. We confirm previous results demonstrating that such a non-Gaussian distribution leads to a slower reionization as compared to the Gaussian case. We further show that the recent WMAP three-year measurement of the optical depth due to electron scattering, $\tau=0.09 \pm 0.03$, weakly constrains the allowed deviations from Gaussianity on the small scales relevant to reionization if a constant spectral index is assumed. We also confirm the need for a significant suppression of star formation in mini-halos, which increases dramatically as we decrease $\nu$.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0512484  [pdf] - 78684
Model selection as a science driver for dark energy surveys
Comments: 10 pages, 15 figures included. Updated to match MNRAS accepted version
Submitted: 2005-12-20, last modified: 2006-05-04
A key science goal of upcoming dark energy surveys is to seek time evolution of the dark energy. This problem is one of {\em model selection}, where the aim is to differentiate between cosmological models with different numbers of parameters. However, the power of these surveys is traditionally assessed by estimating their ability to constrain parameters, which is a different statistical problem. In this paper we use Bayesian model selection techniques, specifically forecasting of the Bayes factors, to compare the abilities of different proposed surveys in discovering dark energy evolution. We consider six experiments -- supernova luminosity measurements by the Supernova Legacy Survey, SNAP, JEDI, and ALPACA, and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements by WFMOS and JEDI -- and use Bayes factor plots to compare their statistical constraining power. The concept of Bayes factor forecasting has much broader applicability than dark energy surveys.
[116]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603016  [pdf] - 80225
The consistency equation hierarchy in single-field inflation models
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX
Submitted: 2006-03-01
Inflationary consistency equations relate the scalar and tensor perturbations. We elucidate the infinite hierarchy of consistency equations of single-field inflation, the first of which is the well-known relation A_T^2/A_S^2 = -n_T/2 between the amplitudes and the tensor spectral index. We write a general expression for all consistency equations both to first and second-order in the slow-roll expansion. We discuss the relation to other consistency equations that have appeared in the literature, in particular demonstrating that the approximate consistency equation recently introduced by Chung and collaborators is equivalent to the second consistency equation of Lidsey et al. (1997).
[117]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0512017  [pdf] - 78217
Cosmic microwave background multipole alignments in slab topologies
Comments: 6 pages RevTex with 6 figures included. Minor changes to match version accepted as Physical Review D Rapid Communication
Submitted: 2005-12-01, last modified: 2006-01-19
Several analyses of the microwave sky maps from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have drawn attention to alignments amongst the low-order multipoles. Amongst the various possible explanations, an effect of cosmic topology has been invoked by several authors. We focus on an alignment of the first four multipoles (\ell = 2 to 5) found by Land and Magueijo (2005), and investigate the distribution of their alignment statistic for a set of simulated cosmic microwave background maps for cosmologies with slab-like topology. We find that this topology does offer a modest increase in the probability of the observed value, but that even for the smallest topology considered the probability of the observed value remains below one percent.
[118]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0508461  [pdf] - 75350
A Nested Sampling Algorithm for Cosmological Model Selection
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures. Minor updates to match version accepted by Astrophys J Letters
Submitted: 2005-08-23, last modified: 2006-01-11
The abundance of new cosmological data becoming available means that a wider range of cosmological models are testable than ever before. However, an important distinction must be made between parameter fitting and model selection. While parameter fitting simply determines how well a model fits the data, model selection statistics, such as the Bayesian Evidence, are now necessary to choose between these different models, and in particular to assess the need for new parameters. We implement a new evidence algorithm known as nested sampling, which combines accuracy, generality of application and computational feasibility, and apply it to some cosmological datasets and models. We find that a five-parameter model with Harrison-Zel'dovich initial spectrum is currently preferred.
[119]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0506558  [pdf] - 73958
Flow equations in generalized braneworld scenarios
Comments: 10 pages RevTeX4 with 3 figures included. Matches published version. Note change of title from original submission
Submitted: 2005-06-23, last modified: 2005-09-16
We discuss the flow equations in the context of general braneworld cosmologies with a modified Friedmann equation, for either an ordinary scalar field or a Dirac-Born-Infeld tachyon as inflaton candidates. The 4D, Randall-Sundrum, and Gauss-Bonnet cases are compared, using the patch formalism which provides a unified description of these models. The inflationary dynamics is described by a tower of flow parameters that can be evolved in time to select a particular subset of points in the space of cosmological observables. We analyze the stability of the fixed points in all the cosmologies (our results in the 4D case already extending those in the literature). Numerical integration of the flow equations shows that the predictions of the Gauss-Bonnet braneworld differ significantly as compared to the Randall-Sundrum and 4D scenarios, whereas tachyon inflation gives tensor perturbations smaller than those in the presence of a normal scalar field. These results are extended to the realization of a noncommutative space-time preserving maximal symmetry. In this case the tensor-to-scalar signal is unchanged, while blue-tilted spectra are favoured.
[120]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0506076  [pdf] - 73476
Dynamics of assisted quintessence
Comments: 6 pages RevTeX4 with three figures. Significant updates, version accepted by Physical Review D. Critical point analysis with two exponential potentials was already carried out by Coley and van den Hoogen in gr-qc/9911075 . Extra numerical analysis added and additional references. Overall conclusions unchanged
Submitted: 2005-06-03, last modified: 2005-07-21
We explore the dynamics of assisted quintessence, where more than one scalar field is present with the same potential. For potentials with tracking solutions, the fields naturally approach the same values; in the context of inflation this leads to the assisted inflation phenomenon where several fields can cooperate to drive a period of inflation though none is able to individually. For exponential potentials, we study the fixed points and their stability confirming results already in the literature, and then carry out a numerical analysis to show how assisted quintessence is realized. For inverse power-law potentials, we find by contrast that there is no assisted behaviour; indeed those are the unique (monotonic) potentials where several fields together behave just as a single field in the same potential. More generally, we provide an algorithm for generating a single-field potential giving equivalent dynamics to multi-field assisted quintessence.
[121]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0506696  [pdf] - 74096
Direct reconstruction of the quintessence potential
Comments: 9 pages RevTeX4 with lots of incorporated figures
Submitted: 2005-06-28
We describe an algorithm which directly determines the quintessence potential from observational data, without using an equation of state parametrisation. The strategy is to numerically determine observational quantities as a function of the expansion coefficients of the quintessence potential, which are then constrained using a likelihood approach. We further impose a model selection criterion, the Bayesian Information Criterion, to determine the appropriate level of the potential expansion. In addition to the potential parameters, the present-day quintessence field velocity is kept as a free parameter. Our investigation contains unusual model types, including a scalar field moving on a flat potential, or in an uphill direction, and is general enough to permit oscillating quintessence field models. We apply our method to the `gold' Type Ia supernovae sample of Riess et al. (2004), confirming the pure cosmological constant model as the best description of current supernovae luminosity-redshift data. Our method is optimal for extracting quintessence parameters from future data.
[122]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0502361  [pdf] - 71152
Stochastic approaches to inflation model building
Comments: 7 pages RevTeX4 with 7 figures. Updated to match version accepted by PRD. Calculations extended to sixth-order and extra clarifications added
Submitted: 2005-02-17, last modified: 2005-05-17
While inflation gives an appealing explanation of observed cosmological data, there are a wide range of different inflation models, providing differing predictions for the initial perturbations. Typically models are motivated either by fundamental physics considerations or by simplicity. An alternative is to generate large numbers of models via a random generation process, such as the flow equations approach. The flow equations approach is known to predict a definite structure to the observational predictions. In this paper, we first demonstrate a more efficient implementation of the flow equations exploiting an analytic solution found by Liddle (2003). We then consider alternative stochastic methods of generating large numbers of inflation models, with the aim of testing whether the structures generated by the flow equations are robust. We find that while typically there remains some concentration of points in the observable plane under the different methods, there is significant variation in the predictions amongst the methods considered.
[123]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0412052  [pdf] - 69456
Structure formation constraints on the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory
Comments: 6 pages, 5 figures, RevTeX. Updated to match version accepted by PRD. Significant updates. Headline constraint tightened to omega > 120 (95% conf) by improved statistical analysis
Submitted: 2004-12-02, last modified: 2005-05-09
We use cosmic microwave background data from WMAP, ACBAR, VSA and CBI, and galaxy power spectrum data from 2dF, to constrain flat cosmologies based on the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory, using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach. Using a parametrization based on \xi=1/4\omega, and performing an exploration in the range \ln\xi \in [-9,3], we obtain a 95% marginalized probability bound of \ln\xi < -6.2, corresponding to a 95% marginalized probability lower bound on the Brans-Dicke parameter \omega>120.
[124]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0501477  [pdf] - 70589
Bayesian model selection and isocurvature perturbations
Comments: 6 pages RevTex file
Submitted: 2005-01-24
Present cosmological data are well explained assuming purely adiabatic perturbations, but an admixture of isocurvature perturbations is also permitted. We use a Bayesian framework to compare the performance of cosmological models including isocurvature modes with the purely adiabatic case; this framework automatically and consistently penalizes models which use more parameters to fit the data. We compute the Bayesian evidence for fits to a dataset comprised of WMAP and other microwave anisotropy data, the galaxy power spectrum from 2dFGRS and SDSS, and Type Ia supernovae luminosity distances. We find that Bayesian model selection favours the purely adiabatic models, but so far only at low significance.
[125]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0412556  [pdf] - 69960
Braneworld flow equations
Comments: 3 pages RevTex plus one figure
Submitted: 2004-12-21
We generalize the flow equations approach to inflationary model building to the Randall-Sundrum Type II braneworld scenario. As the flow equations are quite insensitive to the expansion dynamics, we find results similar to, though not identical to, those found in the standard cosmology.
[126]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0411650  [pdf] - 69249
Clusters of Galaxies: New Results from the CLEF Hydrodynamics Simulation
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in Advances in Space Research (proceedings of the COSPAR 2004 Assembly, Paris)
Submitted: 2004-11-23
Preliminary results are presented from the CLEF hydrodynamics simulation, a large (N=2(428)^3 particles within a 200 Mpc/h comoving box) simulation of the LCDM cosmology that includes both radiative cooling and a simple model for galactic feedback. Specifically, we focus on the X-ray properties of the simulated clusters at z=0 and demonstrate a reasonable level of agreement between simulated and observed cluster scaling relations.
[127]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0411649  [pdf] - 69248
The CLEF-SSH simulation project
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, to appear in proceedings of the SF2A 2004 conference, Paris
Submitted: 2004-11-23
The CLEF-SSH simulation project is an international collaboration, involving the IAS, LATT and the University of Sussex, to produce large hydrodynamic simulations of large-scale structure that implement realistic models of radiative gas cooling and energy feedback. The objective is to use these simulations to study the physics of galaxy clusters and to construct maps of large angular size of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, for the preparation of future experiments. Here we present results from a first run, the CLEF hydrodynamics simulation, which features 2(428)^3 particles of gas and dark matter inside a comoving box with 200 Mpc/h on a side.
[128]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0309040  [pdf] - 114535
The Cosmological Parameters
Comments: Pre-publication version withdrawn at the request of the journal. Final version now available in Reviews of Particle Physics at http://pdg.lbl.gov/2004/reviews/contents_sports.html See also astro-ph/0406681
Submitted: 2003-09-04, last modified: 2004-07-22
Pre-publication version withdrawn at the request of the journal. Final version now available in Reviews of Particle Physics at http://pdg.lbl.gov/2004/reviews/contents_sports.html
[129]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0403181  [pdf] - 63372
A new calculation of the mass fraction of primordial black holes
Comments: 5 pages, 1 figure, minor changes to match version to appear in Phys. Rev. D as a rapid communication
Submitted: 2004-03-08, last modified: 2004-07-07
We revisit the calculation of the abundance of primordial black holes (PBHs) formed from primordial density perturbations, using a formation criterion derived by Shibata and Sasaki which refers to a metric perturbation variable rather than the usual density contrast. We implement a derivation of the PBH abundance which uses peaks theory, and compare it to the standard calculation based on a Press--Schechter-like approach. We find that the two are in reasonable agreement if the Press--Schechter threshold is in the range $\Delta_{{\rm th}} \simeq 0.3$ to 0.5, but advocate use of the peaks theory expression which is based on a sounder theoretical footing.
[130]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0406681  [pdf] - 65838
The Cosmological Parameters
Comments: 27 pages TeX file with four figures incorporated. Article for The Review of Particle Physics 2004, published version at http://pdg.lbl.gov/2004/reviews/contents_sports.html
Submitted: 2004-06-30
This is a new review article for The Review of Particle Physics 2004 (aka the Particle Data Book). It forms a compact review of knowledge of the cosmological parameters as at the end of 2003. Topics included are Parametrizing the Universe; Extensions to the standard model; Probes; Bringing observations together; Outlook for the future.
[131]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0401198  [pdf] - 62068
How many cosmological parameters?
Comments: 5 pages LaTeX file (uses mn2e.cls). Additional discussion and references, matches MNRAS accepted version
Submitted: 2004-01-12, last modified: 2004-05-19
Constraints on cosmological parameters depend on the set of parameters chosen to define the model which is compared with observational data. I use the Akaike and Bayesian information criteria to carry out cosmological model selection, in order to determine the parameter set providing the preferred fit to the data. Applying the information criteria to the current cosmological data sets indicates, for example, that spatially-flat models are statistically preferred to closed models, and that possible running of the spectral index has lower significance than inferred from its confidence limits. I also discuss some problems of statistical assessment arising from there being a large number of `candidate' cosmological parameters that can be investigated for possible cosmological implications, and argue that 95% confidence is too low a threshold to robustly identify the need for new parameters in model fitting. The best present description of cosmological data uses a scale-invariant (n=1) spectrum of gaussian adiabatic perturbations in a spatially-flat Universe, with the cosmological model requiring only five fundamental parameters to fully specify it.
[132]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0405225  [pdf] - 64745
XMM Cluster Survey: X-ray source identification using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey
Comments: 13 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2004-05-12
[ABRIDGED] The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is predicted to detect thousands of clusters observed serendipitously in XMM-Newton pointings. We investigate automating optical follow-up of cluster candidates using the SDSS public archive, concentrating on 42 XMM observations that overlap the SDSS First Data Release. Restricting to the inner 11 arcminutes of the XMM field-of-view gives 637 unique X-ray sources across a 3.09 deg^2 region with SDSS coverage. The log N-log S relation indicates survey completeness to a flux limit of around 1x10^{-14} erg s^-1 cm^-2. We have cross-correlated XMM point sources with SDSS quasars, finding 103 unique matches from which we determine a matching radius of 3.8 arcseconds. Using this we make immediate identifications of roughly half of all XMM point sources as quasars (159) or stars (55). We have estimated the typical error on SDSS-determined photometric cluster redshifts to be 5% for relaxed systems, and 11% for disturbed systems, by comparing them to spectroscopic redshifts for eight previously-known clusters. The error for disturbed systems may be problematic for cluster surveys relying on photometric redshifts alone. We use the False Discovery Rate to select 41 XMM sources (25 point-like, 16 extended) statistically associated with SDSS galaxy overdensities. Of the extended sources, 5 are new cluster candidates and 11 are previously-known clusters (0.044<z<0.782). There are 83 extended X-ray sources not associated with SDSS galaxy overdensities, which are strong candidates for new high-redshift clusters. We highlight two previously-known z>1 clusters rediscovered by our wavelet-based detection software. These results show that the SDSS can provide useful automated follow-up to X-ray cluster surveys, but cannot provide all the optical follow-up necessary for X-ray cluster surveys.
[133]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0311503  [pdf] - 61083
Perturbations in cosmologies with a scalar field and a perfect fluid
Comments: RevTex4, 9 pages, 3 figures. Significant additions on the quintessence scenario (new appendix and additional numerical example). Conclusions unchanged, but more robust
Submitted: 2003-11-21, last modified: 2004-04-22
We study the properties of cosmological density perturbations in a multi-component system consisting of a scalar field and a perfect fluid. We discuss the number of degrees of freedom completely describing the system, introduce a full set of dynamical gauge-invariant equations in terms of the curvature and entropy perturbations, and display an efficient formulation of these equations as a first-order system linked by a fairly sparse matrix. Our formalism includes spatial gradients, extending previous formulations restricted to the large-scale limit, and fully accounts for the evolution of an isocurvature mode intrinsic to the scalar field. We then address the issue of the adiabatic condition, in particular demonstrating its preservation on large scales. Finally, we apply our formalism to the quintessence scenario and clearly underline the importance of initial conditions when considering late-time perturbations. In particular, we show that entropy perturbations can still be present when the quintessence field energy density becomes non-negligible.
[134]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0308074  [pdf] - 58353
Hydrodynamical simulations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect: cluster scaling relations and X-ray properties
Comments: 8 pages LaTeX file with eight figures incorporated. Minor changes following referee's comments, one reference added. Matches published version
Submitted: 2003-08-05, last modified: 2004-03-23
The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is a powerful new tool for finding and studying clusters at high redshift, particularly in combination with their X-ray properties. In this paper we quantify the expected scaling relations between these properties using numerical simulations with various models for heating and cooling of the cluster gas. For a Non-radiative model, we find scaling relations in good agreement with self-similar predictions: $Y\propto T_X^{5/2}$ and $Y \propto L_X^{5/4}$. Our main results focus on predictions from Cooling and Preheating simulations, shown by Muanwong et al. (2002) to provide a good match to the X-ray scaling relations at z=0. For these runs we find slopes of approximately $Y \proptoT_X^3$ and $Y \propto L_X$, steeper and flatter than the self-similar scalings respectively. We also study the redshift evolution of the scaling relations and find the slopes show no evidence of evolution out to redshifts well beyond one, while the normalizations of relations between the SZ signal and X-ray properties do show evolution relative to that expected from self-similarity, particularly at z<1.
[135]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0307286  [pdf] - 57999
On the inflationary flow equations
Comments: 4 pages RevTeX4 file. Corrected typos in Eqs 11 and 13. Supersedes journal version
Submitted: 2003-07-15, last modified: 2004-02-23
I explore properties of the inflationary flow equations. I show that the flow equations do not correspond directly to inflationary dynamics. Nevertheless, they can be used as a rather complicated algorithm for generating inflationary models. I demonstrate that the flow equations can be solved analytically and give a closed form solution for the potentials to which flow equation solutions correspond. I end by considering some simpler algorithms for generating stochastic sets of slow-roll inflationary models for confrontation with observational data.
[136]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0311005  [pdf] - 60585
Inflationary potentials yielding constant scalar perturbation spectral indices
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures. New general derivation method, structure changed
Submitted: 2003-10-31, last modified: 2004-02-11
We explore the types of slow-roll inflationary potentials that result in scalar perturbations with a constant spectral index, i.e., perturbations that may be described by a single power-law spectrum over all observable scales. We devote particular attention to the type of potentials that result in the Harrison--Zel'dovich spectrum.
[137]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0312162  [pdf] - 880688
Constraints on braneworld inflation from CMB anisotropies
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2003-12-05, last modified: 2004-02-09
We obtain observational constraints on Randall--Sundrum type II braneworld inflation using a compilation of data including WMAP, the 2dF and latest SDSS galaxy redshift surveys. We place constraints on three classes of inflation models (large-field, small-field and hybrid models) in the high-energy regime, which exhibit different behaviour compared to the low-energy case. The quartic potential is outside the $2\sigma$ observational contour bound for a number of $e$-folds less than 60, and steep inflation driven by an exponential potential is excluded because of its high tensor-to-scalar ratio. It is more difficult to strongly constrain small-field and hybrid models due to additional freedoms associated with the potentials, but we obtain upper bounds for the energy scale of inflation and the model parameters in certain cases. We also discuss possible ways to break the degeneracy of consistency relations and inflationary observables.
[138]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0310498  [pdf] - 60161
From the production of primordial perturbations to the end of inflation
Comments: RevTex4, 6 pages, 7 figures. To match version accepted by PRD
Submitted: 2003-10-17, last modified: 2003-12-08
In addition to generating the appropriate perturbation power spectrum, an inflationary scenario must take into account the need for inflation to end subsequently. In the context of single-field inflation models where inflation ends by breaking of the slow-roll condition, we constrain the first and second derivatives of the inflaton potential using this additional requirement. We compare this with current observational constraints from the primordial spectrum and discuss several issues relating to our results.
[139]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0309608  [pdf] - 59435
Inflationary slow-roll formalism and perturbations in the Randall-Sundrum Type II braneworld
Comments: 7 pages RevTeX4 file
Submitted: 2003-09-23
We formalize the Hubble slow-roll formalism for inflationary dynamics in Randall-Sundrum Type II braneworld cosmologies, defining Hubble slow-roll parameters which can be used along with the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. Focussing on the high-energy limit, we use these to calculate the exact power spectrum for power-law inflation, and then perturb around this solution to derive the higher-order expression for the density perturbations (sometimes called the Stewart-Lyth correction) of slow-roll braneworld models. Finally we apply our result to specific examples of potentials to calculate the correction to the amplitude of the power spectrum, and compare it with the standard cosmology. We find that the amplitude is not changed significantly by the higher-order correction.
[140]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0305263  [pdf] - 56736
How long before the end of inflation were observable perturbations produced?
Comments: 7 pages RevTeX4 file with one figure incorporated. Minor updates to match version accepted by Physical Review D
Submitted: 2003-05-15, last modified: 2003-09-11
We reconsider the issue of the number of e-foldings before the end of inflation at which observable perturbations were generated. We determine a plausible upper limit on that number for the standard cosmology which is around 60, with the expectation that the actual value will be up to 10 below this. We also note a special property of the $\lambda \phi^4$ model which reduces the uncertainties in that case and favours a higher value, giving a fairly definite prediction of 64 e-foldings for that model. We note an extreme (and highly implausible) situation where the number of e-foldings can be even higher, possibly up to 100, and discuss the shortcomings of quantifying inflation by e-foldings rather than by the change in $aH$. Finally, we discuss the impact of non-standard evolution between the end of inflation and the present, showing that again the expected number of e-foldings can be modified, and in some cases significantly increased.
[141]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0307017  [pdf] - 57730
Observational constraints on braneworld chaotic inflation
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX4 file with three figures incorporated. Minor changes to match version accepted by Physical Review D
Submitted: 2003-07-01, last modified: 2003-08-13
We examine observational constraints on chaotic inflation models in the Randall-Sundrum Type II braneworld. If inflation takes place in the high-energy regime, the perturbations produced by the quadratic potential are further from scale-invariance than in the standard cosmology, in the quartic case more or less unchanged, while for potentials of greater exponent the trend is reversed. We test these predictions against a data compilation including the WMAP measurements of microwave anisotropies and the 2dF galaxy power spectrum. While in the standard cosmology the quartic potential is at the border of what the data allow and all higher powers excluded, we find that in the high-energy regime of braneworld inflation even the quadratic case is under strong observational pressure. We also investigate the intermediate regime where the brane tension is comparable to the inflationary energy scale, where the deviations from scale-invariance prove to be greater.
[142]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0211090  [pdf] - 52825
The power spectrum amplitude from clusters revisited: \sigma_8 using simulations with preheating and cooling
Comments: 9 pages LaTeX file using mn2e.cls, with seven figures incorporated. Modest updates from version 2 to match version accepted by MNRAS. Substantially different from the original submission
Submitted: 2002-11-05, last modified: 2003-08-08
The amplitude of density perturbations, for the currently-favoured LambdaCDM cosmology, is constrained using the observed properties of galaxy clusters. The catalogue used is that of Ikebe et al. (2002). The cluster temperature to mass relation is obtained via N-body/hydrodynamical simulations including radiative cooling and preheating of cluster gas, which we have previously shown to reproduce well the observed temperature--mass relation in the innermost parts of clusters (Thomas et al. 2002). We generate and compare mock catalogues via a Monte Carlo method, which allows us to constrain the relation between X-ray temperature and luminosity, including its scatter, simultaneously with cosmological parameters. We find a luminosity-temperature relation in good agreement with the results of Ikebe et al. (2002), while for the matter power spectrum normalization, we find $\sigma_8 = 0.78_{-0.06}^{+0.30}$ at 95 per cent confidence for $\Omega_0 = 0.35$. Scaling to WMAP's central value of $\Omega_0 = 0.27$ would give a best-fit value of $\sigma_8 \simeq 0.9$.
[143]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302054  [pdf] - 54681
Curvaton reheating: an application to braneworld inflation
Comments: 8 pages RevTeX4 file with two figures incorporated. Improved referencing, matches PRD accepted version
Submitted: 2003-02-04, last modified: 2003-06-27
The curvaton was introduced recently as a distinct inflationary mechanism for generating adiabatic density perturbations. Implicit in that scenario is that the curvaton offers a new mechanism for reheating after inflation, as it is a form of energy density not diluted by the inflationary expansion. We consider curvaton reheating in the context of a braneworld inflation model, {\em steep inflation}, which features a novel use of the braneworld to give a new mechanism for ending inflation. The original steep inflation model featured reheating by gravitational particle production, but the inefficiency of that process brings observational difficulties. We demonstrate here that the phenomenology of steep inflation is much improved by curvaton reheating.
[144]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0306305  [pdf] - 57386
Constraining slow-roll inflation with WMAP and 2dF
Comments: 8 pages RevTeX4 file with six figures incorporated
Submitted: 2003-06-16
We constrain slow-roll inflationary models using the recent WMAP data combined with data from the VSA, CBI, ACBAR and 2dF experiments. We find the slow-roll parameters to be $0 < \epsilon_1 < 0.032$ and $\epsilon_2 + 5.0 \epsilon_1 = 0.036 \pm 0.025$. For inflation models $V \propto \phi^{\alpha}$ we find that $\alpha< 3.9, 4.3$ at the 2$\sigma$ and $3\sigma$ levels, indicating that the $\lambda\phi^4$ model is under very strong pressure from observations. We define a convergence criterion to judge the necessity of introducing further power spectrum parameters such as the spectral index and running of the spectral index. This criterion is typically violated by models with large negative running that fit the data, indicating that the running cannot be reliably measured with present data.
[145]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0304277  [pdf] - 56185
K-essence and the coincidence problem
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX4 file with two figures incorporated. Minor changes to match PRD accepted version
Submitted: 2003-04-15, last modified: 2003-05-26
K-essence has been proposed as a possible means of explaining the coincidence problem of the Universe beginning to accelerate only at the present epoch. We carry out a comprehensive dynamical systems analysis of the k-essence models given so far in the literature. We numerically study the basin of attraction of the tracker solutions and we highlight the behaviour of the field close to sound speed divergences. We find that, when written in terms of parameters with a simple dynamical interpretation, the basins of attraction represent only a small region of the phase space.
[146]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0305357  [pdf] - 56830
Cosmological perturbations and the reionization epoch
Comments: 6 pages LaTeX file with 3 figures incorporated
Submitted: 2003-05-20
We investigate the dependence of the epoch of reionization on the properties of cosmological perturbations, in the context of cosmologies permitted by WMAP. We compute the redshift of reionization using a simple model based on the Press-Schechter approximation. For a power-law initial spectrum we estimate that reionization is likely to occur at a redshift $z_{reion} = 17^{+10}_{-7}$, consistent with the WMAP determination based on the temperature-polarization cross power spectrum. We estimate the delay in reionization if there is a negative running of the spectral index, as weakly indicated by WMAP. We then investigate the dependence of the reionization redshift on the nature of the initial perturbations. We consider chi-squared probability distribution functions with various degrees of freedom, motivated both by non-standard inflationary scenarios and by defect models. We find that in these models reionization is likely occur much earlier, and to be a slower process, than in the case of initial gaussian fluctuations. We also consider a hybrid model in which cosmic strings make an important contribution to the seed fluctuations on scales relevant for reionization. We find that in order for that model to agree with the latest WMAP results, the string contribution to the matter power spectrum on the standard $8 h^{-1} Mpc$ scale is likely to be at most at the level of one percent, which imposes tight constraints on the value of the string mass per unit length.
[147]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0301568  [pdf] - 1468490
Primordial black holes in braneworld cosmologies: astrophysical constraints
Comments: 17 pages RevTeX4 file with three figures incorporated; final paper in series astro-ph/0205149 and astro-ph/0208299. Minor changes to match version accepted by Physical Review D
Submitted: 2003-01-29, last modified: 2003-05-12
In two recent papers we explored the modifications to primordial black hole physics when one moves to the simplest braneworld model, Randall--Sundrum type II. Both the evaporation law and the cosmological evolution of the population can be modified, and additionally accretion of energy from the background can be dominant over evaporation at high energies. In this paper we present a detailed study of how this impacts upon various astrophysical constraints, analyzing constraints from the present density, from the present high-energy photon background radiation, from distortion of the microwave background spectrum, and from processes affecting light element abundances both during and after nucleosynthesis. Typically, the constraints on the formation rate of primordial black holes weaken as compared to the standard cosmology if black hole accretion is unimportant at high energies, but can be strengthened in the case of efficient accretion.
[148]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0202094  [pdf] - 47589
Cosmological parameter estimation and the inflationary cosmology
Comments: 15 pages RevTeX file with figures incorporated. Slow-roll inflation module for use with the CAMB program can be found at http://astronomy.cpes.susx.ac.uk/~sleach/inflation/ This version corrects a typo in the definition of z_S (after Eq.1) and supersedes the journal version
Submitted: 2002-02-05, last modified: 2003-04-25
We consider approaches to cosmological parameter estimation in the inflationary cosmology, focussing on the required accuracy of the initial power spectra. Parametrizing the spectra, for example by power-laws, is well suited to testing the inflationary paradigm but will only correctly estimate cosmological parameters if the parametrization is sufficiently accurate, and we investigate conditions under which this is achieved both for present data and for upcoming satellite data. If inflation is favoured, reliable estimation of its physical parameters requires an alternative approach adopting its detailed predictions. For slow-roll inflation, we investigate the accuracy of the predicted spectra at first and second order in the slow-roll expansion (presenting the complete second-order corrections for the tensors for the first time). We find that within the presently-allowed parameter space, there are regions where it will be necessary to include second-order corrections to reach the accuracy requirements of MAP and Planck satellite data. We end by proposing a data analysis pipeline appropriate for testing inflation and for cosmological parameter estimation from high-precision data.
[149]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302279  [pdf] - 375304
A new view of k-essence
Comments: 7 pages RevTeX4 file with four figures incorporated
Submitted: 2003-02-14
K-essence models, relying on scalar fields with non-canonical kinetic terms, have been proposed as an alternative to quintessence in explaining the observed acceleration of the Universe. We consider the use of field redefinitions to cast k-essence in a more familiar form. While k-essence models cannot in general be rewritten in the form of quintessence models, we show that in certain dynamical regimes an equivalence can be made, which in particular can shed light on the tracking behaviour of k-essence. In several cases, k-essence cannot be observationally distinguished from quintessence using the homogeneous evolution, though there may be small effects on the perturbation spectrum. We make a detailed analysis of two k-essence models from the literature and comment on the nature of the fine tuning arising in the models.
[150]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0207213  [pdf] - 50356
Microwave background constraints on inflationary parameters
Comments: 6 pages LaTeX file with figures incorporated. Major revisions including incorporation of new datasets (CBI and Archeops). Slow-roll inflation module for use with the CAMB program can be found at http://astronomy.cpes.susx.ac.uk/~sleach/inflation/
Submitted: 2002-07-10, last modified: 2002-12-06
We use a compilation of cosmic microwave anisotropy data (including the recent VSA, CBI and Archeops results), supplemented with an additional constraint on the expansion rate, to directly constrain the parameters of slow-roll inflation models. We find good agreement with other papers concerning the cosmological parameters, and display constraints on the power spectrum amplitude from inflation and the first two slow-roll parameters, finding in particular that $\epsilon_1 < 0.057$. The technique we use for parametrizing inflationary spectra may become essential once the data quality improves significantly.
[151]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0207493  [pdf] - 50636
Supermassive black holes in scalar field galaxy halos
Comments: 5 pages RevTex4, no figures. Updated file to match published version
Submitted: 2002-07-23, last modified: 2002-11-15
Ultra-light scalar fields provide an interesting alternative to WIMPS as halo dark matter. In this paper we consider the effect of embedding a supermassive black hole within such a halo, and estimate the absorption probability and the accretion rate of dark matter onto the black hole. We show that the accretion rate would be small over the lifetime of a typical halo, and hence that supermassive central black holes can coexist with scalar field halos.
[152]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0208299  [pdf] - 51115
Primordial black holes in braneworld cosmologies: Accretion after formation
Comments: 6 pages RevTeX4 file. Extension to discussion of thermal balance and grey-body factors
Submitted: 2002-08-15, last modified: 2002-09-24
We recently studied the formation and evaporation of primordial black holes in a simple braneworld cosmology, namely Randall-Sundrum Type II. Here we study the effect of accretion from the cosmological background onto the black holes after formation. While it is generally believed that in the standard cosmology such accretion is of negligible importance, we find that during the high-energy regime of braneworld cosmology accretion can be the dominant effect and lead to a mass increase of potentially orders of magnitude. However, unfortunately the growth is exponentially sensitive to the accretion efficiency, which cannot be determined accurately. Since accretion becomes unimportant once the high-energy regime is over, it does not affect any constraints expressed at the time of black hole evaporation, but it can change the interpretation of those constraints in terms of early Universe formation rates.
[153]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0208562  [pdf] - 51378
Evolution of large-scale perturbations in quintessence models
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX4 file with two figures incorporated
Submitted: 2002-08-30
We carry out a comprehensive study of the dynamics of large-scale perturbations in quintessence scenarios. We model the contents of the Universe by a perfect fluid with equation of state w_f and a scalar field Q with potential V(Q). We are able to reduce the perturbation equations to a system of four first-order equations. During each of the five main regimes of quintessence field behaviour, these equations have constant coefficients, enabling analytic solution of the perturbation evolution by eigenvector decomposition. We determine these solutions and discuss their main properties.
[154]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0205149  [pdf] - 386143
Primordial black holes in braneworld cosmologies: Formation, cosmological evolution and evaporation
Comments: 9 pages RevTeX4 file with four figures incorporated, minor changes to match published version
Submitted: 2002-05-10, last modified: 2002-07-19
We consider the population evolution and evaporation of primordial black holes in the simplest braneworld cosmology, Randall-Sundrum type II. We demonstrate that black holes forming during the high-energy phase of this theory (where the expansion rate is proportional to the density) have a modified evaporation law, resulting in a longer lifetime and lower temperature at evaporation, while those forming in the standard regime behave essentially as in the standard cosmology. For sufficiently large values of the AdS radius, the high-energy regime can be the one relevant for primordial black holes evaporating at key epochs such as nucleosynthesis and the present. We examine the formation epochs of such black holes, and delimit the parameter regimes where the standard scenario is significantly modified.
[155]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0203232  [pdf] - 48253
Initial conditions for quintessence after inflation
Comments: 6 pages RevTeX4 file with five figures incorporated. Matches published version
Submitted: 2002-03-14, last modified: 2002-07-10
We consider the behaviour of a quintessence field during an inflationary epoch, in order to learn how inflation influences the likely initial conditions for quintessence. We use the stochastic inflation formalism to study quantum fluctuations induced in the quintessence field during the early stages of inflation, and conclude that these drive its mean to large values (> 0.1 m_{Planck}). Consequently we find that tracker behaviour typically starts at low redshift, long after nucleosynthesis and most likely also after decoupling.
[156]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0203076  [pdf] - 48097
The simplest curvaton model
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX4 file with three figures incorporated
Submitted: 2002-03-06, last modified: 2002-04-29
We analyze the simplest possible realization of the curvaton scenario, where a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic perturbations is generated by conversion of an isocurvature perturbation generated during inflation, rather than the usual inflationary mechanism. We explicitly evaluate all the constraints on the model, under both the assumptions of prompt and delayed reheating, and outline the viable parameter space.
[157]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0111394  [pdf] - 46160
Constraining the Matter Power Spectrum Normalization using the SDSS/RASS and REFLEX Cluster surveys
Comments: Accepted to ApJ Letters. 4 pages using emulateapj.sty
Submitted: 2001-11-20, last modified: 2002-03-17
We describe a new approach to constrain the amplitude of the power spectrum of matter perturbations in the Universe, parametrized by sigma_8 as a function of the matter density Omega_0. We compare the galaxy cluster X-ray luminosity function of the REFLEX survey with the theoretical mass function of Jenkins et al. (2001), using the mass-luminosity relationship obtained from weak lensing data for a sample of galaxy clusters identified in Sloan Digital Sky Survey commissioning data and confirmed through cross-correlation with the ROSAT all-sky survey. We find sigma_8 = 0.38 Omega_0^(-0.48+0.27 Omega_ 0), which is significantly different from most previous results derived from comparable calculations that used the X-ray temperature function. We discuss possible sources of systematic error that may cause such a discrepancy, and in the process uncover a possible inconsistency between the REFLEX luminosity function and the relation between cluster X-ray luminosity and mass obtained by Reiprich & Bohringer (2001).
[158]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0112449  [pdf] - 46822
Can simulations reproduce the observed temperature-mass relation for clusters of galaxies?
Comments: 5 pages, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2001-12-19
It has become increasingly apparent that traditional hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters are unable to reproduce the observed properties of galaxy clusters, in particular overpredicting the mass corresponding to a given cluster temperature. Such overestimation may lead to systematic errors in results using galaxy clusters as cosmological probes, such as constraints on the density perturbation normalization sigma_8. In this paper we demonstrate that inclusion of additional gas physics, namely radiative cooling and a possible preheating of gas prior to cluster formation, is able to bring the temperature-mass relation in the innermost parts of clusters into good agreement with recent determinations by Allen, Schmidt & Fabian using Chandra data.
[159]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0111556  [pdf] - 46322
Inflationary Cosmology: Status and Prospects
Comments: Invited talk at COSMO-01 Workshop, Rovaniemi, Finland, August 30 - September 4, 2001
Submitted: 2001-11-29
This article gives a brief overview of the status of attempts to constrain inflation using observations, and examines prospects for future developments.
[160]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0109412  [pdf] - 44911
Inflaton potential reconstruction in the braneworld scenario
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX4 file with four figures incorporated; minor addition to discussion
Submitted: 2001-09-24, last modified: 2001-11-19
We consider inflaton potential reconstruction in the context of the simplest braneworld scenario, where both the Friedmann equation and the form of scalar and tensor perturbations are modified at high energies. We derive the reconstruction equations, and analyze them analytically in the high-energy limit and numerically for the general case. As previously shown by Huey and Lidsey, the consistency equation between scalar and tensor perturbations is unchanged in the braneworld scenario. We show that this leads to a perfect degeneracy in reconstruction, whereby a different viable potential can be obtained for any value of the brane tension $\lambda$. Accordingly, the initial perturbations alone cannot be used to distinguish the braneworld scenario from the usual Einstein gravity case.
[161]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0111131  [pdf] - 45897
Tracing Cosmic Evolution with an XMM Serendipitous Cluster Survey
Comments: 4 pages; "Tracing cosmic evolution with galaxy clusters" (Sesto Pusteria 3-6 July 2001), ASP Conference Series in press
Submitted: 2001-11-06
This paper describes updated predictions, as a function of the underlying cosmological model, for a serendipitous galaxy cluster survey that we plan to conduct with the {\em XMM-Newton} X-ray Satellite. We have included the effects of the higher than anticipated internal background count rates and have expanded our predictions to include clusters detected at 3 sigma. Even with the enhanced background levels, we expect the XCS to detect sufficient clusters at z>1 to differentiate between open and flat cosmological models. We have compared the XCS cluster redshift distribution to those expected from the XMM Slew Survey and the ROSAT Massive Cluster Survey (MACS) and find them to be complementary. We conclude that the future existence of the XCS should not deter the launch of a dedicated X-ray survey satellite.
[162]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0109439  [pdf] - 44938
Inflationary Cosmology: Theory and Phenomenology
Comments: 11 pages LaTeX file (using iopart) with 4 figures included via EPSF. Article based on a talk presented at ``The Early Universe and Cosmological Observations: a Critical Review'', Cape Town, July 2001
Submitted: 2001-09-25, last modified: 2001-10-18
This article gives a brief overview of some of the theory behind the inflationary cosmology, and discusses prospects for constraining inflation using observations. Particular care is given to the question of falsifiability of inflation or of subsets of inflationary models.
[163]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0107577  [pdf] - 43948
The impact of cooling and pre-heating on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect
Comments: 4 pages LaTeX file with five figures incorporated. Various clarifications to the discussion. Further colour images and animations at http://astronomy.susx.ac.uk/users/antonio/sz.html
Submitted: 2001-07-31, last modified: 2001-09-18
We use hydrodynamical simulations to assess the impact of radiative cooling and `pre-heating' on predictions for the Sunyaev--Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Cooling significantly reduces both the mean SZ signal and its angular power spectrum, while pre-heating can give a higher mean distortion while leaving the angular power spectrum below that found in a simulation without heating or cooling. We study the relative contribution from high and low density gas, and find that in the cooling model about 60 per cent of the mean thermal distortion arises from low overdensity gas. We find that haloes dominate the thermal SZ power spectrum in all models, while in the cooling simulation the kinetic SZ power spectrum originates predominantly in lower overdensity gas.
[164]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0105361  [pdf] - 42590
The lepton asymmetry: the last chance for a critical-density cosmology?
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2001-05-21
We use a wide range of observations to constrain cosmological models possessing a significant asymmetry in the lepton sector, which offer perhaps the best chance of reconciling a critical-density Universe with current observations. The simplest case, with massless neutrinos, fails to fit many experimental data and does not lead to an acceptable model. If the neutrinos have mass of order one electron-volt (which is favoured by some neutrino observations), then models can be implemented which prove a good fit to microwave anisotropies and large-scale structure data. However, taking into account the latest microwave anisotropy results, especially those from Boomerang, we show that the model can no longer accommodate the observed baryon fraction in clusters. Together with the observed acceleration of the present Universe, this puts considerable pressure on such critical-density models.
[165]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0011384  [pdf] - 39391
Apparent and actual galaxy cluster temperatures
Comments: 7 pages LaTeX file with 13 figures incorporated (uses mn.sty and epsf). Minor changes to match MNRAS accepted version
Submitted: 2000-11-21, last modified: 2001-03-16
The redshift evolution of the galaxy cluster temperature function is a powerful probe of cosmology. However, its determination requires the measurement of redshifts for all clusters in a catalogue, which is likely to prove challenging for large catalogues expected from XMM--Newton, which may contain of order 2000 clusters with measurable temperatures distributed around the sky. In this paper we study the apparent cluster temperature, which can be obtained without cluster redshifts. We show that the apparent temperature function itself is of limited use in constraining cosmology, and so concentrate our focus on studying how apparent temperatures can be combined with other X-ray information to constrain the redshift. We also briefly study the circumstances in which non-thermal spectral features can give redshift information.
[166]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0102352  [pdf] - 41063
Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Predictions for the Planck Surveyor Satellite using the Hubble Volume Simulations
Comments: 11 pages LaTeX file with six figures incorporated, using mn.sty
Submitted: 2001-02-21
We use the billion-particle Hubble Volume simulations to make statistical predictions for the distribution of galaxy clusters that will be observed by the Planck Surveyor satellite through their effect on the cosmic microwave background -- the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. We utilize the lightcone datasets for both critical density (tauCDM) and flat low-density (LambdaCDM) cosmologies: a `full-sky' survey out to $z \sim 0.5$, two `octant' datasets out to beyond $z=1$ and a 100 square degree dataset extending to $z \sim 4$. Making simple, but robust, assumptions regarding both the thermodynamic state of the gas and the detection of objects against an unresolved background, we present the expected number of SZ sources as a function of redshift and angular size, and also by flux (for both the thermal and kinetic effects) for 3 of the relevant HFI frequency channels. We confirm the expectation that Planck will detect around $5\times 10^4$ clusters, though the exact number is sensitive to the choice of several parameters including the baryon fraction, and also to the cluster density profile, so that either cosmology may predict more clusters. We also find that the majority of detected sources should be at $z<1.5$, and we estimate that around one per cent of clusters will be spatially resolved by Planck, though this has a large uncertainty.
[167]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0101406  [pdf] - 40544
Enhancement of superhorizon scale inflationary curvature perturbations
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX file with 2 figures incorporated v2:Contains important O(k^2) correction
Submitted: 2001-01-23, last modified: 2001-02-21
We show that there exists a simple mechanism which can enhance the amplitude of curvature perturbations on superhorizon scales during inflation, relative to their amplitude at horizon crossing. The enhancement may occur even in a single-field inflaton model, and occurs if the quantity $a\dot\phi/H$ becomes sufficiently small, as compared to its value at horizon crossing, for some time interval during inflation. We give a criterion for this enhancement in general single-field inflation models.
[168]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0010082  [pdf] - 38430
Inflationary perturbations near horizon crossing
Comments: 7 pages RevTeX file with six figures incorporated. Minor changes to match published version
Submitted: 2000-10-04, last modified: 2001-01-11
We study the behaviour of inflationary density perturbations in the vicinity of horizon crossing, using numerical evolution of the relevant mode equations. We explore two specific scenarios. In one, inflation is temporarily ended because a portion of the potential is too steep to support inflation. We find that perturbations on super-horizon scales can be modified, usually leading to a large amplification, because of entropy perturbations in the scalar field. This leads to a broad feature in the power spectrum, and the slow-roll and Stewart--Lyth approximations, which assume the perturbations reach an asymptotic regime well outside the horizon, can fail by many orders of magnitude in this regime. In the second scenario we consider perturbations generated right at the end of inflation, which re-enter shortly after inflation ends --- such perturbations can be relevant for primordial black hole formation.
[169]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9812125  [pdf] - 104232
Cosmic microwave background constraints on the epoch of reionization
Comments: 9 pages LaTeX file with ten figures incorporated (uses mn.sty and epsf). Corrects some equation typos, superseding published version
Submitted: 1998-12-07, last modified: 2001-01-10
We use a compilation of cosmic microwave anisotropy data to constrain the epoch of reionization in the Universe, as a function of cosmological parameters. We consider spatially-flat cosmologies, varying the matter density $\Omega_0$ (the flatness being restored by a cosmological constant), the Hubble parameter $h$ and the spectral index $n$ of the primordial power spectrum. Our results are quoted both in terms of the maximum permitted optical depth to the last-scattering surface, and in terms of the highest allowed reionization redshift assuming instantaneous reionization. For critical-density models, significantly-tilted power spectra are excluded as they cannot fit the current data for any amount of reionization, and even scale-invariant models must have an optical depth to last scattering of below 0.3. For the currently-favoured low-density model with $\Omega_0 = 0.3$ and a cosmological constant, the earliest reionization permitted to occur is at around redshift 35, which roughly coincides with the highest estimate in the literature. We provide general fitting functions for the maximum permitted optical depth, as a function of cosmological parameters. We do not consider the inclusion of tensor perturbations, but if present they would strengthen the upper limits we quote.
[170]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0101149  [pdf] - 40287
The effect of reionization on the COBE normalization
Comments: 3 pages LaTeX file with three figures incorporated (uses mn.sty and epsf)
Submitted: 2001-01-10
We point out that the effect of reionization on the microwave anisotropy power spectrum is not necessarily negligible on the scales probed by COBE. It can lead to an upward shift of the COBE normalization by more than the one-sigma error quoted ignoring reionization. We provide a fitting function to incorporate reionization into the normalization of the matter power spectrum.
[171]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0011365  [pdf] - 39372
Gravitino production in the warm inflationary scenario
Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures, submitted to Phys Rev D
Submitted: 2000-11-20
We estimate the production of gravitinos during and after the end of a period of warm inflation, a model in which radiation is produced continuously as the field rolls down the potential producing dissipation. We find that gravitino production is efficient for models in the strong dissipation regime, with the result that standard nucleosynthesis is disrupted unless the magnitude of the inflaton potential is very small. Combining this with the constraint from the thermal production of adiabatic density perturbations we find the dissipation rate must be extraordinarily strong, or that the potential is very flat.
[172]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0006421  [pdf] - 36801
Steep inflation: ending braneworld inflation by gravitational particle production
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX file; corrections include a change to the gravitational wave amplitude, which is now predicted to be detectable
Submitted: 2000-06-29, last modified: 2000-11-17
We propose a scenario for inflation based upon the braneworld picture, in which high-energy corrections to the Friedmann equation permit inflation to take place with potentials ordinarily too steep to sustain it. Inflation ends when the braneworld corrections begin to lose their dominance. Reheating may naturally be brought about via gravitational particle production, rather than the usual inflaton decay mechanism; the reheat temperature may be low enough to satisfy the gravitino bound and the Universe becomes radiation dominated early enough for nucleosynthesis. We illustrate the idea by considering steep exponential potentials, and show they can give satisfactory density perturbations (both amplitude and slope) and reheat successfully. The scalar field may survive to the present epoch without violating observational bounds, and could be invoked in the quintessential inflation scenario of Peebles and Vilenkin.
[173]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0011187  [pdf] - 39194
Hydrodynamical simulations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect: the kinetic effect
Comments: 9 pages LaTeX file with seventeen figures (including some in colour) incorporated. Further colour images and animations at http://star-www.cpes.susx.ac.uk/~andrewl/sz/sz.html
Submitted: 2000-11-09
We use hydrodynamical N-body simulations to study the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. We construct sets of maps, one square degree in size, in three different cosmological models. We confirm earlier calculations that on the scales studied the kinetic effect is much smaller than the thermal (except close to the thermal null point), with an rms dispersion smaller by about a factor five in the Rayleigh-Jeans region. We study the redshift dependence of the rms distortion and the pixel distribution at the present epoch. We compute the angular power spectra of the maps, including their redshift dependence, and compare them with the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and with the expected cosmic microwave background anisotropy spectrum as well as with determinations by other authors. We correlate the kinetic effect with the thermal effect both pixel-by-pixel and for identified thermal sources in the maps to assess the extent to which the kinetic effect is enhanced in locations of strong thermal signal.
[174]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0010639  [pdf] - 38986
Super-horizon perturbations and preheating
Comments: 4 pages, talk presented at "Cosmology and Particle Physics 2000", Verbier (Switzerland), 17-28 July 2000
Submitted: 2000-10-31
We discuss the evolution of linear perturbations about a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background metric, using only the local conservation of energy-momentum. We show that on sufficiently large scales the curvature perturbation on spatial hypersurfaces of uniform-density is constant when the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation is negligible. We clarify the conditions under which super-horizon curvature perturbations may vary, using preheating as an example.
[175]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9911499  [pdf] - 109627
A Serendipitous Galaxy Cluster Survey with XMM: Expected Catalogue Properties and Scientific Applications
Comments: Accepted to ApJ. Minor changes, e.g. presentation of temperature errors as a figure (rather than as a table). Latex (20 pages, 6 figures, uses emulateapj.sty)
Submitted: 1999-11-29, last modified: 2000-10-23
This paper describes a serendipitous galaxy cluster survey that we plan to conduct with the XMM X-ray satellite. We have modeled the expected properties of such a survey for three different cosmological models, using an extended Press-Schechter (Press & Schechter 1974) formalism, combined with a detailed characterization of the expected capabilities of the EPIC camera on board XMM. We estimate that, over the ten year design lifetime of XMM, the EPIC camera will image a total of ~800 square degrees in fields suitable for the serendipitous detection of clusters of galaxies. For the presently-favored low-density model with a cosmological constant, our simulations predict that this survey area would yield a catalogue of more than 8000 clusters, ranging from poor to very rich systems, with around 750 detections above z=1. A low-density open Universe yields similar numbers, though with a different redshift distribution, while a critical-density Universe gives considerably fewer clusters. This dependence of catalogue properties on cosmology means that the proposed survey will place strong constraints on the values of Omega-Matter and Omega-Lambda. The survey would also facilitate a variety of follow-up projects, including the quantification of evolution in the cluster X-ray luminosity-temperature relation, the study of high-redshift galaxies via gravitational lensing, follow-up observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and foreground analyses of cosmic microwave background maps.
[176]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0009491  [pdf] - 38333
Acceleration of the Universe
Comments: 31 pages LaTeX file with two figures incorporated. Paper efficient 2up landscape version (16 pages) at http://star-www.cpes.susx.ac.uk/~andrewl/cargese2.ps.gz Based on talks given at `Understanding our Universe at the close of the 20th century', Cargese, April 2000. Companion paper to astro-ph/0009492 by Pedro Viana
Submitted: 2000-09-29
The cosmological model best capable of fitting current observational data features two separate epochs during which the Universe is accelerating. During the earliest stages of the Universe, such acceleration is known as cosmological inflation, believed to explain the global properties of the Universe and the origin of structure. Observations of the present state of the Universe strongly suggest that its density is currently dominated by dark energy with properties equivalent or similar to a cosmological constant. In these lecture notes, I provide an introductory account of both topics, including the possibility that the two epochs may share the same physical description, and give an overview of the current status.
[177]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0006020  [pdf] - 36400
Initial conditions for hybrid inflation
Comments: 6 pages RevTeX file with four figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). Updates to match accepted version
Submitted: 2000-06-01, last modified: 2000-09-22
In hybrid inflation models, typically only a tiny fraction of possible initial conditions give rise to successful inflation, even if one assumes spatial homogeneity. We analyze some possible solutions to this initial conditions problem, namely assisted hybrid inflation and hybrid inflation on the brane. While the former is successful in achieving the onset of inflation for a wide range of initial conditions, it lacks sound physical motivation at present. On the other hand, in the context of the presently much discussed brane cosmology, extra friction terms appear in the Friedmann equation which solve this initial conditions problem in a natural way.
[178]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0004296  [pdf] - 35655
Black hole constraints on the running-mass inflation model
Comments: 7 pages RevTeX file with seven figures incorporated, minor changes to match accepted version
Submitted: 2000-04-20, last modified: 2000-06-26
The running-mass inflation model, which has strong motivation from particle physics, predicts density perturbations whose spectral index is strongly scale-dependent. For a large part of parameter space the spectrum rises sharply to short scales. In this paper we compute the production of primordial black holes, using both analytic and numerical calculation of the density perturbation spectra. Observational constraints from black hole production are shown to exclude a large region of otherwise permissible parameter space.
[179]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0003278  [pdf] - 35152
A new approach to the evolution of cosmological perturbations on large scales
Comments: 8 pages, revtex, 1 figure, version to appear in Phys Rev D. Sign errors in original version corrected plus other minor additions
Submitted: 2000-03-20, last modified: 2000-06-02
We discuss the evolution of linear perturbations about a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background metric, using only the local conservation of energy-momentum. We show that on sufficiently large scales the curvature perturbation on spatial hypersurfaces of uniform-density is conserved when the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation is negligible. This is the first time that this result has been demonstrated independently of the gravitational field equations. A physical picture of long-wavelength perturbations as being composed of separate Robertson-Walker universes gives a simple understanding of the possible evolution of the curvature perturbation, in particular clarifying the conditions under which super-horizon curvature perturbations may vary.
[180]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9907224  [pdf] - 1469793
Hydrodynamical simulations of the Sunyaev--Zel'dovich effect
Comments: 9 pages LaTeX file with eleven figures (including four in colour) incorporated (uses mn.sty and epsf). Further colour images and animations at http://star-www.cpes.susx.ac.uk/~andrewl/sz/sz.html Updated to match published version
Submitted: 1999-07-16, last modified: 2000-05-23
We use a hydrodynamical N-body code to generate simulated maps, of size one square degree, of the thermal SZ effect. We study three different cosmologies; the currently-favoured low-density model with a cosmological constant, a critical-density model and a low-density open model. We stack simulation boxes corresponding to different redshifts in order to include contributions to the Compton y-parameter out to the highest necessary redshifts. Our main results are: 1. The mean y-distortion is around $4 \times 10^{-6}$ for low-density cosmologies, and $1 \times 10^{-6}$ for critical density. These are below current limits, but not by a wide margin in the former case. 2. In low-density cosmologies, the mean y-distortion comes from a broad range of redshifts, the bulk coming from $z < 2$ and a tail out to $z \sim 5$. For critical-density models, most of the contribution comes from $z < 1$. 3. The number of SZ sources above a given $y$ depends strongly on instrument resolution. For a one arcminute beam, there is around 0.1 sources per square degree with $y > 10^{-5}$ in a critical-density Universe, and around 8 such sources per square degree in low-density models. Low-density models with and without a cosmological constant give very similar results. 4. We estimate that the {\sc Planck} satellite will be able to see of order 25000 SZ sources if the Universe has a low density, or around 10000 if it has critical density.
[181]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9906327  [pdf] - 107048
Inflaton potential reconstruction without slow-roll
Comments: 6 pages RevTeX file with four figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). Minor changes including extra illustrative potential reconstruction
Submitted: 1999-06-21, last modified: 2000-01-19
We describe a method of obtaining the inflationary potential from observations which does not use the slow-roll approximation. Rather, the microwave anisotropy spectrum is obtained directly from a parametrized potential numerically, with no approximation beyond linear perturbation theory. This permits unbiased estimation of the parameters describing the potential, as well as providing the full error covariance matrix. We illustrate the typical uncertainties obtained using the Fisher information matrix technique, studying the $\lambda \phi^4$ potential in detail as a concrete example.
[182]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/9912473  [pdf] - 116652
Super-horizon perturbations and preheating
Comments: 6 pages, Revtex with epsf, 1 figure
Submitted: 1999-12-22
It has recently been claimed by Bassett et al that preheating after inflation may affect the amplitude of curvature perturbations on large scales, undermining the usual inflationary prediction. We analyze the simplest model, and confirm the results of Jedamzik and Sigl and of Ivanov that in linear perturbation theory the effect is negligible. However the dominant effect is second-order in the field perturbation and we show that this too is negligible, and hence conclude that preheating has no significant influence on large-scale perturbations in this model. We briefly discuss the likelihood of an effect in other models.
[183]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9912349  [pdf] - 110012
Perturbation amplitude in isocurvature inflation scenarios
Comments: 7 pages RevTeX file with one figure
Submitted: 1999-12-16
We make a detailed calculation of the amplitude of isocurvature perturbations arising from inflationary models in which the cold dark matter is represented by a scalar field which acquires perturbations during inflation. We use this to compute the normalization to large-angle microwave background anisotropies. Unlike the case of adiabatic perturbations, the normalization to COBE fixes the spectral index of the perturbations; if adiabatic perturbations are negligible then $n_{iso} \simeq 0.4$. Such blue spectra are also favoured by other observational data. Although the pure isocurvature models are unlikely to adequately fit the entire observational data set, these results also have implications for models with mixed adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations.
[184]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9911103  [pdf] - 109231
The dearth of halo dwarf galaxies: is there power on short scales?
Comments: 5 pages LaTeX, 3 figures
Submitted: 1999-11-05
N-body simulations of structure formation with scale-invariant primordial perturbations show significantly more virialized objects of dwarf-galaxy mass in a typical galactic halo than are observed around the Milky Way. We show that the dearth of observed dwarf galaxies could be explained by a dramatic downturn in the power spectrum at small distance scales. This suppression of small-scale power might also help mitigate the disagreement between cuspy simulated halos and smooth observed halos, while remaining consistent with Lyman-alpha-forest constraints on small-scale power. Such a spectrum could arise in inflationary models with broken scale invariance.
[185]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/9910499  [pdf] - 116606
Dynamics and perturbations in assisted chaotic inflation
Comments: 10 pages, revtex, 2 figures
Submitted: 1999-10-26
On compactification from higher dimensions, a single free massive scalar field gives rise to a set of effective four-dimensional scalar fields, each with a different mass. These can cooperate to drive a period of inflation known as assisted inflation. We analyze the dynamics of the simplest implementation of this idea, paying particular attention to the decoupling of fields from the slow-roll regime as inflation proceeds. Unlike normal models of inflation, the dynamics does not become independent of the initial conditions at late times. In particular, we estimate the density perturbations obtained, which retain a memory of the initial conditions even though a homogeneous, spatially-flat Universe is generated.
[186]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9910110  [pdf] - 108664
Observational tests of inflation
Comments: 13 pages LaTeX file with 2 figures input with epsf. To appear, proceedings of `Inner Space, Outer Space II', Fermilab, May 1999
Submitted: 1999-10-06
We are on the verge of the first precision testing of the inflationary cosmology as a model for the origin of structure in the Universe. I review the key predictions of inflation which can be used as observational tests, in the sense of allowing inflation to be falsified. The most important prediction of this type is that the perturbations will cross inside the Hubble radius entirely in their growing mode, though nongaussianity can also provide critical tests. Spatial flatness and tensor perturbations may offer strong support to inflation, but cannot be used to exclude it. Finally, I discuss the extent to which observations will distinguish between inflation models, should the paradigm survive these key tests, in particular describing a technique for reconstruction of the inflaton potential which does not require the slow-roll approximation.
[187]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/9811040  [pdf] - 113093
Early cosmology and the stochastic gravitational wave background
Comments: 17 pages RevTeX file with eight figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). No modifications to results but substantial changes to discussion
Submitted: 1998-11-12, last modified: 1999-05-13
The epoch when the Universe had a temperature higher than a GeV is long before any time at which we have reliable observations constraining the cosmological evolution. For example, the occurrence of a second burst of inflation (sometimes called thermal inflation) at a lower energy scale than standard inflation, or a short epoch of early matter domination, cannot be ruled out by present cosmological data. The cosmological stochastic gravitational wave background, on scales accessible to interferometer detection, is sensitive to non-standard cosmologies of this type. We consider the implications of such alternative models both for ground-based experiments such as LIGO and space-based proposals such as LISA. We show that a second burst of inflation leads to a scale-dependent reduction in the spectrum. Applied to conventional inflation, this further reduces an already disappointingly low signal. In the pre big bang scenario, where a much more potent signal is possible, the amplitude is reduced but the background remains observable by LISA in certain parameter space regions. In each case, a second epoch of inflation induces oscillatory features into the spectrum in a manner analogous to the acoustic peaks in the density perturbation spectrum. On LIGO scales, perturbations can only survive through thermal inflation with detectable amplitudes if their amplitudes were at one time so large that linear perturbation theory is inadequate. Although for an epoch of early matter domination the reduction in the expected signal is not as large as the one caused by a second burst of inflation, the detection in the context of the pre big bang scenario may not be possible since the spectrum peaks around the LIGO frequency window and for lower frequencies behaves as $f^3$.
[188]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9901268  [pdf] - 1462721
Critical collapse and the primordial black hole initial mass function
Comments: 8 pages RevTeX file with ten figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). Minor changes to dicussion only
Submitted: 1999-01-20, last modified: 1999-04-20
It has normally been assumed that primordial black holes (PBHs) always form with mass approximately equal to the mass contained within the horizon at that time. Recent work studying the application of critical phenomena in gravitational collapse to PBH formation has shown that in fact, at a fixed time, PBHs with a range of masses are formed. When calculating the PBH initial mass function it is usually assumed that all PBHs form at the same horizon mass. It is not clear, however, that it is consistent to consider the spread in the mass of PBHs formed at a single horizon mass, whilst neglecting the range of horizon masses at which PBHs can form. We use the excursion set formalism to compute the PBH initial mass function, allowing for PBH formation at a range of horizon masses, for two forms of the density perturbation spectrum. First we examine power-law spectra with $n>1$, where PBHs form on small scales. We find that, in the limit where the number of PBHs formed is small enough to satisfy the observational constraints on their initial abundance, the mass function approaches that found by Niemeyer and Jedamzik under the assumption that all PBHs form at a single horizon mass. Second, we consider a flat perturbation spectrum with a spike at a scale corresponding to horizon mass $\sim 0.5 M_{\odot}$, and compare the resulting PBH mass function with that of the MACHOs (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) detected by microlensing observations. The predicted mass spectrum appears significantly wider than the steeply-falling spectrum found observationally.
[189]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9903195  [pdf] - 105599
Aspects of inflationary reconstruction
Comments: 4 pages LaTeX file. To appear, electronic proceedings of `19th Texas symposium', Paris
Submitted: 1999-03-12
I review various aspects of techniques for reconstructing the potential of the inflaton field from observations, with special emphasis on difficulties which might arise. While my view is that if inflation is to prove viable then most likely it will be one of the simplest models, it is important to consider the impact should we need to move to a more complicated model-building realm.
[190]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9902245  [pdf] - 105264
Galaxy Cluster Abundance Evolution and Cosmological Parameters
Comments: 7 pages, LaTex using emulateapj.sty, to appear in the electronic proceedings of the conference Cosmological Constraints from X-ray Clusters, Strasbourg, France, Dec. 9-11, 1998
Submitted: 1999-02-17
We use the observed evolution of the galaxy cluster X-ray integral temperature distribution function between z=0.05 and z=0.32 in an attempt to constrain the value of the density parameter, Omega_0, for both open and spatially-flat universes. We conclude that when all the most important sources of possible error, both in the observational data and in the theoretical modelling, are taken into account, an unambiguous determination of Omega_0 is not feasible at present. Nevertheless, we find that values of Omega_0 around 0.75 are most favoured, with Omega_0<0.3 excluded with at least 90 per cent confidence. In particular, the Omega_0=1 hypothesis is found to be still viable.
[191]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9901124  [pdf] - 104718
An introduction to cosmological inflation
Comments: 36 pages LaTeX file, with five figures incorporated using epsf. Page-efficient 2up postscript version (18 pages) at http://icstar5.ph.ic.ac.uk/~andrewl/trieste2up.ps To appear, proceedings of ICTP summer school in high-energy physics, 1998
Submitted: 1999-01-11
An introductory account is given of the inflationary cosmology, which postulates a period of accelerated expansion during the Universe's earliest stages. The historical motivation is briefly outlined, and the modelling of the inflationary epoch explained. The most important aspect of inflation is that it provides a possible model for the origin of structure in the Universe, and key results are reviewed, along with a discussion of the current observational situation and outlook.
[192]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9901041  [pdf] - 104635
Inflation and the cosmic microwave background
Comments: 7 pages LaTeX file, with two figures incorporated using epsf. To appear, proceedings of `3K cosmology', Roma, ed F Melchiorri
Submitted: 1999-01-05
Various issues concerning the impact of inflationary models on parameter estimation from the cosmic microwave background are reviewed, with particular focus on the range of possible outcomes of inflationary models and on the amount which might be learnt about inflation from the microwave background.
[193]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9803244  [pdf] - 1235209
Galaxy clusters at 0.3 < z < 0.4 and the value of \Omega_0
Comments: 12 pages LaTeX file with six figures incorporated (uses mn.sty and epsf). Matches accepted version. Minor changes to results. Includes new fitting functions for \sigma_8, superseding those of Viana & Liddle 1996
Submitted: 1998-03-20, last modified: 1998-11-05
The observed evolution of the galaxy cluster X-ray integral temperature distribution function between $z=0.05$ and $z=0.32$ is used in an attempt to constrain the value of the density parameter, $\Omega_{0}$, for both open and spatially-flat universes. We estimate the overall uncertainty in the determination of both the observed and the predicted galaxy cluster X-ray integral temperature distribution functions at $z=0.32$ by carrying out Monte Carlo simulations, where we take into careful consideration all the most important sources of possible error. We include the effect of the formation epoch on the relation between virial mass and X-ray temperature, improving on the assumption that clusters form at the observed redshift which leads to an {\em overestimate} of $\Omega_0$. We conclude that at present both the observational data and the theoretical modelling carry sufficiently large associated uncertainties to prevent an unambiguous determination of $\Omega_{0}$. We find that values of $\Omega_{0}$ around 0.75 are most favoured, with $\Omega_{0}<0.3$ excluded with at least 90 per cent confidence. In particular, the $\Omega_{0}=1$ hypothesis is found to be still viable as far as this dataset is concerned. As a by-product, we also use the revised data on the abundance of galaxy clusters at $z=0.05$ to update the constraint on $\sigma_8$ given by Viana & Liddle 1996, finding slightly lower values than before.
[194]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9809272  [pdf] - 102976
A classification of scalar field potentials with cosmological scaling solutions
Comments: 8 pages RevTeX file with four figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf)
Submitted: 1998-09-22
An attractive method of obtaining an effective cosmological constant at the present epoch is through the potential energy of a scalar field. Considering models with a perfect fluid and a scalar field, we classify all potentials for which the scalar field energy density scales as a power-law of the scale factor when the perfect fluid density dominates. There are three possibilities. The first two are well known; the much-investigated exponential potentials have the scalar field mimicking the evolution of the perfect fluid, while for negative power-laws, introduced by Ratra and Peebles, the scalar field density grows relative to that of the fluid. The third possibility is a new one, where the potential is a positive power-law and the scalar field energy density decays relative to the perfect fluid. We provide a complete analysis of exact solutions and their stability properties, and investigate a range of possible cosmological applications.
[195]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/9711068  [pdf] - 354196
Exponential potentials and cosmological scaling solutions
Comments: 6 pages RevTeX file with four figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). Matches published version
Submitted: 1997-11-21, last modified: 1998-07-01
We present a phase-plane analysis of cosmologies containing a barotropic fluid with equation of state $p_\gamma = (\gamma-1) \rho_\gamma$, plus a scalar field $\phi$ with an exponential potential $V \propto \exp(-\lambda \kappa \phi)$ where $\kappa^2 = 8\pi G$. In addition to the well-known inflationary solutions for $\lambda^2 < 2$, there exist scaling solutions when $\lambda^2 > 3\gamma$ in which the scalar field energy density tracks that of the barotropic fluid (which for example might be radiation or dust). We show that the scaling solutions are the unique late-time attractors whenever they exist. The fluid-dominated solutions, where $V(\phi)/\rho_\gamma \to 0$ at late times, are always unstable (except for the cosmological constant case $\gamma = 0$). The relative energy density of the fluid and scalar field depends on the steepness of the exponential potential, which is constrained by nucleosynthesis to $\lambda^2 > 20$. We show that standard inflation models are unable to solve this `relic density' problem.
[196]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9804177  [pdf] - 101058
Assisted inflation
Comments: 4 pages RevTeX file (uses RevTeX). Trivial changes to match accepted version
Submitted: 1998-04-17, last modified: 1998-06-22
In inflationary scenarios with more than one scalar field, inflation may proceed even if each of the individual fields has a potential too steep for that field to sustain inflation on its own. We show that scalar fields with exponential potentials evolve so as to act cooperatively to assist inflation, by finding solutions in which the energy densities of the different scalar fields evolve in fixed proportion. Such scaling solutions exist for an arbitrary number of scalar fields, with different slopes for the exponential potentials, and we show that these solutions are the unique late-time attractors for the evolution. We determine the density perturbation spectrum produced by such a period of inflation, and show that with multiple scalar fields the spectrum is closer to the scale-invariant than the spectrum that any of the fields would generate individually.
[197]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9806127  [pdf] - 1462712
Inflation during oscillations of the inflaton
Comments: 5 pages RevTeX file with 5 figures incorporated using epsf
Submitted: 1998-06-09
Damour and Mukhanov have recently devised circumstances in which inflation may continue during the oscillatory phase which ensues once the inflaton field reaches the minimum of its potential. We confirm the existence of this phenomenon by numerical integration. In such circumstances the quantification of the amount of inflation requires particular care. We use a definition based on the decrease of the comoving Hubble length, and show that Damour and Mukhanov overestimated the amount of inflation occurring. We use the numerical calculations to check the validity of analytic approximations.
[198]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9712028  [pdf] - 99517
Cosmological parameter estimation and the spectral index from inflation
Comments: 6 pages LaTeX file with one figure incorporated (uses mn.sty and epsf). Important modifications to results
Submitted: 1997-12-02, last modified: 1998-05-27
Accurate estimation of cosmological parameters from microwave background anisotropies requires high-accuracy understanding of the cosmological model. Normally, a power-law spectrum of density perturbations is assumed, in which case the spectral index $n$ can be measured to around $\pm 0.004$ using microwave anisotropy satellites such as MAP and Planck. However, inflationary models generically predict that the spectral index $n$ of the density perturbation spectrum will be scale-dependent. We carry out a detailed investigation of the measurability of this scale dependence by Planck, including the influence of polarization on the parameter estimation. We also estimate the increase in the uncertainty in all other parameters if the scale dependence has to be included. This increase applies even if the scale dependence is too small to be measured unless it is assumed absent, but is shown to be a small effect. We study the implications for inflation models, beginning with a brief examination of the generic slow-roll inflation situation, and then move to a detailed examination of a recently-devised hybrid inflation model for which the scale dependence of $n$ may be observable.
[199]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/9804034  [pdf] - 112975
Cosmological Constraints from Primordial Black Holes
Comments: 8 pages LaTeX file, using elsart.sty, with three figures incorporated using epsf. To appear, proceedings of DM98, Los Angeles (ed D Cline, Elsevier)
Submitted: 1998-04-14
Primordial black holes may form in the early Universe, for example from the collapse of large amplitude density perturbations predicted in some inflationary models. Light black holes undergo Hawking evaporation, the energy injection from which is constrained both at the epoch of nucleosynthesis and at the present. The failure as yet to unambiguously detect primordial black holes places important constraints. In this article, we are particularly concerned with the dependence of these constraints on the model for the complete cosmological history, from the time of formation to the present. Black holes presently give the strongest constraint on the spectral index $n$ of density perturbations, though this constraint does require $n$ to be constant over a very wide range of scales.
[200]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/9803070  [pdf] - 898987
Black holes and gravitational waves in string cosmology
Comments: 6 pages RevTeX file
Submitted: 1998-03-19
Pre--big bang models of inflation based on string cosmology produce a stochastic gravitational wave background whose spectrum grows with decreasing wavelength, and which may be detectable using interferometers such as LIGO. We point out that the gravitational wave spectrum is closely tied to the density perturbation spectrum, and that the condition for producing observable gravitational waves is very similar to that for producing an observable density of primordial black holes. Detection of both would provide strong support to the string cosmology scenario.
[201]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9803152  [pdf] - 100687
Inflation and the microwave background
Comments: 6 pages LaTeX file, with one figures incorporated using epsfig. To appear, proceedings of `Fundamental Parameters in Cosmology', Moriond, January 1998
Submitted: 1998-03-13
I discuss the interplay between inflation and microwave background anisotropies, stressing in particular the accuracy with which inflation predictions need to be made, and the importance of inflation as an underlying paradigm for cosmological parameter estimation.
[202]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9802209  [pdf] - 1462707
On the reliability of inflaton potential reconstruction
Comments: 16 page LaTeX file with eight postscript figures embedded with epsf; no special macros needed
Submitted: 1998-02-15
If primordial scalar and tensor perturbation spectra can be inferred from observations of the cosmic background radiation and large-scale structure, then one might hope to reconstruct a unique single-field inflaton potential capable of generating the observed spectra. In this paper we examine conditions under which such a potential can be reliably reconstructed. For it to be possible at all, the spectra must be well fit by a Taylor series expansion. A complete reconstruction requires a statistically-significant tensor mode to be measured in the microwave background. We find that the observational uncertainties dominate the theoretical error from use of the slow-roll approximation, and conclude that the reconstruction procedure will never insidiously lead to an irrelevant potential.
[203]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9802133  [pdf] - 1462706
The radiation-matter transition in Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory
Comments: 4 pages RevTeX file with one figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf)
Submitted: 1998-02-11
We study the transition from radiation domination to matter domination in Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory, in particular examining how the Hubble length at equality depends on the coupling parameter $\omega$. We consider the prospects for using high-accuracy microwave anisotropy and large-scale structure data to constrain $\omega$ more strongly than by conventional solar system gravity experiments.
[204]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9801148  [pdf] - 99997
Inflation and the cosmic microwave background
Comments: 8 pages LaTeX file, with two figures incorporated using epsf. To appear, proceedings of `The non-sleeping universe', Porto (Astrophysics and Space Science)
Submitted: 1998-01-15
I give a status report and outlook concerning the use of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies to constrain the inflationary cosmology, and stress its crucial role as an underlying paradigm for the estimation of cosmological parameters.
[205]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9710235  [pdf] - 1502370
Primordial black holes and early cosmology
Comments: 5 pages LaTeX file, using sprocl.sty, with three figures incorporated using epsf. To appear, proceedings of Cosmo-97, Ambleside (ed L Roszkowski, World Scientific)
Submitted: 1997-10-22
We describe the changes to the standard primordial black hole constraints on density perturbations if there are modifications to the standard cosmology between the time of formation and nucleosynthesis.
[206]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9708247  [pdf] - 98425
Perturbation evolution in cosmologies with a decaying cosmological constant
Comments: 14 pages RevTeX file with three figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). Also available by e-mailing ARL, or by WWW at http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/papers/lsstru_papers.html Revised version corrects an error in Eq10; results unchanged
Submitted: 1997-08-27, last modified: 1997-10-09
Structure formation models with a cosmological constant are successful in explaining large-scale structure data, but are threatened by the magnitude-redshift relation for Type Ia supernovae. This has led to discussion of models where the cosmological `constant' decays with time, which might anyway be better motivated in a particle physics context. The simplest such models are based on scalar fields, and general covariance demands that a time-evolving scalar field also supports spatial perturbations. We consider the effect of such perturbations on the growth of adiabatic energy density perturbations in a cold dark matter component. We study two types of model, one based on an exponential potential for the scalar field and the other on a pseudo-Nambu Goldstone boson. For each potential, we study two different scenarios, one where the scalar field presently behaves as a decaying cosmological constant and one where it behaves as dust. The initial scalar field perturbations are fixed by the adiabatic condition, as expected from the inflationary cosmology, though in fact we show that the choice of initial condition is of little importance. Calculations are carried out in both the zero-shear (conformal newtonian) and uniform-curvature gauges. We find that both potentials allow models which can provide a successful alternative to cosmological constant models.
[207]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9702006  [pdf] - 1461162
On the instability of the one-texture universe
Comments: 6 pages RevTeX file with one figure incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). Minor revisions to match published version. Also available via WWW at http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/papers/early_papers.html
Submitted: 1997-01-31, last modified: 1997-07-11
The one-texture universe, introduced by Davis in 1987, is a homogeneous mapping of a scalar field with an $S^3$ vacuum into a closed universe. It has long been known to mathematicians that such solutions, although static, are unstable. We show by explicit construction that there is only one unstable mode, corresponding to collapse of the texture towards a single point, in the case where gravitational backreaction is neglected. We discuss the instability timescale in both static and expanding space-times; in the latter case it is of order of the present age of the universe, suggesting that, though unstable, the one-texture universe could survive to the present. The cosmic microwave background constrains the initial magnitude of this unstable perturbation to be less than of order 10^{-3}.
[208]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9705166  [pdf] - 1462697
Primordial black hole constraints in cosmologies with early matter domination
Comments: 7 pages RevTeX file with four figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). Also available by e-mailing ARL, or by WWW at http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/papers/infcos_papers.html
Submitted: 1997-05-21
Moduli fields, a natural prediction of any supergravity and superstring-inspired supersymmetry theory, may lead to a prolonged period of matter domination in the early Universe. This can be observationally viable provided the moduli decay early enough to avoid harming nucleosynthesis. If primordial black holes form, they would be expected to do so before or during this matter dominated era. We examine the extent to which the standard primordial black hole constraints are weakened in such a cosmology. Permitted mass fractions of black holes at formation are of order $10^{-8}$, rather than the usual $10^{-20}$ or so. If the black holes form from density perturbations with a power-law spectrum, its spectral index is limited to $n \lesssim 1.3$, rather than the $n \lesssim 1.25$ obtained in the standard cosmology.
[209]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/9705048  [pdf] - 1237450
Can Inflation be Falsified?
Comments: 7 pages LaTeX file with two figures incorporated by epsf. Fifth Prize in Gravity Research Foundation Essay Competition. To appear, General Relativity and Gravitation
Submitted: 1997-05-19
Despite its central role in modern cosmology, doubts are often expressed as to whether cosmological inflation is really a falsifiable theory. We distinguish two facets of inflation, one as a theory of initial conditions for the hot big bang and the other as a model for the origin of structure in the Universe. We argue that the latter can readily be excluded by observations, and that there are also a number of ways in which the former can find itself in conflict with observational data. Both aspects of the theory are indeed falsifiable.
[210]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9704251  [pdf] - 1462696
Constraints on the density perturbation spectrum from primordial black holes
Comments: 10 pages RevTeX file with four figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). Also available by e-mailing ARL, or by WWW at http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/papers/infcos_papers.html
Submitted: 1997-04-25
We re-examine the constraints on the density perturbation spectrum, including its spectral index $n$, from the production of primordial black holes. The standard cosmology, where the Universe is radiation dominated from the end of inflation up until the recent past, was studied by Carr, Gilbert and Lidsey; we correct two errors in their derivation and find a significantly stronger constraint than they did, $n \lesssim 1.25$ rather than their 1.5. We then consider an alternative cosmology in which a second period of inflation, known as thermal inflation and designed to solve additional relic over-density problems, occurs at a lower energy scale than the main inflationary period. In that case, the constraint weakens to $n \lesssim 1.3$, and thermal inflation also leads to a `missing mass' range, $10^{18} g \lesssim M \lesssim 10^{26} g$, in which primordial black holes cannot form. Finally, we discuss the effect of allowing for the expected non-gaussianity in the density perturbations predicted by Bullock and Primack, which can weaken the constraints further by up to 0.05.
[211]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/9704029  [pdf] - 265391
The gravitational redshift of boson stars
Comments: 7 pages RevTeX file with five figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and psfig)
Submitted: 1997-04-10
We investigate the possible gravitational redshift values for boson stars with a self-interaction, studying a wide range of possible masses. We find a limiting value of $z_{lim} \simeq 0.687$ for stable boson star configurations. We compare theoretical expectation with the observational capabilities in several different wavebands, concluding that direct observation of boson stars by this means will be extremely challenging. X-ray spectroscopy is perhaps the most interesting possibility.
[212]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9610183  [pdf] - 1461160
Complete power spectrum for an induced gravity open inflation model
Comments: 12 pages RevTeX file with four figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). Also available by e-mailing ARL, or by WWW at http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/papers/early_papers.html Only change is additional references
Submitted: 1996-10-23, last modified: 1997-01-22
We study the phenomenological constraints on a recently proposed model of open inflation in the context of induced gravity. The main interest of this model is the relatively small number of parameters, which may be constrained by many different types of observation. We evaluate the complete spectrum of density perturbations, which contains continuum sub-curvature modes, a discrete super curvature mode, and a mode associated with fluctuations in the bubble wall. From these, we compute the angular power spectrum of temperature fluctuations in the microwave background, and derive bounds on the parameters of the model so that the predicted spectrum is compatible with the observed anisotropy of the microwave background and with large-scale structure observations. We analyze the matter era and the approach of the model to general relativity. The model passes all existing constraints.
[213]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9612093  [pdf] - 96121
The Early Universe
Comments: 32 pages LaTeX file (seven figures, mostly colour, incorporated using epsf). To appear, proceedings of `From Quantum Fluctuations to Cosmological Structures', Casablanca, Morocco, December 1996. Postscript in landscape format (16 pages) at http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/papers/early_papers.html Typographical corections only
Submitted: 1996-12-10, last modified: 1997-01-08
An introductory account is given of the modern understanding of the physics of the early Universe. Particular emphasis is placed on the paradigm of cosmological inflation, which postulates a period of accelerated expansion during the Universe's earliest stages. Inflation provides a possible origin for structure in the Universe, such as microwave background anisotropies, galaxies and galaxy clusters; these observed structures can therefore be used to test models of inflation. A brief account is given of other early Universe topics, namely baryogenesis, topological defects, dark matter candidates and primordial black holes.
[214]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9701031  [pdf] - 96304
Accurately determining inflationary perturbations
Comments: 3 pages LaTeX file, using sprocl.sty, with one figure incorporated using epsf. To appear, proceedings of the 18th Texas symposium on relativistic astrophysics (eds Olinto, Frieman and Schramm, World Scientific), December 1996
Submitted: 1997-01-08
Cosmic microwave anisotropy satellites promise extremely accurate measures of the amplitude of perturbations in the universe. We use a numerical code to test the accuracy of existing approximate expressions for the amplitude of perturbations produced by single-field inflation models. We find that the second-order Stewart-Lyth calculation gives extremely accurate results, typically better than one percent. We use our code to carry out an expansion about the general power-law inflation solution, providing a fitting function giving results of even higher accuracy.
[215]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9608106  [pdf] - 1461159
Normalization of modes in an open universe
Comments: 8 pages LaTeX file (using RevTeX). Some restructuring of the arguments and additional material added; no changes to existing formulae or to the principal results
Submitted: 1996-08-16, last modified: 1996-11-12
We discuss the appropriate normalization of modes required to generate a homogeneous random field in an open Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We consider scalar random fields and certain tensor random fields that can be obtained by covariantly differentiating a scalar. Modes of interest fall into three categories: the familiar sub-curvature modes, the more recently discussed super-curvature modes, and a set of discrete modes with positive eigenvalues which can be used to generate homogeneous tensor random fields even though the underlying scalar field is not homogeneous. A particular example of the last case which has been discussed in the literature is the bubble wall fluctuation in open inflationary universes.
[216]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9610215  [pdf] - 95739
Inflation, structure formation and dark matter
Comments: 10 pages LaTeX file with eight figures incorporated using epsf. To appear, proceedings of `Aspects of dark matter in astro- and particle physics', Heidelberg, September 1996
Submitted: 1996-10-26
The formation of structure in the Universe offers some of the most powerful evidence in favour of the existence of dark matter in the Universe. We summarize recent work by ourselves and our collaborators, using linear and quasi-linear theory to probe the allowed parameter space of structure formation models with perturbations based on the inflationary cosmology. Observations used include large and intermediate angle microwave background anisotropies, galaxy clustering, the abundance of galaxy clusters and object abundances at high redshift. The cosmologies studied include critical density models with cold dark matter and with mixed dark matter, cold dark matter models with a cosmological constant and open cold dark matter models. Where possible, we have updated results from our journal papers.
[217]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9508078  [pdf] - 93134
Reconstructing the Inflaton Potential --- an Overview
Comments: 69 pages standard LaTeX plus 4 postscript figures. Postscript version of text in landscape format (35 pages) available at http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/papers/infcos_papers.html Modifications are a variety of updates to discussion and references
Submitted: 1995-08-17, last modified: 1996-10-25
We review the relation between the inflationary potential and the spectra of density (scalar) perturbations and gravitational waves (tensor perturbations) produced, with particular emphasis on the possibility of reconstructing the inflaton potential from observations. The spectra provide a potentially powerful test of the inflationary hypothesis; they are not independent but instead are linked by consistency relations reflecting their origin from a single inflationary potential. To lowest-order in a perturbation expansion there is a single, now familiar, relation between the tensor spectral index and the relative amplitude of the spectra. We demonstrate that there is an infinite hierarchy of such consistency equations, though observational difficulties suggest only the first is ever likely to be useful. We also note that since observations are expected to yield much better information on the scalars than on the tensors, it is likely to be the next-order version of this consistency equation which will be appropriate, not the lowest-order one. If inflation passes the consistency test, one can then confidently use the remaining observational information to constrain the inflationary potential, and we survey the general perturbative scheme for carrying out this procedure. Explicit expressions valid to next-lowest order in the expansion are presented. We then briefly assess the prospects for future observations reaching the quality required, and consider a simulated data set that is motivated by this outlook.
[218]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9605057  [pdf] - 1234654
Cold dark matter models with high baryon content
Comments: 14 pages, LaTeX, with 9 included figures, to appear in MNRAS. Revised version includes updated references, some changes to section 4. Conclusions unchanged
Submitted: 1996-05-10, last modified: 1996-09-30
Recent results have suggested that the density of baryons in the Universe, OmegaB, is much more uncertain than previously thought, and may be significantly higher. We demonstrate that a higher OmegaB increases the viability of critical-density cold dark matter (CDM) models. High baryon fraction offers the twin benefits of boosting the first peak in the microwave anisotropy power spectrum and of suppressing short-scale power in the matter power spectrum. These enable viable CDM models to have a larger Hubble constant than otherwise possible. We carry out a general exploration of high OmegaB CDM models, varying the Hubble constant h and the spectral index n. We confront a variety of observational constraints and discuss specific predictions. Although some observational evidence may favour baryon fractions as high as 20 per cent, we find that values around 10 to 15 per cent provide a reasonable fit to a wide range of data. We suggest that models with OmegaB in this range, with h about 0.5 and n about 0.8, are currently the best critical-density CDM models.
[219]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9607038  [pdf] - 94980
Four-year COBE normalization of inflationary cosmologies
Comments: 5 pages LaTeX file, using RevTeX. A correction is made to the final fitting function, Eq.A5. This correction only affects models which have BOTH gravitational waves and a cosmological constant
Submitted: 1996-07-05, last modified: 1996-08-01
We supply fitting formulae enabling the normalization of slow-roll inflation models to the four-year COBE data. We fully include the effect of the gravitational wave modes, including the predicted relation of the amplitude of these modes to that of the density perturbations. We provide the normalization of the matter power spectrum, which can be directly used for large-scale structure studies. The normalization for tilted spectra is a special case. We also provide fitting functions for the inflationary energy scale of COBE-normalized models and discuss the validity of approximating the spectra by power-laws. In an Appendix, we extend our analysis to include models with a cosmological constant, both with and without gravitational waves.
[220]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9607166  [pdf] - 408956
Open Inflationary Universes in the Induced Gravity Theory
Comments: 7 pages RevTeX file with three figures incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). Also available by e-mailing ARL, or by WWW at http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/papers/early_papers.html
Submitted: 1996-07-31
The induced gravity theory is a variant of Jordan--Brans--Dicke theory where the `dilaton' field possesses a potential. It has the unusual feature that in the presence of a false vacuum there is a {\em stable} static solution with the dilaton field displaced from the minimum of its potential, giving perfect de Sitter expansion. We demonstrate how this solution can be used to implement the open inflationary universe scenario. The necessary second phase of inflation after false vacuum decay by bubble nucleation is driven by the dilaton rolling from the static point to the minimum of its potential. Because the static solution is stable whilst the false vacuum persists, the required evolution occurs for a wide range of initial conditions. As the exterior of the bubble is perfect de Sitter space, there is no problem with fields rolling outside the bubble, as in one of the related models considered by Linde and Mezhlumian, and the expansion rates before and after tunnelling may be similar which prevents problematic high-amplitude super-curvature modes from being generated. Once normalized to the microwave background anisotropies seen by the COBE satellite, the viable models form a one-parameter family for each possible $\Omega_0$.
[221]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9607096  [pdf] - 95038
Accurate determination of inflationary perturbations
Comments: 9 pages LaTeX file with 3 figures incorporated, using RevTeX and epsf
Submitted: 1996-07-18
We use a numerical code for accurate computation of the amplitude of linear density perturbations and gravitational waves generated by single-field inflation models to study the accuracy of existing analytic results based on the slow-roll approximation. We use our code to calculate the coefficient of an expansion about the exact analytic result for power-law inflation; this generates a fitting function which can be applied to all inflationary models to obtain extremely accurate results. In the appropriate limit our results confirm the Stewart--Lyth analytic second-order calculation, and we find that their results are very accurate for inflationary models favoured by current observational constraints.
[222]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9512102  [pdf] - 1234540
Cold Dark Matter Models with a Cosmological Constant
Comments: 11 pages LaTeX file with two figures incorporated (uses mn.sty and epsf). Also available by e-mailing ARL, or by WWW at http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/papers/lsstru_papers.html (UK) or http://physics7.berkeley.edu/cmbserve/papers/lambda.html (US). Final version, to appear MNRAS. No major changes to the conclusions
Submitted: 1995-12-15, last modified: 1996-06-11
We use linear and quasi-linear perturbation theory to analyse cold dark matter models of structure formation in spatially flat models with a cosmological constant. Both a tilted spectrum of density perturbations and a significant gravitational wave contribution to the microwave anisotropy are allowed as possibilities. We provide normalizations of the models to microwave anisotropies, as given by the four-year {\it COBE} observations, and show how all the normalization information for such models, including tilt, can be condensed into a single fitting function which is independent of the value of the Hubble parameter. We then discuss a wide variety of other types of observations. We find that a very wide parameter space is available for these models, provided $\Omega_0$ is greater than about 0.3, and that large-scale structure observations show no preference for any particular value of $\Omega_0$ in the range 0.3 to 1.
[223]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9604001  [pdf] - 94372
Conditions for Successful Extended Inflation
Comments: 8 pages RevTeX file with one figure incorporated (uses RevTeX and epsf). Also available by e-mailing ARL, or by WWW at http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/papers/infcos_papers.html; Revised to include extra references, results unchanged, to appear Phys Rev D
Submitted: 1996-04-01, last modified: 1996-06-10
We investigate, in a model-independent way, the conditions required to obtain a satisfactory model of extended inflation in which inflation is brought to an end by a first-order phase transition. The constraints are that the correct present strength of the gravitational coupling is obtained, that the present theory of gravity is satisfactorily close to general relativity, that the perturbation spectra from inflation are compatible with large scale structure observations and that the bubble spectrum produced at the phase transition doesn't conflict with the observed level of microwave background anisotropies. We demonstrate that these constraints can be summarized in terms of the behaviour in the conformally related Einstein frame, and can be compactly illustrated graphically. We confirm the failure of existing models including the original extended inflation model, and construct models, albeit rather contrived ones, which satisfy all existing constraints.
[224]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9604105  [pdf] - 94476
Structure Formation in Inflationary Cosmologies
Comments: 6 pages LaTeX file with one figure incorporated using epsf. To appear, proceedings of the Moriond conference on Microwave Background Anisotropies, March 1996
Submitted: 1996-04-18
A brief account is given of large-scale structure modelling based on the assumption that the initial perturbations arise from inflation. A recap is made of the implications of inflation for large-scale structure; under the widely applicable slow-roll paradigm inflation adds precisely two extra parameters to the normal scenarios, which can be taken to be the tilt of the density perturbation spectrum and the amplitude of gravitational waves. Some comments are made about the {\it COBE} normalization. A short description is given of an analysis combining cosmic microwave background anisotropy data and large-scale structure data to constrain cosmological parameters, and the case of cold dark matter models with a cosmological constant is used as a specific illustration.
[225]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9511057  [pdf] - 1234509
Pursuing Parameters for Critical Density Dark Matter Models
Comments: 19 pages LaTeX file (uses mn.sty). Figures *not* included due to length. We strongly recommend obtaining the full paper, either by WWW at http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/papers/lsstru_papers.html (UK) or http://www.bartol.udel.edu/~bob/papers (US), or by e-mailing ARL. Final version, to appear MNRAS. Main revision is update to four-year COBE data. Miscellaneous other changes and reference updates. No significant changes to principal conclusions
Submitted: 1995-11-13, last modified: 1996-04-18
We present an extensive comparison of models of structure formation with observations, based on linear and quasi-linear theory. We assume a critical matter density, and study both cold dark matter models and cold plus hot dark matter models. We explore a wide range of parameters, by varying the fraction of hot dark matter $\Omega_{\nu}$, the Hubble parameter $h$ and the spectral index of density perturbations $n$, and allowing for the possibility of gravitational waves from inflation influencing large-angle microwave background anisotropies. New calculations are made of the transfer functions describing the linear power spectrum, with special emphasis on improving the accuracy on short scales where there are strong constraints. For assessing early object formation, the transfer functions are explicitly evaluated at the appropriate redshift. The observations considered are the four-year {\it COBE} observations of microwave background anisotropies, peculiar velocity flows, the galaxy correlation function, and the abundances of galaxy clusters, quasars and damped Lyman alpha systems. Each observation is interpreted in terms of the power spectrum filtered by a top-hat window function. We find that there remains a viable region of parameter space for critical-density models when all the dark matter is cold, though $h$ must be less than 0.5 before any fit is found and $n$ significantly below unity is preferred. Once a hot dark matter component is invoked, a wide parameter space is acceptable, including $n\simeq 1$. The allowed region is characterized by $\Omega_\nu \la 0.35$ and $0.60 \la n \la 1.25$, at 95 per cent confidence on at least one piece of data. There is no useful lower bound on $h$, and for curious combinations of the other parameters it is possible to fit the data with $h$ as high as 0.65.
[226]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9511007  [pdf] - 1234500
The Cluster Abundance in Flat and Open Cosmologies
Comments: Uuencoded package containing LaTeX file (uses mn.sty) plus 7 postscript figures incorporated using epsf. Total length 10 pages. Final version, to appear MNRAS. COBE comparison changed to 4yr data. No change to results or conclusions
Submitted: 1995-11-01, last modified: 1996-04-11
We use the galaxy cluster X-ray temperature distribution function to constrain the amplitude of the power spectrum of density inhomogeneities on the scale corresponding to clusters. We carry out the analysis for critical density universes, for low density universes with a cosmological constant included to restore spatial flatness and for genuinely open universes. That clusters with the same present temperature but different formation times have different virial masses is included. We model cluster mergers using two completely different approaches, and show that the final results from each are extremely similar. We give careful consideration to the uncertainties involved, carrying out a Monte Carlo analysis to determine the cumulative errors. For critical density our result agrees with previous papers, but we believe the result carries a larger uncertainty. For low density universes, either flat or open, the required amplitude of the power spectrum increases as the density is decreased. If all the dark matter is taken to be cold, then the cluster abundance constraint remains compatible with both galaxy correlation data and the {\it COBE} measurement of microwave background anisotropies for any reasonable density.
[227]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9506091  [pdf] - 1234402
Open Cold Dark Matter Models
Comments: 12 pages, uuencoded package containing LaTeX file (using mn.sty) plus 4 postscript figures incorporated using epsf. Main change is an improved cluster abundance calculation. Overall conclusions almost unchanged though. Also two equations corrected, references updated etc. Final version, to appear MNRAS
Submitted: 1995-06-16, last modified: 1995-10-24
Motivated by recent developments in inflationary cosmology indicating the possibility of obtaining genuinely open universes in some models, we compare the predictions of cold dark matter (CDM) models in open universes with a variety of observational information. The spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation is taken to be scale invariant (spectral index $n=1$), corresponding to a flat inflationary potential. We allow arbitrary variation of the density parameter $\Omega_0$ and the Hubble parameter $h$, and take full account of the baryon content assuming standard nucleosynthesis. We normalize the power spectrum using the recent analysis of the two year {\it COBE} DMR data by G\'{o}rski et al. We then consider a variety of observations, namely the galaxy correlation function, bulk flows, the abundance of galaxy clusters and the abundance of damped Lyman alpha systems. For the last two of these, we provide a new treatment appropriate to open universes. We find that, if one allows an arbitrary $h$, then a good fit is available for any $\Omega_0$ greater than 0.35, though for $\Omega_0$ close to 1 the required $h$ is alarmingly low. Models with $\Omega_0 < 0.35$ seem unable to fit observations while keeping the universe over $10$ Gyr old; this limit is somewhat higher than that appearing in the literature thus far. If one assumes a value of $h > 0.6$, as favoured by recent measurements, concordance with the data is only possible for the narrow range $0.35 < \Omega_0 < 0.55$. We have also investigated $n \neq 1$; the extra freedom naturally widens the allowed parameter region. Assuming a range $0.9<n<1.1$, the allowed range of $\Omega_0$ assuming $h > 0.6$ is at most $0.30 < \Omega_0 < 0.60$.
[228]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9508003  [pdf] - 93059
The Open Universe Grishchuk-Zel'dovich Effect
Comments: 10 pages LaTeX file (using RevTeX), plus 4 postscript figures to be printed separately. Final version, to appear in Physical Review D: main change is a new appendix on the dipole anisotropy
Submitted: 1995-08-01, last modified: 1995-09-15
The Grishchuk--Zel'dovich effect is the contribution to the microwave background anisotropy from an extremely large scale adiabatic density perturbation, on the standard hypothesis that this perturbation is a typical realization of a homogeneous Gaussian random field. We analyze this effect in open universes, corresponding to density parameter $\Omega_0<1$ with no cosmological constant, and concentrate on the recently discussed super-curvature modes. The effect is present in all of the low multipoles of the anisotropy, in contrast with the $\Omega_0=1$ case where only the quadrupole receives a contribution. However, for no value of $\Omega_0$ can a very large scale perturbation generate a spectrum capable of matching observations across a wide range of multipoles. We evaluate the magnitude of the effect coming from a given wavenumber as a function of the magnitude of the density perturbation, conveniently specified by the mean-square curvature perturbation. From the absence of the effect at the observed level, we find that for $0.25\leq\Omega_0\leq 0.8$, a curvature perturbation of order unity is permitted only for inverse wavenumbers more than one thousand times the size of the observable universe. As $\Omega_0$ tends to one, the constraint weakens to the flat space result that the inverse wavenumber be more than a hundred times the size of the observable universe, whereas for $\Omega_0 < 0.25$ it becomes stronger. We explain the physical meaning of these results, by relating them to the correlation length of the perturbation. Finally, in an Appendix we consider the dipole anisotropy and show that it always leads to weaker constraints.
[229]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9411104  [pdf] - 1461152
False Vacuum Inflation with a Quartic Potential
Comments: 10 pages, RevTeX 3.0, no figures
Submitted: 1994-11-25
We consider a variant of Hybrid Inflation, where inflation is driven by two interacting scalar fields, one of which has a `Mexican hat' potential and the other a quartic potential. Given the appropriate initial conditions one of the fields can be trapped in a false vacuum state, supported by couplings to the other field. The energy of this vacuum can be used to drive inflation, which ends when the vacuum decays to one of its true minima. Depending on parameters, it is possible for inflation to proceed via two separate epochs, with the potential temporarily steepening sufficiently to suspend inflation. We use numerical simulations to analyse the possibilities, and emphasise the shortcomings of the slow-roll approximation for analysing this scenario. We also calculate the density perturbations produced, which can have a spectral index greater than one.
[230]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9410083  [pdf] - 91967
Inflation as the Unique Causal Mechanism for Generating Density Perturbations on Scales Well Above the Hubble Radius
Comments: 5 pages uuencoded postscript (LaTeX file available from author), SUSSEX-AST 94/10-2
Submitted: 1994-10-27
An examination is made of the widely held belief that inflation is the only possible causal mechanism capable of generating density perturbations on scales well in excess of the Hubble radius. A simple proof is given, which relies only on the assumption that our understanding of the universe from nucleosynthesis onwards is correct. No assumption of the underlying gravitational theory is necessary beyond that it is a metric theory.
[231]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9409077  [pdf] - 1234262
Trends in Large Scale Structure Observations and the Likelihood of Early Reionization
Comments: 8 pages uuencoded postscript (LaTeX file available from ARL), changes include correction of the previously mishandled cosmological constant case (leading also to slight changes in abstract and conclusions) plus an update of the COBE normalisation
Submitted: 1994-09-28, last modified: 1994-10-18
With the imminent promise of constraints on the epoch of reionization from observations of microwave background anisotropies, the question of whether or not the standard Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model permits early reionization has been subjected to detailed investigation by various authors, with the conclusion that reionization may occur at quite high redshift. However, it is widely accepted that this model is excluded, as when normalised to the COBE observations it possesses excessive galaxy clustering on scales below tens of megaparsecs. We examine the trends of observations, first in a fairly model independent way, and second by considering variants on the standard CDM model introduced to resolve the observational conflicts. We conclude that the epoch of reionization favoured by the observational data is typically considerably later than the standard CDM model suggests, and amongst models which may fit the observational data only the introduction of a cosmological constant leads to a reionization redshift close to that of standard CDM.
[232]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9408066  [pdf] - 91751
Interpreting Large Scale Structure Observations
Comments: 36 pages, standard LaTeX plus three uuencoded postscript figures, SUSSEX-AST 94/8-2
Submitted: 1994-08-18
The standard model of large scale structure is considered, in which the structure originates as a Gaussian adiabatic density perturbation with a nearly scale invariant spectrum. The basic theoretical tool of cosmological perturbation theory is described, as well as the possible origin of the density perturbation as a vacuum fluctuation during inflation. Then, after normalising the spectrum to fit the cosmic microwave background anisotropy measured by COBE, some versions of the standard model are compared with a variety of data coming from observations of galaxies and galaxy clusters. The recent COBE analysis of G\'{o}rski and collaborators is used, which gives a significantly higher normalization than earlier ones. The comparison with galaxy and cluster data is done using linear theory, supplemented by the Press-Schechter formula when discussing object abundances of rich clusters and of damped Lyman alpha systems. By focussing on the smoothed density contrast as a function of scale, the observational data can be conveniently illustrated on a single figure, facilitating easy comparison with theory. The spectral index is constrained to $0.6<n<1.1$, and in particle physics motivated models that predict significant gravitational waves the lower limit is tightened to $0.8$. [To appear, Proceedings of Journee Cosmologie, Paris, June 1994]
[233]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9408015  [pdf] - 91700
Formalising the Slow-Roll Approximation in Inflation
Comments: standard LaTeX (20 pages) with two postscipt figures appended
Submitted: 1994-08-04
The meaning of the inflationary slow-roll approximation is formalised. Comparisons are made between an approach based on the Hamilton-Jacobi equations, governing the evolution of the Hubble parameter, and the usual scenario based on the evolution of the potential energy density. The vital role of the inflationary attractor solution is emphasised, and some of its properties described. We propose a new measure of inflation, based upon contraction of the comoving Hubble length as opposed to the usual e-foldings of physical expansion, and derive relevant formulae. We introduce an infinite hierarchy of slow-roll parameters, and show that only a finite number of them are required to produce results to a given order. The extension of the slow-roll approximation into an analytic slow-roll expansion, converging on the exact solution, is provided. Its role in calculations of inflationary dynamics is discussed. We explore rational-approximants as a method of extending the range of convergence of the slow-roll expansion up to, and beyond, the end of inflation.
[234]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9407021  [pdf] - 91607
Reconstructing the Inflaton Potential
Comments: 13 pages, uuencoded postscript file with figures included (LaTeX file available from ARL), FERMILAB-Conf 94/189A
Submitted: 1994-07-07
A review is presented of recent work by the authors concerning the use of large scale structure and microwave background anisotropy data to determine the potential of the inflaton field. The importance of a detection of the stochastic gravitational wave background is emphasised, and some preliminary new results of tests of the method on simulated data sets with uncertainties are described. (Proceedings of ``Unified Symmetry in the Small and in the Large'', Coral Gables, 1994)
[235]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9401014  [pdf] - 91181
Observational Constraints on the Spectral Index
Comments: 11 pages. Revised version with an extended text and comments on damped Lyman alpha systems. Latex file for the text, plus a ps file for the two figures
Submitted: 1994-01-11, last modified: 1994-05-06
We address the possibility of bounding the spectral index $n$ of primordial density fluctuations, using both the cosmic microwave background (cmb) anisotropy and data on galaxies and clusters. Each piece of galaxy and cluster data is reduced to a value of $\sigma(R)$ (the linearly evolved {\em rms} density contrast with top hat smoothing on scale $R$) which allows data on different scales to be readily compared. As a preliminary application, we normalise the spectrum using the ten degree variance of the COBE data, and then compare the prediction with a limited sample of low energy data, for the MDM model with various values of $n$, $\Omega_\nu$ and $h$. With $h=.5$, the data constrain the spectral index to the range $0.7\lsim n \lsim 1.2$. If gravitational waves contribute to the cmb anisotropy with relative strength $R=6(1-n)$ (as in some models of inflation), the lower limit on $n$ is increased to about $0.85$. The uncertainty in $h$ widens this band by about $0.1$ at either end.
[236]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9402021  [pdf] - 880968
Second-Order Reconstruction of the Inflationary Potential
Comments: 22 pages, LaTeX plus two uuencoded postscript figures, revised version incorporates a new section on the philosophical and practical strategy of reconstruction, SUSSEX-AST 94/2-1
Submitted: 1994-02-08, last modified: 1994-03-31
To first order in the deviation from scale invariance the inflationary potential and its first two derivatives can be expressed in terms of the spectral indices of the scalar and tensor perturbations, $n$ and $n_T$, and their contributions to the variance of the quadrupole CBR temperature anisotropy, $S$ and $T$. In addition, there is a ``consistency relation'' between these quantities: $n_T= -{1\over 7}{T\over S}$. We discuss the overall strategy of perturbative reconstruction and derive the second-order expressions for the inflationary potential and its first two derivatives and the first-order expression for its third derivative, all in terms of $n$, $n_T$, $S$, $T$, and $dn/d\ln k$. We also obtain the second-order consistency relation, $n_T =-{1\over 7}{T\over S}[1+0.11{T\over S} + 0.15 (n-1)]$. As an example we consider the exponential potential, the only known case where exact analytic solutions for the perturbation spectra exist. We reconstruct the potential via Taylor expansion (with coefficients calculated at both first and second order), and introduce the Pad\'{e} approximant as a greatly improved alternative.
[237]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9403005  [pdf] - 91294
Texture-Induced Microwave Background Anisotropies
Comments: 15 pages, standard LaTeX with 5 postscript figures available on request, SUSSEX-AST 94/3-1
Submitted: 1994-03-02
We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analysed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60--75\% and angular size typically only 10\% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. The influence of these results on analytic estimates of texture induced microwave anisotropies is examined, and comparison made with other numerical work.
[238]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9401011  [pdf] - 91178
False Vacuum Inflation with Einstein Gravity
Comments: 37 pages, LaTeX (3 figures available as hard copies only), SUSSEX-AST 94/1-1
Submitted: 1994-01-10
We investigate chaotic inflation models with two scalar fields, such that one field (the inflaton) rolls while the other is trapped in a false vacuum state. The false vacuum becomes unstable when the inflaton field falls below some critical value, and a first or second order transition to the true vacuum ensues. Particular attention is paid to Linde's second-order `Hybrid Inflation'; with the false vacuum dominating, inflation differs from the usual true vacuum case both in its cosmology and in its relation to particle physics. The spectral index of the adiabatic density perturbation can be very close to 1, or it can be around ten percent higher. The energy scale at the end of inflation can be anywhere between $10^{16}$\,GeV and $10^{11}$\,GeV, though reheating is prompt so the reheat temperature can't be far below $10^{11}\,$GeV. Topological defects are almost inevitably produced at the end of inflation, and if the inflationary energy scale is near its upper limit they can have significant effects. Because false vacuum inflation occurs with the inflaton field far below the Planck scale, it is easier to implement in the context of supergravity than standard chaotic inflation. That the inflaton mass is small compared with the inflationary Hubble parameter is still a problem for generic supergravity theories, but remarkably this can be avoided in a natural way for a class of supergravity models which follow from orbifold compactification of superstrings. This opens up the prospect of a truly realistic, superstring
[239]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9306030  [pdf] - 90825
Extended Inflation with a Curvature-Coupled Inflaton
Comments: 24 pages, LaTeX (no figures), to appear, Physical Review D, mishandling of the solar system constraint on extended gravity theories corrected, SUSSEX-AST 93/6-1
Submitted: 1993-06-30, last modified: 1993-12-20
We examine extended inflation models enhanced by the addition of a coupling between the inflaton field and the space-time curvature. We examine two types of model, where the underlying inflaton potential takes on second-order and first-order form respectively. One aim is to provide models which satisfy the solar system constraints on the Brans--Dicke parameter $\omega$. This constraint has proven very problematic in previous extended inflation models, and we find circumstances where it can be successfully evaded, though the constraint must be carefully assessed in our model and can be much stronger than the usual $\omega > 500$. In the simplest versions of the model, one may avoid the need to introduce a mass for the Brans--Dicke field in order to ensure that it takes on the correct value at the present epoch, as seems to be required in hyperextended inflation. We also briefly discuss aspects of the formation of topological defects in the inflaton field itself.
[240]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9308044  [pdf] - 745221
Reconstructing the Inflaton Potential---Perturbative Reconstruction to Second Order
Comments: 9 pages, LaTeX, FNAL--PUB--93/258-A; SUSSEX-AST 93/8-2
Submitted: 1993-08-30
One method to reconstruct the scalar field potential of inflation is a perturbative approach, where the values of the potential and its derivatives are calculated as an expansion in departures from the slow-roll approximation. They can then be expressed in terms of observable quantities, such as the square of the ratio of the gravitational wave amplitude to the density perturbation amplitude, the deviation of the spectral index from the Harrison--Zel'dovich value, etc. Here, we calculate complete expressions for the second-order contributions to the coefficients of the expansion by including for the first time corrections to the standard expressions for the perturbation spectra. As well as offering an improved result, these corrections indicate the expected accuracy of the reconstruction. Typically the corrections are only a few percent.
[241]  oai:arXiv.org:gr-qc/9307036  [pdf] - 898977
Can the Gravitational Wave Background from Inflation be Detected Locally?
Comments: 8 pages, standard LaTeX (no figures), SUSSEX-AST 93/7-3
Submitted: 1993-07-26
The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) detection of microwave background anisotropies may contain a component due to gravitational waves generated by inflation. It is shown that the gravitational waves from inflation might be seen using `beam-in-space' detectors, but not the Laser Interferometer Gravity Wave Observatory (LIGO). The central conclusion, dependent only on weak assumptions regarding the physics of inflation, is a surprising one. The larger the component of the COBE signal due to gravitational waves, the {\em smaller} the expected local gravitational wave signal.
[242]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9307020  [pdf] - 250297
The Inflationary Energy Scale
Comments: 17 pages (plus three figures, available from the author as hard copies only), standard LaTeX, SUSSEX-AST 93/7-2
Submitted: 1993-07-12
The energy scale of inflation is of much interest, as it suggests the scale of grand unified physics and also governs whether cosmological events such as topological defect formation can occur after inflation. The COBE results are used to limit the energy scale of inflation at around 60 $e$-foldings from the end of inflation. An exact dynamical treatment based on the Hamilton-Jacobi equations is then used to translate this into limits on the energy scale at the end of inflation. General constraints are given, and then tighter constraints based on physically motivated assumptions regarding the allowed forms of density perturbation and gravitational wave spectra. These are also compared with the values of familiar models.
[243]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9304017  [pdf] - 1234123
Inflation and Mixed Dark Matter Models
Comments: 10 pages, plus figure available from ARL SUSSEX-AST 93/4-2 LANCS-TH 93/1
Submitted: 1993-04-18
Recent large scale structure observations, including COBE, have prompted many authors to discuss modifications of the standard Cold Dark Matter model. Two of these, a tilted spectrum and a gravitational wave contribution to COBE, are at some level demanded by theory under the usual assumption that inflation generates the primeval perturbations. The third, whose motivation comes by contrast from observation, is the introduction of a component of hot dark matter to give the Mixed Dark Matter model. We discuss the implication of taking these modifications together. Should Mixed Dark Matter prove necessary, very strong constraints on inflationary models will ensue.
[244]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/9304228  [pdf] - 115563
Observing the Inflaton Potential
Comments: 9 pages, LaTeX, FERMILAB--PUB--93/071--A; SUSSEX-AST 93/4-1
Submitted: 1993-04-07
We show how observations of the density perturbation (scalar) spectrum and the gravitational wave (tensor) spectrum allow a reconstruction of the potential responsible for cosmological inflation. A complete functional reconstruction or a perturbative approximation about a single scale are possible; the suitability of each approach depends on the data available. Consistency equations between the scalar and tensor spectra are derived, which provide a powerful signal of inflation.
[245]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9303019  [pdf] - 270446
The Cold Dark Matter Density Perturbation
Comments: 117 pages. SUSSEX-AST 92/8-2; LANC-TH 8-2-92
Submitted: 1993-03-31
This is a review of the Cold Dark Matter model of structure formation, and its variants. The approach is largely from first principles, the main aim being to impart a basic understanding of the relevant theory with an eye to the likely intense activity of the next few years, but the current observational status of the model is also critically assessed. The evolution of adiabatic and isocurvature density perturbations is described, and their effect on the large scale cmb anisotropy calculated as well as that of any gravitational waves. The generation of all three types of perturbation during inflation is described, and the normalisation and spectral indices are calculated in terms of the inflationary potential and its first and second derivatives. The comparison of the theory with each type of observation is described, starting with the COBE data and moving down in scale to the non-linear regime. Constraints on the spectrum of the adiabatic density perturbation are exhibited, the spectrum being parametrised by its normalisation and its degree of tilt. Finally extensions of the CDM model are considered, which replace some of the cold dark matter by hot dark matter or a cosmological constant.
[246]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9303011  [pdf] - 90719
Perturbation Spectra from Intermediate Inflation
Comments: 10 pages, LaTeX, SUSSEX-AST 93/2-1
Submitted: 1993-03-23
We investigate models of `intermediate' inflation, where the scale factor $a(t)$ grows as $a(t) = \exp (A t^f)$, $0 < f < 1$, $A$ constant. These solutions arise as exact analytic solutions for a given class of potentials for the inflaton $\phi$. For a simpler class of potentials falling off as a power of $\phi$ they arise as slow-roll solutions, and in particular they include, for $f = 2/3$, the class of potentials which give the Harrison--Zel'dovich spectrum. The perturbation spectral index $n$ can be greater than unity on astrophysical scales. It is also possible to generate substantial gravitational waves while keeping the scalar spectrum close to scale-invariance; this latter possibility performs well when confronted with most observational data.
[247]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/9303288  [pdf] - 115558
Reconstructing the Inflaton Potential---in Principle and in Practice
Comments: 39 pages plus 2 figures (upon request:rocky@fnas01.fnal.gov), LaTeX, FNAL--PUB--93/029-A; SUSSEX-AST 93/3-1
Submitted: 1993-03-22
Generalizing the original work by Hodges and Blumenthal, we outline a formalism which allows one, in principle, to reconstruct the potential of the inflaton field from knowledge of the tensor gravitational wave spectrum or the scalar density fluctuation spectrum, with special emphasis on the importance of the tensor spectrum. We provide some illustrative examples of such reconstruction. We then discuss in some detail the question of whether one can use real observations to carry out this procedure. We conclude that in practice, a full reconstruction of the functional form of the potential will not be possible within the foreseeable future. However, with a knowledge of the dark matter components, it should soon be possible to combine intermediate-scale data with measurements of large-scale cosmic microwave background anisotropies to yield useful information regarding the potential.
[248]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9302010  [pdf] - 90700
The End for Extended Inflation?
Comments: 8 pages 2 Figures, available from A R Liddle LAN-TH-93-02 `replaced' because original file corrupted in transit
Submitted: 1993-02-18
This paper is based on a talk given by A R Liddle at the PASCOS/TEXAS meeting in December 1992, and will appear in the proceedings. The central result is that all known models of inflation which end in a first order phase transition can be ruled out by combining galaxy surveys at a few tens of Mpc with the COBE data (including the effect of gravitational waves). This conclusion is based on the work described in A R Liddle and D H Lyth, Phys Lett B 291 (1992) 391.
[249]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9209003  [pdf] - 90648
The Spectral Index in the CDM Cosmogony
Comments: 51 pages SUSSEX-AST 92/8-1; LANC-TH 8-92
Submitted: 1992-09-13
In a recent paper, we suggested that the density fluctuation spectra arising from power-law (or extended) inflation, which are tilted with respect to the Harrison--Zel'dovich spectrum, may provide an explanation for the excess large scale clustering seen in galaxy surveys such as the APM survey. In the light of the new results from COBE, we examine in detail here cold dark matter cosmogonies based on inflationary models predicting power-law spectra. Along with power-law and extended inflation, this class includes natural inflation. The latter is of interest because, unlike the first two, it produces a power-law spectrum without significant gravitational wave production. We examine a range of phenomena, including large angle microwave background fluctuations, clustering in the galaxy distribution, bulk peculiar velocity flows, the formation of high redshift quasars and the epoch of structure formation. Of the three models, only natural inflation seems capable of explaining the large scale clustering of optical galaxies. Such a model, though at best marginal even at present, has some advantages over standard CDM and on most grounds appears to perform at least as well. Power-law inflation's primary interest may ultimately only be in permitting a larger bias parameter than standard CDM; it appears unable to explain excess clustering. Most models of extended inflation are ruled out at a high confidence level.
[250]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9208007  [pdf] - 90645
COBE, Gravitational Waves, Inflation and Extended Inflation
Comments:
Submitted: 1992-08-27, last modified: 1992-08-31
We analyse the implications for inflationary models of the cosmic microwave background (cmb) anisotropy measured by COBE. Vacuum fluctuations during inflation generate an adiabatic density perturbation, and also gravitational waves. The ratio of these two contributions to the cmb anisotropy is given for an arbitrary slow-roll inflaton potential. Results from the IRAS/QDOT and POTENT galaxy surveys are used to normalise the spectrum of the density perturbation on the scale $20h^{-1}\Mpc$, so that the COBE measurement on the scale $10^3h^{-1}\Mpc$ provides a lower bound on the spectral index $n$. For `power law' and `extended' inflation, gravitational waves are significant and the bound is $n>0.84$ at the $2$-sigma level. For `natural' inflation, gravitational waves are negligible and the constraint is weakened to $n>0.70$, at best marginally consistent with a recent proposal for explaining the excess clustering observed in the APM galaxy survey. Many versions of extended inflation, including those based on the Brans--Dicke theory, are ruled out, because they require $n\lsim 0.75$ in order that bubbles formed at the end of inflation should not be observed now in the cmb.