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Liao, Shijun

Normalized to: Liao, S.

29 article(s) in total. 824 co-authors, from 1 to 8 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 3,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.00046  [pdf] - 2009480
Further evidence for a population of dark-matter-deficient dwarf galaxies
Comments: Published in Nature Astronomy on 25 November 2019, 27 pages including appendix, 7 figures
Submitted: 2019-07-31, last modified: 2019-12-03
In the standard cosmological model, dark matter drives the structure formation and constructs potential wells within which galaxies may form. The baryon fraction in dark halos can reach the universal value (15.7%) in massive clusters and decreases rapidly as the mass of the system decreases. The formation of dwarf galaxies is sensitive both to baryonic processes and the properties of dark matter owing to the shallow potential wells in which they form. In dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, dark matter dominates the mass content even within their optical-light half-radii (r_e ~ 1 kpc). However, recently it has been argued that not all dwarf galaxies are dominated by dark matter. Here we report 19 dwarf galaxies that could consist mainly of baryons up to radii well beyond r_e, at which point they are expected to be dominated by dark matter. Of these, 14 are isolated dwarf galaxies, free from the influence of nearby bright galaxies and high dense environments. This result provides observational evidence that could challenge the formation theory of low-mass galaxies within the framework of standard cosmology. Further observations, in particular deep imaging and spatially-resolved kinematics, are needed to constrain the baryon fraction better in such galaxies.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.11989  [pdf] - 2007368
A wide star-black-hole binary system from radial-velocity measurements
Comments: Published in Nature on Nov 28, 2019
Submitted: 2019-11-27
All stellar mass black holes have hitherto been identified by X-rays emitted by gas that is accreting onto the black hole from a companion star. These systems are all binaries with black holes below 30 M$_{\odot}$$^{1-4}$. Theory predicts, however, that X-ray emitting systems form a minority of the total population of star-black hole binaries$^{5,6}$. When the black hole is not accreting gas, it can be found through radial velocity measurements of the motion of the companion star. Here we report radial velocity measurements of a Galactic star, LB-1, which is a B-type star, taken over two years. We find that the motion of the B-star and an accompanying H$\alpha$ emission line require the presence of a dark companion with a mass of $68^{+11}_{-13}$ M$_{\odot}$, which can only be a black hole. The long orbital period of 78.9 days shows that this is a wide binary system. The gravitational wave experiments have detected similarly massive black holes$^{7,8}$, but forming such massive ones in a high-metallicity environment would be extremely challenging to current stellar evolution theories$^{9-11}$.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.06356  [pdf] - 1998511
Ultra-diffuse galaxies in the Auriga simulations
Comments: 14 pages, 11 figures, version accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-04-12, last modified: 2019-10-19
We investigate the formation of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) using the Auriga high-resolution cosmological magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of Milky Way-sized galaxies. We identify a sample of $92$ UDGs in the simulations that match a wide range of observables such as sizes, central surface brightness, S\'{e}rsic indices, colors, spatial distribution and abundance. Auriga UDGs have dynamical masses similar to normal dwarfs. In the field, the key to their origin is a strong correlation present in low-mass dark matter haloes between galaxy size and halo spin parameter. Field UDGs form in dark matter haloes with larger spins compared to normal dwarfs in the field, in agreement with previous semi-analytical models. Satellite UDGs, on the other hand, have two different origins: $\sim 55\%$ of them formed as field UDGs before they were accreted; the remaining $\sim 45\%$ were normal field dwarfs that subsequently turned into UDGs as a result of tidal interactions.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.07397  [pdf] - 2068942
Hunting for primordial black holes with stochastic gravitational-wave background in the space-based detector frequency band
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2019-10-16
Assuming that primordial black holes compose a fraction of dark matter, some of them may accumulate at the center of galaxy and perform a prograde or retrograde orbit against the gravity pointing towards the center exerted by the central massive black hole. If the mass of primordial black holes is of the order of stellar mass or smaller, such extreme mass ratio inspirals can emit gravitational waves and form a background due to incoherent superposition of all the contributions of the Universe. We investigate the stochastic gravitational-wave background energy density spectra from the directional source, the primordial black holes surrounding Sagittarius A$^\ast$ of the Milky Way, and the isotropic extragalactic total contribution, respectively. As will be shown, the resultant stochastic gravitational-wave background energy density shows different spectrum features such as the peak positions in the frequency domain for the above two kinds of sources. Detection of stochastic gravitational-wave background with such a feature may provide evidence for the existence of primordial black holes. Conversely, a null searching result can put constraints on the abundance of primordial black holes in dark matter.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.07450  [pdf] - 1981331
Proceedings of The Magnificent CE$\nu$NS Workshop 2018
Comments: The Magnificent CEvNS Workshop (2018), Nov 2-3, 2018; Chicago, IL, USA; 44 contributions
Submitted: 2019-10-16
The Magnificent CE$\nu$NS Workshop (2018) was held November 2 & 3 of 2018 on the University of Chicago campus and brought together theorists, phenomenologists, and experimentalists working in numerous areas but sharing a common interest in the process of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CE$\nu$NS). This is a collection of abstract-like summaries of the talks given at the meeting, including links to the slides presented. This document and the slides from the meeting provide an overview of the field and a snapshot of the robust CE$\nu$NS-related efforts both planned and underway.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.13301  [pdf] - 1971494
HIKER: a halo-finding method based on kernel-shift algorithm
Comments: 14 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2019-09-29, last modified: 2019-10-01
We introduce a new halo/subhalo finder, HIKER (a Halo fInder based on KERnel-shift algorithm), which takes advantage of a machine learning method -- the mean-shift algorithm combined with the Plummer kernel function, to effectively locate density peaks corresponding to halos/subhalos in density field. Based on these density peaks, dark matter halos are identified as spherical overdensity structures, and subhalos are bound substructures with boundaries at their tidal radius. By testing HIKER code with mock halos, we show that HIKER performs excellently in recovering input halo properties. Especially, HIKER has higher accuracy in locating halo/subhalo centres than most halo finders. With cosmological simulations, we further show that HIKER reproduces the abundance of dark matter halos and subhalos quite accurately, and the HIKER halo/subhalo mass functions and $V_{max}$ functions are in good agreement with two widely used halo finders, SUBFIND and AHF.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.09070  [pdf] - 1927414
Dark-matter-deficient galaxies in hydrodynamical simulations
Comments: Updated to the accepted version
Submitted: 2018-11-22, last modified: 2019-07-20
Low mass galaxies are expected to be dark matter dominated even within their centrals. Recently two observations reported two dwarf galaxies in group environment with very little dark matter in their centrals. We explore the population and origins of dark-matter-deficient galaxies (DMDGs) in two state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations, the EAGLE and Illustris projects. For all satellite galaxies with $10^9<M_*<10^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$ in groups with $M_{200}>10^{13}$ M$_{\odot}$, we find that about $2.6\%$ of them in the EAGLE, and $1.5\%$ in the Illustris are DMDGs with dark matter fractions below $50\%$ inside two times half-stellar-mass radii. We demonstrate that DMDGs are highly tidal disrupted galaxies; and because dark matter has higher binding energy than stars, mass loss of the dark matter is much more rapid than stars in DMDGs during tidal interactions. If DMDGs were confirmed in observations, they are expected in current galaxy formation models.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.07055  [pdf] - 1895965
The optimal gravitational softening length for cosmological N-body simulations
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, version accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-10-16, last modified: 2019-05-15
Gravitational softening length is one of the key parameters to properly set up a cosmological $N$-body simulation. In this paper, we perform a large suit of high-resolution $N$-body simulations to revise the optimal softening scheme proposed by Power et al. (P03). Our finding is that P03 optimal scheme works well but is over conservative. Using smaller softening lengths than that of P03 can achieve higher spatial resolution and numerically convergent results on both circular velocity and density profiles. However using an over small softening length overpredicts matter density at the inner most region of dark matter haloes. We empirically explore a better optimal softening scheme based on P03 form and find that a small modification works well. This work will be useful for setting up cosmological simulations.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.05522  [pdf] - 1869415
The first constraint from SDSS galaxy-galaxy weak lensing measurements on interacting dark energy models
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, published in ApJL
Submitted: 2018-07-15, last modified: 2019-04-17
We combine constraints from linear and nonlinear scales, for the first time, to study the interaction between dark matter and dark energy. We devise a novel N-body simulation pipeline for cosmological models beyond $\Lambda$CDM. This pipeline is fully self-consistent and opens a new window to study the nonlinear structure formation in general phenomenological interacting dark energy models. By comparing our simulation results with the SDSS galaxy-galaxy weak lensing measurements, we are able to constrain the strength of interaction between dark energy and dark matter. Compared with the previous studies using linear examinations, we point to plausible improvements on the constraints of interaction strength by using small scale information from weak lensing. This improvement is mostly due to the sensitivity of weak lensing measurements on nonlinear structure formation at low redshift. With this new pipeline, it is possible to look for smoking gun signatures of dark matter-dark energy interaction.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.10944  [pdf] - 1836488
Impact of filaments on galaxy formation in their residing dark matter haloes
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, version accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-05-28, last modified: 2019-02-14
We make use of a high-resolution zoom-in hydrodynamical simulation to investigate the impact of filaments on galaxy formation in their residing dark matter haloes. A method based on the density field and the Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm is developed to identify filaments. We show that cold and dense gas preprocessed by dark matter filaments can be further accreted into residing individual low-mass haloes in directions along the filaments. Consequently, comparing with field haloes, gas accretion is very anisotropic for filament haloes. About 30 percent of the accreted gas of a residing filament halo was preprocessed by filaments, leading to two different thermal histories for the gas in filament haloes. Filament haloes have higher baryon and stellar fractions when comparing with their field counterparts. Without including stellar feedback, our results suggest that filaments assist gas cooling and enhance star formation in their residing dark matter haloes at high redshifts (i.e. z=4.0 and 2.5).
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.01519  [pdf] - 1791301
A Fully Self-Consistent Cosmological Simulation Pipeline for Interacting Dark Energy Models
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, accepted by PRD
Submitted: 2018-11-05
We devise a fully self-consistent simulation pipeline for the first time to study the interaction between dark matter and dark energy. We perform convergence tests and show that our code is accurate on different scales. Using the parameters constrained by Planck, Type Ia Supernovae, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Hubble constant observations, we perform cosmological N-body simulations. We calculate the resulting matter power spectra and halo mass functions for four different interacting dark energy models. In addition to the dark matter density distribution, we also show the inhomogeneous density distribution of dark energy. With this new simulation pipeline, we can further refine and constrain interacting dark energy models.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.02194  [pdf] - 1773032
The properties of the quasars astrometric solution in Gaia DR2
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-05-06, last modified: 2018-10-24
Gaia data release 2 (DR2) provides the best non-rotating optical frame aligned with the radio frame (ICRF) thanks to the inclusion of about half-million quasars in the 5-parameter astrometric solution. Given their crucial diagnostic role for characterizing the properties of the celestial reference frame, we aim to make an independent assessment of the astrometry of quasars in DR2. We cross-match with Gaia DR2 the quasars from LQAC3, SDSS and LAMOST, obtaining 208743 new sources (denominated as KQCG). With the quasars already identified in DR2, we estimate the global offsets of parallaxes and proper motions of different quasar subsets to check their astrometric consistency. The features of the proper motion field are analyzed by means of vectorial spherical harmonics (VSH); the scalar field of parallaxes is expanded into spherical harmonics to investigate their spatial correlation. We find a bias of $\sim$ $-0.030$ $mas$ in KQCG parallaxes, and a bias of $-9.1$ $\mu as/yr$ in $\mu_{\alpha\ast}$; a $\sim$ +10 $\mu as/yr$ bias in $\mu_{\delta}$ consistently found in the entire quasar sample. The results of the VSH analysis on different subsets indicate good agreement between them. The proper motion field exhibits a ((-6,-5,-5) $\pm$ 1) $\mu as/yr$ rotation in the northern hemisphere and a rotation of ((0,+1,+3) $\pm$ 1 ) $\mu as /yr$ in the southern one. The spherical harmonics expansion of the parallax field reveals an angular scale of systematics of $\approx$ 18 degrees with a RMS amplitude of 13 $\mu$as. The positional comparison shows that the axes of the current Gaia Celestial Reference Frame and the ICRF2 are aligned within 30 $\mu$as.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.03574  [pdf] - 1757680
An alternative method to generate pre-initial conditions for cosmological $N$-body simulations
Comments: 11 pages, 10 figures, minor revision on figures to match the version accepted by MNRAS, a code to generate CCVT pre-initial conditions is publicly available at https://github.com/liaoshong/ccvt-preic
Submitted: 2018-07-10, last modified: 2018-08-30
Currently, grid and glass methods are the two most popular choices to generate uniform particle distributions (i.e., pre-initial conditions) for cosmological $N$-body simulations. In this article, we introduce an alternative method called the capacity constrained Voronoi tessellation (CCVT), which originates from computer graphics. As a geometrical equilibrium state, a CCVT particle configuration satisfies two constraints: (i) the volume of the Voronoi cell associated with each particle is equal; (ii) every particle is in the center-of-mass position of its Voronoi cell. We show that the CCVT configuration is uniform and isotropic, follows perfectly the minimal power spectrum, $P(k)\propto k^4$, and is quite stable under gravitational interactions. It is natural to incorporate periodic boundary conditions during CCVT making, therefore, we can obtain a larger CCVT by tiling with a small periodic CCVT. When applying the CCVT pre-initial condition to cosmological $N$-body simulations, we show that it plays as good as grid and glass schemes. The CCVT method will be helpful in studying the numerical convergence of pre-initial conditions in cosmological simulations. It can also be used to set up pre-initial conditions in smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulations.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09378  [pdf] - 1732652
Gaia Data Release 2: Observational Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams
Gaia Collaboration; Babusiaux, C.; van Leeuwen, F.; Barstow, M. A.; Jordi, C.; Vallenari, A.; Bossini, D.; Bressan, A.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; van Leeuwen, M.; Brown, A. G. A.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Walton, N. A.; Arenou, F.; Bastian, U.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Bakker, J.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; DeAngeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Holl, B.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Teyssier, D.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Audard, M.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Burgess, P.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Clotet, M.; Creevey, O.; Davidson, M.; DeRidder, J.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fouesneau, M.; Frémat, Y.; Galluccio, L.; García-Torres, M.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Gosset, E.; Guy, L. P.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández, J.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Jordan, S.; Korn, A. J.; Krone-Martins, A.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Lebzelter, T.; Löffler, W.; Manteiga, M.; Marrese, P. M.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Moitinho, A.; Mora, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Richards, P. J.; Rimoldini, L.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Sozzetti, A.; Süveges, M.; Torra, J.; vanReeven, W.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aerts, C.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alvarez, R.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Arcay, B.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Balm, P.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbato, D.; Barblan, F.; Barklem, P. S.; Barrado, D.; Barros, M.; Muñoz, S. Bartholomé; Bassilana, J. -L.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; Berihuete, A.; Bertone, S.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Boeche, C.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Bramante, L.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Brugaletta, E.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Butkevich, A. G.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cancelliere, R.; Cannizzaro, G.; Carballo, R.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Casamiquela, L.; Castellani, M.; Castro-Ginard, A.; Charlot, P.; Chemin, L.; Chiavassa, A.; Cocozza, G.; Costigan, G.; Cowell, S.; Crifo, F.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Cuypers, J.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; deLaverny, P.; DeLuise, F.; DeMarch, R.; deMartino, D.; deSouza, R.; deTorres, A.; Debosscher, J.; delPozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Diakite, S.; Diener, C.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Eriksson, K.; Esquej, P.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernique, P.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Frézouls, B.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavel, A.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Giacobbe, P.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Glass, F.; Gomes, M.; Granvik, M.; Gueguen, A.; Guerrier, A.; Guiraud, J.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Hauser, M.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Heu, J.; Hilger, T.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holland, G.; Huckle, H. E.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Janßen, K.; JevardatdeFombelle, G.; Jonker, P. G.; Juhász, Á. L.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kewley, A.; Klar, J.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, M.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Koubsky, P.; Lambert, S.; Lanza, A. F.; Lasne, Y.; Lavigne, J. -B.; LeFustec, Y.; LePoncin-Lafitte, C.; Lebreton, Y.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; López, M.; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martino, M.; Marton, G.; Mary, N.; Massari, D.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molnár, L.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; O'Mullane, W.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Panahi, A.; Pawlak, M.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poggio, E.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Racero, E.; Ragaini, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Riclet, F.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rivard, A.; Rixon, G.; Roegiers, T.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sanna, N.; Santana-Ros, T.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Ségransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Siltala, L.; Silva, A. F.; Smart, R. L.; Smith, K. W.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; SoriaNieto, S.; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Teyssandier, P.; Thuillot, W.; Titarenko, A.; TorraClotet, F.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Uzzi, S.; Vaillant, M.; Valentini, G.; Valette, V.; vanElteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; Vaschetto, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Viala, Y.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; vonEssen, C.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Wertz, O.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zorec, J.; Zschocke, S.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.
Comments: Published in the A&A Gaia Data Release 2 special issue. Tables 2 and A.4 corrected. Tables available at http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/616/A10
Submitted: 2018-04-25, last modified: 2018-08-13
We highlight the power of the Gaia DR2 in studying many fine structures of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD). Gaia allows us to present many different HRDs, depending in particular on stellar population selections. We do not aim here for completeness in terms of types of stars or stellar evolutionary aspects. Instead, we have chosen several illustrative examples. We describe some of the selections that can be made in Gaia DR2 to highlight the main structures of the Gaia HRDs. We select both field and cluster (open and globular) stars, compare the observations with previous classifications and with stellar evolutionary tracks, and we present variations of the Gaia HRD with age, metallicity, and kinematics. Late stages of stellar evolution such as hot subdwarfs, post-AGB stars, planetary nebulae, and white dwarfs are also analysed, as well as low-mass brown dwarf objects. The Gaia HRDs are unprecedented in both precision and coverage of the various Milky Way stellar populations and stellar evolutionary phases. Many fine structures of the HRDs are presented. The clear split of the white dwarf sequence into hydrogen and helium white dwarfs is presented for the first time in an HRD. The relation between kinematics and the HRD is nicely illustrated. Two different populations in a classical kinematic selection of the halo are unambiguously identified in the HRD. Membership and mean parameters for a selected list of open clusters are provided. They allow drawing very detailed cluster sequences, highlighting fine structures, and providing extremely precise empirical isochrones that will lead to more insight in stellar physics. Gaia DR2 demonstrates the potential of combining precise astrometry and photometry for large samples for studies in stellar evolution and stellar population and opens an entire new area for HRD-based studies.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06177  [pdf] - 1771606
Identifying quasars with astrometric and mid-infrared methods from APOP and ALLWISE
Comments: 7 pages, 7 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2018-07-16
Context. Quasars are spatially stationary, and they are essential objects in astrometry when defining reference frames. However, the census of quasars is far from complete. Mid-infared colors can be used to find quasar candidates because AGNs show a peculiar appearance in mid-infrared color, but these methods are incapable of separating quasars from AGNs. Aims. The aim of our study is to use astrometric and mid-infrared methods to select quasars and get a reliable quasar candidates catalog. Methods. We used a near-zero proper motion criterion in conjuction with WISE (all-sky Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer) [W1-W2] color to select quasar candidates. The [W1-W2] color criterion is defined by the linear boundary of two samples: LAMOST DR5 quasars, which serve as the quasar sample, and LAMOST DR5 stars and galaxies, which serve as the non-quasar sample. The contamination and completeness are evaluated. Results. We present a catalog of 662 753 quasar candidates, with a completeness of about 75% and a reliability of 77.2%.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.00315  [pdf] - 1740013
A comparison of the local spiral structure from Gaia DR2 and VLBI maser parallaxes
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2018-07-01, last modified: 2018-07-05
Context. The Gaia mission has released the second data set (Gaia DR2), which contains parallaxes and proper motions for a large number of massive, young stars. Aims. We investigate the spiral structure in the solar neighborhood revealed by Gaia DR2 and compare it with that depicted by VLBI maser parallaxes. Methods. We examined three samples with different constraints on parallax uncertainty and distance errors and stellar spectral types: (1) all OB stars with parallax errors of less than 10%; (2) only O-type stars with 0.1 mas errors imposed and with parallax distance errors of less than 0.2 kpc; and (3) only O-type stars with 0.05 mas errors imposed and with parallax distance errors of less than 0.3 kpc. Results. In spite of the significant distance uncertainties for stars in DR2 beyond 1.4 kpc, the spiral structure in the solar neighborhood demonstrated by Gaia agrees well with that illustrated by VLBI maser results. The O-type stars available from DR2 extend the spiral arm models determined from VLBI maser parallaxes into the fourth Galactic quadrant, and suggest the existence of a new spur between the Local and Sagittarius arms.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.08821  [pdf] - 1833988
A compilation of known QSOs for the Gaia mission
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-04-23, last modified: 2018-05-04
Quasars are essential for astrometric in the sense that they are spatial stationary because of their large distance from the Sun. The European Space Agency (ESA) space astrometric satellite Gaia is scanning the whole sky with unprecedented accuracy up to a few muas level. However, Gaia's two fields of view observations strategy may introduce a parallax bias in the Gaia catalog. Since it presents no significant parallax, quasar is perfect nature object to detect such bias. More importantly, quasars can be used to construct a Celestial Reference Frame in the optical wavelengths in Gaia mission. In this paper, we compile the most reliable quasars existing in literatures. The final compilation (designated as Known Quasars Catalog for Gaia mission, KQCG) contains 1843850 objects, among of them, 797632 objects are found in Gaia DR1 after cross-identifications. This catalog will be very useful in Gaia mission.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09366  [pdf] - 1732648
Gaia Data Release 2: The astrometric solution
Comments: 25 pages, 29 figures. Special A&A issue on Gaia Data Release 2
Submitted: 2018-04-25
Gaia Data Release 2 (Gaia DR2) contains results for 1693 million sources in the magnitude range 3 to 21 based on observations collected by the European Space Agency Gaia satellite during the first 22 months of its operational phase. We describe the input data, models, and processing used for the astrometric content of Gaia DR2, and the validation of these results performed within the astrometry task. Some 320 billion centroid positions from the pre-processed astrometric CCD observations were used to estimate the five astrometric parameters (positions, parallaxes, and proper motions) for 1332 million sources, and approximate positions at the reference epoch J2015.5 for an additional 361 million mostly faint sources. Special validation solutions were used to characterise the random and systematic errors in parallax and proper motion. For the sources with five-parameter astrometric solutions, the median uncertainty in parallax and position at the reference epoch J2015.5 is about 0.04 mas for bright (G<14 mag) sources, 0.1 mas at G=17 mag, and 0.7 mas at G=20 mag. In the proper motion components the corresponding uncertainties are 0.05, 0.2, and 1.2 mas/yr, respectively. The optical reference frame defined by Gaia DR2 is aligned with ICRS and is non-rotating with respect to the quasars to within 0.15 mas/yr. From the quasars and validation solutions we estimate that systematics in the parallaxes depending on position, magnitude, and colour are generally below 0.1 mas, but the parallaxes are on the whole too small by about 0.03 mas. Significant spatial correlations of up to 0.04 mas in parallax and 0.07 mas/yr in proper motion are seen on small (<1 deg) and intermediate (20 deg) angular scales. Important statistics and information for the users of the Gaia DR2 astrometry are given in the appendices.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00661  [pdf] - 1583004
Non-standard interactions of solar neutrinos in dark matter experiments
Comments: 12 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2017-05-01, last modified: 2017-08-30
Non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) affect both their propagation through matter and their detection, with bounds on NSI parameters coming from various astrophysical and terrestrial neutrino experiments. In this paper, we show that NSI can be probed in future direct dark matter detection experiments through both elastic neutrino-electron scattering and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, and that these channels provide complementary probes of NSI. We show NSI can increase the event rate due to solar neutrinos, with a sharp increase for lower nuclear recoil energy thresholds that are within reach for upcoming detectors. We also identify an interference range of NSI parameters for which the rate is reduced by approximately 40\%. Finally, we show that the "dark side" solution for the solar neutrino mixing angle may be discovered at forthcoming direct detection experiments.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00527  [pdf] - 1582988
More than six hundreds new families of Newtonian periodic planar collisionless three-body orbits
Comments: 61 pages, 55 tables, 4 figures, accepted by Sci. China - Phys. Mech. Astron
Submitted: 2017-04-26, last modified: 2017-07-11
The famous three-body problem can be traced back to Isaac Newton in 1680s. In the 300 years since this "three-body problem" was first recognized, only three families of periodic solutions had been found, until 2013 when \v{S}uvakov and Dmitra\v{s}inovi\'c [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 114301 (2013)] made a breakthrough to numerically find 13 new distinct periodic orbits, which belong to 11 new families of Newtonian planar three-body problem with equal mass and zero angular momentum. In this paper, we numerically obtain 695 families of Newtonian periodic planar collisionless orbits of three-body system with equal mass and zero angular momentum in case of initial conditions with isosceles collinear configuration, including the well-known Figure-eight family found by Moore in 1993, the 11 families found by \v{S}uvakov and Dmitra\v{s}inovi\'c in 2013, and more than 600 new families that have been never reported, to the best of our knowledge. With the definition of the average period $\bar{T} = T/L_f$, where $L_f$ is the length of the so-called "free group element", these 695 families suggest that there should exist the quasi Kepler's third law $ \bar{T}^* \approx 2.433 \pm 0.075$ for the considered case, where $\bar{T}^*= \bar{T} |E|^{3/2}$ is the scale-invariant average period and $E$ is its total kinetic and potential energy, respectively. The movies of these 695 periodic orbits in the real space and the corresponding close curves on the "shape sphere" can be found via the website: http://numericaltank.sjtu.edu.cn/three-body/three-body.htm
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.00117  [pdf] - 1580766
A universal angular momentum profile for dark matter haloes
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, accepted version by ApJ, Figure 5 is added to address the r_s - c relation, Section 5 is updated
Submitted: 2016-11-30, last modified: 2017-06-13
The angular momentum distribution in dark matter haloes and galaxies is a key ingredient in understanding their formation. Especially, the internal distribution of angular momenta is closely related to the formation of disk galaxies. In this article, we use haloes identified from a high-resolution simulation, the Bolshoi simulation, to study the spatial distribution of specific angular momenta, $j(r,\theta)$. We show that by stacking haloes with similar masses to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, the profile can be fitted as a simple function, $j(r,\theta)=j_s \sin^2(\theta/\theta_s) (r/r_s)^2/(1+r/r_s)^4 $, with three free parameters, $j_s, r_s$, and $\theta_s$. Specifically, $j_s$ correlates with the halo mass $M_\mathrm{vir}$ as $j_s\propto M_\mathrm{vir}^{2/3}$, $r_s$ has a weak dependence on the halo mass as $r_s \propto M_\mathrm{vir}^{0.040}$, and $\theta_s$ is independent of $M_\mathrm{vir}$. This profile agrees with that from a rigid shell model, though its origin is unclear. Our universal specific angular momentum profile $j(r,\theta)$ is useful in modelling haloes' angular momenta. Furthermore, by using an empirical stellar mass - halo mass relation, we can infer the averaged angular momentum distribution of a dark matter halo. The specific angular momentum - stellar mass relation within a halo computed from our profile is shown to share a similar shape as that from the observed disk galaxies.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.3515  [pdf] - 1579572
Angular momentum - mass relation for dark matter haloes
Comments: 16 pages, 17 figures, matches the version published in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2014-12-10, last modified: 2017-06-08
We study the empirical relation between an astronomical object's angular momentum $J$ and mass $M$, $J=\beta M^\alpha$, the $J-M$ relation, using N-body simulations. In particular, we investigate the time evolution of the $J-M$ relation to study how the initial power spectrum and cosmological model affect this relation, and to test two popular models of its origin - mechanical equilibrium and tidal torque theory. We find that in the $\Lambda$CDM model, $\alpha$ starts with a value of $\sim 1.5$ at high redshift $z$, increases monotonically, and finally reaches $5/3$ near $z=0$, whereas $\beta$ evolves linearly with time in the beginning, reaches a maximum and decreases, and stabilizes finally. A three-regime scheme is proposed to understand this newly observed picture. We show that the tidal torque theory accounts for this time evolution behaviour in the linear regime, whereas $\alpha=5/3$ comes from the virial equilibrium of haloes. The $J-M$ relation in the linear regime contains the information of the power spectrum and cosmological model. The $J-M$ relations for haloes in different environments and with different merging histories are also investigated to study the effects of a halo's non-linear evolution. An updated and more complete understanding of the $J-M$ relation is thus obtained.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.07592  [pdf] - 1580458
The segregation of baryons and dark matter during halo assembly
Comments: 9 pages, 11 figures, moderate changes to match the version accepted by MNRAS, for a movie of the halo discussed in Section 4, see http://ccg.bao.ac.cn/~shliao/
Submitted: 2016-10-24, last modified: 2017-06-07
The standard galaxy formation theory assumes that baryons and dark matter are initially well-mixed before becoming segregated due to radiative cooling. We use non-radiative hydrodynamical simulations to explicitly examine this assumption and find that baryons and dark matter can also be segregated because of different physics obeyed by gas and dark matter during the build-up of the halo. As a result, baryons in many haloes do not originate from the same Lagrangian region as the dark matter. When using the fraction of corresponding dark matter and gas particles in the initial conditions (the "paired fraction") as a proxy of the dark matter and gas segregation strength of a halo, on average about $25$ percent of the baryonic and dark matter of the final halo are segregated in the initial conditions. This is at odds with the assumption of the standard galaxy formation model. A consequence of this effect is that the baryons and dark matter of the same halo initially experience different tidal torques and thus their angular momentum vectors are often misaligned. The degree of the misalignment is largely preserved during later halo assembly and can be understood with the tidal torque theory. The result challenges the precision of some semi-analytical approaches which utilize dark matter halo merger trees to infer properties of gas associated to dark matter haloes.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.06147  [pdf] - 1581986
A Universe of Ultra-Diffuse Galaxies: Theoretical Predictions from $\Lambda$CDM Simulations
Comments: Revised to match the version accepted by MNRAS; we add discussions on outflow model and UDG morphology; welcome comments
Submitted: 2017-03-17, last modified: 2017-06-07
A particular population of galaxies have drawn much interest recently, which are as faint as typical dwarf galaxies but have the sizes as large as $L^*$ galaxies, the so called "ultra-diffuse galaxie" (UDGs). The lack of tidal features of UDGs in dense environments suggests that their host halos are perhaps as massive as that of the Milky Way. On the other hand, galaxy formation efficiency should be much higher in the halos of such masses. Here we use the model galaxy catalog generated by populating two large simulations: the Millennium-II cosmological simulation and Phoenix simulations of 9 big clusters with the semi-analytic galaxy formation model. This model reproduces remarkably well the observed properties of UDGs in the nearby clusters, including the abundance, profile, color, and morphology, etc. We search for UDG candidates using the public data and find 2 UDG candidates in our Local Group and 23 in our Local Volume, in excellent agreement with the model predictions. We demonstrate that UDGs are genuine dwarf galaxies, formed in the halos of $\sim 10^{10}M_{\odot}$. It is the combination of the late formation time and high-spins of the host halos that results in the spatially extended feature of this particular population. The lack of tidal disruption features of UDGs in clusters can also be explained by their late infall-time.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00688  [pdf] - 1583007
Gaia Data Release 1. Testing the parallaxes with local Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars
Gaia Collaboration; Clementini, G.; Eyer, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Muraveva, T.; Garofalo, A.; Sarro, L. M.; Palmer, M.; Luri, X.; Molinaro, R.; Rimoldini, L.; Szabados, L.; Musella, I.; Anderson, R. I.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Azntoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernánde, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: 29 pages, 25 figures. Accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2017-05-01
Parallaxes for 331 classical Cepheids, 31 Type II Cepheids and 364 RR Lyrae stars in common between Gaia and the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1) as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). In order to test these first parallax measurements of the primary standard candles of the cosmological distance ladder, that involve astrometry collected by Gaia during the initial 14 months of science operation, we compared them with literature estimates and derived new period-luminosity ($PL$), period-Wesenheit ($PW$) relations for classical and Type II Cepheids and infrared $PL$, $PL$-metallicity ($PLZ$) and optical luminosity-metallicity ($M_V$-[Fe/H]) relations for the RR Lyrae stars, with zero points based on TGAS. The new relations were computed using multi-band ($V,I,J,K_{\mathrm{s}},W_{1}$) photometry and spectroscopic metal abundances available in the literature, and applying three alternative approaches: (i) by linear least squares fitting the absolute magnitudes inferred from direct transformation of the TGAS parallaxes, (ii) by adopting astrometric-based luminosities, and (iii) using a Bayesian fitting approach. TGAS parallaxes bring a significant added value to the previous Hipparcos estimates. The relations presented in this paper represent first Gaia-calibrated relations and form a "work-in-progress" milestone report in the wait for Gaia-only parallaxes of which a first solution will become available with Gaia's Data Release 2 (DR2) in 2018.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.01131  [pdf] - 1567701
Gaia Data Release 1. Open cluster astrometry: performance, limitations, and future prospects
Gaia Collaboration; van Leeuwen, F.; Vallenari, A.; Jordi, C.; Lindegren, L.; Bastian, U.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Martino, D.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffer, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegrio, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Rimoldini, L.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingril, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernsteiny, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclarky, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardio, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Palmer, M.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poelsy, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: Accepted for publication by A&A. 21 pages main text plus 46 pages appendices. 34 figures main text, 38 figures appendices. 8 table in main text, 19 tables in appendices
Submitted: 2017-03-03
Context. The first Gaia Data Release contains the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). This is a subset of about 2 million stars for which, besides the position and photometry, the proper motion and parallax are calculated using Hipparcos and Tycho-2 positions in 1991.25 as prior information. Aims. We investigate the scientific potential and limitations of the TGAS component by means of the astrometric data for open clusters. Methods. Mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are derived taking into account the error correlations within the astrometric solutions for individual stars, an estimate of the internal velocity dispersion in the cluster, and, where relevant, the effects of the depth of the cluster along the line of sight. Internal consistency of the TGAS data is assessed. Results. Values given for standard uncertainties are still inaccurate and may lead to unrealistic unit-weight standard deviations of least squares solutions for cluster parameters. Reconstructed mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are generally in very good agreement with earlier Hipparcos-based determination, although the Gaia mean parallax for the Pleiades is a significant exception. We have no current explanation for that discrepancy. Most clusters are observed to extend to nearly 15 pc from the cluster centre, and it will be up to future Gaia releases to establish whether those potential cluster-member stars are still dynamically bound to the clusters. Conclusions. The Gaia DR1 provides the means to examine open clusters far beyond their more easily visible cores, and can provide membership assessments based on proper motions and parallaxes. A combined HR diagram shows the same features as observed before using the Hipparcos data, with clearly increased luminosities for older A and F dwarfs.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.04303  [pdf] - 1523840
Gaia Data Release 1: Astrometry - one billion positions, two million proper motions and parallaxes
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-09-14
Gaia Data Release 1 (Gaia DR1) contains astrometric results for more than 1 billion stars brighter than magnitude 20.7 based on observations collected by the Gaia satellite during the first 14 months of its operational phase. We give a brief overview of the astrometric content of the data release and of the model assumptions, data processing, and validation of the results. For stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues, complete astrometric single-star solutions are obtained by incorporating positional information from the earlier catalogues. For other stars only their positions are obtained by neglecting their proper motions and parallaxes. The results are validated by an analysis of the residuals, through special validation runs, and by comparison with external data. Results. For about two million of the brighter stars (down to magnitude ~11.5) we obtain positions, parallaxes, and proper motions to Hipparcos-type precision or better. For these stars, systematic errors depending e.g. on position and colour are at a level of 0.3 milliarcsecond (mas). For the remaining stars we obtain positions at epoch J2015.0 accurate to ~10 mas. Positions and proper motions are given in a reference frame that is aligned with the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to better than 0.1 mas at epoch J2015.0, and non-rotating with respect to ICRF to within 0.03 mas/yr. The Hipparcos reference frame is found to rotate with respect to the Gaia DR1 frame at a rate of 0.24 mas/yr. Based on less than a quarter of the nominal mission length and on very provisional and incomplete calibrations, the quality and completeness of the astrometric data in Gaia DR1 are far from what is expected for the final mission products. The results nevertheless represent a huge improvement in the available fundamental stellar data and practical definition of the optical reference frame.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.4846  [pdf] - 839652
A geometric delay model for Space VLBI
Comments:
Submitted: 2014-02-14
A relativistic delay model for space very long baseline interferometry (hereafter SVLBI) observation of sources at infinite distance is derived. In SVLBI, where one station is on a spacecraft, the orbiting station's maximum speed in an elliptical Earth orbit is much bigger than the ground VLBI (here after GVLBI), leading to a higher delay rate . The delay models inside the VLBI correlators are usually expressed as fifth-order polynomials in time that good for a limited time interval, which are evaluated by the correlator firmware and track the interferometer delays over a limited time interval. The higher SVLBI delay rate requires more accurate polynomial fitting and evalution, more frequent model updates.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.6796  [pdf] - 883051
A commend on "Three Classes of Newtonian Three-Body Planar Periodic Orbits" by \v{S}uvakov and Dmitra\v{s}inovi\'{c} (PRL, 2013)
Comments: 5 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2013-12-24
Currently, the fifteen new periodic solutions of Newtonian three-body problem with equal mass were reported by \v{S}uvakov and Dmitra\v{s}inovi\'{c} (PRL, 2013) [1]. However, using a reliable numerical approach (namely the Clean Numerical Simulation, CNS) that is based on the arbitrary-order Taylor series method and data in arbitrary-digit precision, it is found that at least seven of them greatly depart from the periodic orbits after a long enough interval of time. Therefore, the reported initial conditions of at least seven of the fifteen orbits reported by \v{S}uvakov and Dmitra\v{s}inovi\'{c} [1] are not accurate enough to predict periodic orbits. Besides, it is found that these seven orbits are unstable.