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Kogut, A.

Normalized to: Kogut, A.

126 article(s) in total. 761 co-authors, from 1 to 70 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 5,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2002.00976  [pdf] - 2042448
Calibration Method and Uncertainty for the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE)
Comments: 18 pages including 8 figures
Submitted: 2020-02-03
The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is an Explorer-class mission concept to measure cosmological signals from both linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and spectral distortions from a perfect blackbody. The targeted measurement sensitivity is 2--4 orders of magnitude below competing astrophysical foregrounds, placing stringent requirements on instrument calibration. An on-board blackbody calibrator presents a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer with a known signal to enable conversion of the sampled interference fringe patterns from telemetry units to physical units. We describe the instrumentation and operations needed to calibrate PIXIE, derive the expected uncertainty for the intensity, polarization, and frequency scales, and show the effect of calibration uncertainty in the derived cosmological signals. In-flight calibration is expected to be accurate to a few parts in $10^6$ at frequencies dominated by the CMB, and a few parts in $10^4$ at higher frequencies dominated by the diffuse dust foreground.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.01724  [pdf] - 2026608
Updated design of the CMB polarization experiment satellite LiteBIRD
Sugai, H.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Alonso, D.; Arnold, K.; Aumont, J.; Austermann, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Barreiro, R. B.; Basak, S.; Beall, J.; Beckman, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Buzzelli, A.; Calabrese, E.; Casas, F. J.; Challinor, A.; Chan, V.; Chinone, Y.; Cliche, J. -F.; Columbro, F.; Cukierman, A.; Curtis, D.; Danto, P.; de Bernardis, P.; de Haan, T.; De Petris, M.; Dickinson, C.; Dobbs, M.; Dotani, T.; Duband, L.; Ducout, A.; Duff, S.; Duivenvoorden, A.; Duval, J. -M.; Ebisawa, K.; Elleflot, T.; Enokida, H.; Eriksen, H. K.; Errard, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Finelli, F.; Flauger, R.; Franceschet, C.; Fuskeland, U.; Ganga, K.; Gao, J. -R.; Génova-Santos, R.; Ghigna, T.; Gomez, A.; Gradziel, M. L.; Grain, J.; Grupp, F.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halverson, N. W.; Hargrave, P.; Hasebe, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, M.; Hazumi, M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herranz, D.; Hill, C.; Hilton, G.; Hirota, Y.; Hivon, E.; Hlozek, R.; Hoang, D. -T.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Iida, T.; Imada, H.; Ishimura, K.; Ishino, H.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jones, M.; Kaga, T.; Kashima, S.; Kataoka, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Keskitalo, R.; Kibayashi, A.; Kikuchi, T.; Kimura, K.; Kisner, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kogiso, N.; Kogut, A.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Komatsu, K.; Konishi, K.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kuo, C. L.; Kurinsky, N.; Kushino, A.; Kuwata-Gonokami, M.; Lamagna, L.; Lattanzi, M.; Lee, A. T.; Linder, E.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Maki, M.; Mangilli, A.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Mathon, R.; Matsumura, T.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Minami, Y.; Mistuda, K.; Molinari, D.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mot, B.; Murata, Y.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagai, M.; Nagata, R.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Natoli, P.; Nerva, S.; Nishibori, T.; Nishino, H.; Nomura, Y.; Noviello, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Ochi, H.; Ogawa, H.; Ogawa, H.; Ohsaki, H.; Ohta, I.; Okada, N.; Okada, N.; Pagano, L.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piacentini, F.; Pisano, G.; Polenta, G.; Poletti, D.; Prouvé, T.; Puglisi, G.; Rambaud, D.; Raum, C.; Realini, S.; Remazeilles, M.; Roudil, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Russell, M.; Sakurai, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Sekimoto, Y.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shinozaki, K.; Shiraishi, M.; Shirron, P.; Signorelli, G.; Smecher, G.; Spizzi, P.; Stever, S. L.; Stompor, R.; Sugiyama, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, J.; Switzer, E.; Takaku, R.; Takakura, H.; Takakura, S.; Takeda, Y.; Taylor, A.; Taylor, E.; Terao, Y.; Thompson, K. L.; Thorne, B.; Tomasi, M.; Tomida, H.; Trappe, N.; Tristram, M.; Tsuji, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Tucker, C.; Ullom, J.; Uozumi, S.; Utsunomiya, S.; Van Lanen, J.; Vermeulen, G.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vissers, M.; Vittorio, N.; Voisin, F.; Walker, I.; Watanabe, N.; Wehus, I.; Weller, J.; Westbrook, B.; Winter, B.; Wollack, E.; Yamamoto, R.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Yanagisawa, M.; Yoshida, T.; Yumoto, J.; Zannoni, M.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Journal of Low Temperature Physics, in press
Submitted: 2020-01-06
Recent developments of transition-edge sensors (TESs), based on extensive experience in ground-based experiments, have been making the sensor techniques mature enough for their application on future satellite CMB polarization experiments. LiteBIRD is in the most advanced phase among such future satellites, targeting its launch in Japanese Fiscal Year 2027 (2027FY) with JAXA's H3 rocket. It will accommodate more than 4000 TESs in focal planes of reflective low-frequency and refractive medium-and-high-frequency telescopes in order to detect a signature imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the primordial gravitational waves predicted in cosmic inflation. The total wide frequency coverage between 34GHz and 448GHz enables us to extract such weak spiral polarization patterns through the precise subtraction of our Galaxy's foreground emission by using spectral differences among CMB and foreground signals. Telescopes are cooled down to 5Kelvin for suppressing thermal noise and contain polarization modulators with transmissive half-wave plates at individual apertures for separating sky polarization signals from artificial polarization and for mitigating from instrumental 1/f noise. Passive cooling by using V-grooves supports active cooling with mechanical coolers as well as adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators. Sky observations from the second Sun-Earth Lagrangian point, L2, are planned for three years. An international collaboration between Japan, USA, Canada, and Europe is sharing various roles. In May 2019, the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA selected LiteBIRD as the strategic large mission No. 2.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.07118  [pdf] - 2050303
The Experiment for Cryogenic Large-aperture Intensity Mapping (EXCLAIM)
Comments: 10 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2019-12-15
The EXperiment for Cryogenic Large-Aperture Intensity Mapping (EXCLAIM) is a cryogenic balloon-borne instrument that will survey galaxy and star formation history over cosmological time scales. Rather than identifying individual objects, EXCLAIM will be a pathfinder to demonstrate an intensity mapping approach, which measures the cumulative redshifted line emission. EXCLAIM will operate at 420-540 GHz with a spectral resolution R=512 to measure the integrated CO and [CII] in redshift windows spanning 0 < z < 3.5. CO and [CII] line emissions are key tracers of the gas phases in the interstellar medium involved in star-formation processes. EXCLAIM will shed light on questions such as why the star formation rate declines at z < 2, despite continued clustering of the dark matter. The instrument will employ an array of six superconducting integrated grating-analog spectrometers (micro-spec) coupled to microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). Here we present an overview of the EXCLAIM instrument design and status.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.06440  [pdf] - 1961730
Sub-Kelvin cooling for two kilopixel bolometer arrays in the PIPER receiver
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2019-09-13
The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a balloon-borne telescope mission to search for inflationary gravitational waves from the early universe. PIPER employs two 32x40 arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors, which operate at 100 mK. An open bucket dewar of liquid helium maintains the receiver and telescope optics at 1.7 K. We describe the thermal design of the receiver and sub-kelvin cooling with a continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (CADR). The CADR operates between 70-130 mK and provides ~10 uW cooling power at 100 mK, nearly five times the loading of the two detector assemblies. We describe electronics and software to robustly control the CADR, overall CADR performance in flight-like integrated receiver testing, and practical considerations for implementation in the balloon float environment.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.01593  [pdf] - 1955429
New Horizons in Cosmology with Spectral Distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background
Comments: 20 pages + references and title page, 12 figures, extended white paper for ESA's Voyage 2050 call, some parts based on arXiv:1903.04218
Submitted: 2019-09-04
Voyage 2050 White Paper highlighting the unique science opportunities using spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CMB spectral distortions probe many processes throughout the history of the Universe. Precision spectroscopy, possible with existing technology, would provide key tests for processes expected within the cosmological standard model and open an enormous discovery space to new physics. This offers unique scientific opportunities for furthering our understanding of inflation, recombination, reionization and structure formation as well as dark matter and particle physics. A dedicated experimental approach could open this new window to the early Universe in the decades to come, allowing us to turn the long-standing upper distortion limits obtained with COBE/FIRAS some 25 years ago into clear detections of the expected standard distortion signals.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.01591  [pdf] - 1956570
Microwave Spectro-Polarimetry of Matter and Radiation across Space and Time
Delabrouille, Jacques; Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Aghanim, Nabila; Ali-Haimoud, Yacine; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo; Banday, Anthony J.; Bartlett, James G.; Baselmans, Jochem; Basu, Kaustuv; Battaglia, Nicholas; Climent, Jose Ramon Bermejo; Bernal, Jose L.; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bolliet, Boris; Bonato, Matteo; Bouchet, François R.; Breysse, Patrick C.; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Chluba, Jens; Churazov, Eugene; Dannerbauer, Helmut; De Bernardis, Paolo; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Endo, Akira; Erler, Jens; Ferraro, Simone; Finelli, Fabio; Fixsen, Dale; Hanany, Shaul; Hart, Luke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hill, J. Colin; Hotinli, Selim C.; Karatsu, Kenichi; Karkare, Kirit; Keating, Garrett K.; Khabibullin, Ildar; Kogut, Alan; Kohri, Kazunori; Kovetz, Ely D.; Lagache, Guilaine; Lesgourgues, Julien; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Maffei, Bruno; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Martins, Carlos; Masi, Silvia; Mather, John; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad; Mroczkowski, Tony; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Nagai, Daisuke; Negrello, Mattia; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Patil, Subodh P.; Piacentini, Francesco; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Ravenni, Andrea; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Revéret, Vincent; Rodriguez, Louis; Rotti, Aditya; Martin, Jose-Alberto Rubino; Sayers, Jack; Scott, Douglas; Silk, Joseph; Silva, Marta; Souradeep, Tarun; Sugiyama, Naonori; Sunyaev, Rashid; Switzer, Eric R.; Tartari, Andrea; Trombetti, Tiziana; Zubeldia, Inigo
Comments: 20 pages, white paper submitted in answer to the "Voyage 2050" call to prepare the long term plan in the ESA science programme
Submitted: 2019-09-04
This paper discusses the science case for a sensitive spectro-polarimetric survey of the microwave sky. Such a survey would provide a tomographic and dynamic census of the three-dimensional distribution of hot gas, velocity flows, early metals, dust, and mass distribution in the entire Hubble volume, exploit CMB temperature and polarisation anisotropies down to fundamental limits, and track energy injection and absorption into the radiation background across cosmic times by measuring spectral distortions of the CMB blackbody emission. In addition to its exceptional capability for cosmology and fundamental physics, such a survey would provide an unprecedented view of microwave emissions at sub-arcminute to few-arcminute angular resolution in hundreds of frequency channels, a data set that would be of immense legacy value for many branches of astrophysics. We propose that this survey be carried-out with a large space mission featuring a broad-band polarised imager and a moderate resolution spectro-imager at the focus of a 3.5m aperture telescope actively cooled to about 8K, complemented with absolutely-calibrated Fourier Transform Spectrometer modules observing at degree-scale angular resolution in the 10-2000 GHz frequency range. We propose two observing modes: a survey mode to map the entire sky as well as a few selected wide fields, and an observatory mode for deeper observations of regions of specific interest.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.07495  [pdf] - 1945993
PICO: Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins
Comments: APC White Paper submitted to the Astro2020 decadal panel; 10 page version of the 50 page mission study report arXiv:1902.10541
Submitted: 2019-08-20
The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins (PICO) is a proposed probe-scale space mission consisting of an imaging polarimeter operating in frequency bands between 20 and 800 GHz. We describe the science achievable by PICO, which has sensitivity equivalent to more than 3300 Planck missions, the technical implementation, the schedule and cost.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.01907  [pdf] - 1929968
Astro2020 APC White Paper: The need for better tools to design future CMB experiments
Comments: 10 pages + references, 4 figures; Submitted to the Astro2020 call for APC white papers
Submitted: 2019-08-05
This white paper addresses key challenges for the design of next-decade Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments, and for assessing their capability to extract cosmological information from CMB polarization. We focus here on the challenges posed by foreground emission, CMB lensing, and instrumental systematics to detect the signal that arises from gravitational waves sourced by inflation and parameterized by $r$, at the level of $r \sim 10^{-3}$ or lower, as proposed for future observational efforts. We argue that more accurate and robust analysis and simulation tools are required for these experiments to realize their promise. We are optimistic that the capability to simulate the joint impact of foregrounds, CMB lensing, and systematics can be developed to the level necessary to support the design of a space mission at $r \sim 10^{-4}$ in a few years. We make the case here for supporting such work. Although ground-based efforts present additional challenges (e.g., atmosphere, ground pickup), which are not addressed here, they would also benefit from these improved simulation capabilities.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.00558  [pdf] - 1927516
Systematic error cancellation for a four-port interferometric polarimeter
Comments: 18 pages including 10 figurers Published in the Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems
Submitted: 2019-08-01
The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is an Explorer-class mission concept to measure the gravitational-wave signature of primordial inflation through its distinctive imprint on the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Its optical system couples a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer to the sky to measure the differential signal between orthogonal linear polarization states from two co-pointed beams on the sky. The double differential nature of the four-port measurement mitigates beam-related systematic errors common to the two-port systems used in most CMB measurements. Systematic errors coupling unpolarized temperature gradients to a false polarized signal cancel to first order for any individual detector. This common-mode cancellation is performed optically, prior to detection, and does not depend on the instrument calibration. Systematic errors coupling temperature to polarization cancel to second order when comparing signals from independent detectors. We describe the polarized beam patterns for PIXIE and assess the systematic error for measurements of CMB polarization.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.13195  [pdf] - 1926524
CMB Spectral Distortions: Status and Prospects
Comments: ASTRO2020 APC white paper
Submitted: 2019-07-30
Departures of the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from a perfect blackbody probe a fundamental property of the universe -- its thermal history. Current upper limits, dating back some 25 years, limit such spectral distortions to 50 parts per million and provide a foundation for the Hot Big Bang model of the early universe. Modern upgrades to the 1980's-era technology behind these limits enable three orders of magnitude or greater improvement in sensitivity. The standard cosmological model provides compelling targets at this sensitivity, spanning cosmic history from the decay of primordial density perturbations to the role of baryonic feedback in structure formation. Fully utilizing this sensitivity requires concurrent improvements in our understanding of competing astrophysical foregrounds. We outline a program using proven technologies capable of detecting the minimal predicted distortions even for worst-case foreground scenarios.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.10558  [pdf] - 1922573
Advanced Astrophysics Discovery Technology in the Era of Data Driven Astronomy
Comments: White paper submitted to the ASTRO2020 decadal survey
Submitted: 2019-07-24
Experience suggests that structural issues in how institutional Astrophysics approaches data-driven science and the development of discovery technology may be hampering the community's ability to respond effectively to a rapidly changing environment in which increasingly complex, heterogeneous datasets are challenging our existing information infrastructure and traditional approaches to analysis. We stand at the confluence of a new epoch of multimessenger science, remote co-location of data and processing power and new observing strategies based on miniaturized spacecraft. Significant effort will be required by the community to adapt to this rapidly evolving range of possible discovery moduses. In the suggested creation of a new Astrophysics element, Advanced Astrophysics Discovery Technology, we offer an affirmative solution that places the visibility of discovery technologies at a level that we suggest is fully commensurate with their importance to the future of the field.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.11556  [pdf] - 1890493
Determination of the Cosmic Infrared Background from COBE/FIRAS and Planck HFI Observations
Comments: 29 pages, 18 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ; minor changes in v2 to match published version
Submitted: 2019-04-25, last modified: 2019-05-23
New determinations are presented of the cosmic infrared background monopole brightness in the Planck HFI bands from 100 GHz to 857 GHz. Planck was not designed to measure the monopole component of sky brightness, so cross-correlation of the 2015 HFI maps with COBE/FIRAS data is used to recalibrate the zero level of the HFI maps. For the HFI 545 and 857 GHz maps, the brightness scale is also recalibrated. Correlation of the recalibrated HFI maps with a linear combination of Galactic H I and H alpha data is used to separate the Galactic foreground emission and determine the cosmic infrared background brightness in each of the HFI bands. We obtain CIB values of 0.007 +- 0.014, 0.010 +- 0.019, 0.060 +- 0.023, 0.149 +- 0.017, 0.371 +- 0.018, and 0.576 +- 0.034 MJy/sr at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz, respectively. The estimated uncertainties for the 353 to 857 GHz bands are about 3 to 6 times smaller than those of previous direct CIB determinations at these frequencies. Our results are compared with integrated source brightness results from selected recent submillimeter and millimeter wavelength imaging surveys.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04218  [pdf] - 1873787
Spectral Distortions of the CMB as a Probe of Inflation, Recombination, Structure Formation and Particle Physics
Comments: Astro2020 Science White Paper, 5 pages text, 13 pages in total, 3 Figures, minor update to references
Submitted: 2019-03-11, last modified: 2019-04-25
Following the pioneering observations with COBE in the early 1990s, studies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have focused on temperature and polarization anisotropies. CMB spectral distortions - tiny departures of the CMB energy spectrum from that of a perfect blackbody - provide a second, independent probe of fundamental physics, with a reach deep into the primordial Universe. The theoretical foundation of spectral distortions has seen major advances in recent years, which highlight the immense potential of this emerging field. Spectral distortions probe a fundamental property of the Universe - its thermal history - thereby providing additional insight into processes within the cosmological standard model (CSM) as well as new physics beyond. Spectral distortions are an important tool for understanding inflation and the nature of dark matter. They shed new light on the physics of recombination and reionization, both prominent stages in the evolution of our Universe, and furnish critical information on baryonic feedback processes, in addition to probing primordial correlation functions at scales inaccessible to other tracers. In principle the range of signals is vast: many orders of magnitude of discovery space could be explored by detailed observations of the CMB energy spectrum. Several CSM signals are predicted and provide clear experimental targets, some of which are already observable with present-day technology. Confirmation of these signals would extend the reach of the CSM by orders of magnitude in physical scale as the Universe evolves from the initial stages to its present form. The absence of these signals would pose a huge theoretical challenge, immediately pointing to new physics.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.06761  [pdf] - 1867937
Time-ordered data simulation and map-making for the PIXIE Fourier transform spectrometer
Comments: 27 pages, 15 figures. Accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2017-10-11, last modified: 2019-04-07
We develop a time-ordered data simulator and map-maker for the proposed PIXIE Fourier transform spectrometer and use them to investigate the impact of polarization leakage, imperfect collimation, elliptical beams, sub-pixel effects, correlated noise and spectrometer mirror jitter on the PIXIE data analysis. We find that PIXIE is robust to all of these effects, with the exception of mirror jitter which could become the dominant source of noise in the experiment if the jitter is not kept significantly below $0.1\mu m\sqrt{s}$. Source code is available at https://github.com/amaurea/pixie.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.10541  [pdf] - 1842579
PICO: Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins
Comments: Probe class mission study submitted to NASA and 2020 Decadal Panel. Executive summary: 2.5 pages; Science: 28 pages; Total: 50 pages, 36 figures
Submitted: 2019-02-26, last modified: 2019-03-05
The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins (PICO) is an imaging polarimeter that will scan the sky for 5 years in 21 frequency bands spread between 21 and 799 GHz. It will produce full-sky surveys of intensity and polarization with a final combined-map noise level of 0.87 $\mu$K arcmin for the required specifications, equivalent to 3300 Planck missions, and with our current best-estimate would have a noise level of 0.61 $\mu$K arcmin (6400 Planck missions). PICO will either determine the energy scale of inflation by detecting the tensor to scalar ratio at a level $r=5\times 10^{-4}~(5\sigma)$, or will rule out with more than $5\sigma$ all inflation models for which the characteristic scale in the potential is the Planck scale. With LSST's data it could rule out all models of slow-roll inflation. PICO will detect the sum of neutrino masses at $>4\sigma$, constrain the effective number of light particle species with $\Delta N_{\rm eff}<0.06~(2\sigma)$, and elucidate processes affecting the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring the optical depth to reionization with errors limited by cosmic variance and by constraining the evolution of the amplitude of linear fluctuations $\sigma_{8}(z)$ with sub-percent accuracy. Cross-correlating PICO's map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect with LSST's gold sample of galaxies will precisely trace the evolution of thermal pressure with $z$. PICO's maps of the Milky Way will be used to determine the make up of galactic dust and the role of magnetic fields in star formation efficiency. With 21 full sky legacy maps in intensity and polarization, which cannot be obtained in any other way, the mission will enrich many areas of astrophysics. PICO is the only single-platform instrument with the combination of sensitivity, angular resolution, frequency bands, and control of systematic effects that can deliver this compelling, timely, and broad science.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.01369  [pdf] - 1728074
Optical Design of PICO, a Concept for a Space Mission to Probe Inflation and Cosmic Origins
Comments: 12 pages, 8 Figures, Submitted to SPIE, Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation
Submitted: 2018-08-03
The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins (PICO) is a probe-class mission concept currently under study by NASA. PICO will probe the physics of the Big Bang and the energy scale of inflation, constrain the sum of neutrino masses, measure the growth of structures in the universe, and constrain its reionization history by making full sky maps of the cosmic microwave background with sensitivity 80 times higher than the Planck space mission. With bands at 21-799 GHz and arcmin resolution at the highest frequencies, PICO will make polarization maps of Galactic synchrotron and dust emission to observe the role of magnetic fields in Milky Way's evolution and star formation. We discuss PICO's optical system, focal plane, and give current best case noise estimates. The optical design is a two-reflector optimized open-Dragone design with a cold aperture stop. It gives a diffraction limited field of view (DLFOV) with throughput of 910 square cm sr at 21 GHz. The large 82 square degree DLFOV hosts 12,996 transition edge sensor bolometers distributed in 21 frequency bands and maintained at 0.1 K. We use focal plane technologies that are currently implemented on operating CMB instruments including three-color multi-chroic pixels and multiplexed readouts. To our knowledge, this is the first use of an open-Dragone design for mm-wave astrophysical observations, and the only monolithic CMB instrument to have such a broad frequency coverage. With current best case estimate polarization depth of 0.65 microK(CMB}-arcmin over the entire sky, PICO is the most sensitive CMB instrument designed to date.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.01368  [pdf] - 1728073
PICO - the probe of inflation and cosmic origins
Comments: 11 pages, 5 Figure, submitted to SPIE, Proceedings of the Conference on Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation, 2018
Submitted: 2018-08-03
The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins (PICO) is a NASA-funded study of a Probe-class mission concept. The top-level science objectives are to probe the physics of the Big Bang by measuring or constraining the energy scale of inflation, probe fundamental physics by measuring the number of light particles in the Universe and the sum of neutrino masses, to measure the reionization history of the Universe, and to understand the mechanisms driving the cosmic star formation history, and the physics of the galactic magnetic field. PICO would have multiple frequency bands between 21 and 799 GHz, and would survey the entire sky, producing maps of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation, of galactic dust, of synchrotron radiation, and of various populations of point sources. Several instrument configurations, optical systems, cooling architectures, and detector and readout technologies have been and continue to be considered in the development of the mission concept. We will present a snapshot of the baseline mission concept currently under development.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.09979  [pdf] - 1637587
The Radio Synchrotron Background: Conference Summary and Report
Comments: 19 pages, 12 figures, updated to journal version
Submitted: 2017-11-22, last modified: 2018-02-05
We summarize the radio synchrotron background workshop that took place July 19-21, 2017 at the University of Richmond. This first scientific meeting dedicated to the topic was convened because current measurements of the diffuse radio monopole reveal a surface brightness that is several times higher than can be straightforwardly explained by known Galactic and extragalactic sources and processes, rendering it by far the least well understood photon background at present. It was the conclusion of a majority of the participants that the radio monopole level is at or near that reported by the ARCADE 2 experiment and inferred from several absolutely calibrated zero level lower frequency radio measurements, and unanimously agreed that the production of this level of surface brightness, if confirmed, represents a major outstanding question in astrophysics. The workshop reached a consensus on the next priorities for investigations of the radio synchrotron background.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.08971  [pdf] - 1625627
Polarized Beam Patterns from a Multi-Moded Feed For Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background
Comments: 16 pages including 8 figurers. Accepted for publication in the Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems
Submitted: 2018-01-26
We measure linearly polarized beam patterns for a multi-moded concentrator and compare the results to a simple model based on geometric optics. We convolve the measured co-polar and cross-polar beams with simulated maps of CMB polarization to estimate the amplitude of the systematic error resulting from the cross-polar beam response. The un-corrected error signal has typical amplitude of 3 nK, corresponding to inflationary B-mode amplitude r ~ 10^{-3}. Convolving the measured cross-polar beam pattern with maps of the CMB E-mode polarization provides a template for correcting the cross-polar response, reducing it to negligible levels.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.04466  [pdf] - 1513841
Multimode bolometer development for the PIXIE instrument
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2016-11-14
The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is an Explorer-class mission concept designed to measure the polarization and absolute intensity of the cosmic microwave background. In the following, we report on the design, fabrication, and performance of the multimode polarization-sensitive bolometers for PIXIE, which are based on silicon thermistors. In particular we focus on several recent advances in the detector design, including the implementation of a scheme to greatly raise the frequencies of the internal vibrational modes of the large-area, low-mass optical absorber structure consisting of a grid of micromachined, ion-implanted silicon wires. With $\sim30$ times the absorbing area of the spider-web bolometers used by Planck, the tensioning scheme enables the PIXIE bolometers to be robust in the vibrational and acoustic environment at launch of the space mission. More generally, it could be used to reduce microphonic sensitivity in other types of low temperature detectors. We also report on the performance of the PIXIE bolometers in a dark cryogenic environment.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.06172  [pdf] - 1531076
The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER)
Comments: 8 pages, 6 figures. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9914. Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2016, conference 9914
Submitted: 2016-07-20
The Primordial Inflation Polarization ExploreR (PIPER) is a balloon-borne telescope designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background on large angular scales. PIPER will map 85% of the sky at 200, 270, 350, and 600 GHz over a series of 8 conventional balloon flights from the northern and southern hemispheres. The first science flight will use two 32x40 arrays of backshort-under-grid transition edge sensors, multiplexed in the time domain, and maintained at 100 mK by a Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator. Front-end cryogenic Variable-delay Polarization Modulators provide systematic control by rotating linear to circular polarization at 3 Hz. Twin telescopes allow PIPER to measure Stokes I, Q, U, and V simultaneously. The telescope is maintained at 1.5 K in an LHe bucket dewar. Cold optics and the lack of a warm window permit sensitivity at the sky-background limit. The ultimate science target is a limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r ~ 0.007, from the reionization bump to l ~ 300. PIPER's first flight will be from the Northern hemisphere, and overlap with the CLASS survey at lower frequencies. We describe the current status of the PIPER instrument.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.02150  [pdf] - 1447857
Foreground Bias From Parametric Models of Far-IR Dust Emission
Comments: 9 pages including 8 figures. Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2016-07-07
We use simple toy models of far-IR dust emission to estimate the accuracy to which the polarization of the cosmic microwave background can be recovered using multi-frequency fits, if the parametric form chosen for the fitted dust model differs from the actual dust emission. Commonly used approximations to the far-IR dust spectrum yield CMB residuals comparable to or larger than the sensitivities expected for the next generation of CMB missions, despite fitting the combined CMB + foreground emission to precision 0.1% or better. The Rayleigh-Jeans approximation to the dust spectrum biases the fitted dust spectral index by Delta beta_d = 0.2 and the inflationary B-mode amplitude by Delta r = 0.03. Fitting the dust to a modified blackbody at a single temperature biases the best-fit CMB by Delta r > 0.003 if the true dust spectrum contains multiple temperature components. A 13-parameter model fitting two temperature components reduces this bias by an order of magnitude if the true dust spectrum is in fact a simple superposition of emission at different temperatures, but fails at the level Delta r = 0.006 for dust whose spectral index varies with frequency. Restricting the observing frequencies to a narrow region near the foreground minimum reduces these biases for some dust spectra but can increase the bias for others. Data at THz frequencies surrounding the peak of the dust emission can mitigate these biases while providing a direct determination of the dust temperature profile.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.08783  [pdf] - 1470725
Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations
Comments: 17 pages, 7 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-06-28
Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for CMB measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 millimeters to 100 microns and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anticorrelation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenological model consisting of the sum of two graybody components. We find that the two-graybody model gives the best fit and the FDS model gives a significantly poorer fit than the other models. The Meisner and Finkbeiner model and the two-level systems model remain viable for use in Galactic foreground subtraction, but the FIRAS data do not have sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to provide a strong test of the predicted spectrum at millimeter wavelengths.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.08089  [pdf] - 1315032
Systematic effects in polarizing Fourier transform spectrometers for cosmic microwave background observations
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJS
Submitted: 2015-10-27
The detection of the primordial B-mode polarization signal of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would provide evidence for inflation. Yet as has become increasingly clear, the detection of a such a faint signal requires an instrument with both wide frequency coverage to reject foregrounds and excellent control over instrumental systematic effects. Using a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) for CMB observations meets both these requirements. In this work, we present an analysis of instrumental systematic effects in polarizing Fourier transform spectrometers, using the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) as a worked example. We analytically solve for the most important systematic effects inherent to the FTS - emissive optical components, misaligned optical components, sampling and phase errors, and spin synchronous effects - and demonstrate that residual systematic error terms after corrections will all be at the sub-nK level, well below the predicted 100 nK B-mode signal.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.00266  [pdf] - 987900
Spectral Confusion for Cosmological Surveys of Redshifted CII Observations
Comments: 7 pages including 7 figures. Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2015-05-01
Far infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of red-shifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencil-beam surveys of red-shifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150 to 1300 micron wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 micron [CII] line and other lines. Although the [CII] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [CII] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20 arcsec and 10 armin, sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.04206  [pdf] - 957095
Polarization Properties of A Multi-Moded Concentrator
Comments: 9 pages including 8 figures. Accepted for publication in the Journal of the Optical Society of America A
Submitted: 2015-03-13
We present the design and performance of a non-imaging concentrator for use in broad-band polarimetry at millimeter through submillimeter wavelengths. A rectangular geometry preserves the input polarization state as the concentrator couples f/2 incident optics to a 2 pi sr detector. Measurements of the co-polar and cross-polar beams in both the few-mode and highly over-moded limits agree with a simple model based on mode truncation. The measured co-polar beam pattern is nearly independent of frequency in both linear polarizations. The cross-polar beam pattern is dominated by a uniform term corresponding to polarization efficiency 94%. After correcting for efficiency, the remaining cross-polar response is -18 dB.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.00499  [pdf] - 1223839
Axial Ratio of Edge-On Spiral Galaxies as a Test For Extended Bright Radio Halos
Comments: 6 Pages, 4 Figures, 1 Table; To Appear In ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2015-01-02
We use surface brightness contour maps of nearby edge-on spiral galaxies to determine whether extended bright radio halos are common. In particular, we test a recent model of the spatial structure of the diffuse radio continuum by Subrahmanyan and Cowsik which posits that a substantial fraction of the observed high-latitude surface brightness originates from an extended Galactic halo of uniform emissivity. Measurements of the axial ratio of emission contours within a sample of normal spiral galaxies at 1500 MHz and below show no evidence for such a bright, extended radio halo. Either the Galaxy is atypical compared to nearby quiescent spirals or the bulk of the observed high-latitude emission does not originate from this type of extended halo.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.4788  [pdf] - 1216429
CLASS: The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor
Comments: 23 pages, 10 figures, Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VII. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9153
Submitted: 2014-08-20
The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an experiment to measure the signature of a gravita-tional-wave background from inflation in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CLASS is a multi-frequency array of four telescopes operating from a high-altitude site in the Atacama Desert in Chile. CLASS will survey 70\% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz, which are chosen to straddle the Galactic-foreground minimum while avoiding strong atmospheric emission lines. This broad frequency coverage ensures that CLASS can distinguish Galactic emission from the CMB. The sky fraction of the CLASS survey will allow the full shape of the primordial B-mode power spectrum to be characterized, including the signal from reionization at low $\ell$. Its unique combination of large sky coverage, control of systematic errors, and high sensitivity will allow CLASS to measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at a level of $r=0.01$ and make a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to the surface of last scattering, $\tau$.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.4789  [pdf] - 1216430
The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS): 38 GHz detector array of bolometric polarimeters
Comments: 15 pages, 4 figures. Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VII. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9153
Submitted: 2014-08-20
The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) experiment aims to map the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at angular scales larger than a few degrees. Operating from Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert of Chile, it will observe over 65% of the sky at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. In this paper we discuss the design, construction, and characterization of the CLASS 38 GHz detector focal plane, the first ever Q-band bolometric polarimeter array.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.2584  [pdf] - 1215558
The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER)
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures. To be published in Proceedings of SPIE Volume 9153. Presented at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation 2014, conference 9153
Submitted: 2014-07-09
The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a balloon-borne cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeter designed to search for evidence of inflation by measuring the large-angular scale CMB polarization signal. BICEP2 recently reported a detection of B-mode power corresponding to the tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.2 on ~2 degree scales. If the BICEP2 signal is caused by inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs), then there should be a corresponding increase in B-mode power on angular scales larger than 18 degrees. PIPER is currently the only suborbital instrument capable of fully testing and extending the BICEP2 results by measuring the B-mode power spectrum on angular scales $\theta$ = ~0.6 deg to 90 deg, covering both the reionization bump and recombination peak, with sensitivity to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio down to r = 0.007, and four frequency bands to distinguish foregrounds. PIPER will accomplish this by mapping 85% of the sky in four frequency bands (200, 270, 350, 600 GHz) over a series of 8 conventional balloon flights from the northern and southern hemispheres. The instrument has background-limited sensitivity provided by fully cryogenic (1.5 K) optics focusing the sky signal onto four 32x40-pixel arrays of time-domain multiplexed Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers held at 140 mK. Polarization sensitivity and systematic control are provided by front-end Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs), which rapidly modulate only the polarized sky signal at 3 Hz and allow PIPER to instantaneously measure the full Stokes vector (I, Q, U, V) for each pointing. We describe the PIPER instrument and progress towards its first flight.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.1652  [pdf] - 1208233
Variable-delay Polarization Modulators for Cryogenic Millimeter-wave Applications
Comments: 8 pages, 10 Figures, Submitted to Review of Scientific Instruments
Submitted: 2014-03-06, last modified: 2014-05-28
We describe the design, construction, and initial validation of the variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) designed for the PIPER cosmic microwave background polarimeter. The VPM modulates between linear and circular polarization by introducing a variable phase delay between orthogonal linear polarizations. Each VPM has a diameter of 39 cm and is engineered to operate in a cryogenic environment (1.5 K). We describe the mechanical design and performance of the kinematic double-blade flexure and drive mechanism along with the construction of the high precision wire grid polarizers.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1212.5226  [pdf] - 1158651
Nine-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Cosmological Parameter Results
Comments: 32 pages, 12 figures, v3: Version accepted to Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series. Includes improvements in response to referee and community; corrected 3 entries in Table 10, (w0 & wa model). See the Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis (LAMBDA): http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/current/ for further detail
Submitted: 2012-12-20, last modified: 2013-06-04
We present cosmological parameter constraints based on the final nine-year WMAP data, in conjunction with additional cosmological data sets. The WMAP data alone, and in combination, continue to be remarkably well fit by a six-parameter LCDM model. When WMAP data are combined with measurements of the high-l CMB anisotropy, the BAO scale, and the Hubble constant, the densities, Omegabh2, Omegach2, and Omega_L, are each determined to a precision of ~1.5%. The amplitude of the primordial spectrum is measured to within 3%, and there is now evidence for a tilt in the primordial spectrum at the 5sigma level, confirming the first detection of tilt based on the five-year WMAP data. At the end of the WMAP mission, the nine-year data decrease the allowable volume of the six-dimensional LCDM parameter space by a factor of 68,000 relative to pre-WMAP measurements. We investigate a number of data combinations and show that their LCDM parameter fits are consistent. New limits on deviations from the six-parameter model are presented, for example: the fractional contribution of tensor modes is limited to r<0.13 (95% CL); the spatial curvature parameter is limited to -0.0027 (+0.0039/-0.0038); the summed mass of neutrinos is <0.44 eV (95% CL); and the number of relativistic species is found to be 3.84+/-0.40 when the full data are analyzed. The joint constraint on Neff and the primordial helium abundance agrees with the prediction of standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis. We compare recent PLANCK measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with our seven-year measurements, and show their mutual agreement. Our analysis of the polarization pattern around temperature extrema is updated. This confirms a fundamental prediction of the standard cosmological model and provides a striking illustration of acoustic oscillations and adiabatic initial conditions in the early universe.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1212.5225  [pdf] - 1158650
Nine-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Final Maps and Results
Comments: 177 pages, 44 figures, v3: Version accepted to Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series. Includes improvements in clarity of presentation and Fig 43 revised to include WMAP-only solutions, in response to referee and community. See the Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis (LAMBDA): http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/current/ for further detail
Submitted: 2012-12-20, last modified: 2013-06-04
We present the final nine-year maps and basic results from the WMAP mission. We provide new nine-year full sky temperature maps that were processed to reduce the asymmetry of the effective beams. Temperature and polarization sky maps are examined to separate CMB anisotropy from foreground emission, and both types of signals are analyzed in detail. The WMAP mission has resulted in a highly constrained LCDM cosmological model with precise and accurate parameters in agreement with a host of other cosmological measurements. When WMAP data are combined with finer scale CMB, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Hubble constant measurements, we find that Big Bang nucleosynthesis is well supported and there is no compelling evidence for a non-standard number of neutrino species (3.84+/-0.40). The model fit also implies that the age of the universe is 13.772+/-0.059 Gyr, and the fit Hubble constant is H0 = 69.32+/-0.80 km/s/Mpc. Inflation is also supported: the fluctuations are adiabatic, with Gaussian random phases; the detection of a deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity reported earlier by WMAP now has high statistical significance (n_s = 0.9608+/-0.0080); and the universe is close to flat/Euclidean, Omega_k = -0.0027 (+0.0039/-0.0038). Overall, the WMAP mission has resulted in a reduction of the cosmological parameter volume by a factor of 68,000 for the standard six-parameter LCDM model, based on CMB data alone. For a model including tensors, the allowed seven-parameter volume has been reduced by a factor 117,000. Other cosmological observations are in accord with the CMB predictions, and the combined data reduces the cosmological parameter volume even further. With no significant anomalies and an adequate goodness-of-fit, the inflationary flat LCDM model and its precise and accurate parameters rooted in WMAP data stands as the standard model of cosmology.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.4041  [pdf] - 1123498
Synchrotron Spectral Curvature from 22 MHz to 23 GHz
Comments: 7 pages including 7 figures. Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2012-05-17
We combine surveys of the radio sky at frequencies 22 MHz to 1.4 GHz with data from the ARCADE-2 instrument at frequencies 3 to 10 GHz to characterize the frequency spectrum of diffuse synchrotron emission in the Galaxy. The radio spectrum steepens with frequency from 22 MHz to 10 GHz. The projected spectral index at 23 GHz derived from the low-frequency data agrees well with independent measurements using only data at frequencies 23 GHz and above. Comparing the spectral index at 23 GHz to the value from previously published analyses allows extension of the model to higher frequencies. The combined data are consistent with a power-law index beta = -2.64 +/- 0.03 at 0.31 GHz, steepening by an amount Delta beta = 0.07 every octave in frequency. Comparison of the radio data to models including the cosmic ray energy spectrum suggests that any break in the synchrotron spectrum must occur at frequencies above 23 GHz.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.2044  [pdf] - 1076532
The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE): A Nulling Polarimeter for Cosmic Microwave Background Observations
Comments: 37 pages including 17 figures. Submitted to the Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics
Submitted: 2011-05-10
The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is an Explorer-class mission to measure the gravity-wave signature of primordial inflation through its distinctive imprint on the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background. The instrument consists of a polarizing Michelson interferometer configured as a nulling polarimeter to measure the difference spectrum between orthogonal linear polarizations from two co-aligned beams. Either input can view the sky or a temperature-controlled absolute reference blackbody calibrator. PIXIE will map the absolute intensity and linear polarization (Stokes I, Q, and U parameters) over the full sky in 400 spectral channels spanning 2.5 decades in frequency from 30 GHz to 6 THz (1 cm to 50 um wavelength). Multi-moded optics provide background-limited sensitivity using only 4 detectors, while the highly symmetric design and multiple signal modulations provide robust rejection of potential systematic errors. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r < 10^{-3} at 5 standard deviations. The rich PIXIE data set will also constrain physical processes ranging from Big Bang cosmology to the nature of the first stars to physical conditions within the interstellar medium of the Galaxy.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4758  [pdf] - 436667
Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Are There Cosmic Microwave Background Anomalies?
Comments: 19 pages, 17 figures, also available with higher-res figures on http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov; accepted by ApJS; (v2) text as accepted
Submitted: 2010-01-26, last modified: 2011-01-03
(Abridged) A simple six-parameter LCDM model provides a successful fit to WMAP data, both when the data are analyzed alone and in combination with other cosmological data. Even so, it is appropriate to search for any hints of deviations from the now standard model of cosmology, which includes inflation, dark energy, dark matter, baryons, and neutrinos. The cosmological community has subjected the WMAP data to extensive and varied analyses. While there is widespread agreement as to the overall success of the six-parameter LCDM model, various "anomalies" have been reported relative to that model. In this paper we examine potential anomalies and present analyses and assessments of their significance. In most cases we find that claimed anomalies depend on posterior selection of some aspect or subset of the data. Compared with sky simulations based on the best fit model, one can select for low probability features of the WMAP data. Low probability features are expected, but it is not usually straightforward to determine whether any particular low probability feature is the result of the a posteriori selection or of non-standard cosmology. We examine in detail the properties of the power spectrum with respect to the LCDM model. We examine several potential or previously claimed anomalies in the sky maps and power spectra, including cold spots, low quadrupole power, quadropole-octupole alignment, hemispherical or dipole power asymmetry, and quadrupole power asymmetry. We conclude that there is no compelling evidence for deviations from the LCDM model, which is generally an acceptable statistical fit to WMAP and other cosmological data.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4731  [pdf] - 436666
Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Planets and Celestial Calibration Sources
Comments: 72 pages, 21 figures; accepted to ApJS; (v2) corrected Mars model scaling factors, added figure 21, added text to Mars, Saturn and celestial sources sections
Submitted: 2010-01-26, last modified: 2010-12-21
(Abridged) We present WMAP seven-year observations of bright sources which are often used as calibrators at microwave frequencies. Ten objects are studied in five frequency bands (23 - 94 GHz): the outer planets (Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune) and five fixed celestial sources (Cas A, Tau A, Cyg A, 3C274 and 3C58). The seven-year analysis of Jupiter provides temperatures which are within 1-sigma of the previously published WMAP five-year values, with slightly tighter constraints on variability with orbital phase, and limits (but no detections) on linear polarization. Scaling factors are provided which, when multiplied by the Wright Mars thermal model predictions at 350 micron, reproduce WMAP seasonally averaged observations of Mars within ~2%. An empirical model is described which fits brightness variations of Saturn due to geometrical effects and can be used to predict the WMAP observations to within 3%. Seven-year mean temperatures for Uranus and Neptune are also tabulated. Uncertainties in Uranus temperatures are 3%-4% in the 41, 61 and 94 GHz bands; the smallest uncertainty for Neptune is ~8% for the 94 GHz band. Intriguingly, the spectrum of Uranus appears to show a dip at ~30 GHz of unidentified origin, although the feature is not of high statistical significance. Flux densities for the five selected fixed celestial sources are derived from the seven-year WMAP sky maps, and are tabulated for Stokes I, Q and U, along with polarization fraction and position angle. Fractional uncertainties for the Stokes I fluxes are typically 1% to 3%. Source variability over the seven-year baseline is also estimated. Significant secular decrease is seen for Cas A and Tau A: our results are consistent with a frequency independent decrease of about 0.53% per year for Cas A and 0.22% per year for Tau A.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4555  [pdf] - 1024810
Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Galactic Foreground Emission
Comments: [v3 minor typos fixed, bibliography updated] 74 pages, 13 figures, 6 tables. Accepted by the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series. High-res figures and data products available at <a href="http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/dr4/map_bibliography.cfm">the LAMBDA Web site</a>
Submitted: 2010-01-25, last modified: 2010-12-16
[Abridged] We present updated estimates of Galactic foreground emission using seven years of WMAP data. Using the power spectrum of differences between multi-frequency template-cleaned maps, we find no evidence for foreground contamination outside of the updated (KQ85y7) foreground mask. We place a 15 microKelvin upper bound on rms foreground contamination in the cleaned maps used for cosmological analysis. We find no indication in the polarization data of an extra "haze" of hard synchrotron emission from energetic electrons near the Galactic center. We provide an updated map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the internal linear combination (ILC) method, updated foreground masks, and updates to point source catalogs with 62 newly detected sources. Also new are tests of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) foreground fitting procedure against systematics in the time-stream data, and tests against the observed beam asymmetry. Within a few degrees of the Galactic plane, WMAP total intensity data show a rapidly steepening spectrum from 20-40 GHz, which may be due to emission from spinning dust grains, steepening synchrotron, or other effects. Comparisons are made to a 1-degree 408 MHz map (Haslam et al.) and the 11-degree ARCADE 2 data (Singal et al.). We find that spinning dust or steepening synchrotron models fit the combination of WMAP and 408 MHz data equally well. ARCADE data appear inconsistent with the steepening synchrotron model, and consistent with the spinning dust model, though some discrepancies remain regarding the relative strength of spinning dust emission. More high-resolution data in the 10-40 GHz range would shed much light on these issues.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4538  [pdf] - 298364
Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Cosmological Interpretation
Comments: 57 pages, 20 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJS. (v2) References added. The SZ section expanded with more analysis. The discrepancy between the KS and X-ray derived profiles has been resolved. (v3) New analysis of the SZ effect on individual clusters added (Section 7.3). The LCDM parameters have been updated using the latest recombination history code (RECFAST version 1.5)
Submitted: 2010-01-25, last modified: 2010-11-09
(Abridged) The 7-year WMAP data and improved astrophysical data rigorously test the standard cosmological model and its extensions. By combining WMAP with the latest distance measurements from BAO and H0 measurement, we determine the parameters of the simplest LCDM model. The power-law index of the primordial power spectrum is n_s=0.968+-0.012, a measurement that excludes the scale-invariant spectrum by 99.5%CL. The other parameters are also improved from the 5-year results. Notable examples of improved parameters are the total mass of neutrinos, sum(m_nu)<0.58eV, and the effective number of neutrino species, N_eff=4.34+0.86-0.88. We detect the effect of primordial helium on the temperature power spectrum and provide a new test of big bang nucleosynthesis. We detect, and show on the map for the first time, the tangential and radial polarization patterns around hot and cold spots of temperature fluctuations, an important test of physical processes at z=1090 and the dominance of adiabatic scalar fluctuations. With the 7-year TB power spectrum, the limit on a rotation of the polarization plane due to potential parity-violating effects has improved to Delta(alpha)=-1.1+-1.4(stat)+-1.5(syst) degrees. We report significant detections of the SZ effect at the locations of known clusters of galaxies. The measured SZ signal agrees well with the expected signal from the X-ray data. However, it is a factor of 0.5 to 0.7 times the predictions from "universal profile" of Arnaud et al., analytical models, and hydrodynamical simulations. We find, for the first time in the SZ effect, a significant difference between the cooling-flow and non-cooling-flow clusters (or relaxed and non-relaxed clusters), which can explain some of the discrepancy. This lower amplitude is consistent with the lower-than-theoretically-expected SZ power spectrum recently measured by the South Pole Telescope collaboration.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4635  [pdf] - 298365
Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Power Spectra and WMAP-Derived Parameters
Comments: 22 pages, 14 figures, version accepted to Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, added high-l EE detection, consolidated parameter recovery simulations
Submitted: 2010-01-26, last modified: 2010-07-07
(Abridged) We present the angular power spectra derived from the 7-year maps and discuss the cosmological conclusions that can be inferred from WMAP data alone. The third acoustic peak in the TT spectrum is now well measured by WMAP. In the context of a flat LambdaCDM model, this improvement allows us to place tighter constraints on the matter density from WMAP data alone, and on the epoch of matter-radiation equality, The temperature-polarization (TE) spectrum is detected in the 7-year data with a significance of 20 sigma, compared to 13 sigma with the 5-year data. The low-l EE spectrum, a measure of the optical depth due to reionization, is detected at 5.5 sigma significance when averaged over l = 2-7. The BB spectrum, an important probe of gravitational waves from inflation, remains consistent with zero. The upper limit on tensor modes from polarization data alone is a factor of 2 lower with the 7-year data than it was using the 5-year data (Komatsu et al. 2010). We test the parameter recovery process for bias and find that the scalar spectral index, ns, is biased high, but only by 0.09 sigma, while the remaining parameters are biased by < 0.15 sigma. The improvement in the third peak measurement leads to tighter lower limits from WMAP on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom (e.g., neutrinos) in the early universe: Neff > 2.7 (95% CL). Also, using WMAP data alone, the primordial helium mass fraction is found to be YHe = 0.28+0.14-0.15, and with data from higher-resolution CMB experiments included, we now establish the existence of pre-stellar helium at > 3 sigma (Komatsu et al. 2010).
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.0546  [pdf] - 332879
The ARCADE 2 Instrument
Comments: 12 pages, 14 figues, 3 tables, 2 figures added, Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2009-01-05, last modified: 2010-04-02
The second generation Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE 2) instrument is a balloon-borne experiment to measure the radiometric temperature of the cosmic microwave background and Galactic and extra-Galactic emission at six frequencies from 3 to 90 GHz. ARCADE 2 utilizes a double-nulled design where emission from the sky is compared to that from an external cryogenic full-aperture blackbody calibrator by cryogenic switching radiometers containing internal blackbody reference loads. In order to further minimize sources of systematic error, ARCADE 2 features a cold fully open aperture with all radiometrically active components maintained at near 2.7 K without windows or other warm objects, achieved through a novel thermal design. We discuss the design and performance of the ARCADE 2 instrument in its 2005 and 2006 flights.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1001.4744  [pdf] - 1024824
Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Sky Maps, Systematic Errors, and Basic Results
Comments: 42 pages, 9 figures, Submitted to Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series
Submitted: 2010-01-26
(Abridged) New full sky temperature and polarization maps based on seven years of data from WMAP are presented. The new results are consistent with previous results, but have improved due to reduced noise from the additional integration time, improved knowledge of the instrument performance, and improved data analysis procedures. The improvements are described in detail. The seven year data set is well fit by a minimal six-parameter flat Lambda-CDM model. The parameters for this model, using the WMAP data in conjunction with baryon acoustic oscillation data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and priors on H_0 from Hubble Space Telescope observations, are: Omega_bh^2 = 0.02260 +-0.00053, Omega_ch^2 = 0.1123 +-0.0035, Omega_Lambda = 0.728 +0.015 -0.016, n_s = 0.963 +-0.012, tau = 0.087 +-0.014 and sigma_8 = 0.809 +-0.024 (68 % CL uncertainties). The temperature power spectrum signal-to-noise ratio per multipole is greater that unity for multipoles < 919, allowing a robust measurement of the third acoustic peak. This measurement results in improved constraints on the matter density, Omega_mh^2 = 0.1334 +0.0056 -0.0055, and the epoch of matter- radiation equality, z_eq = 3196 +134 -133, using WMAP data alone. The new WMAP data, when combined with smaller angular scale microwave background anisotropy data, results in a 3 sigma detection of the abundance of primordial Helium, Y_He = 0.326 +-0.075.The power-law index of the primordial power spectrum is now determined to be n_s = 0.963 +-0.012, excluding the Harrison-Zel'dovich-Peebles spectrum by >3 sigma. These new WMAP measurements provide important tests of Big Bang cosmology.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.4280  [pdf] - 1001123
Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Bayesian Estimation of CMB Polarization Maps
Comments: 11 pages, 9 figures, matches version accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2008-11-26, last modified: 2009-11-02
We describe a sampling method to estimate the polarized CMB signal from observed maps of the sky. We use a Metropolis-within-Gibbs algorithm to estimate the polarized CMB map, containing Q and U Stokes parameters at each pixel, and its covariance matrix. These can be used as inputs for cosmological analyses. The polarized sky signal is parameterized as the sum of three components: CMB, synchrotron emission, and thermal dust emission. The polarized Galactic components are modeled with spatially varying power law spectral indices for the synchrotron, and a fixed power law for the dust, and their component maps are estimated as by-products. We apply the method to simulated low resolution maps with pixels of side 7.2 degrees, using diagonal and full noise realizations drawn from the WMAP noise matrices. The CMB maps are recovered with goodness of fit consistent with errors. Computing the likelihood of the E-mode power in the maps as a function of optical depth to reionization, tau, for fixed temperature anisotropy power, we recover tau=0.091+-0.019 for a simulation with input tau=0.1, and mean tau=0.098 averaged over 10 simulations. A `null' simulation with no polarized CMB signal has maximum likelihood consistent with tau=0. The method is applied to the five-year WMAP data, using the K, Ka, Q and V channels. We find tau=0.090+-0.019, compared to tau=0.086+-0.016 from the template-cleaned maps used in the primary WMAP analysis. The synchrotron spectral index, beta, averaged over high signal-to-noise pixels with standard deviation sigma(beta)<0.25, but excluding ~6% of the sky masked in the Galactic plane, is -3.03+-0.04. This estimate does not vary significantly with Galactic latitude, although includes an informative prior.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.3915  [pdf] - 1001110
CMBPol Mission Concept Study: Prospects for polarized foreground removal
Comments: 42 pages, 14 figures, Foreground Removal Working Group contribution to the CMBPol Mission Concept Study, v2, matches AIP version
Submitted: 2008-11-24, last modified: 2009-11-02
In this report we discuss the impact of polarized foregrounds on a future CMBPol satellite mission. We review our current knowledge of Galactic polarized emission at microwave frequencies, including synchrotron and thermal dust emission. We use existing data and our understanding of the physical behavior of the sources of foreground emission to generate sky templates, and start to assess how well primordial gravitational wave signals can be separated from foreground contaminants for a CMBPol mission. At the estimated foreground minimum of ~100 GHz, the polarized foregrounds are expected to be lower than a primordial polarization signal with tensor-to-scalar ratio r=0.01, in a small patch (~1%) of the sky known to have low Galactic emission. Over 75% of the sky we expect the foreground amplitude to exceed the primordial signal by about a factor of eight at the foreground minimum and on scales of two degrees. Only on the largest scales does the polarized foreground amplitude exceed the primordial signal by a larger factor of about 20. The prospects for detecting an r=0.01 signal including degree-scale measurements appear promising, with 5 sigma_r ~0.003 forecast from multiple methods. A mission that observes a range of scales offers better prospects from the foregrounds perspective than one targeting only the lowest few multipoles. We begin to explore how optimizing the composition of frequency channels in the focal plane can maximize our ability to perform component separation, with a range of typically 40 < nu < 300 GHz preferred for ten channels. Foreground cleaning methods are already in place to tackle a CMBPol mission data set, and further investigation of the optimization and detectability of the primordial signal will be useful for mission design.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.0902  [pdf] - 22071
Observing the Evolution of the Universe
Aguirre, James; Amblard, Alexandre; Ashoorioon, Amjad; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Balbi, Amedeo; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Benford, Dominic; Birkinshaw, Mark; Bock, Jamie; Bond, Dick; Borrill, Julian; Bouchet, Franois; Bridges, Michael; Bunn, Emory; Calabrese, Erminia; Cantalupo, Christopher; Caramete, Ana; Carbone, Carmelita; Chatterjee, Suchetana; Church, Sarah; Chuss, David; Contaldi, Carlo; Cooray, Asantha; Das, Sudeep; De Bernardis, Francesco; De Bernardis, Paolo; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Dsert, F. -Xavier; Devlin, Mark; Dickinson, Clive; Dicker, Simon; Dobbs, Matt; Dodelson, Scott; Dore, Olivier; Dotson, Jessie; Dunkley, Joanna; Falvella, Maria Cristina; Fixsen, Dale; Fosalba, Pablo; Fowler, Joseph; Gates, Evalyn; Gear, Walter; Golwala, Sunil; Gorski, Krzysztof; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Gundersen, Josh; Halpern, Mark; Hanany, Shaul; Hazumi, Masashi; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hertzberg, Mark; Hinshaw, Gary; Hirata, Christopher; Hivon, Eric; Holmes, Warren; Holzapfel, William; Hu, Wayne; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Irwin, Kent; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, William; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Khoury, Justin; Kinney, Will; Kisner, Theodore; Knox, Lloyd; Kogut, Alan; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kovac, John; Krauss, Lawrence; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Landau, Susana; Lawrence, Charles; Leach, Samuel; Lee, Adrian; Leitch, Erik; Leonardi, Rodrigo; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liddle, Andrew; Lim, Eugene; Limon, Michele; Loverde, Marilena; Lubin, Philip; Magalhaes, Antonio; Maino, Davide; Marriage, Tobias; Martin, Victoria; Matarrese, Sabino; Mather, John; Mathur, Harsh; Matsumura, Tomotake; Meerburg, Pieter; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Meyer, Stephan; Miller, Amber; Milligan, Michael; Moodley, Kavilan; Neimack, Michael; Nguyen, Hogan; O'Dwyer, Ian; Orlando, Angiola; Pagano, Luca; Page, Lyman; Partridge, Bruce; Pearson, Timothy; Peiris, Hiranya; Piacentini, Francesco; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pietrobon, Davide; Pisano, Giampaolo; Pogosian, Levon; Pogosyan, Dmitri; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Popa, Lucia; Pryke, Clement; Raeth, Christoph; Ray, Subharthi; Reichardt, Christian; Ricciardi, Sara; Richards, Paul; Rocha, Graca; Rudnick, Lawrence; Ruhl, John; Rusholme, Benjamin; Scoccola, Claudia; Scott, Douglas; Sealfon, Carolyn; Sehgal, Neelima; Seiffert, Michael; Senatore, Leonardo; Serra, Paolo; Shandera, Sarah; Shimon, Meir; Shirron, Peter; Sievers, Jonathan; Sigurdson, Kris; Silk, Joe; Silverberg, Robert; Silverstein, Eva; Staggs, Suzanne; Stebbins, Albert; Stivoli, Federico; Stompor, Radek; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Swetz, Daniel; Tartari, Andria; Tegmark, Max; Timbie, Peter; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory; Urrestilla, Jon; Vaillancourt, John; Veneziani, Marcella; Verde, Licia; Vieira, Joaquin; Watson, Scott; Wandelt, Benjamin; Wilson, Grant; Wollack, Edward; Wyman, Mark; Yadav, Amit; Yannick, Giraud-Heraud; Zahn, Olivier; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zemcov, Michael; Zwart, Jonathan
Comments: Science White Paper submitted to the US Astro2010 Decadal Survey. Full list of 177 author available at http://cmbpol.uchicago.edu
Submitted: 2009-03-04
How did the universe evolve? The fine angular scale (l>1000) temperature and polarization anisotropies in the CMB are a Rosetta stone for understanding the evolution of the universe. Through detailed measurements one may address everything from the physics of the birth of the universe to the history of star formation and the process by which galaxies formed. One may in addition track the evolution of the dark energy and discover the net neutrino mass. We are at the dawn of a new era in which hundreds of square degrees of sky can be mapped with arcminute resolution and sensitivities measured in microKelvin. Acquiring these data requires the use of special purpose telescopes such as the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), located in Chile, and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). These new telescopes are outfitted with a new generation of custom mm-wave kilo-pixel arrays. Additional instruments are in the planning stages.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.0559  [pdf] - 19994
Interpretation of the Extragalactic Radio Background
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2009-01-05
We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies, to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and the estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 2 sigma upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of mu < 5.8 x 10^{-5} and Y_ff < 6.2 x 10^{-5}. We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. After subtraction of an estimate of the contribution of discrete radio sources, this unexplained signal is consistent with extragalactic emission in the form of a power law with amplitude 1.06 \pm 0.11 K at 1 GHz and a spectral index of -2.56 \pm 0.04.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.0555  [pdf] - 1490614
ARCADE 2 Measurement of the Extra-Galactic Sky Temperature at 3-90 GHz
Comments: 11 pages 5 figures Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2009-01-05
The ARCADE 2 instrument has measured the absolute temperature of the sky at frequencies 3, 8, 10, 30, and 90 GHz, using an open-aperture cryogenic instrument observing at balloon altitudes with no emissive windows between the beam-forming optics and the sky. An external blackbody calibrator provides an {\it in situ} reference. Systematic errors were greatly reduced by using differential radiometers and cooling all critical components to physical temperatures approximating the CMB temperature. A linear model is used to compare the output of each radiometer to a set of thermometers on the instrument. Small corrections are made for the residual emission from the flight train, balloon, atmosphere, and foreground Galactic emission. The ARCADE 2 data alone show an extragalactic rise of $50\pm7$ mK at 3.3 GHz in addition to a CMB temperature of $2.730\pm .004$ K. Combining the ARCADE 2 data with data from the literature shows a background power law spectrum of $T=1.26\pm 0.09$ [K] $(\nu/\nu_0)^{-2.60\pm 0.04}$ from 22 MHz to 10 GHz ($\nu_0=1$ GHz) in addition to a CMB temperature of $2.725\pm .001$ K.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:0901.0562  [pdf] - 362611
ARCADE 2 Observations of Galactic Radio Emission
Comments: 10 poges, 9 figures. Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2009-01-05
We use absolutely calibrated data from the ARCADE 2 flight in July 2006 to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index beta_synch = -2.5 +/- 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 +/- 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc|b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of CII emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power-law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission towards the north polar cap T_Gal = 0.498 +/- 0.028 K and spectral index beta = -2.55 +/- 0.03 at reference frequency 1 GHz. The well calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emission, based on the integrated intensity of emission from the Galactic plane instead of cross-correlations with the thermal dust spatial morphology. The Galactic plane intensity measured by ARCADE 2 is fainter than predicted by models without spinning dust, and is consistent with spinning dust contributing 0.4 +/- 0.1 of the Galactic plane emission at 22 GHz.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:0811.3911  [pdf] - 18840
CMBPol Mission Concept Study: A Mission to Map our Origins
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2008-11-24
Quantum mechanical metric fluctuations during an early inflationary phase of the universe leave a characteristic imprint in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The amplitude of this signal depends on the energy scale at which inflation occurred. Detailed observations by a dedicated satellite mission (CMBPol) therefore provide information about energy scales as high as $10^{15}$ GeV, twelve orders of magnitude greater than the highest energies accessible to particle accelerators, and probe the earliest moments in the history of the universe. This summary provides an overview of a set of studies exploring the scientific payoff of CMBPol in diverse areas of modern cosmology, such as the physics of inflation, gravitational lensing and cosmic reionization, as well as foreground science and removal .
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.0715  [pdf] - 142149
Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Galactic Foreground Emission
Comments: accepted by ApJS, 49 pages, 4 tables, 21 figures. PS and PDF versions with high-resolution figures available at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/dr3/map_bibliography.cfm
Submitted: 2008-03-05, last modified: 2008-10-21
We present a new estimate of foreground emission in the WMAP data, using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The new technique delivers maps of each foreground component for a variety of foreground models, error estimates of the uncertainty of each foreground component, and provides an overall goodness-of-fit measurement. The resulting foreground maps are in broad agreement with those from previous techniques used both within the collaboration and by other authors. We find that for WMAP data, a simple model with power-law synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust components fits 90% of the sky with a reduced chi-squared of 1.14. However, the model does not work well inside the Galactic plane. The addition of either synchrotron steepening or a modified spinning dust model improves the fit. This component may account for up to 14% of the total flux at Ka-band (33 GHz). We find no evidence for foreground contamination of the CMB temperature map in the 85% of the sky used for cosmological analysis.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.0586  [pdf] - 10673
Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Likelihoods and Parameters from the WMAP data
Comments: 49 pages, 18 figures, version accepted by ApJS. Original Section 2 moved to separate paper. For higher quality figs, see version on http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov
Submitted: 2008-03-05, last modified: 2008-10-19
This paper focuses on cosmological constraints derived from analysis of WMAP data alone. A simple LCDM cosmological model fits the five-year WMAP temperature and polarization data. The basic parameters of the model are consistent with the three-year data and now better constrained: Omega_b h^2 = 0.02273+-0.00062, Omega_c h^2 = 0.1099+-0.0062, Omega_L = 0.742+-0.030, n_s = 0.963+0.014- 0.015, tau = 0.087+-0.017, sigma_8 = 0.796+-0.036. With five years of polarization data, we have measured the optical depth to reionization, tau>0, at 5 sigma significance. The redshift of an instantaneous reionization is constrained to be z_reion = 11.0+-1.4 with 68% confidence. This excludes a sudden reionization of the universe at z=6 at more than 3.5 sigma significance, suggesting that reionization was an extended process. Using two methods for polarized foreground cleaning we get consistent estimates for the optical depth, indicating an error due to foreground treatment of tau~0.01. This cosmological model also fits small-scale CMB data, and a range of astronomical data measuring the expansion rate and clustering of matter in the universe. We find evidence for the first time in the CMB power spectrum for a non-zero cosmic neutrino background, or a background of relativistic species, with the standard three light neutrino species preferred over the best-fit LCDM model with N_eff=0 at >99.5% confidence, and N_eff > 2.3 (95% CL) when varied. The five-year WMAP data improve the upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r < 0.43 (95% CL), for power-law models. With longer integration we find no evidence for a running spectral index, with dn_s/dlnk = -0.037+-0.028.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.0570  [pdf] - 10669
Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)Observations: Beam Maps and Window Functions
Comments: 48 pages, 16 figures; version with better quality figures available from http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov; revised version, accepted for Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series
Submitted: 2008-03-05, last modified: 2008-10-17
Cosmology and other scientific results from the WMAP mission require an accurate knowledge of the beam patterns in flight. While the degree of beam knowledge for the WMAP one-year and three-year results was unprecedented for a CMB experiment, we have significantly improved the beam determination as part of the five-year data release. Physical optics fits are done on both the A and the B sides for the first time. The cutoff scale of the fitted distortions on the primary mirror is reduced by a factor of ~2 from previous analyses. These changes enable an improvement in the hybridization of Jupiter data with beam models, which is optimized with respect to error in the main beam solid angle. An increase in main-beam solid angle of ~1% is found for the V2 and W1-W4 differencing assemblies. Although the five-year results are statistically consistent with previous ones, the errors in the five-year beam transfer functions are reduced by a factor of ~2 as compared to the three-year analysis. We present radiometry of the planet Jupiter as a test of the beam consistency and as a calibration standard; for an individual differencing assembly, errors in the measured disk temperature are ~0.5%.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.0577  [pdf] - 10671
The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Source Catalog
Comments: 31 pages Latex with 4 embedded figures. Version accepted by the ApJ Supplements
Submitted: 2008-03-04, last modified: 2008-10-17
We present the list of point sources found in the WMAP 5-year maps. The technique used in the first-year and three-year analysis now finds 390 point sources, and the five-year source catalog is complete for regions of the sky away from the galactic plane to a 2 Jy limit, with SNR > 4.7 in all bands in the least covered parts of the sky. The noise at high frequencies is still mainly radiometer noise, but at low frequencies the CMB anisotropy is the largest uncertainty. A separate search of CMB-free V-W maps finds 99 sources of which all but one can be identified with known radio sources. The sources seen by WMAP are not strongly polarized. Many of the WMAP sources show significant variability from year to year, with more than a 2:1 range between the minimum and maximum fluxes.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.0547  [pdf] - 10659
Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Cosmological Interpretation
Comments: 52 pages, 21 figures, accepted for publication in ApJS. (v2) References added. Cosmological parameters updated with the latest union supernova compilation (Kowalski et al. arXiv:0804.4142)
Submitted: 2008-03-04, last modified: 2008-10-17
(Abridged) The WMAP 5-year data strongly limit deviations from the minimal LCDM model. We constrain the physics of inflation via Gaussianity, adiabaticity, the power spectrum shape, gravitational waves, and spatial curvature. We also constrain the properties of dark energy, parity-violation, and neutrinos. We detect no convincing deviations from the minimal model. The parameters of the LCDM model, derived from WMAP combined with the distance measurements from the Type Ia supernovae (SN) and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO), are: Omega_b=0.0456+-0.0015, Omega_c=0.228+-0.013, Omega_Lambda=0.726+-0.015, H_0=70.5+-1.3 km/s/Mpc, n_s=0.960+-0.013, tau=0.084+-0.016, and sigma_8=0.812+-0.026. With WMAP+BAO+SN, we find the tensor-to-scalar ratio r<0.22 (95% CL), and n_s>1 is disfavored regardless of r. We obtain tight, simultaneous limits on the (constant) equation of state of dark energy and curvature. We provide a set of "WMAP distance priors," to test a variety of dark energy models. We test a time-dependent w with a present value constrained as -0.33<1+w_0<0.21 (95% CL). Temperature and matter fluctuations obey the adiabatic relation to within 8.9% and 2.1% for the axion and curvaton-type dark matter, respectively. The TE and EB spectra constrain cosmic parity-violation. We find the limit on the total mass of neutrinos, sum(m_nu)<0.67 eV (95% CL), which is free from the uncertainty in the normalization of the large-scale structure data. The effective number of neutrino species is constrained as N_{eff} = 4.4+-1.5 (68%), consistent with the standard value of 3.04. Finally, limits on primordial non-Gaussianity are -9<f_{NL}^{local}<111 and -151<f_{NL}^{equil}<253 (95% CL) for the local and equilateral models, respectively.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.0593  [pdf] - 10675
Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Angular Power Spectra
Comments: 29 pages, 13 figures, accepted by ApJS
Submitted: 2008-03-05, last modified: 2008-10-17
We present the temperature and polarization angular power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) derived from the first 5 years of WMAP data. The 5-year temperature (TT) spectrum is cosmic variance limited up to multipole l=530, and individual l-modes have S/N>1 for l<920. The best fitting six-parameter LambdaCDM model has a reduced chi^2 for l=33-1000 of chi^2/nu=1.06, with a probability to exceed of 9.3%. There is now significantly improved data near the third peak which leads to improved cosmological constraints. The temperature-polarization correlation (TE) is seen with high significance. After accounting for foreground emission, the low-l reionization feature in the EE power spectrum is preferred by \Delta\chi^2=19.6 for optical depth tau=0.089 by the EE data alone, and is now largely cosmic variance limited for l=2-6. There is no evidence for cosmic signal in the BB, TB, or EB spectra after accounting for foreground emission. We find that, when averaged over l=2-6, l(l+1)C^{BB}_l/2\pi < 0.15 uK^2 (95% CL).
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:0803.0732  [pdf] - 10704
Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Data Processing, Sky Maps, and Basic Results
Comments: 46 pages, 13 figures, and 7 tables. Version accepted for publication, ApJS, Feb-2009. Includes 5-year dipole results and additional references. Also available at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/dr3/map_bibliography.cfm
Submitted: 2008-03-05, last modified: 2008-10-17
We present new full-sky temperature and polarization maps in five frequency bands from 23 to 94 GHz, based on data from the first five years of the WMAP sky survey. The five-year maps incorporate several improvements in data processing made possible by the additional years of data and by a more complete analysis of the instrument calibration and in-flight beam response. We present several new tests for systematic errors in the polarization data and conclude that Ka band data (33 GHz) is suitable for use in cosmological analysis, after foreground cleaning. This significantly reduces the overall polarization uncertainty. With the 5 year WMAP data, we detect no convincing deviations from the minimal 6-parameter LCDM model: a flat universe dominated by a cosmological constant, with adiabatic and nearly scale-invariant Gaussian fluctuations. Using WMAP data combined with measurements of Type Ia supernovae and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, we find (68% CL uncertainties): Omega_bh^2 = 0.02267 \pm 0.00059, Omega_ch^2 = 0.1131 \pm 0.0034, Omega_Lambda = 0.726 \pm 0.015, n_s = 0.960 \pm 0.013, tau = 0.084 \pm 0.016, and Delta_R^2 = (2.445 \pm 0.096) x 10^-9. From these we derive: sigma_8 = 0.812 \pm 0.026, H_0 = 70.5 \pm 1.3 km/s/Mpc, z_{reion} = 10.9 \pm 1.4, and t_0 = 13.72 \pm 0.12 Gyr. The new limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio is r < 0.22 (95% CL). We obtain tight, simultaneous limits on the (constant) dark energy equation of state and spatial curvature: -0.14 < 1+w < 0.12 and -0.0179 < Omega_k < 0.0081 (both 95% CL). The number of relativistic degrees of freedom (e.g. neutrinos) is found to be N_{eff} = 4.4 \pm 1.5, consistent with the standard value of 3.04. Models with N_{eff} = 0 are disfavored at >99.5% confidence.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:0707.0873  [pdf] - 2856
ExoPTF Science Uniquely Enabled by Far-IR Interferometry: Probing the Formation of Planetary Systems, and Finding and Characterizing Exoplanets
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, submitted to the Exoplanet Task Force (AAAC), 30 March 2007
Submitted: 2007-07-05
By providing sensitive sub-arcsecond images and integral field spectroscopy in the 25 - 400 micron wavelength range, a far-IR interferometer will revolutionize our understanding of planetary system formation, reveal otherwise-undetectable planets through the disk perturbations they induce, and spectroscopically probe the atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets in orbits typical of most of the planets in our solar system. The technical challenges associated with interferometry in the far-IR are greatly relaxed relative to those encountered at shorter wavelengths or when starlight nulling is required. A structurally connected far-IR interferometer with a maximum baseline length of 36 m can resolve the interesting spatial structures in nascent and developed exoplanetary systems and measure exozodiacal emission at a sensitivity level critical to TPF-I mission planning. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope was recommended in the Community Plan for Far-IR/Submillimeter Space Astronomy, studied as a Probe-class mission, and estimated to cost 800M dollars. The scientific communities in Europe, Japan, and Canada have also demonstrated a keen interest in far-IR interferometry through mission planning workshops and technology research, suggesting the possibility of an international collaborative effort.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:0707.0883  [pdf] - 2861
The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT): High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy in the far-infrared
Comments: 20 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in J. Adv. Space Res. on 26 May 2007
Submitted: 2007-07-05
We report results of a recently-completed pre-Formulation Phase study of SPIRIT, a candidate NASA Origins Probe mission. SPIRIT is a spatial and spectral interferometer with an operating wavelength range 25 - 400 microns. SPIRIT will provide sub-arcsecond resolution images and spectra with resolution R = 3000 in a 1 arcmin field of view to accomplish three primary scientific objectives: (1) Learn how planetary systems form from protostellar disks, and how they acquire their inhomogeneous composition; (2) characterize the family of extrasolar planetary systems by imaging the structure in debris disks to understand how and where planets of different types form; and (3) learn how high-redshift galaxies formed and merged to form the present-day population of galaxies. Observations with SPIRIT will be complementary to those of the James Webb Space Telescope and the ground-based Atacama Large Millimeter Array. All three observatories could be operational contemporaneously.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:0704.3991  [pdf] - 876
Three-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Foreground Polarization
Comments: 9 pages with 8 figures. For higher quality figures, see the version posted at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/dr2/map_bibliography.cfm
Submitted: 2007-04-30
We present a full-sky model of polarized Galactic microwave emission based on three years of observations by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) at frequencies from 23 to 94 GHz. The model compares maps of the Stokes Q and U components from each of the 5 WMAP frequency bands in order to separate synchrotron from dust emission, taking into account the spatial and frequency dependence of the synchrotron and dust components. This simple two-component model of the interstellar medium accounts for at least 97% of the polarized emission in the WMAP maps of the microwave sky. Synchrotron emission dominates the polarized foregrounds at frequencies below 50 GHz, and is comparable to the dust contribution at 65 GHz. The spectral index of the synchrotron component, derived solely from polarization data, is -3.2 averaged over the full sky, with a modestly flatter index on the Galactic plane. The synchrotron emission has mean polarization fraction 2--4% in the Galactic plane and rising to over 20% at high latitude, with prominent features such as the North Galactic Spur more polarized than the diffuse component. Thermal dust emission has polarization fraction 1% near the Galactic center, rising to 6% at the anti-center. Diffuse emission from high-latitude dust is also polarized with mean fractional polarization 0.036 +/- 0.011.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603452  [pdf] - 80661
Three-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Beam Profiles, Data Processing, Radiometer Characterization and Systematic Error Limits
Comments: 58 pgs, 16 figs. Accepted version of the 3-year paper as posted on http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/dr2/map_bibliography.cfm in January 2007
Submitted: 2006-03-17, last modified: 2007-02-27
The WMAP satellite has completed 3 years of observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The 3-year data products include several sets of full sky maps of the Stokes I, Q and U parameters in 5 frequency bands, spanning 23 to 94 GHz, and supporting items, such as beam window functions and noise covariance matrices. The processing used to produce the current sky maps and supporting products represents a significant advancement over the first year analysis, and is described herein. Improvements to the pointing reconstruction, radiometer gain modeling, window function determination and radiometer spectral noise parametrization are presented. A detailed description of the updated data processing that produces maximum likelihood sky map estimates is presented, along with the methods used to produce reduced resolution maps and corresponding noise covariance matrices. Finally two methods used to evaluate the noise of the full resolution sky maps are presented along with several representative year-to-year null tests, demonstrating that sky maps produced from data from different observational epochs are consistent.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603451  [pdf] - 80660
Three-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Temperature Analysis
Comments: 116 pgs, 24 figs. Accepted version of the 3-year paper as posted to http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/dr2/map_bibliography.cfm in January 2007
Submitted: 2006-03-17, last modified: 2007-02-27
We present new full-sky temperature maps in five frequency bands from 23 to 94 GHz, based on the first three years of the WMAP sky survey. The new maps, which are consistent with the first-year maps and more sensitive, incorporate improvements in data processing made possible by the additional years of data and by a more complete analysis of the polarization signal. These include refinements in the gain calibration and beam response models. We employ two forms of multi-frequency analysis to separate astrophysical foreground signals from the CMB, each of which improves on our first-year analyses. First, we form an improved 'Internal Linear Combination' map, based solely on WMAP data, by adding a bias correction step and by quantifying residual uncertainties in the resulting map. Second, we fit and subtract new spatial templates that trace Galactic emission; in particular, we now use low-frequency WMAP data to trace synchrotron emission. The WMAP point source catalog is updated to include 115 new sources. We derive the angular power spectrum of the temperature anisotropy using a hybrid approach that combines a maximum likelihood estimate at low l (large angular scales) with a quadratic cross-power estimate for l>30. Our best estimate of the CMB power spectrum is derived by averaging cross-power spectra from 153 statistically independent channel pairs. The combined spectrum is cosmic variance limited to l=400, and the signal-to-noise ratio per l-mode exceeds unity up to l=850. The first two acoustic peaks are seen at l=220.8 +- 0.7 and l=530.9 +- 3.8, respectively, while the first two troughs are seen at l=412.4 +- 1.9 and l=675.1 +- 11.1, respectively. The rise to the third peak is unambiguous; when the WMAP data are combined with higher resolution CMB measurements, the existence of a third acoustic peak is well established.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603450  [pdf] - 80659
Three Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Polarization Analysis
Comments: 105 pgs, 28 figs. Accepted version of the 3-year paper as posted to http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/dr2/map_bibliography.cfm in January 2007
Submitted: 2006-03-17, last modified: 2007-02-27
The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe WMAP has mapped the entire sky in five frequency bands between 23 and 94 GHz with polarization sensitive radiometers. We present three-year full-sky maps of the polarization and analyze them for foreground emission and cosmological implications. These observations open up a new window for understanding the universe. WMAP observes significant levels of polarized foreground emission due to both Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal dust emission. The least contaminated channel is at 61 GHz. Informed by a model of the Galactic foreground emission, we subtract the foreground emission from the maps. In the foreground corrected maps, for l=2-6, we detect l(l+1) C_l^{EE} / (2 pi) = 0.086 +-0.029 microkelvin^2. This is interpreted as the result of rescattering of the CMB by free electrons released during reionization and corresponds to an optical depth of tau = 0.10 +- 0.03. We see no evidence for B-modes, limiting them to l(l+1) C_l^{BB} / (2 pi) = -0.04 +- 0.03 microkelvin^2. We find that the limit from the polarization signals alone is r<2.2 (95% CL) corresponding to a limit on the cosmic density of gravitational waves of Omega_{GW}h^2 < 5 times 10^{-12}. From the full WMAP analysis, we find r<0.55 (95% CL) corresponding to a limit of Omega_{GW}h^2 < 10^{-12} (95% CL).
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0603449  [pdf] - 80658
Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Three Year Results: Implications for Cosmology
Comments: 91 pgs, 28 figs. Accepted version of the 3-year paper as posted to http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/dr2/map_bibliography.cfm in January 2007
Submitted: 2006-03-19, last modified: 2007-02-27
A simple cosmological model with only six parameters (matter density, Omega_m h^2, baryon density, Omega_b h^2, Hubble Constant, H_0, amplitude of fluctuations, sigma_8, optical depth, tau, and a slope for the scalar perturbation spectrum, n_s) fits not only the three year WMAP temperature and polarization data, but also small scale CMB data, light element abundances, large-scale structure observations, and the supernova luminosity/distance relationship. Using WMAP data only, the best fit values for cosmological parameters for the power-law flat LCDM model are (Omega_m h^2, Omega_b h^2, h, n_s, tau, sigma_8) = 0.1277+0.0080-0.0079, 0.02229+-0.00073, 0.732+0.031-0.032, 0.958+-0.016, 0.089+-0.030, 0.761+0.049-0.048). The three year data dramatically shrink the allowed volume in this six dimensional parameter space. Assuming that the primordial fluctuations are adiabatic with a power law spectrum, the WMAP data_alone_ require dark matter, and favor a spectral index that is significantly less than the Harrison-Zel'dovich-Peebles scale-invariant spectrum (n_s=1, r=0). Models that suppress large-scale power through a running spectral index or a large-scale cut-off in the power spectrum are a better fit to the WMAP and small scale CMB data than the power-law LCDM model; however, the improvement in the fit to the WMAP data is only Delta chi^2 = 3 for 1 extra degree of freedom. The combination of WMAP and other astronomical data yields significant constraints on the geometry of the universe, the equation of state of the dark energy, the gravitational wave energy density, and neutrino properties. Consistent with the predictions of simple inflationary theories, we detect no significant deviations from Gaussianity in the CMB maps.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0609546  [pdf] - 85138
PAPPA: Primordial Anisotropy Polarization Pathfinder Array
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures. Proceedings of the Fundamental Physics With CMB workshop, UC Irvine, March 23-25, 2006, to be published in New Astronomy Reviews
Submitted: 2006-09-19
The Primordial Anisotropy Polarization Pathfinder Array (PAPPA) is a balloon-based instrument to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background and search for the signal from gravity waves excited during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. PAPPA will survey a 20 x 20 deg patch at the North Celestial Pole using 32 pixels in 3 passbands centered at 89, 212, and 302 GHz. Each pixel uses MEMS switches in a superconducting microstrip transmission line to combine the phase modulation techniques used in radio astronomy with the sensitivity of transition-edge superconducting bolometers. Each switched circuit modulates the incident polarization on a single detector, allowing nearly instantaneous characterization of the Stokes I, Q, and U parameters. We describe the instrument design and status.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0609373  [pdf] - 84965
ARCADE: Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission
Comments: 12 pages, 6 figures. Proceedings of the Fundamental Physics With CMB workshop, UC Irvine, March 23-25, 2006, to be published in New Astronomy Reviews
Submitted: 2006-09-13
The Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) is a balloon-borne instrument designed to measure the temperature of the cosmic microwave background at centimeter wavelengths. ARCADE searches for deviations from a blackbody spectrum resulting from energy releases in the early universe. Long-wavelength distortions in the CMB spectrum are expected in all viable cosmological models. Detecting these distortions or showing that they do not exist is an important step for understanding the early universe. We describe the ARCADE instrument design, current status, and future plans.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0404400  [pdf] - 64308
Constraints On The Topology Of The Universe From The WMAP First-Year Sky Maps
Comments: 16 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2004-04-20
We compute the covariance expected between the spherical harmonic coefficients $a_{\ell m}$ of the cosmic microwave temperature anisotropy if the universe had a compact topology. For fundamental cell size smaller than the distance to the decoupling surface, off-diagonal components carry more information than the diagonal components (the power spectrum). We use a maximum likelihood analysis to compare the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe first-year data to models with a cubic topology. The data are compatible with finite flat topologies with fundamental domain $L > 1.2$ times the distance to the decoupling surface at 95% confidence. The WMAP data show reduced power at the quadrupole and octopole, but do not show the correlations expected for a compact topology and are indistinguishable from infinite models.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0402580  [pdf] - 63094
Design and Calibration of a Cryogenic Blackbody Calibrator at Centimeter Wavelengths
Comments: 5 pages including 5 figures. Submitted to Review of Scientific Instruments
Submitted: 2004-02-24
We describe the design and calibration of an external cryogenic blackbody calibrator used for the first two flights of the Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) instrument. The calibrator consists of a microwave absorber weakly coupled to a superfluid liquid helium bath. Half-wave corrugations viewed 30 deg off axis reduce the return loss below -35 dB. Ruthenium oxide resistive thermometers embedded within the absorber monitor the temperature across the face of the calibrator. The thermal calibration transfers the calibration of a reference thermometer to the flight thermometers using the flight thermometer readout system. Data taken near the superfluid transition in 8 independent calibrations 4 years apart agree within 0.3 mK, providing an independent verification of the thermometer calibration at temperatures near that of the cosmic microwave background.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0402579  [pdf] - 63093
The Temperature of the CMB at 10 GHz
Comments: 8 pages including 5 figures. Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2004-02-24
We report the results of an effort to measure the low frequency portion of the spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB), using a balloon-borne instrument called ARCADE (Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission). These measurements are to search for deviations from a thermal spectrum that are expected to exist in the CMB due to various processes in the early universe. The radiometric temperature was measured at 10 and 30 GHz using a cryogenic open-aperture instrument with no emissive windows. An external blackbody calibrator provides an in situ reference. A linear model is used to compare the radiometer output to a set of thermometers on the instrument. The unmodeled residuals are less than 50 mK peak-to-peak with a weighted RMS of 6 mK. Small corrections are made for the residual emission from the flight train, atmosphere, and foreground Galactic emission. The measured radiometric temperature of the CMB is 2.721 +/- 0.010 K at 10 GHz and 2.694 +/- 0.032 K at 30 GHz.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0402578  [pdf] - 63092
An Instrument to Measure the Temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at Centimeter Wavelengths
Comments: 6 pages including 5 figures. Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2004-02-24
The Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) is a balloon-borne instrument to measure the temperature of the cosmic microwave background at centimeter wavelengths. ARCADE uses narrow-band cryogenic radiometers to compare the sky to an external full-aperture calibrator. To minimize potential sources of systematic error, ARCADE uses a novel open-aperture design which maintains the antennas and calibrator at temperatures near 3 K at the mouth of an open bucket Dewar, without windows or other warm objects between the antennas and the sky. We discuss the design and performance of the ARCADE instrument from its 2001 and 2003 flights.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302218  [pdf] - 358225
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Parameter Estimation Methodology
Comments: Replaced with version with final edits for ApJ. One of thirteen companion papers on first-year WMAP results; 38 pages, 8 figures; a version with higher quality figures is available at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/
Submitted: 2003-02-11, last modified: 2003-08-13
We describe our methodology for comparing the WMAP measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and other complementary data sets to theoretical models. The unprecedented quality of the WMAP data, and the tight constraints on cosmological parameters that are derived, require a rigorous analysis so that the approximations made in the modeling do not lead to significant biases. We describe our use of the likelihood function to characterize the statistical properties of the microwave background sky. We outline the use of the Monte Carlo Markov Chains to explore the likelihood of the data given a model to determine the best fit cosmological parameters and their uncertainties. We add to the WMAP data the l>~700 CBI and ACBAR measurements of the CMB, the galaxy power spectrum at z~0 obtained from the 2dF galaxy redshift survey (2dFGRS), and the matter power spectrum at z~3 as measured with the Ly alpha forest. These last two data sets complement the CMB measurements by probing the matter power spectrum of the nearby universe. Combining CMB and 2dFGRS requires that we include in our analysis a model for galaxy bias, redshift distortions, and the non-linear growth of structure. We show how the statistical and systematic uncertainties in the model and the data are propagated through the full analysis.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302213  [pdf] - 54840
Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) First Year Observations: TE Polarization
Comments: Replaced with version accepted by ApJ; Fig. 9 caption fixed. One of 13 companion papers on first-year WMAP results; 33 pages, 9 figures; version with higher quality figures is at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/
Submitted: 2003-02-11, last modified: 2003-07-21
The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has mapped the full sky in Stokes I, Q, and U parameters at frequencies 23, 33, 41, 61, and 94 GHz. We detect correlations between the temperature and polarization maps significant at more than 10 standard deviations. The correlations are present in all WMAP frequency bands with similar amplitude from 23 to 94 GHz, and are consistent with a superposition of a CMB signal with a weak foreground. The fitted CMB component is robust against different data combinations and fitting techniques. On small angular scales theta < 5 deg, the WMAP data show the temperature-polarization correlation expected from adiabatic perturbations in the temperature power spectrum. The data for l > 20 agree well with the signal predicted solely from the temperature power spectra, with no additional free parameters. We detect excess power on large angular scales (theta > 10 deg) compared to predictions based on the temperature power spectra alone. The excess power is well described by reionization at redshift 11 < z_r < 30 at 95% confidence, depending on the ionization history. A model-independent fit to reionization optical depth yields results consistent with the best-fit LambdaCDM model, with best fit value tau = 0.17 +- 0.04 at 68% confidence, including systematic and foreground uncertainties. This value is larger than expected given the detection of a Gunn-Peterson trough in the absorption spectra of distant quasars, and implies that the universe has a complex ionization history: WMAP has detected the signal from an early epoch of reionization.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302214  [pdf] - 54841
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Beam Profiles and Window Functions
Comments: Replaced with version accepted by ApJ. One of thirteen companion papers on first-year WMAP results; 27 pages, 6 figures; a version with higher quality figures is at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/
Submitted: 2003-02-11, last modified: 2003-06-25
Knowledge of the beam profiles is of critical importance for interpreting data from cosmic microwave background experiments. In this paper, we present the characterization of the in-flight optical response of the WMAP satellite. The main beam intensities have been mapped to < -30 dB of their peak values by observing Jupiter with the satellite in the same observing mode as for CMB observations. The beam patterns closely follow the pre-launch expectations. The full width at half maximum is a function of frequency and ranges from 0.82 degrees at 23 GHz to 0.21 degrees at 94 GHz; however, the beams are not Gaussian. We present: (a) the beam patterns for all ten differential radiometers and show that the patterns are substantially independent of polarization in all but the 23 GHz channel; (b) the effective symmetrized beam patterns that result from WMAP's compound spin observing pattern; (c) the effective window functions for all radiometers and the formalism for propagating the window function uncertainty; and (d) the conversion factor from point source flux to antenna temperature. A summary of the systematic uncertainties, which currently dominate our knowledge of the beams, is also presented. The constancy of Jupiter's temperature within a frequency band is an essential check of the optical system. The tests enable us to report a calibration of Jupiter to 1-3% accuracy relative to the CMB dipole.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302220  [pdf] - 358226
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Interpretation of the TT and TE Angular Power Spectrum Peaks
Comments: Replaced with version accepted by ApJ. One of 13 companion papers on first-year WMAP results; 21 pages with 3 figures; a version with higher quality figures is at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/
Submitted: 2003-02-11, last modified: 2003-06-25
The CMB has distinct peaks in both its temperature angular power spectrum (TT) and temperature-polarization cross-power spectrum (TE). From the WMAP data we find the first peak in the temperature spectrum at l = 220.1 +- 0.8 with an amplitude of 74.7 +- 0.5 microK; the first trough at l = 411.7 +- 3.5 with an amplitude of 41.0 +- 0.5 microK; and the second peak at l = 546 +- 10 with an amplitude of 48.8 +- 0.9 microK. The TE spectrum has an antipeak at l = 137 +- 9 with a cross-power of -35 +- 9 microK^2, and a peak at l = 329 +- 19 with cross-power 105 +- 18 microK^2. All uncertainties are 1 sigma and include calibration and beam errors. An intuition for how the data determine the cosmological parameters may be gained by limiting one's attention to a subset of parameters and their effects on the peak characteristics. We interpret the peaks in the context of a flat adiabatic LambdaCDM model with the goal of showing how the cosmic baryon density, Omega_b h^2, matter density, Omega_m h^2, scalar index, n_s, and age of the universe are encoded in their positions and amplitudes. To this end, we introduce a new scaling relation for the TE antipeak-to-peak amplitude ratio and recompute known related scaling relations for the TT spectrum in light of the WMAP data. From the scaling relations, we show that WMAP's tight bound on Omega_b h^2 is intimately linked to its robust detection of the first and second peaks of the TT spectrum.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302209  [pdf] - 54836
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Determination of Cosmological Parameters
Comments: Replaced with version accepted by ApJ. One of thirteen companion papers on first-year WMAP results; 51 pages, 17 figures; a version with higher quality figures is available at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/
Submitted: 2003-02-11, last modified: 2003-06-16
WMAP precision data enables accurate testing of cosmological models. We find that the emerging standard model of cosmology, a flat Lambda-dominated universe seeded by nearly scale-invariant adiabatic Gaussian fluctuations, fits the WMAP data. With parameters fixed only by WMAP data, we can fit finer scale CMB measurements and measurements of large scle structure (galaxy surveys and the Lyman alpha forest). This simple model is also consistent with a host of other astronomical measurements. We then fit the model parameters to a combination of WMAP data with other finer scale CMB experiments (ACBAR and CBI), 2dFGRS measurements and Lyman alpha forest data to find the model's best fit cosmological parameters: h=0.71+0.04-0.03, Omega_b h^2=0.0224+-0.0009, Omega_m h^2=0.135+0.008-0.009, tau=0.17+-0.06, n_s(0.05/Mpc)=0.93+-0.03, and sigma_8=0.84+-0.04. WMAP's best determination of tau=0.17+-0.04 arises directly from the TE data and not from this model fit, but they are consistent. These parameters imply that the age of the universe is 13.7+-0.2 Gyr. The data favors but does not require a slowly varying spectral index. By combining WMAP data with other astronomical data sets, we constrain the geometry of the universe, Omega_tot = 1.02 +- 0.02, the equation of state of the dark energy w < -0.78 (95% confidence limit assuming w >= -1), and the energy density in stable neutrinos, Omega_nu h^2 < 0.0076 (95% confidence limit). For 3 degenerate neutrino species, this limit implies that their mass is less than 0.23 eV (95% confidence limit). The WMAP detection of early reionization rules out warm dark matter.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302223  [pdf] - 54850
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Tests of Gaussianity
Comments: Replaced with version accepted by ApJ. One of thirteen companion papers on first-year WMAP results; 35 pages, 9 figures; a version with higher quality figures is available at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/
Submitted: 2003-02-11, last modified: 2003-06-16
We present limits to the amplitude of non-Gaussian primordial fluctuations in the WMAP 1-year cosmic microwave background sky maps. A non-linear coupling parameter, f_NL, characterizes the amplitude of a quadratic term in the primordial potential. We use two statistics: one is a cubic statistic which measures phase correlations of temperature fluctuations after combining all configurations of the angular bispectrum. The other uses the Minkowski functionals to measure the morphology of the sky maps. Both methods find the WMAP data consistent with Gaussian primordial fluctuations and establish limits, -58<f_NL<134, at 95% confidence. There is no significant frequency or scale dependence of f_NL. The WMAP limit is 30 times better than COBE, and validates that the power spectrum can fully characterize statistical properties of CMB anisotropy in the WMAP data to high degree of accuracy. Our results also validate the use of a Gaussian theory for predicting the abundance of clusters in the local universe. We detect a point-source contribution to the bispectrum at 41 GHz, b_src = (9.5+-4.4) X 1e-5 uK^3 sr^2, which gives a power spectrum from point sources of c_src = (15+-6) X 1e-3 uK^2 sr in thermodynamic temperature units. This value agrees well with independent estimates of source number counts and the power spectrum at 41 GHz, indicating that b_src directly measures residual source contributions.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302207  [pdf] - 54834
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Preliminary Maps and Basic Results
Comments: Replaced with version accepted by ApJ. One of thirteen companion papers on first-year WMAP results; 43 pages, 17 figures; a version with higher quality graphics is at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/
Submitted: 2003-02-11, last modified: 2003-06-05
We present full sky microwave maps in five bands (23 to 94 GHz) from the WMAP first year sky survey. Calibration errors are <0.5% and the low systematic error level is well specified. The 2<l<900 anisotropy power spectrum is cosmic variance limited for l<354 with a signal-to-noise ratio >1 per mode to l=658. The temperature-polarization cross-power spectrum reveals both acoustic features and a large angle correlation from reionization. The optical depth of reionization is 0.17 +/- 0.04, which implies a reionization epoch of 180+220-80 Myr (95% CL) after the Big Bang at a redshift of 20+10-9 (95% CL) for a range of ionization scenarios. This early reionization is incompatible with the presence of a significant warm dark matter density. The age of the best-fit universe is 13.7 +/- 0.2 Gyr old. Decoupling was 379+8-7 kyr after the Big Bang at a redshift of 1089 +/- 1. The thickness of the decoupling surface was dz=195 +/- 2. The matter density is Omega_m h^2 = 0.135 +0.008 -0.009, the baryon density is Omega_b h^2 = 0.0224 +/- 0.0009, and the total mass-energy of the universe is Omega_tot = 1.02 +/- 0.02. The spectral index of scalar fluctuations is fit as n_s = 0.93 +/- 0.03 at wavenumber k_0 = 0.05 Mpc^-1, with a running index slope of dn_s/d ln k = -0.031 +0.016 -0.018 in the best-fit model. This flat universe model is composed of 4.4% baryons, 22% dark matter and 73% dark energy. The dark energy equation of state is limited to w<-0.78 (95% CL). Inflation theory is supported with n_s~1, Omega_tot~1, Gaussian random phases of the CMB anisotropy, and superhorizon fluctuations. An admixture of isocurvature modes does not improve the fit. The tensor-to-scalar ratio is r(k_0=0.002 Mpc^-1)<0.90 (95% CL).
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302208  [pdf] - 358222
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Foreground Emission
Comments: Replaced with version accepted by ApJ. One of 13 companion papers on first-year WMAP results. 42 pages with 13 figures; a version with higher quality figures is at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/
Submitted: 2003-02-11, last modified: 2003-06-05
Full sky maps are made in five microwave frequency bands to separate the temperature anisotropy of the CMB from foreground emission. We define masks that excise regions of high foreground emission. The effectiveness of template fits to remove foreground emission from the WMAP data is examined. These efforts result in a CMB map with minimal contamination and a demonstration that the WMAP CMB power spectrum is insensitive to residual foreground emission. We construct a model of the Galactic emission components. We find that the Milky Way resembles other normal spiral galaxies between 408 MHz and 23 GHz, with a synchrotron spectral index that is flattest (beta ~ -2.5) near star-forming regions, especially in the plane, and steepest (beta ~ -3) in the halo. The significant synchrotron index steepening out of the plane suggests a diffusion process in which the halo electrons are trapped in the Galactic potential long enough to suffer synchrotron and inverse Compton energy losses and hence a spectral steepening. The synchrotron index is steeper in the WMAP bands than in lower frequency radio surveys, with a spectral break near 20 GHz to beta < -3. The modeled thermal dust spectral index is also steep in the WMAP bands, with beta ~ 2.2. Microwave and H alpha measurements of the ionized gas agree. Spinning dust emission is limited to < ~5% of the Ka-band foreground emission. A catalog of 208 point sources is presented. Derived source counts suggest a contribution to the anisotropy power from unresolved sources of (15.0 +- 1.4) 10^{-3} microK^2 sr at Q-band and negligible levels at V-band and W-band.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0306048  [pdf] - 1233151
WMAP Polarization Results
Comments: To be published in the proceedings of "The Cosmic Microwave Background and its Polarization", New Astronomy Reviews, (eds. S. Hanany and K.A. Olive)
Submitted: 2003-06-02
The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has mapped the full sky in Stokes I, Q, and U parameters at frequencies 23, 33, 41, 61, and 94 GHz. We detect correlations between the temperature and polarization maps significant at more than 10 standard deviations. The correlations are inconsistent with instrument noise and are significantly larger than the upper limits established for potential systematic errors. Correlations on small angualr scales are consistent with the the signal expected from adiabatic initial conditions. We detect excess power on large angular scales consistent with an early epoch of reionization. A model-independent fit to reionization optical depth yields results consistent with the best-fit LCDM model, with best fit value tau = 0.17 +/- 0.04 at 68% confidence, including systematic and foreground uncertainties.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0306044  [pdf] - 1233150
Reionization and Structure Formation with ARCADE
Comments: To be published in the proceedings of "The Cosmic Microwave Background and its Polarization", New Astronomy Reviews, (eds. S. Hanany and K.A. Olive)
Submitted: 2003-06-02
Structure formation in the early universe is expected to produce a cosmological background of free-free emission. The Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) will measure the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background at centimeter wavelengths to detect this signature of structure formation. I describe the ARCADE instrument and the cryogenic engineering required to achieve mK accuracy at such long wavelengths.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302225  [pdf] - 358229
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Implications for Inflation
Comments: Accepted by ApJ; 49 pages, 9 figures. V2: Gives constraints from WMAP data alone. Corrected approximation which made the constraints in Table 1 to shift slightly. Corrected the Inflation Flow following the revision to Kinney, astro-ph/0206032. No conclusions have been changed. For a detailed list of changes see http://www.astro.princeton.edu/~hiranya/README.ERRATA.txt
Submitted: 2003-02-11, last modified: 2003-05-12
We confront predictions of inflationary scenarios with the WMAP data, in combination with complementary small-scale CMB measurements and large-scale structure data. The WMAP detection of a large-angle anti-correlation in the temperature--polarization cross-power spectrum is the signature of adiabatic superhorizon fluctuations at the time of decoupling. The WMAP data are described by pure adiabatic fluctuations: we place an upper limit on a correlated CDM isocurvature component. Using WMAP constraints on the shape of the scalar power spectrum and the amplitude of gravity waves, we explore the parameter space of inflationary models that is consistent with the data. We place limits on inflationary models; for example, a minimally-coupled lambda phi^4 is disfavored at more than 3-sigma using WMAP data in combination with smaller scale CMB and large scale structure survey data. The limits on the primordial parameters using WMAP data alone are: n_s(k_0=0.002 Mpc^{-1})=1.20_{-0.11}^{+0.12}, dn/dlnk=-0.077^{+0.050}_{- 0.052}, A(k_0=0.002 Mpc}^{-1})=0.71^{+0.10}_{-0.11} (68% CL), and r(k_0=0.002 Mpc^{-1})<1.28 (95% CL).
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0305097  [pdf] - 358234
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Dark Energy Induced Correlation with Radio Sources
Comments: 13 pages, 4 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2003-05-07
The first-year WMAP data, in combination with any one of a number of other cosmic probes, show that we live in a flat \Lambda-dominated CDM universe with \Omega_m ~ 0.27 and \Omega_\Lambda ~ 0.73. In this model the late-time action of the dark energy, through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, should produce CMB anisotropies correlated with matter density fluctuations at z<2 (Crittenden & Turok 1996). The measurement of such a signal is an important independent check of the model. We cross-correlate the NRAO VLA Sky Survey radio source catalog (Condon et al. 1998) with the WMAP data in search of this signal, and see indications of the expected correlation. Assuming a flat \Lambda-CDM cosmology, we find \Omega_\Lambda>0 (95% CL, statistical errors only) with the peak of the likelihood at \Omega_\Lambda=0.68, consistent with the preferred WMAP value. A closed model with \Omega_m=1.28, h=0.33, and no dark energy component (\Omega_\Lambda=0), marginally consistent with the WMAP CMB TT angular power spectrum, would produce an anti-correlation between the matter distribution and the CMB. Our analysis of the cross-correlation of the WMAP data with the NVSS catalog rejects this cosmology at the 3\sigma level.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0301164  [pdf] - 54135
Design, Implementation and Testing of the MAP Radiometers
Comments: Updated with comments; 24 pages with 10 low-resolution figures; version with better figures is at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/map_bibliography.html
Submitted: 2003-01-10, last modified: 2003-02-24
The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) satellite, launched June 30, 2001, will produce full sky maps of the cosmic microwave background radiation in 5 frequency bands spanning 20 - 106 GHz. MAP contains 20 differential radiometers built with High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifiers with passively cooled input stages. The design and test techniques used to evaluate and minimize systematic errors and the pre-launch performance of the radiometers for all five bands are presented.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302217  [pdf] - 358224
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Angular Power Spectrum
Comments: One of thirteen companion papers on first-year WMAP results submitted to ApJ; 44 pages, 14 figures; a version with higher quality figures is also available at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/map_bibliography.html
Submitted: 2003-02-11
We present the angular power spectrum derived from the first-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps. We study a variety of power spectrum estimation methods and data combinations and demonstrate that the results are robust. The data are modestly contaminated by diffuse Galactic foreground emission, but we show that a simple Galactic template model is sufficient to remove the signal. Point sources produce a modest contamination in the low frequency data. After masking ~700 known bright sources from the maps, we estimate residual sources contribute ~3500 uK^2 at 41 GHz, and ~130 uK^2 at 94 GHz, to the power spectrum l*(l+1)*C_l/(2*pi) at l=1000. Systematic errors are negligible compared to the (modest) level of foreground emission. Our best estimate of the power spectrum is derived from 28 cross-power spectra of statistically independent channels. The final spectrum is essentially independent of the noise properties of an individual radiometer. The resulting spectrum provides a definitive measurement of the CMB power spectrum, with uncertainties limited by cosmic variance, up to l~350. The spectrum clearly exhibits a first acoustic peak at l=220 and a second acoustic peak at l~540 and it provides strong support for adiabatic initial conditions. Kogut et al. (2003) analyze the C_l^TE power spectrum, and present evidence for a relatively high optical depth, and an early period of cosmic reionization. Among other things, this implies that the temperature power spectrum has been suppressed by \~30% on degree angular scales, due to secondary scattering.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302224  [pdf] - 358228
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: On-Orbit Radiometer Characterization
Comments: One of thirteen companion papers on first-year WMAP results submitted to ApJ; 22 pages, 8 figures; a version with higher quality figures is also available at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/map_bibliography.html
Submitted: 2003-02-11
The WMAP satellite has completed one year of measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation using 20 differential high-electron-mobility-transistor (HEMT) based radiometers. All the radiometers are functioning nominally, and characterizations of the on-orbit radiometer performance are presented, with an emphasis on properties that are required for the production of sky maps from the time ordered data. A radiometer gain model, used to smooth and interpolate the CMB dipole gain measurements is also presented. No degradation in the sensitivity of any of the radiometers has been observed during the first year of observations.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302222  [pdf] - 358227
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Data Processing Methods and Systematic Errors Limits
Comments: One of 13 companion papers on first-year WMAP results submitted to ApJ; 58 pages with 14 figures; a version with higher quality figures is at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/map_bibliography.html
Submitted: 2003-02-11
We describe the calibration and data processing methods used to generate full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the first year of Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations. Detailed limits on residual systematic errors are assigned based largely on analyses of the flight data supplemented, where necessary, with results from ground tests. The data are calibrated in flight using the dipole modulation of the CMB due to the observatory's motion around the Sun. This constitutes a full-beam calibration source. An iterative algorithm simultaneously fits the time-ordered data to obtain calibration parameters and pixelized sky map temperatures. The noise properties are determined by analyzing the time-ordered data with this sky signal estimate subtracted. Based on this, we apply a pre-whitening filter to the time-ordered data to remove a low level of 1/f noise. We infer and correct for a small ~1% transmission imbalance between the two sky inputs to each differential radiometer, and we subtract a small sidelobe correction from the 23 GHz (K band) map prior to further analysis. No other systematic error corrections are applied to the data. Calibration and baseline artifacts, including the response to environmental perturbations, are negligible. Systematic uncertainties are comparable to statistical uncertainties in the characterization of the beam response. Both are accounted for in the covariance matrix of the window function and are propagated to uncertainties in the final power spectrum. We characterize the combined upper limits to residual systematic uncertainties through the pixel covariance matrix.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0302215  [pdf] - 358223
First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Galactic Signal Contamination from Sidelobe Pickup
Comments: One of thirteen companion papers on first-year WMAP results submitted to ApJ; 23 pages, 7 figures; a version with higher quality figures is also available at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/map_bibliography.html
Submitted: 2003-02-11
Since the Galactic center is ~1000 times brighter than fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), CMB experiments must carefully account for stray Galactic pickup. We present the level of contamination due to sidelobes for the year one CMB maps produced by the WMAP observatory. For each radiometer, full 4 pi sr antenna gain patterns are determined from a combination of numerical prediction, ground-based and space-based measurements. These patterns are convolved with the WMAP year one sky maps and observatory scan pattern to generate expected sidelobe signal contamination, for both intensity and polarized microwave sky maps. Outside of the Galactic plane, we find rms values for the expected sidelobe pickup of 15, 2.1, 2.0, 0.3, 0.5 uK for K, Ka, Q, V, and W bands respectively. Except at K band, the rms polarized contamination is <<1 uK. Angular power spectra of the Galactic pickup are presented.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0301159  [pdf] - 54130
The MAP Satellite Feed Horns
Comments: 9 pages with 7 figures, of which 2 are in low-resolution versions; paper is available with higher quality figures at http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_mm/tp_links.html
Submitted: 2003-01-10
We present the design, manufacturing methods, and characterization of 20 microwave feed horns currently in use on the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) satellite. The nature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy requires a detailed understanding of the properties of every optical component of a microwave telescope. In particular, the properties of the feeds must be known so that the forward gain and sidelobe response of the telescope can be modeled and so that potential systematic effects may be computed. MAP requires low emissivity, azimuthally symmetric, low-sidelobe feeds in five microwave bands (K, Ka, Q, V, and W) that fit within a constrained geometry. The beam pattern of each feed is modeled and compared with measurements; the agreement is generally excellent to the -60 dB level (80 degrees from the beam peak). This agreement verifies the beam-predicting software and the manufacturing process. The feeds also affect the properties and modeling of the microwave receivers. To this end, we show that the reflection from the feeds is less than -25 dB over most of each band and that their emissivity is acceptable. The feeds meet their multiple requirements.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0301158  [pdf] - 54129
The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission
Comments: ApJ in press; 22 pages with 10 low-resolution figures; version with better quality figures is available at http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_mm/tp_links.html
Submitted: 2003-01-10
The purpose of the MAP mission is to determine the geometry, content, and evolution of the universe via a 13 arcmin full-width-half-max (FWHM) resolution full sky map of the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation with uncorrelated pixel noise, minimal systematic errors, multifrequency observations, and accurate calibration. These attributes were key factors in the success of NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission, which made a 7 degree FWHM resolution full sky map, discovered temperature anisotropy, and characterized the fluctuations with two parameters, a power spectral index and a primordial amplitude. Following COBE considerable progress has been made in higher resolution measurements of the temperature anisotropy. With 45 times the sensitivity and 33 times the angular resolution of the COBE mission, MAP will vastly extend our knowledge of cosmology. MAP will measure the physics of the photon-baryon fluid at recombination. From this, MAP measurements will constrain models of structure formation, the geometry of the universe, and inflation. In this paper we present a pre-launch overview of the design and characteristics of the MAP mission. This information will be necessary for a full understanding of the MAP data and results, and will also be of interest to scientists involved in the design of future cosmic microwave background experiments and/or space science missions.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0301160  [pdf] - 54131
The Optical Design and Characterization of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe
Comments: ApJ in press; 22 pages with 11 low resolution figures; paper is available with higher quality figures at http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_mm/tp_links.html
Submitted: 2003-01-10
The primary goal of the MAP satellite, now in orbit, is to make high fidelity polarization sensitive maps of the full sky in five frequency bands between 20 and 100 GHz. From these maps we will characterize the properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and Galactic and extragalactic emission on angular scales ranging from the effective beam size, <0.23 degree, to the full sky. MAP is a differential microwave radiometer. Two back-to-back shaped offset Gregorian telescopes feed two mirror symmetric arrays of ten corrugated feeds. We describe the prelaunch design and characterization of the optical system, compare the optical models to the measurements, and consider multiple possible sources of systematic error.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0208585  [pdf] - 51401
A Low Noise Thermometer Readout for Ruthenium Oxide Resistors
Comments: 5 pages text 7 figures
Submitted: 2002-08-30
The thermometer and thermal control system, for the Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) experiment, is described, including the design, testing, and results from the first flight of ARCADE. The noise is equivalent to about 1 Omega or 0.15 mK in a second for the RuO_2 resistive thermometers at 2.7 K. The average power dissipation in each thermometer is 1 nW. The control system can take full advantage of the thermometers to maintain stable temperatures. Systematic effects are still under investigation, but the measured precision and accuracy are sufficient to allow measurement of the cosmic background spectrum. Journal-ref: Review of Scientific Instruments Vol 73 #10 (Oct 2002)
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0112359  [pdf] - 46732
Neural networks as a tool for parameter estimation in astrophysical data
Comments: 21 pages, 3 figures, submitted to "Neural Networks" special issue on GeoScience and Astronomy
Submitted: 2001-12-14
We present a neural net algorithm for parameter estimation in the context of large cosmological data sets. Cosmological data sets present a particular challenge to pattern-recognition algorithms since the input patterns (galaxy redshift surveys, maps of cosmic microwave background anisotropy) are not fixed templates overlaid with random noise, but rather are random realizations whose information content lies in the correlations between data points. We train a ``committee'' of neural nets to distinguish between Monte Carlo simulations at fixed parameter values. Sampling the trained networks using additional Monte Carlo simulations generated at intermediate parameter values allows accurate interpolation to parameter values for which the networks were never trained. The Monte Carlo samples automatically provide the probability distributions and truth tables required for either a frequentist or Bayseian analysis of the one observable sky. We demonstrate that neural networks provide unbiased parameter estimation with comparable precision as maximum-likelihood algorithms but significant computational savings. In the context of CMB anisotropies, the computational cost for parameter estimation via neural networks scales as $N^{3/2}$. The results are insensitive to the noise levels and sampling schemes typical of large cosmological data sets and provide a desirable tool for the new generation of large, complex data sets.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0108234  [pdf] - 44210
Neural Networks as a tool for parameter estimation in mega-pixel data sets
Comments: Submitted to ApJ; 30 pages, 7 figures, uses AASTeX v5.0
Submitted: 2001-08-14
We present a neural net algorithm for parameter estimation in the context of large cosmological data sets. Cosmological data sets present a particular challenge to pattern-recognition algorithms since the input patterns (galaxy redshift surveys, maps of cosmic microwave background anisotropy) are not fixed templates overlaid with random noise, but rather are random realizations whose information content lies in the correlations between data points. We train a ``committee'' of neural nets to distinguish between Monte Carlo simulations at fixed parameter values. Sampling the trained networks using additional Monte Carlo simulations generated at intermediate parameter values allows accurate interpolation to parameter values for which the networks were never trained. The Monte Carlo samples automatically provide the probability distributions and truth tables required for either a frequentist or Bayseian analysis of the one observable sky. We demonstrate that neural networks provide unbiased parameter estimation with comparable precision as maximum-likelihood algorithms but significant computational savings. In the context of CMB anisotropies, the computational cost for parameter estimation via neural networks scales as $N^{3/2}$. The results are insensitive to the noise levels and sampling schemes typical of large cosmological data sets and provide a desirable tool for the new generation of large, complex data sets.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0010333  [pdf] - 38680
Statistical Power, the Bispectrum and the Search for Non-Gaussianity in the CMB Anisotropy
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ; 20 pages, 6 figures, uses AASTeX v5.0
Submitted: 2000-10-17
We use simulated maps of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy to quantify the ability of different statistical tests to discriminate between Gaussian and non-Gaussian models. Despite the central limit theorem on large angular scales, both the genus and extrema correlation are able to discriminate between Gaussian models and a semi-analytic texture model selected as a physically motivated non-Gaussian model. When run on the COBE 4-year CMB maps, both tests prefer the Gaussian model. Although the bispectrum has comparable statistical power when computed on the full sky, once a Galactic cut is imposed on the data the bispectrum loses the ability to discriminate between models. Off-diagonal elements of the bispectrum are comparable to the diagonal elements for the non-Gaussian texture model and must be included to obtain maximum statistical power.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0006159  [pdf] - 36539
Simulations of Foreground Effects for CMB Polarization
Comments: 12 pages, 3 PostScript figures, uses psfig macro. Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2000-06-12
We use a simple model to investigate the effect of polarized Galactic foreground emission on the ability of planned CMB missions to detect and model CMB polarization. Emission from likely polarized sources (synchrotron and spinning dust) would dominate the polarization of the microwave sky at frequencies below 90 GHz if known Galactic foregrounds are at least 10% polarized at high latitude (|b| > 30 deg). Maps of polarization at frequencies below 90 GHz will likely require correction for foreground emission to enable statistical analysis of the individual Stokes Q or U components. The temperature-polarization cross-correlation is less affected by foreground emission, even if the foreground polarization is highly correlated with the foreground intensity. Polarized foregrounds, even if uncorrected, do not dominate the uncertainty in the temperature-polarization cross-correlation for instrument noise levels typical of the MAP experiment. Methods which remove galactic signals at the cost of signal to noise ratio should carefully balance the value of rejecting faint foregrounds with the cost of increased instrument noise.
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9902177  [pdf] - 105196
Likelihood Analysis for Mega-Pixel Maps
Comments: 9 pages LaTeX including 2 PostScript figures. Additional discussion of conjugate gradient chi-squared algorithm. Matches accepted version
Submitted: 1999-02-11, last modified: 1999-06-11
The derivation of cosmological parameters from astrophysical data sets routinely involves operations counts which scale as O(N^3) where N is the number of data points. Currently planned missions, including MAP and Planck, will generate sky maps with N_d = 10^6 or more pixels. Simple ``brute force'' analysis, applied to such mega-pixel data, would require years of computing even on the fastest computers. We describe an algorithm which allows estimation of the likelihood function in the direct pixel basis. The algorithm uses a conjugate gradient approach to evaluate chi-squared and a geometric approximation to evaluate the determinant. Monte Carlo simulations provide a correction to the determinant, yielding an unbiased estimate of the likelihood surface in an arbitrary region surrounding the likelihood peak. The algorithm requires O(N_d^{3/2}) operations and O(N_d) storage for each likelihood evaluation, and allows for significant parallel computation.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9902307  [pdf] - 105326
Anomalous Microwave Emission
Comments: 10 pages, 4 encapsulated PostScript figures using paspconf and epsf macros. Proceedings of the Sloan Workshop on Microwave Foregrounds, November 14--15 1998, Princeton NJ
Submitted: 1999-02-22
Improved knowledge of diffuse Galactic emission is important to maximize the scientific return from scheduled CMB anisotropy missions. Cross-correlation of microwave maps with maps of the far-IR dust continuum show a ubiquitous microwave emission component whose spatial distribution is traced by far-IR dust emission. The spectral index of this emission, beta_{radio} = -2.2 (+0.5 -0.7) is suggestive of free-free emission but does not preclude other candidates. Comparison of H-alpha and microwave results show that both data sets have positive correlations with the far-IR dust emission. Microwave data, however, are consistently brighter than can be explained solely from free-free emission traced by H-alpha. This ``anomalous'' microwave emission can be explained as electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The anomalous component at 53 GHz is 2.5 times as bright as the free-free emission traced by H-alpha, providing an approximate normalization for models with significant spinning dust emission.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9702172  [pdf] - 96691
Galactic microwave emission at degree angular scales
Comments: Minor revisions to match published version. 14 pages, with 2 figures included. Color figure and links at http://www.sns.ias.edu/~angelica/foreground.html
Submitted: 1997-02-20, last modified: 1997-07-25
We cross-correlate the Saskatoon Ka and Q-Band Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data with different maps to quantify possible foreground contamination. We detect a marginal correlation (2 sigma) with the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) 240, 140 and 100 microm maps, but we find no significant correlation with point sources, with the Haslam 408 MHz map or with the Reich and Reich 1420 MHz map. The rms amplitude of the component correlated with DIRBE is about 20% of the CMB signal. Interpreting this component as free-free emission, this normalization agrees with that of Kogut et al. (1996a; 1996b) and supports the hypothesis that the spatial correlation between dust and warm ionized gas observed on large angular scales persists to smaller angular scales. Subtracting this contribution from the CMB data reduces the normalization of the Saskatoon power spectrum by only a few percent.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9707252  [pdf] - 98076
A Determination of the Spectral Index of Galactic Synchrotron Emission in the 1-10 GHz range
Comments: 12 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 1997-07-22
We present an analysis of simultaneous multifrequency measurements of the Galactic emission in the 1-10 GHz range with 18 degrees, angular resolution taken from a high altitude site. Our data yield a determination of the synchrotron spectral index between 1.4 GHz and 7.5 GHz of 2.81 +/- 0.16. Combining our data with the maps from Haslam et al. (1982) and Reich & Reich (1986) we find 2.76 +/- 0.11 in the 0.4 - 7.5 GHz range. These results are in agreement with the few previously published measurements. The variation of spectral index with frequency based on our results and compared with other data found in the literature suggests a steepening of the synchrotron spectrum towards high frequencies as expected from theory, because of the steepening of the parent cosmic ray electron energy spectrum. Comparison between the Haslam data and the 19 GHz map (Cottingham 1987) also indicates a significant spectral index variation on large angular scale. Addition quality data are necessary to provide a serious study of these effects.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9706282  [pdf] - 97803
Spatial Correlation Between H-Alpha Emission and Infrared Cirrus
Comments: LaTeX with 5 PostScript figures, 11 pages total. Accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal, September 1997 issue
Submitted: 1997-06-27
Cross-correlation of the DIRBE 100 micron survey with previously published H-alpha maps tests correlations between far-infrared dust and the warm ionized interstellar medium in different regions of the sky. A 10 x 12 deg patch at Galactic latitude b = -21 shows a correlation slope a_0 = 0.85 +/- 0.44 Rayleighs / MJy sr significant at 97% confidence. A set of H-alpha images over the north celestial polar cap yields a weaker correlation slope a_0 = 0.34 +/- 0.33 Rayleighs / MJy sr. Combined with observations from microwave anisotropy experiments, the data show roughly similar correlations on angular scales 0.7 deg to 90 deg. Microwave experiments may observe more emission per unit dust emission than are traced by the same structures observed in H-alpha.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9705090  [pdf] - 97352
Foreground contamination around the North Celestial Pole
Comments: Proceedings from 18th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics: Texas in Chicago. 3 pages, with 1 figure included. Color figure and links at http://www.sns.ias.edu/~angelica/foreground.html
Submitted: 1997-05-12
We cross-correlate the Saskatoon Q-Band data with different spatial template maps to quantify possible foreground contamination. We detect a correlation with the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) 100 microm map, which we interpret as being due to Galactic free-free emission. Subtracting this foreground power reduces the Saskatoon normalization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) power spectrum by roughly 2%.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9701090  [pdf] - 96363
Limits to Global Rotation and Shear From the COBE DMR 4-Year Sky Maps
Comments: 10 pages LaTeX including 3 PostScript figures using psfig style macro. To appear in Physical Review D15
Submitted: 1997-01-15
Small departures from a homogeneous isotropic spacetime create observable features in the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background. We cross-correlate the maps of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 4-year data set with template maps from Bianchi VII_h cosmological models to limit global rotation or shear in the early universe. On the largest scales, spacetime is well described by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric, with departures from isotropy about each spatial point limited to shear sigma/H_0 < 10^{-9} and rotation omega/H_0 < 6 x 10^{-8} for 0.1 < Omega_0 < 1.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9607100  [pdf] - 95042
Diffuse Microwave Emission Survey
Comments: Proceedings from XVI Moriond Astrophysics meeting held March March 16-23 in Les Arcs, France. 8 pages including 4 PostScript figures with psfig macros. Figure 5 available as hardcopy from author. Revised once to re-set text height
Submitted: 1996-07-19
The Diffuse Microwave Emission Survey (DIMES) has been selected for a mission concept study for NASA's New Mission Concepts for Astrophysics program. DIMES will measure the frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse Galactic foregrounds at centimeter wavelengths to 0.1% precision (0.1 mK), and will map the angular distribution to 20 muK per 6 degree field of view. It consists of a set of narrow-band cryogenic radiometers, each of which compares the signal from the sky to a full-aperture blackbody calibration target. All frequency channels compare the sky to the same blackbody target, with common offset and calibration, so that deviations from a blackbody spectral shape may be determined with maximum precision. Measurements of the CMB spectrum complement CMB anisotropy experiments and provide information on the early universe unobtainable in any other way; even a null detection will place important constraints on the matter content, structure, and evolution of the universe. Centimeter-wavelength measurements of the diffuse Galactic emission fill in a crucial wavelength range and test models of the heat sources, energy balance, and composition of the interstellar medium.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9601179  [pdf] - 94034
Monte Carlo Simulations of Medium-Scale CMB Anisotropy
Comments: 7 pages LaTeX including one PostScript figure (using psfig macros). Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Submitted: 1996-01-30
Recent detections of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy at half-degree angular scales show considerable scatter in the reported amplitude even at similar angular resolution. We use Monte Carlo techniques to simulate the current set of medium-scale CMB observations, including all relevant aspects of sky coverage and measurement technique. The scatter in the reported amplitudes is well within the range expected for the standard cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model, and results primarily from the restricted sky coverage of each experiment. Within the context of standard CDM current observations of CMB anisotropy support the detection of a ``Doppler peak'' in the CMB power spectrum consistent with baryon density 0.01 < Omega_b < 0.13 (95% confidence) for Hubble constant H_0 = 50 km/s/Mpc. The uncertainties are approximately evenly divided between instrument noise and cosmic variance arising from the limited sky coverage.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9601060  [pdf] - 93915
Microwave Emission at High Galactic Latitudes
Comments: 14 pages including 2 encapsulated color figures. Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal (Letters)
Submitted: 1996-01-11
We use the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 4-year sky maps to model Galactic microwave emission at high latitudes (|b| > 20 deg). Cross-correlation of the DMR maps with Galactic template maps detects fluctuations in the high-latitude microwave sky brightness with the angular variation of the DIRBE far-infrared dust maps and a frequency dependence consistent with a superposition of dust and free-free emission. We find no significant correlations between the DMR maps and various synchrotron templates. On the largest angular scales (e.g., quadrupole), Galactic emission is comparable in amplitude to the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The CMB quadrupole amplitude, after correction for Galactic emission, has amplitude $Q_{rms}$ = 10.7 uK with random uncertainty 3.6 uK and systematic uncertainty 7.1 uK from uncertainty in our knowledge of Galactic microwave emission.
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9601063  [pdf] - 93918
Power Spectrum of Primordial Inhomogeneity Determined from the 4-Year COBE DMR Sky Maps
Comments: 9 pages of text in LaTeX, 1 postscript Table, 4 postscript figures (2 color plates), submitted to The Astrophysical Journal (Letters)
Submitted: 1996-01-11
Fourier analysis and power spectrum estimation of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on an incompletely sampled sky developed by Gorski (1994) has been applied to the high-latitude portion of the 4-year COBE DMR 31.5, 53 and 90 GHz sky maps. Likelihood analysis using newly constructed Galaxy cuts (extended beyond |b| = 20deg to excise the known foreground emission) and simultaneously correcting for the faint high latitude galactic foreground emission is conducted on the DMR sky maps pixelized in both ecliptic and galactic coordinates. The Bayesian power spectrum estimation from the foreground corrected 4-year COBE DMR data renders n ~ 1.2 +/- 0.3, and Q_{rms-PS} ~ 15.3^{+3.7}_{-2.8} microK (projections of the two-parameter likelihood). These results are consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich n=1 model of amplitude Q_{rms-PS} ~ 18 microK detected with significance exceeding 14sigma (dQ/Q < 0.07). (A small power spectrum amplitude drop below the published 2-year results is predominantly due to the application of the new, extended Galaxy cuts.)
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9601064  [pdf] - 93919
Non-cosmological Signal Contributions to the COBE-DMR Four-Year Sky Maps
Comments: 14 Pages LaTeX, submitted to The Astrophysical Journal (Letters)
Submitted: 1996-01-11
We limit the possible contributions from non-cosmological sources to the COBE-DMR four-year sky maps. The DMR data are cross-correlated with maps of rich clusters, extragalactic IRAS sources, HEAO-1 A-2 X-ray emission and 5 GHz radio sources using a Fourier space technique. There is no evidence of significant contamination by such sources at an rms level of ~8 uK (95% confidence level at 7 degree resolution) in the most sensitive 53 GHz sky map. This level is consistent with previous limits set by analysis of earlier DMR data and by simple extrapolations from existing source models. We place a 95% confidence level rms limit on the Comptonization parameter averaged over the high-latitude sky of $\delta y\ <\ 1\ \times\ 10^{-6}$. Extragalactic sources have an insignificant effect on CMB power spectrum parameterizations determined from the DMR data.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9601065  [pdf] - 93920
RMS Anisotropy in the COBE-DMR Four-Year Sky Maps
Comments: 14 pages, submitted to The Astrophysical Journal (Letters)
Submitted: 1996-01-11
The sky-RMS is the simplest model-independent characterization of a cosmological anisotropy signal. The RMS temperature fluctuations determined from the $COBE$-DMR four-year sky maps are frequency independent, consistent with the hypothesis that they are cosmological in origin, with a typical amplitude at 7 degrees of ~ 35 \pm\ 2 uK and at 10 degrees of ~29 \pm\ 1 uK. A joint analysis of the 7 deg and 10 deg "cross"-RMS derived from the data in both Galactic and Ecliptic coordinates is used to determine the RMS quadrupole normalization, $Q_{rms-PS}$, for a scale-invariant Harrison-Zel'dovich power law model. The difference in the inferred normalizations either including or excluding the quadrupole is a consequence of the sensitivity of the method to the Galaxy contaminated observed sky quadrupole. Whilst there are variations depending on the data selection, all results are consistent with an inferred \qrms\ normalization of ~18 \pm\ 2 uK.
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9601066  [pdf] - 93921
Calibration and Systematic Error Analysis For the COBE-DMR Four-Year Sky Maps
Comments: 47 pages including 13 encapsulated PostScript figures. Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 1996-01-11
The Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) has mapped the full microwave sky to mean sensitivity 26 uK per 7 deg field of view. The absolute calibration is determined to 0.7% with drifts smaller than 0.2% per year. We have analyzed both the raw differential data and the pixelized sky maps for evidence of contaminating sources such as solar system foregrounds, instrumental susceptibilities, and artifacts from data recovery and processing. Most systematic effects couple only weakly to the sky maps. The largest uncertainties in the maps result from the instrument susceptibility to the Earth's magnetic field, microwave emission from the Earth, and upper limits to potential effects at the spacecraft spin period. Systematic effects in the maps are small compared to either the noise or the celestial signal: the 95% confidence upper limit for the pixel-pixel rms from all identified systematics is less than 6 uK in the worst channel. A power spectrum analysis of the (A-B)/2 difference maps shows no evidence for additional undetected systematic effects.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9601067  [pdf] - 93922
4-Year COBE DMR Cosmic Microwave Background Observations: Maps and Basic Results
Comments: 11 pages plus 2 PostScript figures. Figures 2 and 4 are not included, but are available upon request to bennett@stars.gsfc.nasa.gov. Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal (Letters)
Submitted: 1996-01-11
The cosmic microwave background radiation provides unique constraints on cosmological models. In this Letter we present a summary of the spatial properties of the cosmic microwave background radiation based on the full 4 years of COBE DMR observations, as detailed in a set of companion Letters. The anisotropy is consistent with a scale-invariant power law model and Gaussian statistics. With full use of the multi-frequency 4-year DMR data, including our estimate of the effects of Galactic emission, we find a power-law spectral index of $n=1.2\pm 0.3$ and a quadrupole normalization $Q_{rms-PS}=15.3^{+3.8}_{-2.8}$ $\mu$K. For $n=1$ the best-fit normalization is $Q_{rms-PS}\vert_{n=1}=18\pm 1.6$ $\mu$K. These values are consistent with both our previous 1-year and 2-year results. The results include use of the $\ell=2$ quadrupole term; exclusion of this term gives consistent results, but with larger uncertainties. The 4-year sky maps, presented in this Letter, portray an accurate overall visual impression of the anisotropy since the signal-to-noise ratio is ~2 per 10 degree sky map patch. The improved signal-to-noise ratio of the 4-year maps also allows for improvements in Galactic modeling and limits on non-Gaussian statistics.
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9601061  [pdf] - 93916
2-Point Correlations in the COBE DMR 4-Year Anisotropy Maps
Comments: Sumbitted to ApJ Letters
Submitted: 1996-01-11
The 2-point temperature correlation function is evaluated from the 4-year COBE DMR microwave anisotropy maps. We examine the 2-point function, which is the Legendre transform of the angular power spectrum, and show that the data are statistically consistent from channel to channel and frequency to frequency. The most likely quadrupole normalization is computed for a scale-invariant power-law spectrum of CMB anisotropy, using a variety of data combinations. For a given data set, the normalization inferred from the 2-point data is consistent with that inferred by other methods. The smallest and largest normalization deduced from any data combination are 16.4 and 19.6 uK respectively, with a value ~18 uK generally preferred.
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9601062  [pdf] - 93917
Tests for Non-Gaussian Statistics in the DMR Four-Year Sky Maps
Comments: 15 pages including 4 encapsulated PostScript figures. Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal (Letters)
Submitted: 1996-01-11
We search the high-latitude portion of the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 4-year sky maps for evidence of a non-Gaussian temperature distribution in the cosmic microwave background. The genus, 3-point correlation function, and 2-point correlation function of temperature maxima and minima are all in excellent agreement with the hypothesis that the CMB anisotropy on angular scales of 7 degrees or larger represents a random-phase Gaussian field. A likelihood comparison of the DMR sky maps to a set of random-phase non-Gaussian toy models selects the exact Gaussian model as most likely. Monte Carlo simulations show that the 2-point correlation of the peaks and valleys in the maps provides the greatest discrimination among the class of models tested.
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9601058  [pdf] - 93913
Band Power Spectra in the COBE DMR 4-Year Anisotropy Maps
Comments: Submitted to ApJ Letters
Submitted: 1996-01-11
We employ a pixel-based likelihood technique to estimate the angular power spectrum of the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) 4-year sky maps. The spectrum is consistent with a scale-invariant power-law form with a normalization, expressed in terms of the expected quadrupole anisotropy, of Q_{rms-PS|n=1} = 18 +/- 1.4 uK, and a best-fit spectral index of 1.2 +/- 0.3. The normalization is somewhat smaller than we concluded from the 2-year data, mainly due to additional Galactic modeling. We extend the analysis to investigate the extent to which the ``small" quadrupole observed in our sky is statistically consistent with a power-law spectrum. The most likely quadrupole amplitude is somewhat dependent on the details of Galactic foreground subtraction and data selection, ranging between 7 and 10 uK, but in no case is there compelling evidence that the quadrupole is too small to be consistent with a power-law spectrum. We conclude with a likelihood analysis of the band power amplitude in each of four spectral bands between l = 2 and 40, and find no evidence for deviations from a simple power-law spectrum.
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9509151  [pdf] - 93364
High-Latitude Galactic Emission in the COBE DMR Two-Year Sky Maps
Comments: uuencoded compressed archive with LaTex source code and 4 encapsulated PostScript figures (using epsf macros). Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 1995-09-29
We cross-correlate the COBE-DMR 2-year sky maps with spatial templates from long-wavelength radio surveys and the far-infrared COBE DIRBE maps. We place an upper limit on the spectral index of synchrotron radiation beta_{synch} < -2.9 between 408 MHz and 31.5 GHz. We obtain a statistically significant cross-correlation with the DIRBE maps whose dependence on the DMR frequencies indicates a superposition of dust and free-free emission. The high-latitude dust emission (|b| > 30 deg) is well fitted by a single dust component with temperature T = 18 (+3, -7) K and emissivity epsilon ~ nu^beta with beta = 1.9 (+3.0, -0.5). The free-free emission is spatially correlated with the dust on angular scales larger than the 7 degree DMR beam, with rms variations 5.3 +/- 1.8 uK at 53 GHz and angular power spectrum P ~ ell^{-3}. If this correlation persists to smaller angular scales, free-free emission should not be a significant contaminant to measurements of the cosmic microwave anisotropy at degree angular scales for frequencies above 20 GHz.
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9507045  [pdf] - 92983
Field Ordering and Energy Density in Texture Cosmology
Comments: 10 pages uu-encoded compressed postscript including 2 figures. Accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 1995-07-12
We use numerical simulations of the time evolution of global textures to investigate the relationship between ordering dynamics and energy density in an expanding universe. Events in which individual textures become fully wound are rare. The energy density is dominated by the more numerous partially wound configurations, with median topological charge alpha ~ 0.44. This verifies the recent supposition (Borrill et al. 1994) that such partially wound configurations should dominate the cosmic microwave background.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9503033  [pdf] - 92450
Three-Point Correlations in the COBE-DMR Two-Year Anisotropy Maps
Comments: 13 pages of uuencoded Postscript, including two tables and two figures
Submitted: 1995-03-07
We compute the three-point temperature correlation function of the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) two-year sky maps to search for evidence of non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations. We detect three-point correlations in our sky with a substantially higher signal-to-noise ratio than from the first year data. However, the magnitude of the signal is consistent with the level of cosmic variance expected from Gaussian fluctuations, even when the low order multipole moments, up to l = 9, are filtered from the data. These results do not strongly constrain most existing models of structure formation, but the absence of intrinsic three-point correlations on large angular scales is an important consistency test for such models.
[116]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9408097  [pdf] - 91782
On the RMS Anisotropy at 7 degrees and 10 degrees Observed in the COBE-DMR Two Year Sky Maps
Comments: 15 pages including 3 tables and 3 figures, uuencoded Postscript; Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal; COBE Preprint 94-16
Submitted: 1994-08-30
The frequency-independent RMS temperature fluctuations determined from the COBE-DMR two year sky maps are used to infer the parameter Q_{rms-PS}, which characterizes the normalization of power law models of primordial cosmological temperature anisotropy. In particular, a 'cross'-RMS statistic is used to determine Q_{rms-PS} for a forced fit to a scale-invariant Harrison-Zel'dovich (n = 1) spectral model. Using a joint analysis of the 7 degree and 10 degree RMS temperature derived from both the 53 and 90 GHz sky maps, we find Q_{rms-PS} = 17.0^{+2.5}_{-2.1} uK when the low quadrupole is included, and Q_{rms-PS} = 19.4^{+2.3}_{-2.1} uK excluding the quadrupole. These results are consistent with the n = 1 fits from more sensitive methods (e.g. power spectrum, correlation function). The effect of the low quadrupole derived from the COBE-DMR data on the inferred Q_{rms-PS} normalization is investigated. A bias to lower Q_{rms-PS} is found when the quadrupole is included. The higher normalization for a forced n = 1 fit is then favored by the cross-RMS technique. As initially pointed out in Wright et al. (1994a) and further discussed here, analytic formulae for the RMS sky temperature fluctuations will NOT provide the correct normalization amplitude.
[117]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9408070  [pdf] - 355313
Gaussian Statistics of the Cosmic Microwave Background: Correlation of Temperature Extrema In the COBE DMR Two-Year Sky Maps
Comments: uuencoded compressed PostScript file (8 pages including 1 figure) submitted to The Astrophysical Journal Letters, August 18, 1994 (COBE preprint 94-15)
Submitted: 1994-08-19
We use the two-point correlation function of the extrema points (peaks and valleys) in the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 2-year sky maps as a test for non-Gaussian temperature distribution in the cosmic microwave background anisotropy. A maximum likelihood analysis compares the DMR data to n=1 toy models whose random-phase spherical harmonic components $a_{\ell m}$ are drawn from either Gaussian, $\chi^2$, or log-normal parent populations. The likelihood of the 53 GHz (A+B)/2 data is greatest for the exact Gaussian model. All non-Gaussian models tested are ruled out at 90\% confidence, limited by type II errors in the statistical inference. The extrema correlation function is a stronger test for this class of non-Gaussian models than topological statistics such as the genus.
[118]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9408038  [pdf] - 91723
CMB Maps at 0.5 Degree Resolution II: Unresolved Features
Comments: uuencoded compressed PostScript file (8 pages including 2 figures) submitted to The Astrophysical Journal Letters, August 12, 1994
Submitted: 1994-08-12
High-contrast peaks in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy can appear as unresolved sources to observers. We fit simulated CMB maps generated with a cold dark matter model to a set of unresolved features at instrumental resolution 0.5 degrees to 1.5 degrees and present the integral density per steradian n(>|T|) of unresolved features brighter than threshold temperature |T|. A typical medium-scale experiment observing 0.001 sr at 0.5 degree resolution would expect to observe one unresolved feature brighter than 85 \muK after convolution with the beam profile, with less than 5% probability to observe a source brighter than 150 \muK. Increasing the power-law index of primordial density perturbations n from 1 to 1.5 raises these temperature limits |T| by a factor of 2. The results are only weakly dependent on the assumed values of the Hubble constant and baryon density.
[119]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9408037  [pdf] - 91722
CMB Maps at 0.5 degree Resolution I: Full-Sky Simulations and Basic Results
Comments: 13 pages with 3 figures and 1 color plate available on request, uuencoded Postscript
Submitted: 1994-08-12
We have simulated full-sky maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy expected from Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models at 0.5 and 1.0 degree angular resolution. Statistical properties of the maps are presented as a function of sky coverage, angular resolution, and instrument noise, and the implications of these results for observability of the Doppler peak are discussed. The rms fluctuations in a map are not a particularly robust probe of the existence of a Doppler peak, however, a full correlation analysis can provide reasonable sensitivity. We find that sensitivity to the Doppler peak depends primarily on the fraction of sky covered, and only secondarily on the angular resolution and noise level. Color plates and one-dimensional scans of the maps are presented to visually illustrate the anisotropies.
[120]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9401012  [pdf] - 91179
Cosmic Temperature Fluctuations from Two Years of COBE DMR Observations
Comments: Accepted by the Astrophysical Journal. Modifications include the addition of a quadrupole- removed correlation function and an analysis of the technique bias on the power spectral index, n. The most likely, de-biased, estimate of n is between 1.1 and 1.3. 57 pages of uu-encoded postscript (incl 3 b&w figures)
Submitted: 1994-01-10, last modified: 1994-06-22
The first two years of COBE DMR observations of the CMB anisotropy are analyzed and compared with our previously published first year results. The results are consistent, but the addition of the second year of data increases the precision and accuracy of the detected CMB temperature fluctuations. The two-year 53 GHz data are characterized by RMS temperature fluctuations of DT=44+/-7 uK at 7 degrees and DT=30.5+/-2.7 uK at 10 degrees angular resolution. The 53X90 GHz cross-correlation amplitude at zero lag is C(0)^{1/2}=36+/-5 uK (68%CL) for the unsmoothed 7 degree DMR data. A likelihood analysis of the cross correlation function, including the quadrupole anisotropy, gives a most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude Q_{rms-PS}=12.4^{+5.2}_{-3.3} uK (68% CL) and a spectral index n=1.59^{+0.49}_{-0.55} for a power law model of initial density fluctuations, P(k)~k^n. With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 17.4 +/-1.5 uK (68% CL). Excluding the quadrupole anisotropy we find Q_{rms-PS}= 16.0^{+7.5}_{-5.2} uK (68% CL), n=1.21^{+0.60}_{-0.55}, and, with n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.2+/-1.6 uK (68% CL). Monte Carlo simulations indicate that these derived estimates of n may be biased by ~+0.3 (with the observed low value of the quadrupole included in the analysis) and {}~+0.1 (with the quadrupole excluded). Thus the most likely bias-corrected estimate of n is between 1.1 and 1.3. Our best estimate of the dipole from the two-year DMR data is 3.363+/-0.024 mK towards Galactic coordinates (l,b)= (264.4+/-0.2 degrees, +48.1+/-0.4 degrees), and our best estimate of the RMS quadrupole amplitude in our sky is 6+/-3 uK.
[121]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9403067  [pdf] - 91356
On Determining the Spectrum of Primordial Inhomogeneity from the COBE DMR Sky Maps: II. Results of Two Year Data Analysis
Comments: 13 pages, 4 figures included, uuencoded Postscript file. Submitted to ApJ Letters, COBE Preprint #94-08
Submitted: 1994-03-31
A new technique of Fourier analysis on a cut sky (Gorski, 1994) has been applied to the two year COBE DMR sky maps. The Bayesian power spectrum estimation results are consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich n=1 model. The maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of the power spectrum of primordial perturbations are n=1.22 (1.02) and Q_{rms-PS}=17 (20) uK including (excluding) the quadrupole anisotropy. The marginal likelihood function on n renders n=1.10 \pm 0.32 (0.87 \pm 0.36).
[122]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9403021  [pdf] - 91310
Correlated Errors in the COBE DMR Sky Maps
Comments: 11 pages + 3 figures, post-script file
Submitted: 1994-03-10
The {\it COBE} DMR sky maps contain low-level correlated noise. We obtain estimates of the amplitude and pattern of the correlated noise from three techniques: angular averages of the covariance matrix, Monte Carlo simulations of two-point correlation functions, and direct analysis of the DMR maps. The results from the three methods are mutually consistent. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1\%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of $60 \deg$ due to the $60 \deg$ separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance at $60 \deg$ is $0.45\% ^{+0.18}_{-0.14}$ of the mean variance. Additionally, the variance in a given pixel is $0.7\%$ greater than would be expected from a single beam experiment with the same noise properties. Auto-correlation functions suffer from a $\sim 1.5\; \sigma$ positive bias at $60 \deg$ while cross-correlations have no bias. Published {\it COBE} DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise. COBE pre-print 94-
[123]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9402007  [pdf] - 91225
Search For Unresolved Sources In The COBE-DMR Two-Year Sky Maps
Comments: 16 pages including 2 figures, uuencoded PostScript, COBE preprint 94-06
Submitted: 1994-02-02
We have searched the temperature maps from the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) first two years of data for evidence of unresolved sources. The high-latitude sky (|b| > 30\deg) contains no sources brighter than 192 uK thermodynamic temperature (322 Jy at 53 GHz). The cumulative count of sources brighter than threshold T, N(> T), is consistent with a superposition of instrument noise plus a scale-invariant spectrum of cosmic temperature fluctuations normalized to Qrms-PS = 17 uK. We examine the temperature maps toward nearby clusters and find no evidence for any Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, \Delta y < 7.3 x 10^{-6} (95% CL) averaged over the DMR beam. We examine the temperature maps near the brightest expected radio sources and detect no evidence of significant emission. The lack of bright unresolved sources in the DMR maps, taken with anisotropy measurements on smaller angular scales, places a weak constraint on the integral number density of any unresolved Planck-spectrum sources brighter than flux density S, n(> S) < 2 x 10^4 (S/1 Jy)^{-2} sr^{-1}.
[124]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9312056  [pdf] - 91157
Dipole Anisotropy in the COBE DMR First-Year Sky Maps
Comments: Post Script (4 figures) Ap J 419, 1-6 (1993)
Submitted: 1993-12-23
We present a determination of the cosmic microwave background dipole amplitude and direction from the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) first year of data. Data from the six DMR channels are consistent with a Doppler-shifted Planck function of dipole amplitude Delta T = 3.365 +/-0.027 mK toward direction (l,b) = (264.4 +/- 0.3 deg, 48.4 +/- 0.5 deg). The implied velocity of the Local Group with respect to the CMB rest frame is 627 +/- 22 km/s toward (l,b) = (276 +/- 3 deg, 30 +/- 3 deg). DMR has also mapped the dipole anisotropy resulting from the Earth's orbital motion about the Solar system barycenter, yielding a measurement of the monopole CMB temperature at 31.5, 53, and 90 GHz, to be 2.75 +/- 0.05 K.
[125]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9312031  [pdf] - 316996
Statistics and Topology of the COBE DMR First Year Maps
Comments: 17 pages post script
Submitted: 1993-12-14
We use statistical and topological quantities to test the COBE-DMR first year sky maps against the hypothesis that the observed temperature fluctuations reflect Gaussian initial density perturbations with random phases. Recent papers discuss specific quantities as discriminators between Gaussian and non-Gaussian behavior, but the treatment of instrumental noise on the data is largely ignored. The presence of noise in the data biases many statistical quantities in a manner dependent on both the noise properties and the unknown CMB temperature field. Appropriate weighting schemes can minimize this effect, but it cannot be completely eliminated. Analytic expressions are presented for these biases, and Monte Carlo simulations used to assess the best strategy for determining cosmologically interesting information from noisy data. The genus is a robust discriminator that can be used to estimate the power law quadrupole-normalized amplitude independently of the 2-point correlation function. The genus of the DMR data are consistent with Gaussian initial fluctuations with Q_rms = 15.7 +/- 2.2 - (6.6 +/- 0.3)(n - 1) uK where n is the power law index. Fitting the rms temperature variations at various smoothing angles gives Q_rms = 13.2 +/- 2.5 uK and n = 1.7 +0.3 -0.6. While consistent with Gaussian fluctuations, the first year data are only sufficient to rule out strongly non-Gaussian distributions of fluctuations.
[126]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9311030  [pdf] - 91054
Limits on Three-Point Correlations in the COBE-DMR First Year Anisotropy Maps
Comments: 14 pages, 2 figures, uuencoded Postscript, COBE #93-12
Submitted: 1993-11-12
We compute the three-point temperature correlation function of the {\it COBE} Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) first-year sky maps to search for non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations. The level of fluctuations seen in the computed correlation function are too large to be attributable solely to instrument noise. However the fluctuations are consistent with the level expected to result from a superposition of instrument noise and sky signal arising from a Gaussian power law model of initial fluctuations, with a quadrupole normalized amplitude of 17 $\mu$K and a power law spectral index $n = 1$. We place limits on the amplitude of intrinsic three-point correlations with a variety of predicted functional forms.