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Johnson, John A.

Normalized to: Johnson, J.

472 article(s) in total. 2873 co-authors, from 1 to 117 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 5,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.04795  [pdf] - 2127792
The Accretion History of AGN: A Newly Defined Population of Cold Quasars
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-08-13, last modified: 2020-07-06
Quasars are the most luminous of active galactic nuclei (AGN), and are perhaps responsible for quenching star formation in their hosts. The Stripe 82X catalog covers 31.3 deg$^2$ of the Stripe 82 field, of which the 15.6 deg$^2$ covered with XMM-Newton is also covered by Herschel/SPIRE. We have 2500 X-ray detected sources with multi-wavelength counterparts, and 30% of these are unobscured quasars, with $L_X > 10^{44}\,$erg/s and $M_B < -23$. We define a new population of quasars which are unobscured, have X-ray luminosities in excess of $10^{44}\,$erg/s, have broad emission lines, and yet are also bright in the far-infrared, with a 250$\mu$m flux density of $S_{\rm 250}>30$mJy. We refer to these Herschel-detected, unobscured quasars as "Cold Quasars". A mere 4% (21) of the X-ray- and optically-selected unobscured quasars in Stripe 82X are detected at 250$\mu$m. These Cold Quasars lie at $z\sim1-3$, have $L_{\rm IR}>10^{12}\,L_\odot$, and have star formation rates of $\sim200-1400\,M_\odot$/yr. Cold Quasars are bluer in the mid-IR than the full quasar population, and 72% of our Cold Quasars have WISE W3 $<$ 11.5 [Vega], while only 19% of the full quasar sample meets this criteria. Crucially, Cold Quasars have on average $\sim9\times$ as much star formation as the main sequence of star forming galaxies at similar redshifts. Although dust-rich, unobscured quasars have occasionally been noted in the literature before, we argue that they should be considered as a separate class of quasars due to their high star formation rates. This phase is likely short-lived, as the central engine and immense star formation consume the gas reservoir. Cold Quasars are type-1 blue quasars that reside in starburst galaxies.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.04618  [pdf] - 2112031
Cosmological perturbations in the interacting dark sector: Mapping fields and fluids
Comments: 18 pages, 1 table
Submitted: 2020-06-05
There is no unique way to describe the dark energy-dark matter interaction, as we have little information about the nature and dynamics of the dark sector. Hence, in many of the phenomenological dark matter fluid interaction models in the literature, the interaction strength $Q_{\nu}$ in the dark sector is introduced by hand. Demanding that the interaction strength $Q_{\nu}$ in the dark sector must have a field theory description, we obtain a unique form of interaction strength. We show the equivalence between the fields and fluids for the $f(R,\chi)$ model where $f$ is an arbitrary, smooth function of $R$ and the scalar field $\chi$, which represents dark matter. Up to first order in perturbations, we show that the one-to-one mapping between the field theory description and the phenomenological fluid description of interacting dark energy and dark matter exists \emph{only} for this unique form of interaction. We then classify the interacting dark energy models considered in the literature into two categories based on the field-theoretic description.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.00022  [pdf] - 2104893
The Consequences of Gamma-ray Burst Jet Opening Angle Evolution on the Inferred Star Formation Rate
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-05-29
Gamma-ray burst (GRB) data suggest that the jets from GRBs in the high redshift universe are more narrowly collimated than those at lower redshifts. This implies that we detect relatively fewer long GRB progenitor systems (i.e. massive stars) at high redshifts, because a greater fraction of GRBs have their jets pointed away from us. As a result, estimates of the star formation rate (from the GRB rate) at high redshifts may be diminished if this effect is not taken into account. In this paper, we estimate the star formation rate (SFR) using the observed GRB rate, accounting for an evolving jet opening angle. We find that the SFR in the early universe (z > 3) can be up to an order of magnitude higher than the canonical estimates, depending on the severity of beaming angle evolution and the fraction of stars that make long gamma-ray bursts. Additionally, we find an excess in the SFR at low redshifts, although this lessens when accounting for evolution of the beaming angle. Finally, under the assumption that GRBs do in fact trace canonical forms of the cosmic SFR, we constrain the resulting fraction of stars that must produce GRBs, again accounting for jet beaming-angle evolution. We find this assumption suggests a high fraction of stars in the early universe producing GRBs - a result that may, in fact, support our initial assertion that GRBs do not trace canonical estimates of the SFR.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2005.07653  [pdf] - 2095699
Response to Comment on "A Non-Interacting Low-Mass Black Hole -- Giant Star Binary System"
Comments: 5 pages
Submitted: 2020-05-15
van den Heuvel & Tauris argue that if the red giant star in the system 2MASS J05215658+4359220 has a mass of 1 solar mass (M$_\odot$), then its unseen companion could be a binary composed of two 0.9 M$_\odot$ stars, making a triple system. We contend that the existing data are most consistent with a giant of mass $3.2^{+1.0}_{-1.0}$ M$_\odot$, implying a black hole companion of $3.3^{+2.8}_{-0.7}$ M$_\odot$.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.01136  [pdf] - 2109985
A pair of TESS planets spanning the radius valley around the nearby mid-M dwarf LTT 3780
Cloutier, Ryan; Eastman, Jason D.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Mortier, Annelies; Watson, Christopher A.; Stalport, Manu; Pinamonti, Matteo; Lienhard, Florian; Harutyunyan, Avet; Damasso, Mario; Latham, David W.; Collins, Karen A.; Massey, Robert; Irwin, Jonathan; Winters, Jennifer G.; Charbonneau, David; Ziegler, Carl; Matthews, Elisabeth; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Kreidberg, Laura; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ricker, George; Vanderspek, Roland; Seager, Sara; Winn, Joshua; Jenkins, Jon M.; Vezie, Michael; Udry, Stéphane; Twicken, Joseph D.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Ségransan, Damien; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Santos, Nuno C.; Rice, Ken; Rackham, Benjamin V.; Poretti, Ennio; Piotto, Giampaolo; Phillips, David; Pepe, Francesco; Molinari, Emilio; Mignon, Lucile; Micela, Giuseppina; Melo, Claudio; de Medeiros, José R.; Mayor, Michel; Matson, Rachel; Fiorenzano, Aldo F. Martinez; Mann, Andrew W.; Magazzú, Antonio; Lovis, Christophe; López-Morales, Mercedes; Lopez, Eric; Lissauer, Jack J.; Lépine, Sébastien; Law, Nicholas; Kielkopf, John F.; Johnson, John A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Howell, Steve B.; Gonzales, Erica; Ghedina, Adriano; Forveille, Thierry; Figueira, Pedro; Dumusque, Xavier; Dressing, Courtney D.; Doyon, René; Díaz, Rodrigo F.; Di Fabrizio, Luca; Delfosse, Xavier; Cosentino, Rosario; Conti, Dennis M.; Collins, Kevin I.; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Ciardi, David; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Burke, Christopher; Buchhave, Lars; Briceño, César; Boyd, Patricia; Bouchy, François; Beichman, Charles; Artigau, Étienne; Almenara, Jose M.
Comments: Accepted to AJ. 8 figures, 6 tables. CSV file of the RV measurements (i.e. Table 2) are included in the source code
Submitted: 2020-03-02, last modified: 2020-05-12
We present the confirmation of two new planets transiting the nearby mid-M dwarf LTT 3780 (TIC 36724087, TOI-732, $V=13.07$, $K_s=8.204$, $R_s$=0.374 R$_{\odot}$, $M_s$=0.401 M$_{\odot}$, d=22 pc). The two planet candidates are identified in a single TESS sector and are validated with reconnaissance spectroscopy, ground-based photometric follow-up, and high-resolution imaging. With measured orbital periods of $P_b=0.77$ days, $P_c=12.25$ days and sizes $r_{p,b}=1.33\pm 0.07$ R$_{\oplus}$, $r_{p,c}=2.30\pm 0.16$ R$_{\oplus}$, the two planets span the radius valley in period-radius space around low mass stars thus making the system a laboratory to test competing theories of the emergence of the radius valley in that stellar mass regime. By combining 63 precise radial-velocity measurements from HARPS and HARPS-N, we measure planet masses of $m_{p,b}=2.62^{+0.48}_{-0.46}$ M$_{\oplus}$ and $m_{p,c}=8.6^{+1.6}_{-1.3}$ M$_{\oplus}$, which indicates that LTT 3780b has a bulk composition consistent with being Earth-like, while LTT 3780c likely hosts an extended H/He envelope. We show that the recovered planetary masses are consistent with predictions from both photoevaporation and from core-powered mass loss models. The brightness and small size of LTT 3780, along with the measured planetary parameters, render LTT 3780b and c as accessible targets for atmospheric characterization of planets within the same planetary system and spanning the radius valley.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.02905  [pdf] - 2093143
The Sixteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys: First Release from the APOGEE-2 Southern Survey and Full Release of eBOSS Spectra
Ahumada, Romina; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Arcodia, Riccardo; Armengaud, Eric; Aubert, Marie; Avila, Santiago; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Balland, Christophe; Barger, Kat; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Basu, Sarbani; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael L.; Beers, Timothy C.; Benavides, B. Izamar T.; Bender, Chad F.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Bershady, Matthew; Beutler, Florian; Bidin, Christian Moni; Bird, Jonathan; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Boquien, Mederic; Borissova, Jura; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, W. N.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Bureau, Martin; Burgasser, Adam; Burtin, Etienne; Cano-Diaz, Mariana; Capasso, Raffaella; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Chabanier, Solene; Chaplin, William; Chapman, Michael; Cherinka, Brian; Chiappini, Cristina; Choi, Peter Doohyun; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Chung, Haeun; Clerc, Nicolas; Coffey, Damien; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; da Costa, Luiz; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Cunha, Katia; Ilha, Gabriele da Silva; Dai, Yu Sophia; Damsted, Sanna B.; Darling, Jeremy; Davidson, James W.; Davies, Roger; Dawson, Kyle; De, Nikhil; de la Macorra, Axel; De Lee, Nathan; Queiroz, Anna Barbara de Andrade; Machado, Alice Deconto; de la Torre, Sylvain; Dell'Agli, Flavia; Bourboux, Helion du Mas des; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Dillon, Sean; Donor, John; Drory, Niv; Duckworth, Chris; Dwelly, Tom; Ebelke, Garrett; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Eigenbrot, Arthur Davis; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Eracleous, Mike; Erfanianfar, Ghazaleh; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fan, Xiaohui; Farr, Emily; Fernandez-Trincado, Jose G.; Feuillet, Diane; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fofie, Patricia; Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fromenteau, Sebastien; Fu, Hai; Galbany, Lluis; Garcia, Rafael A.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Oehmichen, Luis Alberto Garma; Ge, Junqiang; Maia, Marcio Antonio Geimba; Geisler, Doug; Gelfand, Joseph; Goddy, Julian; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul; Grier, Catherine J.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawken, Adam James; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Hekker, S.; Hogg, David W.; Holtzman, Jon; Horta, Danny; Hou, Jiamin; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Huber, Daniel; Hunt, Jason A. S.; Chitham, J. Ider; Imig, Julie; Jaber, Mariana; Angel, Camilo Eduardo Jimenez; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy M.; Jonsson, Henrik; Jullo, Eric; Kim, Yerim; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkpatrick, Charles C.; Kite, George W.; Klaene, Mark; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Kong, Hui; Kounkel, Marina; Krishnarao, Dhanesh; Lacerna, Ivan; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lane, Richard R.; Law, David R.; Leung, Henry W.; Lewis, Hannah; Li, Cheng; Lian, Jianhui; Lin, Lihwai; Long, Dan; Longa-Pena, Penelope; Lundgren, Britt; Lyke, Brad W.; Mackereth, J. Ted; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Martini, Paul; Masseron, Thomas; Masters, Karen L.; Mathur, Savita; McDermid, Richard M.; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Miglio, Andrea; Minniti, Dante; Minsley, Rebecca; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Mohammad, Faizan Gohar; Mosser, Benoit; Mueller, Eva-Maria; Muna, Demitri; Munoz-Gutierrez, Andrea; Myers, Adam D.; Nadathur, Seshadri; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Nascimento, Janaina Correa do; Nevin, Rebecca Jean; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; O'Connell, Julia E.; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel; Oravetz, Audrey; Osorio, Yeisson; Pace, Zachary J.; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palicio, Pedro A.; Pan, Hsi-An; Pan, Kaike; Parker, James; Paviot, Romain; Peirani, Sebastien; Ramrez, Karla Pena; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Perez-Rafols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Poovelil, Vijith Jacob; Povick, Joshua Tyler; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Ray, Amy; Rembold, Sandro Barboza; Rezaie, Mehdi; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogerio; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos; Rose, Benjamin; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Rowlands, Kate; Rubin, Kate H. R.; Salvato, Mara; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Sanchez-Menguiano, Laura; Sanchez-Gallego, Jose R.; Sayres, Conor; Schaefer, Adam; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Schlafly, Edward; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serenelli, Aldo; Shafieloo, Arman; Shamsi, Shoaib Jamal; Shao, Zhengyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shetrone, Matthew; Shirley, Raphael; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Simon, Joshua D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anze; Smethurst, Rebecca; Sobeck, Jennifer; Sodi, Bernardo Cervantes; Souto, Diogo; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stello, Dennis; Stermer, Julianna; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Stutz, Amelia; Suarez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Talbot, Michael S.; Tayar, Jamie; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Theriault, Riley; Thomas, Daniel; Thomas, Zak C.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Toledo, Hector Hernandez; Tremonti, Christy A.; Troup, Nicholas W.; Tuttle, Sarah; Unda-Sanzana, Eduardo; Valentini, Marica; Vargas-Gonzalez, Jaime; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Vazquez-Mata, Jose Antonio; Vivek, M.; Wake, David; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Wild, Vivienne; Wilson, John C.; Wilson, Robert F.; Wolthuis, Nathan; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Yeche, Christophe; Zamora, Olga; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Cheng; Zhao, Gongbo; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun; Zou, Hu
Comments: DR16 release: Monday Dec 9th 2019. This is the alphabetical order SDSS-IV collaboration data release paper. 25 pages, 6 figures, accepted by ApJS on 11th May 2020. Minor changes clarify or improve text and figures relative to v1
Submitted: 2019-12-05, last modified: 2020-05-11
This paper documents the sixteenth data release (DR16) from the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys; the fourth and penultimate from the fourth phase (SDSS-IV). This is the first release of data from the southern hemisphere survey of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2); new data from APOGEE-2 North are also included. DR16 is also notable as the final data release for the main cosmological program of the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS), and all raw and reduced spectra from that project are released here. DR16 also includes all the data from the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) and new data from the SPectroscopic IDentification of ERosita Survey (SPIDERS) programs, both of which were co-observed on eBOSS plates. DR16 has no new data from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey (or the MaNGA Stellar Library "MaStar"). We also preview future SDSS-V operations (due to start in 2020), and summarize plans for the final SDSS-IV data release (DR17).
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.04839  [pdf] - 2086448
Homogeneous Analysis of Globular Clusters from the APOGEE Survey with the BACCHUS Code. II. The Southern Clusters and Overview
Comments: Published in MNRAS, 31 pages, 24 figures, 7 tables. Further typos are corrected, now identical in text, figures and tables to the published paper
Submitted: 2019-12-10, last modified: 2020-04-29
We investigate the Fe, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ce and Nd abundances of 2283 red giant stars in 31 globular clusters from high-resolution spectra observed in both the northern and southern hemisphere by the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 survey. This unprecedented homogeneous dataset, largest to date, allows us to discuss the intrinsic Fe spread, the shape and statistics of Al-Mg and N-C anticorrelations as a function of cluster mass, luminosity, age and metallicity for all 31 clusters. We find that the Fe spread does not depend on these parameters within our uncertainties including cluster metallicity, contradicting earlier observations. We do not confirm the metallicity variations previously observed in M22 and NGC 1851. Some clusters show a bimodal Al distribution, while others exhibit a continuous distribution as has been previously reported in the literature. We confirm more than 2 populations in $\omega$ Cen and NGC 6752, and find new ones in M79. We discuss the scatter of Al by implementing a correction to the standard chemical evolution of Al in the Milky Way. After correction, its dependence on cluster mass is increased suggesting that the extent of Al enrichment as a function of mass was suppressed before the correction. We observe a turnover in the Mg-Al anticorrelation at very low Mg in $\omega$ Cen, similar to the pattern previously reported in M15 and M92. $\omega$ Cen may also have a weak K-Mg anticorrelation, and if confirmed, it would be only the third cluster known to show such a pattern.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.00057  [pdf] - 2085077
The Evolution of Gamma-ray Burst Jet Opening Angle through Cosmic Time
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-11-29, last modified: 2020-04-16
Jet opening angles of long gamma-ray bursts (lGRBs) appear to evolve in cosmic time, with lGRBs at higher redshifts being on average more narrowly beamed than those at lower redshifts. We examine the nature of this anti-correlation in the context of collimation by the progenitor stellar envelope. First, we show that the data indicate a strong correlation between gamma-ray luminosity and jet opening angle, and suggest this is a natural selection effect - only the most luminous GRBs are able to successfully launch jets with large opening angles. Then, by considering progenitor properties expected to evolve through cosmic time, we show that denser stars lead to more collimated jets; we argue that the apparent anti-correlation between opening angle and redshift can be accounted for if lGRB massive star progenitors at high redshifts have higher average density compared to those at lower redshifts. This may be viable for an evolving IMF - under the assumption that average density scales directly with mass, this relationship is consistent with the form of the IMF mass evolution suggested in the literature. The jet angle-redshift anti-correlation may also be explained if the lGRB progenitor population is dominated by massive stars at high redshift, while lower redshift lGRBs allow for a greater diversity of progenitor systems (that may fail to collimate the jet as acutely). Overall, however, we find both the jet angle-redshift anti-correlation and jet angle-luminosity correlation are consistent with the conditions of jet launch through, and collimation by, the envelope of a massive star progenitor.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.07730  [pdf] - 2061678
The Clustering of X-ray Luminous Quasars
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2020-01-21, last modified: 2020-03-09
The clustering of active galactic nuclei (AGN) sheds light on their typical large (Mpc-scale) environments, which can constrain the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Here we measure the clustering of luminous X-ray-selected AGN in the Stripe 82X and XMM-XXL-North surveys around the peak epoch of black hole growth, in order to investigate the dependence of luminosity on large-scale AGN environment. We compute the auto-correlation function of AGN in two luminosity bins, $10^{43}\leq L_X<10^{44.5}$ erg s$^{-1}$ at $z\sim 0.8$ and $L_X\geq 10^{44.5}$ erg s$^{-1}$ at $z\sim 1.8$, and calculate the AGN bias taking into account the redshift distribution of the sources using three different methods. Our results show that while the less luminous sample has an inferred typical halo mass that is smaller than for the more luminous AGN, the host halo mass may be less dependent on luminosity than suggested in previous work. Focusing on the luminous sample, we calculate a typical host halo mass of $\sim 10^{13}$ M$_{\odot}~h^{-1}$, which is similar to previous measurements of moderate-luminosity X-ray AGN and significantly larger than the values found for optical quasars of similar luminosities and redshifts. We suggest that the clustering differences between different AGN selection techniques are dominated by selection biases, and not due to a dependence on AGN luminosity. We discuss the limitations of inferring AGN triggering mechanisms from halo masses derived by large-scale bias.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.06222  [pdf] - 2054169
Chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge as traced by microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars. VII. Lithium
Comments: 8 pages, 6 figures, resubmitted to A&A after referee comments
Submitted: 2020-01-17
Lithium abundances are presented for 91 dwarf and subgiant stars in the Galactic bulge. The analysis is based on line synthesis of the 7Li line at 6707 {\AA} in high-resolution spectra obtained during gravitational microlensing events, when the brightnesses of the targets were highly magnified. Our main finding is that the bulge stars at sub-solar metallicities, and that are older than about eight billion years, does not show any sign of Li production, that is, the Li trend with metallicity is flat (or even slightly declining). This indicates that no lithium was produced during the first few billion years in the history of the bulge. This finding is essentially identical to what is seen for the (old) thick disk stars in the Solar neighbourhood, and adds another piece of evidence for a tight connection between the metal-poor bulge and the Galactic thick disk. For the bulge stars younger than about eight billion years, the sample contains a group of stars at very high metallicities at [Fe/H]~+0.4 that have lithium abundances in the range A(Li)=2.6-2.8. In the Solar neighbourhood the lithium abundances have been found to peak at a A(Li)~3.3 at [Fe/H]~ +0.1 and then decrease by 0.4-0.5 dex when reaching [Fe/H]~+0.4. The few bulge stars that we have at these metallicities, seem to support this declining A(Li) trend. This could indeed support the recent claim that the low A(Li) abundances at the highest metallicities seen in the Solar neighbourhood could be due to stars from the inner disk, or the bulge region, that have migrated to the Solar neighbourhood.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.05597  [pdf] - 2057873
Stellar Characterization of M-dwarfs from the APOGEE Survey: A Calibrator Sample for the M-dwarf Metallicities
Comments: Accepted to ApJ, 2 tables and 11 figures
Submitted: 2020-01-15
We present spectroscopic determinations of the effective temperatures, surface gravities and metallicities for 21 M-dwarfs observed at high-resolution (R $\sim$ 22,500) in the \textit{H}-band as part of the SDSS-IV APOGEE survey. The atmospheric parameters and metallicities are derived from spectral syntheses with 1-D LTE plane parallel MARCS models and the APOGEE atomic/molecular line list, together with up-to-date H$_{2}$O and FeH molecular line lists. Our sample range in $T_{\rm eff}$ from $\sim$ 3200 to 3800K, where eleven stars are in binary systems with a warmer (FGK) primary, while the other 10 M-dwarfs have interferometric radii in the literature. We define an $M_{K_{S}}$--Radius calibration based on our M-dwarf radii derived from the detailed analysis of APOGEE spectra and Gaia DR2 distances, as well as a mass-radius relation using the spectroscopically-derived surface gravities. A comparison of the derived radii with interferometric values from the literature finds that the spectroscopic radii are slightly offset towards smaller values, with $\Delta$ = -0.01 $\pm$ 0.02 $R{\star}$/$R_{\odot}$. In addition, the derived M-dwarf masses based upon the radii and surface gravities tend to be slightly smaller (by $\sim$5-10\%) than masses derived for M-dwarf members of eclipsing binary systems for a given stellar radius. The metallicities derived for the 11 M-dwarfs in binary systems, compared to metallicities obtained for their hotter FGK main-sequence primary stars from the literature, shows excellent agreement, with a mean difference of [Fe/H](M-dwarf - FGK primary) = +0.04 $\pm$ 0.18 dex, confirming the APOGEE metallicity scale derived here for M-dwarfs.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.11954  [pdf] - 2026450
The Pan-Pacific Planet Search. VIII. Complete results and the occurrence rate of planets around low-luminosity giants
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. Full text of tables A1 and A2 available from the lead author in exchange for advice on how to make MNRAS format long tables properly
Submitted: 2019-11-26
Our knowledge of the populations and occurrence rates of planets orbiting evolved intermediate-mass stars lags behind that for solar-type stars by at least a decade. Some radial velocity surveys have targeted these low-luminosity giant stars, providing some insights into the properties of their planetary systems. Here we present the final data release of the Pan-Pacific Planet Search, a 5-year radial velocity survey using the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope. We present 1293 precise radial velocity measurements for 129 stars, and highlight six potential substellar-mass companions which require additional observations to confirm. Correcting for the substantial incompleteness in the sample, we estimate the occurrence rate of giant planets orbiting low-luminosity giant stars to be approximately 7.8$^{+9.1}_{-3.3}$\%. This result is consistent with the frequency of such planets found to orbit main-sequence A-type stars, from which the PPPS stars have evolved.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.04985  [pdf] - 2026321
A Full Implementation of Spectro-Perfectionism for Precise Radial Velocity Exoplanet Detection: A Test Case With the MINERVA Reduction Pipeline
Comments: 15 pages, 10 figures
Submitted: 2019-11-12
We present a computationally tractable implementation of spectro-perfectionism, a method which minimizes error imparted by spectral extraction. We develop our method in conjunction with a full raw reduction pipeline for the MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA), capable of performing both optimal extraction and spectro-perfectionism. Although spectro-perfectionism remains computationally expensive, our implementation can extract a MINERVA exposure in approximately $30\,\text{min}$. We describe our localized extraction procedure and our approach to point spread function fitting. We compare the performance of both extraction methods on a set of 119 exposures on HD122064, an RV standard star. Both the optimal extraction and spectro-perfectionism pipelines achieve nearly identical RV precision under a six-exposure chronological binning. We discuss the importance of reliable calibration data for point spread function fitting and the potential of spectro-perfectionism for future precise radial velocity exoplanet studies.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.02598  [pdf] - 1995524
The Impact of Starbursts on Element Abundance Ratios
Comments: 17 pages; 11 figures; submitted to MNRAS; comments welcome
Submitted: 2019-11-06
We investigate the impact of bursts in star formation on the predictions of one-zone chemical evolution models, adopting oxygen (O), iron (Fe), and strontium (Sr), as representative $\alpha$, iron-peak, and s-process elements, respectively. To this end, we develop the Versatile Integrator for Chemical Evolution (VICE), a python package. Starbursts driven by a temporary boost of gas accretion rate create loops in [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] evolutionary tracks and a peak in the stellar [O/Fe] distribution at intermediate values. Bursts driven by a temporary boost of star formation efficiency have a similar effect, and they also produce a population of $\alpha$-deficient stars during the depressed star formation phase that follows the burst. This $\alpha$-deficient population is more prominent if the outflow rate is tied to a time-averaged star formation rate (SFR) instead of the instantaneous SFR. Theoretical models of Sr production predict a strong metallicity dependence of supernova and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star yields, though comparison to data suggests an additional source that is nearly metallicity-independent. Evolution of [Sr/Fe] and [Sr/O] during a starburst is complex because of the yield metallicity dependence and the multiple timescales in play. Moderate amplitude (10-20\%) sinusoidal oscillations in SFR produce loops in [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] tracks and multiple peaks in [O/Fe] distributions, which could be one source of intrinsic scatter in observed sequences. We investigate models that have a factor of ~2 enhancement of SFR at t = 12 Gyr, as suggest by some recent Milky Way observations. A late episode of enhanced star formation could help explain the existence of young stars with moderate $\alpha$-enhancements and the surprisingly young median age found for solar metallicity stars in the solar neighborhood, while also raising the possibility that this starburst has not fully decayed.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.09124  [pdf] - 1990394
The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) Experiment
The LZ Collaboration; Akerib, D. S.; Akerlof, C. W.; Akimov, D. Yu.; Alquahtani, A.; Alsum, S. K.; Anderson, T. J.; Angelides, N.; Araújo, H. M.; Arbuckle, A.; Armstrong, J. E.; Arthurs, M.; Auyeung, H.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Balashov, S.; Bang, J.; Barry, M. J.; Barthel, J.; Bauer, D.; Bauer, P.; Baxter, A.; Belle, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bensinger, J.; Benson, T.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Bhatti, A.; Biekert, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Birrittella, B.; Boast, K. E.; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Boulton, E. M.; Boxer, B.; Bramante, R.; Branson, S.; Brás, P.; Breidenbach, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. V.; Bunker, R.; Burdin, S.; Busenitz, J. K.; Campbell, J. S.; Carels, C.; Carlsmith, D. L.; Carlson, B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Cascella, M.; Chan, C.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Chott, N. I.; Cole, A.; Coleman, J.; Colling, D.; Conley, R. A.; Cottle, A.; Coughlen, R.; Craddock, W. W.; Curran, D.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; da Cunha, J. P.; Dahl, C. E.; Dardin, S.; Dasu, S.; Davis, J.; Davison, T. J. R.; de Viveiros, L.; Decheine, N.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Dushkin, A.; Edberg, T. K.; Edwards, W. R.; Edwards, B. N.; Edwards, J.; Elnimr, M. M.; Emmet, W. T.; Eriksen, S. R.; Faham, C. H.; Fan, A.; Fayer, S.; Fiorucci, S.; Flaecher, H.; Florang, I. M. Fogarty; Ford, P.; Francis, V. B.; Froborg, F.; Fruth, T.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gantos, N. J.; Garcia, D.; Geffre, A.; Gehman, V. M.; Gelfand, R.; Genovesi, J.; Gerhard, R. M.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, E.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Gokhale, S.; Gomber, B.; Gonda, T. G.; Greenall, A.; Greenwood, S.; Gregerson, G.; van der Grinten, M. G. D.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Hall, C. R.; Hamilton, D.; Hans, S.; Hanzel, K.; Harrington, T.; Harrison, A.; Hasselkus, C.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hemer, D.; Hertel, S. A.; Heise, J.; Hillbrand, S.; Hitchcock, O.; Hjemfelt, C.; Hoff, M. D.; Holbrook, B.; Holtom, E.; Hor, J. Y-K.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Hurteau, T. W.; Ignarra, C. M.; Irving, M. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Jahangir, O.; Jeffery, S. N.; Ji, W.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, J.; Johnson, P.; Jones, W. G.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kamaha, A.; Kamdin, K.; Kasey, V.; Kazkaz, K.; Keefner, J.; Khaitan, D.; Khaleeq, M.; Khazov, A.; Khromov, A. V.; Khurana, I.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, W. T.; Kocher, C. D.; Konovalov, A. M.; Korley, L.; Korolkova, E. V.; Koyuncu, M.; Kras, J.; Kraus, H.; Kravitz, S. W.; Krebs, H. J.; Kreczko, L.; Krikler, B.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Kumpan, A. V.; Kyre, S.; Lambert, A. R.; Landerud, B.; Larsen, N. A.; Laundrie, A.; Leason, E. A.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Leonard, D. S.; Leonard, R.; Lesko, K. T.; Levy, C.; Li, J.; Liu, Y.; Liao, J.; Liao, F. -T.; Lin, J.; Lindote, A.; Linehan, R.; Lippincott, W. H.; Liu, R.; Liu, X.; Loniewski, C.; Lopes, M. I.; Paredes, B. López; Lorenzon, W.; Lucero, D.; Luitz, S.; Lyle, J. M.; Lynch, C.; Majewski, P. A.; Makkinje, J.; Malling, D. C.; Manalaysay, A.; Manenti, L.; Mannino, R. L.; Marangou, N.; Markley, D. J.; MarrLaundrie, P.; Martin, T. J.; Marzioni, M. F.; Maupin, C.; McConnell, C. T.; McKinsey, D. N.; McLaughlin, J.; Mei, D. -M.; Meng, Y.; Miller, E. H.; Minaker, Z. J.; Mizrachi, E.; Mock, J.; Molash, D.; Monte, A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morad, J. A.; Morrison, E.; Mount, B. J.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Naim, D.; Naylor, A.; Nedlik, C.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Nesbit, J.; Neves, F.; Nikkel, J. A.; Nikoleyczik, J. A.; Nilima, A.; O'Dell, J.; Oh, H.; O'Neill, F. G.; O'Sullivan, K.; Olcina, I.; Olevitch, M. A.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Oxborough, L.; Pagac, A.; Pagenkopf, D.; Pal, S.; Palladino, K. J.; Palmaccio, V. M.; Palmer, J.; Pangilinan, M.; Patton, S. J.; Pease, E. K.; Penning, B. P.; Pereira, G.; Pereira, C.; Peterson, I. B.; Piepke, A.; Pierson, S.; Powell, S.; Preece, R. M.; Pushkin, K.; Qie, Y.; Racine, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C. A.; Richards, A.; Riffard, Q.; Rischbieter, G. R. C.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rose, H. J.; Rosero, R.; Rossiter, P.; Rucinski, R.; Rutherford, G.; Rynders, D.; Saba, J. S.; Sabarots, L.; Santone, D.; Sarychev, M.; Sazzad, A. B. M. R.; Schnee, R. W.; Schubnell, M.; Scovell, P. R.; Severson, M.; Seymour, D.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, G. W.; Shutt, T. A.; Silk, J. J.; Silva, C.; Skarpaas, K.; Skulski, W.; Smith, A. R.; Smith, R. J.; Smith, R. E.; So, J.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Stancu, I.; Stark, M. R.; Stephenson, S.; Stern, N.; Stevens, A.; Stiegler, T. M.; Stifter, K.; Studley, R.; Sumner, T. J.; Sundarnath, K.; Sutcliffe, P.; Swanson, N.; Szydagis, M.; Tan, M.; Taylor, W. C.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, D. J.; Temples, D.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Thomas, K. J.; Thomson, J. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; Timalsina, M.; To, W. H.; Tomás, A.; Tope, T. E.; Tripathi, M.; Tronstad, D. R.; Tull, C. E.; Turner, W.; Tvrznikova, L.; Utes, M.; Utku, U.; Uvarov, S.; Va'vra, J.; Vacheret, A.; Vaitkus, A.; Verbus, J. R.; Vietanen, T.; Voirin, E.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Walcott, S.; Waldron, W. L.; Walker, K.; Wang, J. J.; Wang, R.; Wang, L.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J. R.; Migneault, J.; Weatherly, S.; Webb, R. C.; Wei, W. -Z.; While, M.; White, R. G.; White, J. T.; White, D. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wilson, K.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wolfs, J. D.; Woodward, D.; Worm, S. D.; Xiang, X.; Xiao, Q.; Xu, J.; Yeh, M.; Yin, J.; Young, I.; Zhang, C.
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-10-20, last modified: 2019-11-03
We describe the design and assembly of the LUX-ZEPLIN experiment, a direct detection search for cosmic WIMP dark matter particles. The centerpiece of the experiment is a large liquid xenon time projection chamber sensitive to low energy nuclear recoils. Rejection of backgrounds is enhanced by a Xe skin veto detector and by a liquid scintillator Outer Detector loaded with gadolinium for efficient neutron capture and tagging. LZ is located in the Davis Cavern at the 4850' level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, USA. We describe the major subsystems of the experiment and its key design features and requirements.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.08520  [pdf] - 1988589
Spitzer Microlensing Program as a Probe for Globular Cluster Planets. Analysis of OGLE-2015-BLG-0448
Comments: ApJ submitted, 12 pages, 8 figures, 2 tabels
Submitted: 2015-12-28, last modified: 2019-10-29
The microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0448 was observed by Spitzer and lay within the tidal radius of the globular cluster NGC 6558. The event had moderate magnification and was intensively observed, hence it had the potential to probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters. We measure the proper motion of NGC 6558 ($\mu_{\rm cl}$(N,E) = (+0.36+-0.10, +1.42+-0.10) mas/yr) as well as the source and show that the lens is not a cluster member. Even though this particular event does not probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters, other potential cluster lens events can be verified using our methodology. Additionally, we find that microlens parallax measured using OGLE photometry is consistent with the value found based on the light curve displacement between Earth and Spitzer.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.01106  [pdf] - 2025924
Outflows from inflows: the nature of Bondi-like accretion
Comments: Accepted by MNRAS Letters. Animations viewable at https://trwaters.github.io/OutflowsFromInflows/
Submitted: 2019-10-02, last modified: 2019-10-21
The classic Bondi solution remains a common starting point both for studying black hole growth across cosmic time in cosmological simulations and for smaller scale simulations of AGN feedback. In nature, however, there will be inhomogenous distributions of rotational velocity and density along the outer radius ($R_o$) marking the sphere of influence of a black hole. While there have been many studies of how the Bondi solution changes with a prescribed angular momentum boundary condition, they have all assumed a constant density at $R_o$. In this Letter, we show that a non-uniform density at $R_o$ causes a meridional flow and due to conservation of angular momentum, the Bondi solution qualitatively changes into an inflow-outflow solution. Using physical arguments, we analytically identify the critical logarithmic density gradient $|\partial{\ln{\rho}}/\partial{\theta}|$ above which this change of the solution occurs. For realistic $R_o$, this critical gradient is less than 0.01 and tends to 0 as $R_o \rightarrow \infty$. We show using numerical simulations that, unlike for solutions with an imposed rotational velocity, the accretion rate for solutions under an inhomogenous density boundary condition remains constant at nearly the Bondi rate $\dot{M}_B$, while the outflow rate can greatly exceed $\dot{M}_B$.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.08554  [pdf] - 1983152
Induced metal-free star formation around a massive black hole seed
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, submitted to ApJL
Submitted: 2019-10-18
The direct formation of a massive black hole is a potential seeding mechanism of the earliest observed supermassive black holes. We investigate how the existence of a massive black hole seed impacts the ionization and thermal state of its pre-galactic host halo and subsequent star formation. We show that its X-ray radiation ionizes and heats the medium, enhancing $\rm{H}_2$ formation in shielded regions, within the nuclear region in the span of a million years. The enhanced molecular cooling triggers the formation of a $\sim 10^4~{\rm M}_\odot$ metal-free stellar cluster at a star formation efficiency of $\sim 0.1\%$ in a single event. Star formation occurs near the edges of the H II region that is partially ionized by X-rays, thus the initial size depends on the black hole properties and surrounding environment. The simulated metal-free galaxy has an initial half-light radius of $\sim 10$ pc but expands to $\sim 50$ pc after 10 million years because of the outward velocities of their birth clouds. Supernova feedback then quenches any further star formation for tens of millions of years, allowing the massive black hole to dominate the spectrum once the massive metal-free stars die.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.06113  [pdf] - 2025705
Abundance ratios in GALAH DR2 and their implications for nucleosynthesis
Comments: 27 pages, 18 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2019-08-16, last modified: 2019-10-08
Using a sample of 70 924 stars from the second data release of the GALAH optical spectroscopic survey, we construct median sequences of [X/Mg] vs. [Mg/H] for 21 elements, separating the high-$\alpha$/``low-Ia'' and low-$\alpha$/``high-Ia'' stellar populations through cuts in [Mg/Fe]. Previous work with the near-IR APOGEE survey has shown that such sequences are nearly independent of location in the Galactic disk, implying that they are determined by stellar nucleosynthesis yields with little sensitivity to other chemical evolution aspects. The separation between the two [X/Mg] sequences indicates the relative importance of prompt and delayed enrichment mechanisms, while the sequences' slopes indicate metallicity dependence of the yields. GALAH and APOGEE measurements agree for some of their common elements, but differ in sequence separation or metallicity trends for others. GALAH offers access to nine new elements. We infer that about $75\%$ of solar C comes from core collapse supernovae and $25\%$ from delayed mechanisms. We find core collapse fractions of $60-80\%$ for the Fe-peak elements Sc, Ti, Cu, and Zn, with strong metallicity dependence of the core collapse Cu yield. For the neutron capture elements Y, Ba, and La, we infer large delayed contributions with non-monotonic metallicity dependence. The separation of the [Eu/Mg] sequences implies that at least $\sim30\%$ of Eu enrichment is delayed with respect to star formation. We compare our results to predictions of several supernova and AGB yield models; C, Na, K, Mn, and Ca all show discrepancies with models that could make them useful diagnostics of nucleosynthesis physics.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.07608  [pdf] - 1983842
Low-energy modified gravity signatures on the large-scale structures
Comments: 21 figures, 22 pages
Submitted: 2019-04-16, last modified: 2019-09-30
A large number of dark energy and modified gravity models lead to the same expansion history of the Universe, hence, making it difficult to distinguish them from observations. To make the calculations transparent, we consider $f(R)$ gravity with a pressureless matter without making any assumption about the form of $f(R)$. Using the late-time expansion history realizations constructed by Shafieloo et al~\cite{2018-Shafieloo.etal-PRD}, we explicitly show for any $f(R)$ model that the Bardeen potentials $\Psi$ and $\Phi$ evolve differently. For an arbitrary $f(R)$ model that leads to late-time accelerated expansion, we explicitly show that $|\Psi + \Phi|$ and its time-derivative evolves differently than the $\Lambda$CDM model at lower redshifts. We show that the $\Psi/\Phi$ has a significant deviation from unity for larger wave-numbers. We discuss the implications of the results for the cosmological observations.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.07489  [pdf] - 2025565
The K2 Galactic Caps Project -- Going Beyond the \textit{Kepler} Field and Ageing the Galactic Disc
Comments: 17 pages, 16 figures. Accepted to MNRAS 01/08/2019. Updated manuscript
Submitted: 2019-06-18, last modified: 2019-09-28
Analyses of data from spectroscopic and astrometric surveys have led to conflicting results concerning the vertical characteristics of the Milky Way. Ages are often used to provide clarity, but typical uncertainties of $>$ 40\,\% restrict the validity of the inferences made. Using the \textit{Kepler} APOKASC sample for context, we explore the global population trends of two K2 campaign fields (3 and 6), which extend further vertically out of the Galactic plane than APOKASC. We analyse the properties of red giant stars utilising three asteroseismic data analysis methods to cross-check and validate detections. The Bayesian inference tool PARAM is used to determine the stellar masses, radii and ages. Evidence of a pronounced red giant branch bump and an [$\alpha$/Fe] dependence on the position of the red clump is observed from the radii distribution of the K2 fields. Two peaks in the age distribution centred at $\sim$5 and and $\sim$12 Gyr are found using a sample with $\sigma_{\rm{age}}$ $<$ 35\,\%. In a comparison with \textit{Kepler}, we find the older peak to be more prominent for K2. This age bimodality is also observed based on a chemical selection of low- ($\leq$ 0.1) and high- ($>$ 0.1) [$\alpha$/Fe] stars. As a function of vertical distance from the Galactic mid-plane ($|Z|$), the age distribution shows a transition from a young to old stellar population with increasing $|Z|$ for the K2 fields. Further coverage of campaign targets with high resolution spectroscopy is required to increase the yield of precise ages achievable with asteroseismology.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.06266  [pdf] - 1971453
Insights from the APOKASC Determination of the Evolutionary State of Red-Giant Stars by consolidation of different methods
Comments: 19 pages, 10 figures, accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Submitted: 2019-09-13
The internal working of low-mass stars is of great significance to both the study of stellar structure and the history of the Milky Way. Asteroseismology has the power to directly sense the internal structure of stars and allows for the determination of the evolutionary state -- i.e. has helium burning commenced or is the energy generated only by the fusion in the hydrogen-burning shell? We use observational data from red-giant stars in a combination (known as APOKASC) of asteroseismology (from the \textit{Kepler} mission) and spectroscopy (from SDSS/APOGEE). The new feature of the analysis is that the APOKASC evolutionary state determination is based on the comparison of diverse approaches to the investigation of the frequency-power spectrum. The high level of agreement between the methods is a strong validation of the approaches. Stars for which there is not a consensus view are readily identified. The comparison also facilitates the identification of unusual stars including those that show evidence for very strong coupling between p and g cavities. The comparison between the classification based on the spectroscopic data and asteroseismic data have led to a new value for the statistical uncertainty in APOGEE temperatures. These consensus evolutionary states will be used as an input for methods that derive masses and ages for these stars based on comparison of observables with stellar evolutionary models (`grid-based modeling') and as a training set for machine-learning and other data-driven methods of evolutionary state determination
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.09991  [pdf] - 1966719
First radial velocity results from the MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA)
Comments: 22 pages, 9 figures, submitted to PASP, Peer-Reviewed and Accepted
Submitted: 2019-04-22, last modified: 2019-09-11
The MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) is a dedicated observatory of four 0.7m robotic telescopes fiber-fed to a KiwiSpec spectrograph. The MINERVA mission is to discover super-Earths in the habitable zones of nearby stars. This can be accomplished with MINERVA's unique combination of high precision and high cadence over long time periods. In this work, we detail changes to the MINERVA facility that have occurred since our previous paper. We then describe MINERVA's robotic control software, the process by which we perform 1D spectral extraction, and our forward modeling Doppler pipeline. In the process of improving our forward modeling procedure, we found that our spectrograph's intrinsic instrumental profile is stable for at least nine months. Because of that, we characterized our instrumental profile with a time-independent, cubic spline function based on the profile in the cross dispersion direction, with which we achieved a radial velocity precision similar to using a conventional "sum-of-Gaussians" instrumental profile: 1.8 m s$^{-1}$ over 1.5 months on the RV standard star HD 122064. Therefore, we conclude that the instrumental profile need not be perfectly accurate as long as it is stable. In addition, we observed 51 Peg and our results are consistent with the literature, confirming our spectrograph and Doppler pipeline are producing accurate and precise radial velocities.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.03276  [pdf] - 1994057
KELT-24b: A 5M$_{\rm J}$ Planet on a 5.6 day Well-Aligned Orbit around the Young V=8.3 F-star HD 93148
Comments: 18 pages, 10 Figures, 6 Tables, Accepted to the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2019-06-07, last modified: 2019-09-03
We present the discovery of KELT-24 b, a massive hot Jupiter orbiting a bright (V=8.3 mag, K=7.2 mag) young F-star with a period of 5.6 days. The host star, KELT-24 (HD 93148), has a $T_{\rm eff}$ =$6509^{+50}_{-49}$ K, a mass of $M_{*}$ = $1.460^{+0.055}_{-0.059}$ $M_{\odot}$, radius of $R_{*}$ = $1.506\pm0.022$ $R_{\odot}$, and an age of $0.78^{+0.61}_{-0.42}$ Gyr. Its planetary companion (KELT-24 b) has a radius of $R_{\rm P}$ = $1.272\pm0.021$ $R_{\rm J}$, a mass of $M_{\rm P}$ = $5.18^{+0.21}_{-0.22}$ $M_{\rm J}$, and from Doppler tomographic observations, we find that the planet's orbit is well-aligned to its host star's projected spin axis ($\lambda$ = $2.6^{+5.1}_{-3.6}$). The young age estimated for KELT-24 suggests that it only recently started to evolve from the zero-age main sequence. KELT-24 is the brightest star known to host a transiting giant planet with a period between 5 and 10 days. Although the circularization timescale is much longer than the age of the system, we do not detect a large eccentricity or significant misalignment that is expected from dynamical migration. The brightness of its host star and its moderate surface gravity make KELT-24b an intriguing target for detailed atmospheric characterization through spectroscopic emission measurements since it would bridge the current literature results that have primarily focused on lower mass hot Jupiters and a few brown dwarfs.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.02278  [pdf] - 1938447
On the Cosmological Evolution of Long Gamma-ray Burst Properties
Comments: Accepted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-06-05, last modified: 2019-08-08
We examine the relationship between a number of long gamma-ray burst (lGRB) properties (isotropic emitted energy, luminosity, intrinsic duration, jet opening angle) and redshift. We find that even when accounting for conservative detector flux limits, there appears to be a significant correlation between isotropic equivalent energy and redshift, suggesting cosmological evolution of the lGRB progenitor. Analyzing a sub-sample of lGRBs with jet opening angle estimates, we find the beaming-corrected lGRB emitted energy does not correlate with redshift, but jet opening angle does. Additionally, we find a statistically significant anti-correlation between the intrinsic prompt duration and redshift, even when accounting for potential selection effects. We also find that - for a given redshift - isotropic energy is positively correlated with intrinsic prompt duration. None of these GRB properties appear to be correlated with galactic offset. From our selection-effect-corrected redshift distribution, we estimate a co-moving rate density for lGRBs, and compare this to the global cosmic star formation rate (SFR). We find the lGRB rate mildly exceeds the global star formation rate between a redshift of 3 and 5, and declines rapidly at redshifts above this (although we cannot constrain the lGRB rate above a redshift of about 6 due to sample incompleteness). We find the lGRB rate diverges significantly from the SFR at lower redshifts. We discuss both the correlations and lGRB rate density in terms of various lGRB progenitor models and their apparent preference for low-metallicity environments.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.06797  [pdf] - 1917087
SpecTel: A 10-12 meter class Spectroscopic Survey Telescope
Comments: Submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey as a facilities white paper
Submitted: 2019-07-15
We recommend a conceptual design study for a spectroscopic facility in the southern hemisphere comprising a large diameter telescope, fiber system, and spectrographs collectively optimized for massively-multiplexed spectroscopy. As a baseline, we propose an 11.4-meter aperture, optical spectroscopic survey telescope with a five square degree field of view. Using current technologies, the facility could be equipped with 15,000 robotically-controlled fibers feeding spectrographs over 360<lambda<1330 nm with options for fiber-fed spectrographs at high resolution and a panoramic IFU at a separate focus. This would enable transformational progress via its ability to access a larger fraction of objects from Gaia, LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST than any currently funded or planned spectroscopic facility. An ESO-sponsored study (arXiv:1701.01976) discussed the scientific potential in ambitious new spectroscopic surveys in Galactic astronomy, extragalactic astronomy, and cosmology. The US community should establish links with European and other international communities to plan for such a powerful facility and maximize the potential of large aperture multi-object spectroscopy given the considerable investment in deep imaging surveys.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.05422  [pdf] - 1915244
In Pursuit of Galactic Archaeology: Astro2020 Science White Paper
Comments: Submitted as an Astro2020 Science White Paper
Submitted: 2019-07-11
The next decade affords tremendous opportunity to achieve the goals of Galactic archaeology. That is, to reconstruct the evolutionary narrative of the Milky Way, based on the empirical data that describes its current morphological, dynamical, temporal and chemical structures. Here, we describe a path to achieving this goal. The critical observational objective is a Galaxy-scale, contiguous, comprehensive mapping of the disk's phase space, tracing where the majority of the stellar mass resides. An ensemble of recent, ongoing, and imminent surveys are working to deliver such a transformative stellar map. Once this empirical description of the dust-obscured disk is assembled, we will no longer be operationally limited by the observational data. The primary and significant challenge within stellar astronomy and Galactic archaeology will then be in fully utilizing these data. We outline the next-decade framework for obtaining and then realizing the potential of the data to chart the Galactic disk via its stars. One way to support the investment in the massive data assemblage will be to establish a Galactic Archaeology Consortium across the ensemble of stellar missions. This would reflect a long-term commitment to build and support a network of personnel in a dedicated effort to aggregate, engineer, and transform stellar measurements into a comprehensive perspective of our Galaxy.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.04388  [pdf] - 1914288
The Origin of Elements Across Cosmic Time: Astro2020 Science White Paper
Comments: Submitted as an Astro2020 Science White Paper
Submitted: 2019-07-09
The problem of the origin of the elements is a fundamental one in astronomy and one that has many open questions. Prominent examples include (1) the nature of Type Ia supernovae and the timescale of their contributions; (2) the observational identification of elements such as titanium and potassium with the $\alpha$-elements in conflict with core-collapse supernova predictions; (3) the number and relative importance of r-process sites; (4) the origin of carbon and nitrogen and the influence of mixing and mass loss in winds; and (5) the origin of the intermediate elements, such as Cu, Ge, As, and Se, that bridge the region between charged-particle and neutron-capture reactions. The next decade will bring to maturity many of the new tools that have recently made their mark, such as large-scale chemical cartography of the Milky Way and its satellites, the addition of astrometric and asteroseismic information, the detection and characterization of gravitational wave events, 3-D simulations of convection and model atmospheres, and improved laboratory measurements for transition probabilities and nuclear masses. All of these areas are key for continued improvement, and such improvement will benefit many areas of astrophysics.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.10830  [pdf] - 1907169
Origin of $\alpha$-rich young stars: clues from C, N and O
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-06-25
A small set of chemically old stars that appear young by their independently derived masses has been detected. These are so-called $\alpha$-rich young stars. For a sample of 51 red-giant stars, for which spectra are available from SDSS/APOGEE and masses are available from asteroseismic measures based on \textit{Kepler} lightcurves, we derive the C, N and O abundances through an independent analysis. These stars span a wide range of N/C surface number density ratios. We interpret the high-mass stars with low N/C as being products of mergers or mass transfer during or after first dredge up, because the dredge-up features are the same as for low-mass stars. The $\alpha$-rich young stars with high N/C follow the expected trend of N/C for their mass, and could be either genuine young stars (leaving their high [$\alpha$/Fe] unexplained) or the results of mergers on the main sequence.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09082  [pdf] - 1893254
Retired A Stars Revisited: An Updated Giant Planet Occurrence Rate as a Function of Stellar Metallicity and Mass
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ. Changes from v1 to v2: Figure 16 was updated. Changes from v2 to v3: Figure 9 was corrected. None of the results in the paper are affected
Submitted: 2018-04-24, last modified: 2019-05-31
Exoplanet surveys of evolved stars have provided increasing evidence that the formation of giant planets depends not only on stellar metallicity ([Fe/H]), but also the mass ($M_\star$). However, measuring accurate masses for subgiants and giants is far more challenging than it is for their main-sequence counterparts, which has led to recent concerns regarding the veracity of the correlation between stellar mass and planet occurrence. In order to address these concerns we use HIRES spectra to perform a spectroscopic analysis on an sample of 245 subgiants and derive new atmospheric and physical parameters. We also calculate the space velocities of this sample in a homogeneous manner for the first time. When reddening corrections are considered in the calculations of stellar masses and a -0.12 M$_{\odot}$ offset is applied to the results, the masses of the subgiants are consistent with their space velocity distributions, contrary to claims in the literature. Similarly, our measurements of their rotational velocities provide additional confirmation that the masses of subgiants with $M_\star \geq 1.6$ M$_{\odot}$ (the "Retired A Stars") have not been overestimated in previous analyses. Using these new results for our sample of evolved stars, together with an updated sample of FGKM dwarfs, we confirm that giant planet occurrence increases with both stellar mass and metallicity up to 2.0 M$_{\odot}$. We show that the probability of formation of a giant planet is approximately a one-to-one function of the total amount of metals in the protoplanetary disk $M_\star 10^{[Fe/H]}$. This correlation provides additional support for the core accretion mechanism of planet formation.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.07901  [pdf] - 1912679
Extreme Primordial Star Formation Enabled by High Redshift Quasars
Comments: 9 pages, 9 figures, 2 tables; ApJ in press
Submitted: 2018-06-20, last modified: 2019-05-20
High redshift quasars emit copious X-ray photons which heat the intergalactic medium to temperatures up to $\sim$ 10$^6$ K. At such high temperatures the primordial gas will not form stars until it is assembled into dark matter haloes with masses of up to $\sim$ 10$^{11}$ M$_{\odot}$, at which point the hot gas collapses and cools under the influence of gravity. Once this occurs, there is a massive reservoir of primordial gas from which stars can form, potentially setting the stage for the brightest Population (Pop) III starbursts in the early Universe. Supporting this scenario, recent observations of quasars at z $\sim$ 6 have revealed a lack of accompanying Lyman $\alpha$ emitting galaxies, consistent with suppression of primordial star formation in haloes with masses below $\sim$ 10$^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$. Here we model the chemical and thermal evolution of the primordial gas as it collapses into such a massive halo irradiated by a nearby quasar in the run-up to a massive Pop III starburst. We find that within $\sim$ 100 kpc of the highest redshift quasars discovered to date the Lyman-Werner flux produced in the quasar host galaxy may be high enough to stimulate the formation of a direct collapse black hole (DCBH). A survey with single pointings of the NIRCam instrument at individual known high-z quasars may be a promising strategy for finding Pop III stars and DCBHs with the James Webb Space Telescope.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.04839  [pdf] - 1867248
Astro 2020 Science White Paper: Evolved Planetary Systems around White Dwarfs
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures Science White Paper submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey
Submitted: 2019-04-09, last modified: 2019-04-12
Practically all known planet hosts will evolve into white dwarfs, and large parts of their planetary systems will survive this transition - the same is true for the solar system beyond the orbit of Mars. Spectroscopy of white dwarfs accreting planetary debris provides the most accurate insight into the bulk composition of exo-planets. Ground-based spectroscopic surveys of ~260, 000 white dwarfs detected with Gaia will identify >1000 evolved planetary systems, and high-throughput high-resolution space-based ultraviolet spectroscopy is essential to measure in detail their abundances. So far, evidence for two planetesimals orbiting closely around white dwarfs has been obtained, and their study provides important constraints on the composition and internal structure of these bodies. Major photometric and spectroscopic efforts will be necessary to assemble a sample of such close-in planetesimals that is sufficiently large to establish their properties as a population, and to deduce the architectures of the outer planetary systems from where they originated. Mid-infrared spectroscopy of the dusty disks will provide detailed mineralogical information of the debris, which, in combination with the elemental abundances measured from the white dwarf spectroscopy, will enable detailed physical modelling of the chemical, thermodynamic, and physical history of the accreted material. Flexible multi-epoch infrared observations are essential to determine the physical nature, and origin of the variability observed in many of the dusty disks. Finally, the direct detection of the outer reservoirs feeding material to the white dwarfs will require sensitive mid- and far-infrared capabilities.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.02751  [pdf] - 2000167
Discovery of a Candidate Black Hole - Giant Star Binary System in the Galactic Field
Comments: Submitted. 57 pages, 12 figures; main text and supplementary material updated
Submitted: 2018-06-07, last modified: 2019-04-05
We report the discovery of the first likely black hole in a non-interacting binary system with a field red giant. By combining radial velocity measurements from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) with photometric variability data from the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN), we identified the bright rapidly-rotating giant 2MASS J05215658+4359220 as a binary system with a massive unseen companion. Subsequent radial velocity measurements reveal a system with an orbital period of 83 days and near-zero eccentricity. The photometric variability period of the giant is consistent with the orbital period, indicative of star spots and tidal synchronization. Constraints on the giant's mass and radius from its luminosity, surface gravity, and temperature imply an unseen companion with mass of $3.3^{+2.8}_{-0.7}$ M$_\odot$, indicating a low-mass black hole or an exceedingly massive neutron star. Measurement of the astrometric binary motion by {\it Gaia} will further characterize the system. This discovery demonstrates the potential of massive spectroscopic surveys like APOGEE and all-sky, high-cadence photometric surveys like ASAS-SN to revolutionize our understanding of the compact object mass function, and to test theories of binary star evolution and the supernova mechanism.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.09205  [pdf] - 1854197
Astro2020 Science White Paper: gravity-wave asteroseismology of intermediate- and high-mass stars
Comments: 8 pages. White paper submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey
Submitted: 2019-03-21
The evolution of a star is driven by the physical processes in its interior making the theory of stellar structure and evolution the most crucial ingredient for not only stellar evolution studies, but any field of astronomy which relies on the yields along stellar evolution. High-precision time-series photometric data assembled by recent space missions revealed that current models of stellar structure and evolution show major shortcomings already in the two earliest nuclear burning phases, impacting all subsequent phases prior to the formation of the end-of-life remnant. This white paper focuses specifically on the transport of chemical elements and of angular momentum in the stellar structure and evolution models of stars born with convective core, as revealed by their gravity-mode oscillations.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.08188  [pdf] - 1853144
Astro2020 Science White Paper: Stellar Physics and Galactic Archeology using Asteroseismology in the 2020's
Comments: 11 pages, 4 figures. White paper submitted to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey
Submitted: 2019-03-19
Asteroseismology is the only observational tool in astronomy that can probe the interiors of stars, and is a benchmark method for deriving fundamental properties of stars and exoplanets. Over the coming decade, space-based and ground-based observations will provide a several order of magnitude increase of solar-like oscillators, as well as a dramatic increase in the number and quality of classical pulsator observations, providing unprecedented possibilities to study stellar physics and galactic stellar populations. In this white paper, we describe key science questions and necessary facilities to continue the asteroseismology revolution into the 2020's.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.04612  [pdf] - 1849941
Astro2020 Science White Paper: Understanding the evolution of close white dwarf binaries
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures Science White Paper submitted to Astro2020 Decadal Survey
Submitted: 2019-03-11, last modified: 2019-03-15
Interacting binaries containing white dwarfs can lead to a variety of outcomes that range from powerful thermonuclear explosions, which are important in the chemical evolution of galaxies and as cosmological distance estimators, to strong sources of low frequency gravitational wave radiation, which makes them ideal calibrators for the gravitational low-frequency wave detector LISA mission. However, current theoretical evolution models still fail to explain the observed properties of the known populations of white dwarfs in both interacting and detached binaries. Major limitations are that the existing population models have generally been developed to explain the properties of sub-samples of these systems, occupying small volumes of the vast parameter space, and that the observed samples are severely biased. The overarching goal for the next decade is to assemble a large and homogeneous sample of white dwarf binaries that spans the entire range of evolutionary states, to obtain precise measurements of their physical properties, and to further develop the theory to satisfactorily reproduce the properties of the entire population. While ongoing and future all-sky high- and low-resolution optical spectroscopic surveys allow us to enlarge the sample of these systems, high-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy is absolutely essential for the characterization of the white dwarfs in these binaries. The Hubble Space Telescope is currently the only facility that provides ultraviolet spectroscopy, and with its foreseeable demise, planning the next ultraviolet mission is of utmost urgency.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.10199  [pdf] - 1860052
Chemical Abundances of Main-Sequence, Turnoff, Subgiant and red giant Stars from APOGEE spectra II: Atomic Diffusion in M67 Stars
Comments: Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2019-02-26
Chemical abundances for 15 elements (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ni) are presented for 83 stellar members of the 4 Gyr old solar-metallicity open cluster M67. The sample contains stars spanning a wide range of evolutionary phases, from G dwarfs to red clump stars. The abundances were derived from near-IR ($\lambda$1.5 -- 1.7$\mu$m) high-resolution spectra ($R$ = 22,500) from the SDSS-IV/APOGEE survey. A 1-D LTE abundance analysis was carried out using the APOGEE synthetic spectral libraries, via chi-square minimization of the synthetic and observed spectra with the qASPCAP code. We found significant abundance differences ($\sim$0.05 -- 0.30 dex) between the M67 member stars as a function of the stellar mass (or position on the HR diagram), where the abundance patterns exhibit a general depletion (in [X/H]) in stars at the main-sequence turnoff. The amount of the depletion is different for different elements. We find that atomic diffusion models provide, in general, good agreement with the abundance trends for most chemical species, supporting recent studies indicating that measurable atomic diffusion operates in M67 stars.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.09592  [pdf] - 1838380
Constraining Metallicity-dependent Mixing and Extra Mixing using [C/N] in Alpha-Rich Field Giants
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-01-28, last modified: 2019-02-10
Internal mixing on the giant branch is an important process which affects the evolution of stars and the chemical evolution of the galaxy. While several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this mixing, better empirical constraints are necessary. Here, we use [C/N] abundances in 26097 evolved stars from the SDSS-IV/APOGEE-2 Data Release 14 to trace mixing and extra mixing in old field giants with -1.7< [Fe/H] < 0.1. We show that the APOGEE [C/N] ratios before any dredge-up occurs are metallicity dependent, but that the change in [C/N] at the first dredge-up is metallicity independent for stars above [Fe/H] ~ -1. We identify the position of the red giant branch (RGB) bump as a function of metallicity, note that a metallicity-dependent extra mixing episode takes place for low-metallicity stars ([Fe/H] <-0.4) 0.14 dex in log g above the bump, and confirm that this extra mixing is stronger at low metallicity, reaching $\Delta$ [C/N] = 0.58 dex at [Fe/H] = -1.4. We show evidence for further extra mixing on the upper giant branch, well above the bump, among the stars with [Fe/H] < -1.0. This upper giant branch mixing is stronger in the more metal-poor stars, reaching 0.38 dex in [C/N] for each 1.0 dex in log g. The APOGEE [C/N] ratios for red clump (RC) stars are significantly higher than for stars at the tip of the RGB, suggesting additional mixing processes occur during the helium flash or that unknown abundance zero points for C and N may exist among the red clump RC sample. Finally, because of extra mixing, we note that current empirical calibrations between [C/N] ratios and ages cannot be naively extrapolated for use in low-metallicity stars specifically for those above the bump in the luminosity function.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.01316  [pdf] - 1826285
A giant impact as the likely origin of different twins in the Kepler-107 exoplanet system
Comments: Published in Nature Astronomy on 4 February 2019, 35 pages including Supplementary Information material
Submitted: 2019-02-04
Measures of exoplanet bulk densities indicate that small exoplanets with radius less than 3 Earth radii ($R_\oplus$) range from low-density sub-Neptunes containing volatile elements to higher density rocky planets with Earth-like or iron-rich (Mercury-like) compositions. Such astonishing diversity in observed small exoplanet compositions may be the product of different initial conditions of the planet-formation process and/or different evolutionary paths that altered the planetary properties after formation. Planet evolution may be especially affected by either photoevaporative mass loss induced by high stellar X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) flux or giant impacts. Although there is some evidence for the former, there are no unambiguous findings so far about the occurrence of giant impacts in an exoplanet system. Here, we characterize the two innermost planets of the compact and near-resonant system Kepler-107. We show that they have nearly identical radii (about $1.5-1.6~R_\oplus$), but the outer planet Kepler-107c is more than twice as dense (about $12.6~\rm g\,cm^{-3}$) as the innermost Kepler-107b (about $5.3~\rm g\,cm^{-3}$). In consequence, Kepler-107c must have a larger iron core fraction than Kepler-107b. This imbalance cannot be explained by the stellar XUV irradiation, which would conversely make the more-irradiated and less-massive planet Kepler-107b denser than Kepler-107c. Instead, the dissimilar densities are consistent with a giant impact event on Kepler-107c that would have stripped off part of its silicate mantle. This hypothesis is supported by theoretical predictions from collisional mantle stripping, which match the mass and radius of Kepler-107c.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.07302  [pdf] - 1818822
Masses and radii for the three super-Earths orbiting GJ 9827, and implications for the composition of small exoplanets
Comments: 16 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Submitted: 2018-12-18, last modified: 2019-01-11
Super-Earths belong to a class of planet not found in the Solar System, but which appear common in the Galaxy. Given that some super-Earths are rocky, while others retain substantial atmospheres, their study can provide clues as to the formation of both rocky planets and gaseous planets, and - in particular - they can help to constrain the role of photo-evaporation in sculpting the exoplanet population. GJ 9827 is a system already known to host 3 super-Earths with orbital periods of 1.2, 3.6 and 6.2 days. Here we use new HARPS-N radial velocity measurements, together with previously published radial velocities, to better constrain the properties of the GJ 9827 planets. Our analysis can't place a strong constraint on the mass of GJ 9827 c, but does indicate that GJ 9827 b is rocky with a composition that is probably similar to that of the Earth, while GJ 9827 d almost certainly retains a volatile envelope. Therefore, GJ 9827 hosts planets on either side of the radius gap that appears to divide super-Earths into pre-dominantly rocky ones that have radii below $\sim 1.5 R_\oplus$, and ones that still retain a substantial atmosphere and/or volatile components, and have radii above $\sim 2 R_\oplus$. That the less heavily irradiated of the 3 planets still retains an atmosphere, may indicate that photoevaporation has played a key role in the evolution of the planets in this system.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.05092  [pdf] - 1830562
APOGEE [C/N] Abundances Across the Galaxy: Migration and Infall from Red Giant Ages
Comments: 15 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-12-12
We present [C/N]-[Fe/H] abundance trends from the SDSS-IV Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey, Data Release 14 (DR14), for red giant branch stars across the Milky Way Galaxy (MW, 3 kpc $<$ R $<$ 15 kpc). The carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (often expressed as [C/N]) can indicate the mass of a red giant star, from which an age can be inferred. Using masses and ages derived by Martig et al., we demonstrate that we are able to interpret the DR14 [C/N]-[Fe/H] abundance distributions as trends in age-[Fe/H] space. Our results show that an anti-correlation between age and metallicity, which is predicted by simple chemical evolution models, is not present at any Galactic zone. Stars far from the plane ($|$Z$|$ $>$ 1 kpc) exhibit a radial gradient in [C/N] ($\sim$ $-$0.04 dex/kpc). The [C/N] dispersion increases toward the plane ($\sigma_{[C/N]}$ = 0.13 at $|$Z$|$ $>$ 1 kpc to $\sigma_{[C/N]}$ = 0.18 dex at $|$Z$|$ $<$ 0.5 kpc). We measure a disk metallicity gradient for the youngest stars (age $<$ 2.5 Gyr) of $-$0.060 dex/kpc from 6 kpc to 12 kpc, which is in agreement with the gradient found using young CoRoGEE stars by Anders et al. Older stars exhibit a flatter gradient ($-$0.016 dex/kpc), which is predicted by simulations in which stars migrate from their birth radii. We also find that radial migration is a plausible explanation for the observed upturn of the [C/N]-[Fe/H] abundance trends in the outer Galaxy, where the metal-rich stars are relatively enhanced in [C/N].
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.02759  [pdf] - 1830544
The Fifteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys: First Release of MaNGA Derived Quantities, Data Visualization Tools and Stellar Library
Aguado, D. S.; Ahumada, Romina; Almeida, Andres; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Ortiz, Erik Aquino; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Aubert, Marie; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Rembold, Sandro Barboza; Barger, Kat; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bates, Dominic; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael L.; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bernardi, Mariangela; Bershady, Matthew; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Mederic; Borissova, Jura; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William Nielsen; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam; Byler, Nell; Diaz, Mariana Cano; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Sodi, Bernardo Cervantes; Chen, Yanping; Cherinka, Brian; Choi, Peter Doohyun; Chung, Haeun; Coffey, Damien; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; Covey, Kevin; Ilha, Gabriele da Silva; da Costa, Luiz; Dai, Yu Sophia; Damke, Guillermo; Darling, Jeremy; Davies, Roger; Dawson, Kyle; Agathe, Victoria de Sainte; Machado, Alice Deconto; Del Moro, Agnese; De Lee, Nathan; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Sanchez, Helena Dominguez; Donor, John; Drory, Niv; Bourboux, Helion du Mas des; Duckworth, Chris; Dwelly, Tom; Ebelke, Garrett; Emsellem, Eric; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fernandez-Trincado, Jose G.; Feuillet, Diane; Fischer, Johanna-Laina; Fleming, Scott W.; Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fu, Hai; Galbany, Lluis; Garcia-Dias, Rafael; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Oehmichen, Luis Alberto Garma; Maia, Marcio Antonio Geimba; Gil-Marin, Hector; Grabowski, Kathleen; Gu, Meng; Guo, Hong; Ha, Jaewon; Harrington, Emily; Hasselquist, Sten; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Toledo, Hector Hernandez; Hicks, Harry; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Hunt, Jason A. S.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Hector J.; Angel, Camilo Eduardo Jimenez; Johnson, Jennifer; Jones, Amy; Jonsson, Henrik; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kollmeier, Juna; Krawczyk, Coleman; Kreckel, Kathryn; Kruk, Sandor; Lacerna, Ivan; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lane, Richard R.; Law, David R.; Lee, Young-Bae; Li, Cheng; Lian, Jianhui; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Yen-Ting; Lintott, Chris; Long, Dan; Longa-Pena, Penelope; Mackereth, J. Ted; de la Macorra, Axel; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Olena; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Mariappan, Vivek; Marinelli, Mariarosa; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masseron, Thomas; Masters, Karen L.; McDermid, Richard M.; Pena, Nicolas Medina; Meneses-Goytia, Sofia; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Minniti, Dante; Minsley, Rebecca; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nascimento, Janaina Correa do; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nitschelm, Christian; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Minakata, Rene A. Ortega; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palicio, Pedro A.; Pan, Kaike; Pan, Hsi-An; Parikh, Taniya; Parker, James; Peirani, Sebastien; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Peterken, Thomas; Pinsonneault, Marc; Prakash, Abhishek; Raddick, Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogerio; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Rose, Benjamin; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Rowlands, Kate; Rubin, Kate H. R.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Sanchez-Gallego, Jose R.; Sayres, Conor; Schaefer, Adam; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Schlafly, Edward; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald; Schultheis, Mathias; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shamsi, Shoaib J.; Shao, Zhengyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shetty, Shravan; Simonian, Gregory; Smethurst, Rebecca; Sobeck, Jennifer; Souter, Barbara J.; Spindler, Ashley; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suarez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Talbot, Michael S.; Tayar, Jamie; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Unda-Sanzana, Eduardo; Valenzuela, Octavio; na, Mariana Vargas-Maga; Mata, Jose Antonio Vazquez; Wake, David; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Wild, Vivienne; Wilson, John; Woods, Emily; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun; Zinn, Joel C.; Zou, Hu
Comments: Paper to accompany DR15. 25 pages, 6 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJSS. The two papers on the MaNGA Data Analysis Pipeline (DAP, Westfall et al. and Belfiore et al., see Section 4.1.2), and the paper on Marvin (Cherinka et al., see Section 4.2) have been submitted for collaboration review and will be posted to arXiv in due course. v2 fixes some broken URLs in the PDF
Submitted: 2018-12-06, last modified: 2018-12-10
Twenty years have passed since first light for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Here, we release data taken by the fourth phase of SDSS (SDSS-IV) across its first three years of operation (July 2014-July 2017). This is the third data release for SDSS-IV, and the fifteenth from SDSS (Data Release Fifteen; DR15). New data come from MaNGA - we release 4824 datacubes, as well as the first stellar spectra in the MaNGA Stellar Library (MaStar), the first set of survey-supported analysis products (e.g. stellar and gas kinematics, emission line, and other maps) from the MaNGA Data Analysis Pipeline (DAP), and a new data visualisation and access tool we call "Marvin". The next data release, DR16, will include new data from both APOGEE-2 and eBOSS; those surveys release no new data here, but we document updates and corrections to their data processing pipelines. The release is cumulative; it also includes the most recent reductions and calibrations of all data taken by SDSS since first light. In this paper we describe the location and format of the data and tools and cite technical references describing how it was obtained and processed. The SDSS website (www.sdss.org) has also been updated, providing links to data downloads, tutorials and examples of data use. While SDSS-IV will continue to collect astronomical data until 2020, and will be followed by SDSS-V (2020-2025), we end this paper by describing plans to ensure the sustainability of the SDSS data archive for many years beyond the collection of data.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.02206  [pdf] - 1863910
The Secondary Spin Bias of Dark Matter Haloes
Comments: 11 pages, 6 figures; submitted to MNRAS, comments welcome
Submitted: 2018-12-05
We investigate the role of angular momentum in the clustering of dark matter haloes. We make use of data from two high-resolution N-body simulations spanning over four orders of magnitude in halo mass, from $10^{9.8}$ to $10^{14}\ h^{-1}\ \text{M}_\odot$. We explore the hypothesis that mass accretion in filamentary environments alters the angular momentum of a halo, thereby driving a correlation between the spin parameter $\lambda$ and the strength of clustering. However, we do not find evidence that the distribution of matter on large scales is related to the spin of haloes. We find that a halo's spin is correlated with its age, concentration, sphericity, and mass accretion rate. Removing these correlations strongly affects the strength of secondary spin bias at low halo masses. We also find that high spin haloes are slightly more likely to be found near another halo of comparable mass. These haloes that are found near a comparable mass neighbour - a \textit{twin} - are strongly spatially biased. We demonstrate that this \textit{twin bias}, along with the relationship between spin and mass accretion rates, statistically accounts for halo spin secondary bias.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.03043  [pdf] - 1859921
Retired A Stars and Their Companions VIII: 15 New Planetary Signals Around Subgiants and Transit Parameters for California Planet Search Planets with Subgiant Hosts
Comments: 30 pages, 24 figures, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal. Machine-readable tables included in source download. A coauthor was accidentally omitted in version 1. Version 2 also includes clarification on the calculated transit probabilities. Version 3 fixes small errors in Tables 3 and 5
Submitted: 2018-11-07, last modified: 2018-11-16
We present the discovery of 7 new planets and 8 planet candidates around subgiant stars, as additions to the known sample of planets around "retired A stars" (Johnson et al. 2006). Among these are the possible first 3-planet systems around subgiant stars, HD 163607 and HD 4917. Additionally, we present calculations of possible transit times, durations, depths, and probabilities for all known planets around subgiant (3 < log g < 4) stars, focused on possible transits during the TESS mission. While most have transit probabilities of 1-2%, we find that there are 3 planets with transit probabilities > 9%.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.02077  [pdf] - 1779802
Techniques for Finding Close-in, Low-mass Planets around Subgiants
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-11-05
Jupiter-mass planets with large semi-major axes ($a > 1.0$ AU) occur at a higher rate around evolved intermediate mass stars. There is a pronounced paucity of close-in ($a < 0.6$ AU), intermediate period ($5 < P < 100$ days), low-mass ($M_{\rm planet} < 0.7M_{\rm Jup} $) planets, known as the `Planet Desert'. Current radial velocity methods have yet to yield close-in, low-mass planets around these stars because the planetary signals could be hidden by the (5-10) m s$^{-1}$ radial velocity variations caused by acoustic oscillations. We find that by implementing an observing strategy of taking three observations per night separated by an optimal $\Delta t$, which is a function of the oscillation periods and amplitudes, we can average over the stellar jitter and improve our sensitivity to low-mass planets. We find $\Delta t$ can be approximated using the stellar mass and radius given by the relationship $\Delta t = $1.79 $(M/M_{\odot})^{-0.82} ~(R/R_{\odot})^{1.92}$. We test our proposed method by injecting planets into very well sampled data of a subgiant star, $\gamma$ Cep. We compare the fraction of planets recovered by our method to the fraction of planets recovered using current radial velocity observational strategies. We find that our method decreases the RMS of the stellar jitter due to acoustic oscillations by a factor of three over current single epoch observing strategies used for subgiant stars. Our observing strategy provides a means to test whether the Planet Desert extends to lower mass planets.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.01097  [pdf] - 1818730
APOGEE DR14/DR15 Abundances in the Inner Milky Way
Comments: Submitted to AAS Journals; revised after referee report
Submitted: 2018-11-02
We present an overview of the distributions of 11 elemental abundances in the Milky Way's inner regions, as traced by APOGEE stars released as part of SDSS Data Release 14/15 (DR14/DR15), including O, Mg, Si, Ca, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Na, Al, and K. This sample spans ~4000 stars with R_GC<4 kpc, enabling the most comprehensive study to date of these abundances and their variations within the innermost few kiloparsecs of the Milky Way. We describe the observed abundance patterns ([X/Fe]-[Fe/H]), compare to previous literature results and to patterns in stars at the solar Galactic radius, and discuss possible trends with DR14/DR15 effective temperatures. We find that the position of the [Mg/Fe]-[Fe/H] "knee" is nearly constant with R_GC, indicating a well-mixed star-forming medium or high levels of radial migration in the early inner Galaxy. We quantify the linear correlation between pairs of elements in different subsamples of stars and find that these relationships vary; some abundance correlations are very similar between the alpha-rich and alpha-poor stars, but others differ significantly, suggesting variations in the metallicity dependencies of certain supernova yields. These empirical trends will form the basis for more detailed future explorations and for the refinement of model comparison metrics. That the inner Milky Way abundances appear dominated by a single chemical evolutionary track and that they extend to such high metallicities underscore the unique importance of this part of the Galaxy for constraining the ingredients of chemical evolution modeling and for improving our understanding of the evolution of the Galaxy as a whole.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.00968  [pdf] - 1779596
The origin of accreted stellar halo populations in the Milky Way using APOGEE, $\textit{Gaia}$, and the EAGLE simulations
Comments: 19 Pages, 11 Figures (+4 in abstracts), Accepted for publication in MNRAS. ** Important new additions include an appendix showing numerical convergence tests, and a new figure and accompanying text demonstrating the consistency in element abundances between accreted satellites in EAGLE and the high eccentricity stars from APOGEE **
Submitted: 2018-08-02, last modified: 2018-10-30
Recent work indicates that the nearby Galactic halo is dominated by the debris from a major accretion event. We confirm that result from an analysis of APOGEE-DR14 element abundances and $\textit{Gaia}$-DR2 kinematics of halo stars. We show that $\sim$2/3 of nearby halo stars have high orbital eccentricities ($e \gtrsim 0.8$), and abundance patterns typical of massive Milky Way dwarf galaxy satellites today, characterised by relatively low [Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], [Al/Fe], and [Ni/Fe]. The trend followed by high $e$ stars in the [Mg/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane shows a change of slope at [Fe/H]$\sim-1.3$, which is also typical of stellar populations from relatively massive dwarf galaxies. Low $e$ stars exhibit no such change of slope within the observed [Fe/H] range and show slightly higher abundances of Mg, Al and Ni. Unlike their low $e$ counterparts, high $e$ stars show slightly retrograde motion, make higher vertical excursions and reach larger apocentre radii. By comparing the position in [Mg/Fe]-[Fe/H] space of high $e$ stars with those of accreted galaxies from the EAGLE suite of cosmological simulations we constrain the mass of the accreted satellite to be in the range $10^{8.5}\lesssim M_*\lesssim 10^{9}\mathrm{M_\odot}$. We show that the median orbital eccentricities of debris are largely unchanged since merger time, implying that this accretion event likely happened at $z\lesssim1.5$. The exact nature of the low $e$ population is unclear, but we hypothesise that it is a combination of $\textit{in situ}$ star formation, high $|z|$ disc stars, lower mass accretion events, and contamination by the low $e$ tail of the high $e$ population. Finally, our results imply that the accretion history of the Milky Way was quite unusual.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.12325  [pdf] - 1859910
Chemical Cartography with APOGEE: Multi-element abundance ratios
Comments: 29 pp, 22 figs, submitted to AAS journals, comments welcome
Submitted: 2018-10-29
We map the trends of elemental abundance ratios across the Galactic disk, spanning R = 3-15 kpc and midplane distance |Z|= 0-2 kpc, for 15 elements in a sample of 20,485 stars measured by the SDSS/APOGEE survey (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni). Adopting Mg rather than Fe as our reference element, and separating stars into two populations based on [Fe/Mg], we find that the median trends of [X/Mg] vs. [Mg/H] in each population are nearly independent of location in the Galaxy. The full multi-element cartography can be summarized by combining these nearly universal median sequences with our measured metallicity distribution functions and the relative proportions of the low-[Fe/Mg] (high-alpha) and high-[Fe/Mg] (low-alpha) populations, which depend strongly on R and |Z|. We interpret the median sequences with a semi-empirical "2-process" model that describes both the ratio of core collapse and Type Ia supernova contributions to each element and the metallicity dependence of the supernova yields. These observationally inferred trends can provide strong tests of supernova nucleosynthesis calculations. Our results lead to a relatively simple picture of abundance ratio variations in the Milky Way, in which the trends at any location can be described as the sum of two components with relative contributions that change systematically and smoothly across the Galaxy. Deviations from this picture and future extensions to other elements can provide further insights into the physics of stellar nucleosynthesis and unusual events in the Galaxy's history.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.08187  [pdf] - 1757275
K2-263b: A 50-day period sub-Neptune with a mass measurement using HARPS-N
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS. v2: EPIC ID changed to assigned K2 name
Submitted: 2018-08-24, last modified: 2018-09-26
This paper reports on the validation and mass measurement of K2-263b, a sub-Neptune orbiting a quiet G9V star. Using K2 data from campaigns C5 and C16, we find this planet to have a period of $50.818947\pm 0.000094$ days and a radius of $2.41\pm0.12$ R$_{\oplus}$. We followed this system with HARPS-N to obtain 67 precise radial velocities. A combined fit of the transit and radial velocity data reveals that K2-263b has a mass of $14.8\pm3.1$ M$_{\oplus}$. Its bulk density ($5.7_{-1.4}^{+1.6}$ g cm$^{-3}$) implies that this planet has a significant envelope of water or other volatiles around a rocky core. EPIC211682544b likely formed in a similar way as the cores of the four giant planets in our own Solar System, but for some reason, did not accrete much gas. The planetary mass was confirmed by an independent Gaussian process-based fit to both the radial velocities and the spectroscopic activity indicators. K2-263b belongs to only a handful of confirmed K2 exoplanets with periods longer than 40 days. It is among the longest periods for a small planet with a precisely determined mass using radial velocities.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.00449  [pdf] - 1762874
Radiation Hydrodynamical Simulations of the First Quasars
Comments: 7 pages, 7 figures. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2017-03-01, last modified: 2018-09-21
Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are the central engines of luminous quasars and are found in most massive galaxies today. But the recent discoveries of ULAS J1120+0641, a $2 \times 10^9$ M$_{\odot}$ BH at $z =$ 7.1, and ULAS J1342+0928, a $8.0 \times 10^{8}$ M$_{\odot}$ BH at $z =$ 7.5, now push the era of quasar formation up to just 690 Myr after the Big Bang. Here we report new cosmological simulations of SMBHs with X-rays fully coupled to primordial chemistry and hydrodynamics that show that J1120 and J1342 can form from direct collapse black holes (DCBHs) if their growth is fed by cold, dense accretion streams, like those thought to fuel rapid star formation in some galaxies at later epochs. Our models reproduce all of the observed properties of J1120: its mass, luminosity, and H II region as well as star formation rates and metallicities in its host galaxy. They also reproduce the dynamical mass of the innermost 1.5 kpc of its emission region recently measured by ALMA and J-band magnitudes that are in good agreement with those found by the VISTA Hemisphere Survey.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.05615  [pdf] - 1751097
Ground- and Space-based Detection of the Thermal Emission Spectrum of the Transiting Hot Jupiter KELT-2Ab
Comments: accepted to AJ
Submitted: 2018-09-14
We describe the detection of water vapor in the atmosphere of the transiting hot Jupiter KELT-2Ab by treating the star-planet system as a spectroscopic binary with high-resolution, ground-based spectroscopy. We resolve the signal of the planet's motion with deep combined flux observations of the star and the planet. In total, six epochs of Keck NIRSPEC $L$-band observations were obtained, and the full data set was subjected to a cross correlation analysis with a grid of self-consistent atmospheric models. We measure a radial projection of the Keplerian velocity, $K_P$, of 148 $\pm$ 7 km s$^{-1}$, consistent with transit measurements, and detect water vapor at 3.8$\sigma$. We combine NIRSPEC $L$-band data with $Spitzer$ IRAC secondary eclipse data to further probe the metallicity and carbon-to-oxygen ratio of KELT-2Ab's atmosphere. While the NIRSPEC analysis provides few extra constraints on the $Spitzer$ data, it does provide roughly the same constraints on metallicity and carbon-to-oxygen ratio. This bodes well for future investigations of the atmospheres of non-transiting hot Jupiters.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.07504  [pdf] - 1737992
The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: closed-loop adaptive optics while dithering
Comments: 21 pages, 19 figures, SPIE (2018) 10707-49
Submitted: 2018-08-22
The InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) is the first-light client instrument for the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS) on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). IRIS includes three natural guide star (NGS) On-Instrument Wavefront Sensors (OIWFS) to measure tip/tilt and focus errors in the instrument focal plane. NFIRAOS also has an internal natural guide star wavefront sensor, and IRIS and NFIRAOS must precisely coordinate the motions of their wavefront sensor positioners to track the locations of NGSs while the telescope is dithering (offsetting the telescope to cover more area), to avoid a costly re-acquisition time penalty. First, we present an overview of the sequencing strategy for all of the involved subsystems. We then predict the motion of the telescope during dithers based on finite-element models provided by TMT, and finally analyze latency and jitter issues affecting the propagation of position demands from the telescope control system to individual motor controllers.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.09773  [pdf] - 1743828
APOGEE Data Releases 13 and 14: Data and Analysis
Comments: 31 pages, 31 figures; Astronomical Journal in press
Submitted: 2018-07-25
Data and analysis methodology used for the SDSS/APOGEE Data Releases 13 and 14 are described, highlighting differences from the DR12 analysis presented in Holtzman (2015). Some improvement in the handling of telluric absorption and persistence is demonstrated. The derivation and calibration of stellar parameters, chemical abundances, and respective uncertainties are described, along with the ranges over which calibration was performed. Some known issues with the public data related to the calibration of the effective temperatures (DR13), surface gravity (DR13 and DR14), and C and N abundances for dwarfs (DR13 and DR14) are highlighted. We discuss how results from a data-driven technique, The Cannon (Casey 2016), are included in DR14, and compare those with results from the APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP). We describe how using The Cannon in a mode that restricts the abundance analysis of each element to regions of the spectrum with known features from that element leads to Cannon abundances can lead to significantly different results for some elements than when all regions of the spectrum are used to derive abundances.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.07945  [pdf] - 1715872
Inflation with $f(R,\phi)$ in Jordan frame
Comments: 10 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2017-05-22, last modified: 2018-07-15
We consider an $f(R)$ action that is non-minimally coupled to a massive scalar field. The model closely resembles scalar-tensor theory and by conformal transformation can be transformed to Einstein frame. To avoid the ambiguity of the frame dependence, we obtain an exact analytical solution in Jordan frame and show that the model leads to a period of accelerated expansion with an exit. Further, we compute the scalar and tensor power spectrum for the model and compare them with observations.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.11633  [pdf] - 1699839
Stellar and Planetary Characterization of the Ross 128 Exoplanetary System from APOGEE Spectra
Comments: Accepted in ApJLetters, 3 figures, 2 tables, 12 pages
Submitted: 2018-05-29, last modified: 2018-06-14
The first detailed chemical abundance analysis of the M dwarf (M4.0) exoplanet-hosting star Ross 128 is presented here, based upon near-infrared (1.5--1.7 \micron) high-resolution ($R$$\sim$22,500) spectra from the SDSS-APOGEE survey. We determined precise atmospheric parameters $T_{\rm eff}$=3231$\pm$100K, log$g$=4.96$\pm$0.11 dex and chemical abundances of eight elements (C, O, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, and Fe), finding Ross 128 to have near solar metallicity ([Fe/H] = +0.03$\pm$0.09 dex). The derived results were obtained via spectral synthesis (1-D LTE) adopting both MARCS and PHOENIX model atmospheres; stellar parameters and chemical abundances derived from the different adopted models do not show significant offsets. Mass-radius modeling of Ross 128b indicate that it lies below the pure rock composition curve, suggesting that it contains a mixture of rock and iron, with the relative amounts of each set by the ratio of Fe/Mg. If Ross 128b formed with a sub-solar Si/Mg ratio, and assuming the planet's composition matches that of the host-star, it likely has a larger core size relative to the Earth. The derived planetary parameters -- insolation flux (S$_{\rm Earth}$=1.79$\pm$0.26) and equilibrium temperature ($T_{\rm eq}$=294$\pm$10K) -- support previous findings that Ross 128b is a temperate exoplanet in the inner edge of the habitable zone.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.05489  [pdf] - 1689205
Science Impacts of the SPHEREx All-Sky Optical to Near-Infrared Spectral Survey II: Report of a Community Workshop on the Scientific Synergies Between the SPHEREx Survey and Other Astronomy Observatories
Comments: 50 pages, 24 figures, more details at http://spherex.caltech.edu
Submitted: 2018-05-14, last modified: 2018-05-24
SPHEREx is a proposed NASA MIDEX mission selected for Phase A study. SPHEREx would carry out the first all-sky spectral survey in the near infrared. At the end of its two-year mission, SPHEREx would obtain 0.75-to-5$\mu$m spectra of every 6.2 arcsec pixel on the sky, with spectral resolution R>35 and a 5-$\sigma$ sensitivity AB$>$19 per spectral/spatial resolution element. More details concerning SPHEREx are available at http://spherex.caltech.edu. The SPHEREx team has proposed three specific science investigations to be carried out with this unique data set: cosmic inflation, interstellar and circumstellar ices, and the extra-galactic background light. Though these three themes are undoubtedly compelling, they are far from exhausting the scientific output of SPHEREx. Indeed, SPHEREx would create a unique all-sky spectral database including spectra of very large numbers of astronomical and solar system targets, including both extended and diffuse sources. These spectra would enable a wide variety of investigations, and the SPHEREx team is dedicated to making the data available to the community to enable these investigations, which we refer to as Legacy Science. To that end, we have sponsored two workshops for the general scientific community to identify the most interesting Legacy Science themes and to ensure that the SPHEREx data products are responsive to their needs. In February of 2016, some 50 scientists from all fields met in Pasadena to develop these themes and to understand their implications for the SPHEREx mission. The 2016 workshop highlighted many synergies between SPHEREx and other contemporaneous astronomical missions, facilities, and databases. Consequently, in January 2018 we convened a second workshop at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge to focus specifically on these synergies. This white paper reports on the results of the 2018 SPHEREx workshop.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.09322  [pdf] - 1677757
The Fourteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and from the second phase of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment
Abolfathi, Bela; Aguado, D. S.; Aguilar, Gabriela; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Ananna, Tonima Tasnim; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Ata, Metin; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Barger, Kathleen A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Bastien, Fabienne; Bates, Dominic; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bender, Chad F.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Bershady, Matthew A.; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Mederic; Borissova, Jura; Bovy, Jo; Diaz, Christian Andres Bradna; Brandt, William Nielsen; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam J.; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolas G.; Canas, Caleb I.; Cano-Diaz, Mariana; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Casey, Andrew R.; Sodi, Bernardo Cervantes; Chen, Yanping; Cherinka, Brian; Chiappini, Cristina; Choi, Peter Doohyun; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; Nascimento, Janaina Correa do; da Costa, Luiz; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Cunha, Katia; Ilha, Gabriele da Silva; Damke, Guillermo J.; Darling, Jeremy; Davidson, James W.; Dawson, Kyle; Lizaola, Miguel Angel C. de Icaza; de la Macorra, Axel; de la Torre, Sylvain; De Lee, Nathan; Agathe, Victoria de Sainte; Machado, Alice Deconto; Dell'Agli, Flavia; Delubac, Timothee; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Donor, John; Downes, Juan Jose; Drory, Niv; Bourboux, Helion du Mas des; Duckworth, Christopher J.; Dwelly, Tom; Dyer, Jamie; Ebelke, Garrett; Eigenbrot, Arthur Davis; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Mike; Erfanianfar, Ghazaleh; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fan, Xiaohui; Alvar, Emma Fernandez; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Feuillet, Diane; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter; Fu, Hai; Chew, Yilen Gomez Maqueo; Galbany, Lluis; Perez, Ana E. Garcia; Garcia-Dias, R.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Oehmichen, Luis Alberto Garma; Gaulme, Patrick; Gelfand, Joseph; Gil-Marin, Hector; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Goddard, Daniel; Hernandez, Jonay I. Gonzalez; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul J.; Grier, Catherine J.; Gueguen, Alain; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Hekker, Saskia; Hernandez, Jesus; Toledo, Hector Hernandez; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon; Hou, Jiamin; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Hunt, Jason A. S.; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Angel, Camilo Eduardo Jimenez; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jonsson, Henrik; Jullo, Eric; Khan, Fahim Sakil; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Charles C.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Law, David R.; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Young-Bae; Li, Hongyu; Li, Cheng; Lian, Jianhui; Liang, Yu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Mackereth, J. Ted; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio Antonio Geimba; Majewski, Steven; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Mariappan, Vivek; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masseron, Thomas; Masters, Karen L.; McDermid, Richard M.; McGreer, Ian D.; Melendez, Matthew; Meneses-Goytia, Sofia; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Minchev, Ivan; Minniti, Dante; Mueller, Eva-Maria; Muller-Sanchez, Francisco; Muna, Demitri; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; O'Connell, Julia; Oelkers, Ryan James; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Ortiz, Erik Aquino; Osorio, Yeisson; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palicio, Pedro Alonso; Pan, Hsi-An; Pan, Kaike; Parikh, Taniya; Paris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Pisani, Alice; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Queiroz, Anna Barbara de Andrade; Raddick, M. Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Rembold, Sandro Barboza; Richstein, Hannah; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogerio; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Torres, Sergio Rodriguez; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Ruiz, Jose; Salvato, Mara; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Almeida, Jorge Sanchez; Sanchez-Gallego, Jose R.; Rojas, Felipe Antonio Santana; Santiago, Basilio Xavier; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Schlafly, Edward; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Schuster, William J.; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serenelli, Aldo; Shen, Shiyin; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Simon, Joshua D.; Skrutskie, Mike; Slosar, Anze; Smethurst, Rebecca; Smith, Verne; Sobeck, Jennifer; Somers, Garrett; Souter, Barbara J.; Souto, Diogo; Spindler, Ashley; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stello, Dennis; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy; Suarez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Szigeti, Laszlo; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Talbot, Michael S.; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Teske, Johanna; Thaker, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas W.; Urry, Meg; Valenzuela, O.; Bosch, Remco van den; Vargas-Gonzalez, Jaime; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wilcots, Eric; Wild, Vivienne; Williams, Rob A.; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yeche, Christophe; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Cheng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun; Zinn, Joel C.; Zou, Hu
Comments: SDSS-IV collaboration alphabetical author data release paper. DR14 happened on 31st July 2017. 19 pages, 5 figures. Accepted by ApJS on 28th Nov 2017 (this is the "post-print" and "post-proofs" version; minor corrections only from v1, and most of errors found in proofs corrected)
Submitted: 2017-07-28, last modified: 2018-05-06
The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) has been in operation since July 2014. This paper describes the second data release from this phase, and the fourteenth from SDSS overall (making this, Data Release Fourteen or DR14). This release makes public data taken by SDSS-IV in its first two years of operation (July 2014-2016). Like all previous SDSS releases, DR14 is cumulative, including the most recent reductions and calibrations of all data taken by SDSS since the first phase began operations in 2000. New in DR14 is the first public release of data from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS); the first data from the second phase of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-2), including stellar parameter estimates from an innovative data driven machine learning algorithm known as "The Cannon"; and almost twice as many data cubes from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) survey as were in the previous release (N = 2812 in total). This paper describes the location and format of the publicly available data from SDSS-IV surveys. We provide references to the important technical papers describing how these data have been taken (both targeting and observation details) and processed for scientific use. The SDSS website (www.sdss.org) has been updated for this release, and provides links to data downloads, as well as tutorials and examples of data use. SDSS-IV is planning to continue to collect astronomical data until 2020, and will be followed by SDSS-V.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09983  [pdf] - 1799829
The Second APOKASC Catalog: The Empirical Approach
Comments: 29 pages, 26 figures. Submitted ApJSupp. Comments welcome. For access to the main data table (Table 5) use https://www.dropbox.com/s/k33td8ukefwy5tv/APOKASC2_Table5.txt?dl=0; for access to the individual pipeline values (Table 6) use https://www.dropbox.com/s/vl9s2p3obftrv8m/APOKASC2_Table6.txt?dl=0
Submitted: 2018-04-26
We present a catalog of stellar properties for a large sample of 6676 evolved stars with APOGEE spectroscopic parameters and \textit{Kepler} asteroseismic data analyzed using five independent techniques. Our data includes evolutionary state, surface gravity, mean density, mass, radius, age, and the spectroscopic and asteroseismic measurements used to derive them. We employ a new empirical approach for combining asteroseismic measurements from different methods, calibrating the inferred stellar parameters, and estimating uncertainties. With high statistical significance, we find that asteroseismic parameters inferred from the different pipelines have systematic offsets that are not removed by accounting for differences in their solar reference values. We include theoretically motivated corrections to the large frequency spacing ($\Delta \nu$) scaling relation, and we calibrate the zero point of the frequency of maximum power ($\nu_{\rm max}$) relation to be consistent with masses and radii for members of star clusters. For most targets, the parameters returned by different pipelines are in much better agreement than would be expected from the pipeline-predicted random errors, but 22\% of them had at least one method not return a result and a much larger measurement dispersion. This supports the usage of multiple analysis techniques for asteroseismic stellar population studies. The measured dispersion in mass estimates for fundamental calibrators is consistent with our error model, which yields median random and systematic mass uncertainties for RGB stars of order 4\%. Median random and systematic mass uncertainties are at the 9\% and 8\% level respectively for RC stars.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09189  [pdf] - 1672065
Stellar multiplicity in high-resolution spectroscopic surveys. I. Application to APOGEE subgiants and giants
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures, submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2018-04-24
Many field stars reside in binaries, and the analysis and interpretation of photometric and spectroscopic surveys must take this into account. We have developed a model to predict how binaries influence the scientific results inferred from large spectroscopic surveys. Based on the rapid binary evolution code BSE, it allows us to model a representative population of binaries and generate synthetic survey observations. We describe this model in detail, and apply it to the radial velocity variation of subgiant and giant stars in the Galactic disc, as observed by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. APOGEE provides an excellent data set for testing our binary models since a large fraction of the stars have been observed multiple times. By comparing our model to the APOGEE observations we constrain the initial binary fraction of solar-metallicity stars in the sample to be $f_{\rm b,0}=0.35\pm0.01$, in line with the solar neighbourhood. We find that the binary fraction is higher at lower metallicities, consistent with other observational studies. Our model matches the shape of the high-velocity scatter in APOGEE, which suggests that most velocity variability above 0.5 km/s comes from binaries. Our exploration of binary initial properties shows that APOGEE is mostly sensitive to binaries with periods between 3 and 3000 years, and is largely insensitive to the detailed properties of the population. We can, however, rule out a population where the mass of the lower-mass star is drawn from the IMF independently of its companion.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.11219  [pdf] - 1658306
Infrared Observations of Southern Classical Novae 1991 to 1992
Comments: 47 pages, 23 figures
Submitted: 2018-03-29
We report on a program to monitor classical novae (CNe) to determine if they produced dust in the ejecta created by their outbursts. Of the ten systems we followed, five produced dust. We also present limited infrared and optical spectroscopy of these objects. We present a complete $JHKLM$ spectrum for V992 Sco. V992 Sco was one of the brightest CNe in the infrared of all time, and our $M$-band spectrum of this object shows strong emission from the CO fundamental. We believe this to be the first, and only, spectroscopic observation of this feature in a CNe.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.08820  [pdf] - 1674979
An accurate mass determination for Kepler-1655b, a moderately-irradiated world with a significant volatile envelope
Comments: 21 pages, 14 figures, 4 tables; accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2018-03-23
We present the confirmation of a small, moderately-irradiated (F = 155 +/- 7 Fearth) Neptune with a substantial gas envelope in a P=11.8728787+/-0.0000085-day orbit about a quiet, Sun-like G0V star Kepler-1655. Based on our analysis of the Kepler light curve, we determined Kepler-1655b's radius to be 2.213+/-0.082 Rearth. We acquired 95 high-resolution spectra with TNG/HARPS-N, enabling us to characterize the host star and determine an accurate mass for Kepler-1655b of 5.0+3.1/-2.8 Mearth via Gaussian-process regression. Our mass determination excludes an Earth-like composition with 98\% confidence. Kepler-1655b falls on the upper edge of the evaporation valley, in the relatively sparsely occupied transition region between rocky and gas-rich planets. It is therefore part of a population of planets that we should actively seek to characterize further.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.07559  [pdf] - 1822758
KELT-22Ab: A Massive Hot Jupiter Transiting a Near Solar Twin
Comments: 14 pages, 13 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2018-03-20
We present the discovery of KELT-22Ab, a hot Jupiter from the KELT-South survey. KELT-22Ab transits the moderately bright ($V\sim 11.1$) Sun-like G2V star TYC 7518-468-1. The planet has an orbital period of $P = 1.3866529 \pm 0.0000027 $ days, a radius of $R_{P} = 1.285_{-0.071}^{+0.12}~R_{J}$, and a relatively large mass of $M_{P} = 3.47_{-0.14}^{+0.15}~ M_{J}$. The star has $R_{\star} = 1.099_{-0.046}^{+0.079}~ R_{\odot}$, $M_{\star} = 1.092_{-0.041}^{+0.045}~ M_{\odot}$, ${T_{\rm eff}\,} = 5767_{-49}^{+50}~$ K, ${\log{g_\star}} = 4.393_{-0.060}^{+0.039}~$ (cgs), and [m/H] = $+0.259_{-0.083}^{+0.085}~$, and thus, other than its slightly super-solar metallicity, appears to be a near solar twin. Surprisingly, KELT-22A exhibits kinematics and a Galactic orbit that are somewhat atypical for thin disk stars. Nevertheless, the star is rotating quite rapidly for its estimated age, shows evidence of chromospheric activity, and is somewhat metal rich. Imaging reveals a slightly fainter companion to KELT-22A that is likely bound, with a projected separation of 6\arcsec ($\sim$1400 AU). In addition to the orbital motion caused by the transiting planet, we detect a possible linear trend in the radial velocity of KELT-22A suggesting the presence of another relatively nearby body that is perhaps non-stellar. KELT-22Ab is highly irradiated (as a consequence of the small semi-major axis of $a/R_{\star} = 4.97$), and is mildly inflated. At such small separations, tidal forces become significant. The configuration of this system is optimal for measuring the rate of tidal dissipation within the host star. Our models predict that, due to tidal forces, the semi-major axis of KELT-22Ab is decreasing rapidly, and is thus predicted to spiral into the star within the next Gyr.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.04461  [pdf] - 1670655
Chemical Abundances of Main-Sequence, Turn-off, Subgiant and red giant Stars from APOGEE spectra I: Signatures of Diffusion in the Open Cluster M67
Comments: Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2018-03-12
Detailed chemical abundance distributions for fourteen elements are derived for eight high-probability stellar members of the solar metallicity old open cluster M67 with an age of $\sim$4 Gyr. The eight stars consist of four pairs, with each pair occupying a distinct phase of stellar evolution: two G-dwarfs, two turnoff stars, two G-subgiants, and two red clump K-giants. The abundance analysis uses near-IR high-resolution spectra ($\lambda$1.5 -- 1.7$\mu$m) from the APOGEE survey and derives abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, and Fe. Our derived stellar parameters and metallicity for 2M08510076+113115 suggest that this star is a solar-twin, exhibiting abundance differences relative to the Sun of $\leq$ 0.04 dex for all elements. Chemical homogeneity is found within each class of stars ($\sim$0.02 dex), while significant abundance variations ($\sim$0.05 -- 0.20 dex) are found across the different evolutionary phases; the turnoff stars typically have the lowest abundances, while the red clump tend to have the largest. Non-LTE corrections to the LTE-derived abundances are unlikely to explain the differences. A detailed comparison of the derived Fe, Mg, Si, and Ca abundances with recently published surface abundances from stellar models that include chemical diffusion, provides a good match between the observed and predicted abundances as a function of stellar mass. Such agreement would indicate the detection of chemical diffusion processes in the stellar members of M67.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.08320  [pdf] - 1717019
Eyes on K2-3: A system of three likely sub-Neptunes characterized with HARPS-N and HARPS
Comments: 14 pages, 15 figures, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2018-02-22
M-dwarf stars are promising targets for identifying and characterizing potentially habitable planets. K2-3 is a nearby (45 pc), early-type M dwarf hosting three small transiting planets, the outermost of which orbits close to the inner edge of the stellar (optimistic) habitable zone. The K2-3 system is well suited for follow-up characterization studies aimed at determining accurate masses and bulk densities of the three planets. Using a total of 329 radial velocity measurements collected over 2.5 years with the HARPS-N and HARPS spectrographs and a proper treatment of the stellar activity signal, we aim to improve measurements of the masses and bulk densities of the K2-3 planets. We use our results to investigate the physical structure of the planets. We analyse radial velocity time series extracted with two independent pipelines by using Gaussian process regression. We adopt a quasi-periodic kernel to model the stellar magnetic activity jointly with the planetary signals. We use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the robustness of our mass measurements of K2-3\,c and K2-3\,d, and to explore how additional high-cadence radial velocity observations might improve them. Despite the stellar activity component being the strongest signal present in the radial velocity time series, we are able to derive masses for both planet b ($M_{\rm b}=6.6\pm1.1$ $M_{\rm \oplus}$) and planet c ($M_{\rm c}=3.1^{+1.3}_{-1.2}$ $M_{\rm \oplus}$). The Doppler signal due to K2-3\,d remains undetected, likely because of its low amplitude compared to the radial velocity signal induced by the stellar activity. The closeness of the orbital period of K2-3\,d to the stellar rotation period could also make the detection of the planetary signal complicated. [...]
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.04042  [pdf] - 1634237
The California-Kepler Survey. IV. Metal-rich Stars Host a Greater Diversity of Planets
Comments: 32 pages, 15 figures, 9 tables, accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2017-12-11, last modified: 2018-01-21
Probing the connection between a star's metallicity and the presence and properties of any associated planets offers an observational link between conditions during the epoch of planet formation and mature planetary systems. We explore this connection by analyzing the metallicities of Kepler target stars and the subset of stars found to host transiting planets. After correcting for survey incompleteness, we measure planet occurrence: the number of planets per 100 stars with a given metallicity $M$. Planet occurrence correlates with metallicity for some, but not all, planet sizes and orbital periods. For warm super-Earths having $P = 10-100$ days and $R_P = 1.0-1.7~R_E$, planet occurrence is nearly constant over metallicities spanning $-$0.4 dex to +0.4 dex. We find 20 warm super-Earths per 100 stars, regardless of metallicity. In contrast, the occurrence of warm sub-Neptunes ($R_P = 1.7-4.0~R_E$) doubles over that same metallicity interval, from 20 to 40 planets per 100 stars. We model the distribution of planets as $d f \propto 10^{\beta M} d M$, where $\beta$ characterizes the strength of any metallicity correlation. This correlation steepens with decreasing orbital period and increasing planet size. For warm super-Earths $\beta = -0.3^{+0.2}_{-0.2}$, while for hot Jupiters $\beta = +3.4^{+0.9}_{-0.8}$. High metallicities in protoplanetary disks may increase the mass of the largest rocky cores or the speed at which they are assembled, enhancing the production of planets larger than 1.7 $R_E$. The association between high metallicity and short-period planets may reflect disk density profiles that facilitate the inward migration of solids or higher rates of planet-planet scattering.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.06117  [pdf] - 1767359
Origins of Hot Jupiters
Comments: Submitted to ARAA. Comments/suggestions welcome
Submitted: 2018-01-18
Hot Jupiters were the first exoplanets to be discovered around main sequence stars and astonished us with their close-in orbits. They are a prime example of how exoplanets have challenged our textbook, solar-system inspired story of how planetary systems form and evolve. More than twenty years after the discovery of the first hot Jupiter, there is no consensus on their predominant origin channel. Three classes of hot Jupiter creation hypotheses have been proposed: in situ formation, disk migration, and high eccentricity tidal migration. Although no origin channel alone satisfactorily explains all the evidence, two major origins channels together plausibly account for properties of hot Jupiters themselves and their connections to other exoplanet populations.
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.00660  [pdf] - 1641321
Stellar Multiplicity Meets Stellar Evolution And Metallicity: The APOGEE View
Comments: 13 pages, 13 figures, replaced with version accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2017-11-02, last modified: 2018-01-15
We use the multi-epoch radial velocities acquired by the APOGEE survey to perform a large scale statistical study of stellar multiplicity for field stars in the Milky Way, spanning the evolutionary phases between the main sequence and the red clump. We show that the distribution of maximum radial velocity shifts (\drvm) for APOGEE targets is a strong function of \logg, with main sequence stars showing \drvm\ as high as $\sim$300 \kms, and steadily dropping down to $\sim$30 \kms\ for \logg$\sim$0, as stars climb up the Red Giant Branch (RGB). Red clump stars show a distribution of \drvm\ values comparable to that of stars at the tip of the RGB, implying they have similar multiplicity characteristics. The observed attrition of high \drvm\ systems in the RGB is consistent with a lognormal period distribution in the main sequence and a multiplicity fraction of 0.35, which is truncated at an increasing period as stars become physically larger and undergo mass transfer after Roche Lobe Overflow during H shell burning. The \drvm\ distributions also show that the multiplicity characteristics of field stars are metallicity dependent, with metal-poor ([Fe/H]$\lesssim-0.5$) stars having a multiplicity fraction a factor 2-3 higher than metal-rich ([Fe/H]$\gtrsim0.0$) stars. This has profound implications for the formation rates of interacting binaries observed by astronomical transient surveys and gravitational wave detectors, as well as the habitability of circumbinary planets.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.09847  [pdf] - 1634177
Confirming chemical clocks: asteroseismic age dissection of the Milky Way disk(s)
Comments: 15 pages, 16 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2017-10-26, last modified: 2018-01-15
Investigations of the origin and evolution of the Milky Way disk have long relied on chemical and kinematic identification of its components to reconstruct our Galactic past. Difficulties in determining precise stellar ages have restricted most studies to small samples, normally confined to the solar neighbourhood. Here we break this impasse with the help of asteroseismic inference and perform a chronology of the evolution of the disk throughout the age of the Galaxy. We chemically dissect the Milky Way disk population using a sample of red giant stars spanning out to 2~kpc in the solar annulus observed by the {\it Kepler} satellite, with the added dimension of asteroseismic ages. Our results reveal a clear difference in age between the low- and high-$\alpha$ populations, which also show distinct velocity dispersions in the $V$ and $W$ components. We find no tight correlation between age and metallicity nor [$\alpha$/Fe] for the high-$\alpha$ disk stars. Our results indicate that this component formed over a period of more than 2~Gyr with a wide range of [M/H] and [$\alpha$/Fe] independent of time. Our findings show that the kinematic properties of young $\alpha$-rich stars are consistent with the rest of the high-$\alpha$ population and different from the low-$\alpha$ stars of similar age, rendering support to their origin being old stars that went through a mass transfer or stellar merger event, making them appear younger, instead of migration of truly young stars formed close to the Galactic bar.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.03502  [pdf] - 1637648
An ultra-short period rocky super-Earth with a secondary eclipse and a Neptune-like companion around K2-141
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures., accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2018-01-10
Ultra-short period (USP) planets are a class of low mass planets with periods shorter than one day. Their origin is still unknown, with photo-evaporation of mini-Neptunes and in-situ formation being the most credited hypotheses. Formation scenarios differ radically in the predicted composition of USP planets, it is therefore extremely important to increase the still limited sample of USP planets with precise and accurate mass and density measurements. We report here the characterization of an USP planet with a period of 0.28 days around K2-141 (EPIC 246393474), and the validation of an outer planet with a period of 7.7 days in a grazing transit configuration. We derived the radii of the planets from the K2 light curve and used high-precision radial velocities gathered with the HARPS-N spectrograph for mass measurements. For K2-141b we thus inferred a radius of $1.51\pm0.05~R_\oplus$ and a mass of $5.08\pm0.41~M_\oplus$, consistent with a rocky composition and lack of a thick atmosphere. K2-141c is likely a Neptune-like planet, although due to the grazing transits and the non-detection in the RV dataset, we were not able to put a strong constraint on its density. We also report the detection of secondary eclipses and phase curve variations for K2-141b. The phase variation can be modeled either by a planet with a geometric albedo of $0.30 \pm 0.06$ in the Kepler bandpass, or by thermal emission from the surface of the planet at $\sim$3000K. Only follow-up observations at longer wavelengths will allow us to distinguish between these two scenarios.
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.07010  [pdf] - 1608469
KELT-19Ab: A P~4.6 Day Hot Jupiter Transiting a Likely Am Star with a Distant Stellar Companion
Comments: Published in The Astronomical Journal. 18 pages, 14 figures, 6 tables
Submitted: 2017-09-20, last modified: 2017-12-22
We present the discovery of the giant planet KELT-19Ab, which transits the moderately bright $(\mathrm{V} \sim 9.9)$ A8V star TYC 764-1494-1 with an orbital period of 4.61 days. We confirm the planetary nature of the companion via a combination of radial velocities, which limit the mass to $< 4.1\,\mathrm{M_J}$ $(3\sigma)$, and a clear Doppler tomography signal, which indicates a retrograde projected spin-orbit misalignment of $\lambda = -179.7^{+3.7}_{-3.8}$ degrees. Global modeling indicates that the $\rm{T_{eff}} =7500 \pm 110\,\mathrm{K}$ host star has $\mathrm{M_*} = 1.62^{+0.25}_{-0.20}\,\mathrm{M_\odot}$ and $\mathrm{R_*} = 1.83 \pm 0.10\,\mathrm{R_\odot}$. The planet has a radius of $\mathrm{R_P}=1.91 \pm 0.11\,\mathrm{R_J}$ and receives a stellar insolation flux of $\sim 3.2\times 10^{9}\,\mathrm{erg\,s^{-1}\,cm^{-2}}$, leading to an inferred equilibrium temperature of $\rm{T_{EQ}} = \sim 1935\,\rm{K}$ assuming zero albedo and complete heat redistribution. With a $v\sin{I_*}=84.8\pm 2.0\,\mathrm{km\,s^{-1}}$, the host is relatively slowly rotating compared to other stars with similar effective temperatures, and it appears to be enhanced in metallic elements but deficient in calcium, suggesting that it is likely an Am star. KELT-19A would be the first detection of an Am host of a transiting planet of which we are aware. Adaptive optics observations of the system reveal the existence of a companion with late G9V/early K1V spectral type at a projected separation of $\approx 160\,\mathrm{AU}$. Radial velocity measurements indicate that this companion is bound. Most Am stars are known to have stellar companions, which are often invoked to explain the relatively slow rotation of the primary. In this case, the stellar companion is unlikely to have caused the tidal braking of the primary. However, it may have emplaced the transiting planetary companion via the Kozai-Lidov mechanism.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.03234  [pdf] - 1590994
SDSS-V: Pioneering Panoptic Spectroscopy
Comments: 23-page summary of the current status of SDSS-V. See also http://www.sdss.org/future/. SDSS-V is currently seeking institutional and individual members -- join us!
Submitted: 2017-11-08
SDSS-V will be an all-sky, multi-epoch spectroscopic survey of over six million objects. It is designed to decode the history of the Milky Way, trace the emergence of the chemical elements, reveal the inner workings of stars, and investigate the origin of planets. It will also create an integral-field spectroscopic map of the gas in the Galaxy and the Local Group that is 1,000x larger than the current state of the art and at high enough spatial resolution to reveal the self-regulation mechanisms of galactic ecosystems. SDSS-V will pioneer systematic, spectroscopic monitoring across the whole sky, revealing changes on timescales from 20 minutes to 20 years. The survey will thus track the flickers, flares, and radical transformations of the most luminous persistent objects in the universe: massive black holes growing at the centers of galaxies. The scope and flexibility of SDSS-V will be unique among extant and future spectroscopic surveys: it is all-sky, with matched survey infrastructures in both hemispheres; it provides near-IR and optical multi-object fiber spectroscopy that is rapidly reconfigurable to serve high target densities, targets of opportunity, and time-domain monitoring; and it provides optical, ultra-wide-field integral field spectroscopy. SDSS-V, with its programs anticipated to start in 2020, will be well-timed to multiply the scientific output from major space missions (e.g., TESS, Gaia, eROSITA) and ground-based projects. SDSS-V builds on the 25-year heritage of SDSS's advances in data analysis, collaboration infrastructure, and product deliverables. The project is now refining its science scope, optimizing the survey strategies, and developing new hardware that builds on the SDSS-IV infrastructure. We present here an overview of the current state of these developments as we seek to build our worldwide consortium of institutional and individual members.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.06858  [pdf] - 1605007
The First APOKASC Catalog of Kepler Dwarf and Subgiant Stars
Comments: 38 pages, 24 figures, 8 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJS
Submitted: 2017-10-18, last modified: 2017-11-02
(Abridged) We present the first APOKASC catalog of spectroscopic and asteroseismic data for 415 dwarfs and subgiants. Asteroseismic data have been obtained by Kepler in short cadence. The spectroscopic parameters are based on spectra taken as part of APOGEE and correspond to DR13 of SDSS. We analyze our data using two Teff scales, the spectroscopic values from DR13 and those derived from SDSS griz photometry. We use the differences in our results arising from these choices as a test of systematic Teff, and find that they can lead to significant differences in the derived stellar properties. Determinations of surface gravity ($\log{g}$), mean density ($\rho$), radius ($R$), mass ($M$), and age ($\tau$) for the whole sample have been carried out with stellar grid-based modeling. We have assessed random and systematic error sources in the spectroscopic and seismic data, as well as in the grid-based modeling determination of the stellar quantities in the catalog. We provide stellar properties for both Teff scales. The median combined (random and systematic) uncertainties are 2% (0.01 dex; $\log{g}$), 3.4% ($\rho$), 2.6% ($R$), 5.1% ($M$), and 19% ($\tau$) for the photometric Teff scale and 2% ($\log{g}$), 3.5% ($\rho$), 2.7% ($R$), 6.3% ($M$), and 23% ($\tau$) for the spectroscopic scale. Comparisons with stellar quantities in the catalog by Chaplin et al.(2014) highlight the importance of metallicity measurements for determining stellar parameters accurately. We compare our results with those from other sources, including stellar radii determined from TGAS parallaxes and asteroseismic analyses based on individual frequencies. We find a very good agreement in all cases. Comparisons give strong support to the determination of stellar quantities based on global seismology, a relevant result for future missions such as TESS and PLATO. Table 5 corrected (wrongly listed SDSS Teff before).
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.08620  [pdf] - 1590190
Retrieval of Water Vapor Column Abundance and Aerosol Properties from ChemCam Passive Sky Spectroscopy
Comments: 64 pages with embedded figures; this is the accepted version of the manuscript; the meta-data version of the abstract has been shorted to meet arXiv rules
Submitted: 2017-10-24, last modified: 2017-10-29
We derive water vapor column abundances and aerosol properties from Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) ChemCam passive mode observations of scattered sky light. Each ChemCam passive sky observation acquires spectra at two different elevation angles. We fit these spectra with a discrete-ordinates multiple scattering radiative transfer model, using the correlated-k approximation for gas absorption bands. The retrieval proceeds by first fitting the continuum of the ratio of the two elevation angles to solve for aerosol properties, and then fitting the continuum-removed ratio to solve for gas abundances. The final step of the retrieval makes use of the observed CO2 absorptions and the known CO2 abundance to correct the retrieved water vapor abundance for the effects of the vertical distribution of scattering aerosols and to derive an aerosol scale height parameter. The ChemCam-retrieved water abundances show, with only a few exceptions, the same seasonal behavior and the same timing of seasonal minima and maxima as the TES, CRISM, and REMS-H data sets that we compare them to. However ChemCam-retrieved water abundances are generally lower than zonal and regional scale from-orbit water vapor data, while at the same time being significantly larger than pre-dawn REMS-H abundances. Pending further analysis of REMS-H volume mixing ratio uncertainties, the differences between ChemCam and REMS-H pre-dawn mixing ratios appear to be much too large to be explained by large scale circulations and thus they tend to support the hypothesis of substantial diurnal interactions of water vapor with the surface. Our preliminary aerosol results, meanwhile, show the expected seasonal pattern in dust particle size but also indicate a surprising inter-annual increase in water-ice cloud opacities.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.00026  [pdf] - 1593660
Precise Masses in the WASP-47 System
Comments: 15 pages, 3 figures, 3 tables. Accepted in AJ
Submitted: 2017-09-29
We present precise radial velocity observations of WASP-47, a star known to host a hot Jupiter, a distant Jovian companion, and, uniquely, two additional transiting planets in short-period orbits: a super-Earth in a ~19 hour orbit, and a Neptune in a ~9 day orbit. We analyze our observations from the HARPS-N spectrograph along with previously published data to measure the most precise planet masses yet for this system. When combined with new stellar parameters and reanalyzed transit photometry, our mass measurements place strong constraints on the compositions of the two small planets. We find unlike most other ultra-short-period planets, the inner planet, WASP-47 e, has a mass (6.83 +/- 0.66 Me) and radius (1.810 +/- 0.027 Re) inconsistent with an Earth-like composition. Instead, WASP-47 e likely has a volatile-rich envelope surrounding an Earth-like core and mantle. We also perform a dynamical analysis to constrain the orbital inclination of WASP-47 c, the outer Jovian planet. This planet likely orbits close to the plane of the inner three planets, suggesting a quiet dynamical history for the system. Our dynamical constraints also imply that WASP-47 c is much more likely to transit than a geometric calculation would suggest. We calculate a transit probability for WASP-47 c of about 10%, more than an order of magnitude larger than the geometric transit probability of 0.6%.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.00076  [pdf] - 1593661
The discovery and mass measurement of a new ultra-short-period planet: EPIC~228732031b
Comments: 24 pages, 14 figures, accepted to AJ
Submitted: 2017-09-29
We report the discovery of a new ultra-short-period planet and summarize the properties of all such planets for which the mass and radius have been measured. The new planet, EPIC~228732031b, was discovered in {\it K2} Campaign 10. It has a radius of 1.81$^{+0.16}_{-0.12}~R_{\oplus}$ and orbits a G dwarf with a period of 8.9 hours. Radial velocities obtained with Magellan/PFS and TNG/HARPS-N show evidence for stellar activity along with orbital motion. We determined the planetary mass using two different methods: (1) the "floating chunk offset" method, based only on changes in velocity observed on the same night, and (2) a Gaussian process regression based on both the radial-velocity and photometric time series. The results are consistent and lead to a mass measurement of $6.5 \pm 1.6~M_{\oplus}$, and a mean density of $6.0^{+3.0}_{-2.7}$~g~cm$^{-3}$.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.04163  [pdf] - 1602530
K2-106, a system containing a metal-rich planet and a planet of lower density
Comments: 11 pages with 9 figures, accepted by A&A, Sep 8, 2017
Submitted: 2017-05-11, last modified: 2017-09-26
Planets in the mass range from 2 to 15 MEarth are very diverse. Some of them have low densities, while others are very dense. By measuring the masses and radii, the mean densities, structure, and composition of the planets are constrained. These parameters also give us important information about their formation and evolution, and about possible processes for atmospheric loss.We determined the masses, radii, and mean densities for the two transiting planets orbiting K2-106. The inner planet has an ultra-short period of 0.57 days. The period of the outer planet is 13.3 days.Although the two planets have similar masses, their densities are very different. For K2-106b we derive Mb=8.36-0.94+0.96 MEarh, Rb=1.52+/-0.16 REarth, and a high density of 13.1-3.6+5.4 gcm-3. For K2-106c, we find Mc=5.8-3.0+3.3 MEarth, Rc=2.50-0.26+0.27 REarth and a relatively low density of 2.0-1.1+1.6 gcm-3.Since the system contains two planets of almost the same mass, but different distances from the host star, it is an excellent laboratory to study atmospheric escape. In agreement with the theory of atmospheric-loss processes, it is likely that the outer planet has a hydrogen-dominated atmosphere. The mass and radius of the inner planet is in agreement with theoretical models predicting an iron core containing 80+20-30% of its mass. Such a high metal content is surprising, particularly given that the star has an ordinary (solar) metal abundance. We discuss various possible formation scenarios for this unusual planet.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.02013  [pdf] - 1604725
The Thirteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-IV Survey MApping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory
SDSS Collaboration; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott; Andrews, Brett H.; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barbuy, Beatriz; Barger, Kat; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Basu, Sarbani; Bates, Dominic; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Baumgarten, Falk; Baur, Julien; Bautista, Julian; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bershady, Matthew; de Lis, Sara Bertran; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Borissova, J.; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William Nielsen; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolas G.; Chavez, Hugo Orlando Camacho; Diaz, M. Cano; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Chen, Yanping; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Croft, Rupert; Cunha, Katia; da Costa, Luiz; Ilha, Gabriele da Silva; Darling, Jeremy; Davidson, James W.; Dawson, Kyle; De Lee, Nathan; de la Macorra, Axel; de la Torre, Sylvain; Machado, Alice Deconto; Delubac, Timothee; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Donor, John; Downes, Juan Jose; Drory, Niv; Bourboux, Helion du Mas des; Du, Cheng; Dwelly, Tom; Ebelke, Garrett; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Escoffier, Stephanie; Evans, Michael L.; Falcon-Barroso, Jesus; Fan, Xiaohui; Favole, Ginevra; Fernandez-Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Feuillet, Diane; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter; Fu, Hai; Gao, Yang; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Perez, Ana E. Garcia; Garcia, Rafael A.; Garcia-Dias, R.; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Junqiang; Geisler, Douglas; Marin, Hector Gil; Gillespie, Bruce; Girardi, Leo; Goddard, Daniel; Chew, Yilen Gomez Maqueo; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul; Grier, Catherine J.; Grier, Thomas; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Matt; Harding, Paul; Harley, R. E.; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Hekker, Saskia; Toledo, Hector Hernandez; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Holzer, Parker H.; Hu, Jian; Huber, Daniel; Hutchinson, Timothy Alan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Hector J.; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivory, KeShawn; Jaehnig, Kurt; Jensen, Trey W.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jullo, Eric; Kallinger, T.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Law, David R.; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Leauthaud, Alexie; Li, Cheng; Li, Ran; Li, Chen; Li, Niu; Liang, Fu-Heng; Liang, Yu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Lin; Lin, Yen-Ting; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; MacDonald, Nicholas; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mackereth, J. Ted; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio Antonio-Geimba; Maiolino, Roberto; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Olena; Mallmann, Nicolas Dullius; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Valpuesta, Inma Martinez; Masters, Karen L.; Mathur, Savita; McGreer, Ian D.; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Miglio, Andrea; Minchev, Ivan; Molaverdikhani, Karan; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Mosser, Benoit; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; O'Connell, Julia; Oravetz, Audrey; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Paris, Isabelle; Peacock, John A.; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Percival, Jeffrey W.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Pisani, Alice; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Jones, Natalie; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Raichoor, Anand; Rembold, Sandro Barboza; Reyna, A. M.; Rich, James; Richstein, Hannah; Ridl, Jethro; Riffel, Rogerio; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Rodrigues, Thaise S.; Roe, Natalie; Lopes, A. Roman; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Sanchez-Gallego, Jose R.; Santiago, Basilio Xavier; Schiavon, Ricardo; Schimoia, Jaderson S.; Schlafly, Eddie; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schoenrich, Ralph; Schultheis, Mathias; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serenelli, Aldo; Sesar, Branimir; Shao, Zhengyi; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Michael; Smith, Verne V.; Sobeck, Jennifer; Somers, Garrett; Souto, Diogo; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stello, Dennis; Bergmann, Thaisa Storchi; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suarez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas; Trump, Jonathan R.; Unda-Sanzana, Eduardo; Valenzuela, O.; Bosch, Remco van den; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vivek, M.; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Yuting; Wang, Enci; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wilcots, Eric; Wild, Vivienne; Williams, Rob A.; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yeche, Christophe; Yuan, Fang-Ting; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Cheng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun; Zinn, Joel C.; Zou, Hu
Comments: Full information on DR13 available at http://www.sdss.org. Comments welcome to spokesperson@sdss.org. To be published in ApJS
Submitted: 2016-08-05, last modified: 2017-09-25
The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in July 2014. It pursues three core programs: APOGEE-2, MaNGA, and eBOSS. In addition, eBOSS contains two major subprograms: TDSS and SPIDERS. This paper describes the first data release from SDSS-IV, Data Release 13 (DR13), which contains new data, reanalysis of existing data sets and, like all SDSS data releases, is inclusive of previously released data. DR13 makes publicly available 1390 spatially resolved integral field unit observations of nearby galaxies from MaNGA, the first data released from this survey. It includes new observations from eBOSS, completing SEQUELS. In addition to targeting galaxies and quasars, SEQUELS also targeted variability-selected objects from TDSS and X-ray selected objects from SPIDERS. DR13 includes new reductions of the SDSS-III BOSS data, improving the spectrophotometric calibration and redshift classification. DR13 releases new reductions of the APOGEE-1 data from SDSS-III, with abundances of elements not previously included and improved stellar parameters for dwarf stars and cooler stars. For the SDSS imaging data, DR13 provides new, more robust and precise photometric calibrations. Several value-added catalogs are being released in tandem with DR13, in particular target catalogs relevant for eBOSS, TDSS, and SPIDERS, and an updated red-clump catalog for APOGEE. This paper describes the location and format of the data now publicly available, as well as providing references to the important technical papers that describe the targeting, observing, and data reduction. The SDSS website, http://www.sdss.org, provides links to the data, tutorials and examples of data access, and extensive documentation of the reduction and analysis procedures. DR13 is the first of a scheduled set that will contain new data and analyses from the planned ~6-year operations of SDSS-IV.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.00155  [pdf] - 1586604
Target Selection for the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 Survey
Comments: 19 pages, 6 figures. Accepted to AJ
Submitted: 2017-08-01, last modified: 2017-09-18
APOGEE-2 is a high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopic survey observing roughly 300,000 stars across the entire sky. It is the successor to APOGEE and is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). APOGEE-2 is expanding upon APOGEE's goals of addressing critical questions of stellar astrophysics, stellar populations, and Galactic chemodynamical evolution using (1) an enhanced set of target types and (2) a second spectrograph at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. APOGEE-2 is targeting red giant branch (RGB) and red clump (RC) stars, RR Lyrae, low-mass dwarf stars, young stellar objects, and numerous other Milky Way and Local Group sources across the entire sky from both hemispheres. In this paper, we describe the APOGEE-2 observational design, target selection catalogs and algorithms, and the targeting-related documentation included in the SDSS data releases.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.07820  [pdf] - 1579762
Planetary Candidates from the First Year of the K2 Mission
Comments: Accepted by ApJS. 23 pages, 4 figures, 5 tables. v2 fixes an error in Equation 3
Submitted: 2015-11-24, last modified: 2017-09-15
The Kepler Space Telescope is currently searching for planets transiting stars along the ecliptic plane as part of its extended K2 mission. We processed the publicly released data from the first year of K2 observations (Campaigns 0, 1, 2, and 3) and searched for periodic eclipse signals consistent with planetary transits. Out of 59,174 targets we searched, we detect 234 planetary candidates around 208 stars. These candidates range in size from gas giants to smaller than the Earth, and range in orbital periods from hours to over a month. We conducted initial reconnaissance spectroscopy of 68 of the brighter candidate host stars, and present high resolution optical spectra for these stars. We make all of our data products, including light curves, spectra, and vetting diagnostics available to users online.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.06348  [pdf] - 1736178
Stellar multiplicity in the Milky Way Galaxy
Comments: 2 pages, 1 figure, to appear in the proceedings of the IAU Symposium 334 "Rediscovering our Galaxy", Potsdam, 10-14 July 2017, eds. C. Chiappini, I. Minchev, E. Starkenburg, M. Valentini
Submitted: 2017-08-21
We present our models of the effect of binaries on high-resolution spectroscopic surveys. We want to determine how many binary stars will be observed, whether unresolved binaries will contaminate measurements of chemical abundances, and how we can use spectroscopic surveys to better constrain the population of binary stars in the Galaxy. Using a rapid binary-evolution algorithm that enables modelling of the most complex binary systems we generate a series of large binary populations in the Galactic disc and evaluate the results. As a first application we use our model to study the binary fraction in APOGEE giants. We find tentative evidence for a change in binary fraction with metallicity.
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.05960  [pdf] - 1736166
The age and abundance structure of the stellar populations in the central sub-kpc of the Milky Way
Comments: 4 pages, contributed talk at the IAU Symposium 334 "Rediscovering our Galaxy" in Potsdam, July 10-14, 2017
Submitted: 2017-07-19
The four main findings about the age and abundance structure of the Milky Way bulge based on microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars are: (1) a wide metallicity distribution with distinct peaks at [Fe/H]=-1.09, -0.63, -0.20, +0.12, +0.41; (2) a high fraction of intermediate-age to young stars where at [Fe/H]>0 more than 35 % are younger than 8 Gyr, (3) several episodes of significant star formation in the bulge 3, 6, 8, and 11 Gyr ago; (4) the `knee' in the alpha-element abundance trends of the sub-solar metallicity bulge appears to be located at a slightly higher [Fe/H] (about 0.05 to 0.1 dex) than in the local thick disk.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.02971  [pdf] - 1581450
Chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge as traced by microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars. VI. Age and abundance structure of the stellar populations in the central sub-kpc of the Milky Way
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-02-09, last modified: 2017-07-10
We present a detailed elemental abundance study of 90 F and G dwarf, turn-off and subgiant stars in the Galactic bulge. Based on high-resolution spectra acquired during gravitational microlensing events, stellar ages and abundances for 11 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Zn, Y and Ba) have been determined. We find that the Galactic bulge has a wide metallicity distribution with significant peaks at [Fe/H]=-1.09, -0.63, -0.20, +0.12, +0.41. We also find a high fraction of intermediate-age to young stars: at [Fe/H]>0 more than 35 % are younger than 8 Gyr. For [Fe/H]<-0.5 most stars are 10 Gyr or older. We have also identified several episodes when significant star formation in the bulge happened: 3, 6, 8, and 12 Gyr ago. We further find that the "knee" in the alpha-element abundance trends of the sub-solar metallicity bulge is located at about 0.1 dex higher [Fe/H] than in the local thick disk. The Galactic bulge has complex age and abundance properties that appear to be tightly connected to the main Galactic stellar populations. In particular, the peaks in the metallicity distribution, the star formation episodes, and the abundance trends, show similarities with the properties of the Galactic thin and thick disks. At the same time there are additional components not seen outside the bulge region, and that most likely can be associated with the Galactic bar. For instance, the star formation rate appears to have been slightly faster in the bulge than in the local thick disk, which most likely is an indication of the denser stellar environment closer to the Galactic centre. Our results strengthen the observational evidence that support the idea of a secular origin for the Galactic bulge, formed out of the other main Galactic stellar populations present in the central regions of our Galaxy.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.01534  [pdf] - 1585565
Detection of Water Vapor in the Thermal Spectrum of the Non-Transiting Hot Jupiter upsilon Andromedae b
Comments: Accepted to AJ
Submitted: 2017-07-05
The upsilon Andromedae system was the first multi-planet system discovered orbiting a main sequence star. We describe the detection of water vapor in the atmosphere of the innermost non-transiting gas giant ups~And~b by treating the star-planet system as a spectroscopic binary with high-resolution, ground-based spectroscopy. We resolve the signal of the planet's motion and break the mass-inclination degeneracy for this non-transiting planet via deep combined flux observations of the star and the planet. In total, seven epochs of Keck NIRSPEC $L$ band observations, three epochs of Keck NIRSPEC short wavelength $K$ band observations, and three epochs of Keck NIRSPEC long wavelength $K$ band observations of the ups~And~system were obtained. We perform a multi-epoch cross correlation of the full data set with an atmospheric model. We measure the radial projection of the Keplerian velocity ($K_P$ = 55 $\pm$ 9 km/s), true mass ($M_b$ = 1.7 $^{+0.33}_{-0.24}$ $M_J$), and orbital inclination \big($i_b$ = 24 $\pm$ 4$^{\circ}$\big), and determine that the planet's opacity structure is dominated by water vapor at the probed wavelengths. Dynamical simulations of the planets in the ups~And~system with these orbital elements for ups~And~b show that stable, long-term (100 Myr) orbital configurations exist. These measurements will inform future studies of the stability and evolution of the ups~And~system, as well as the atmospheric structure and composition of the hot Jupiter.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.10282  [pdf] - 1585370
Stellar Chemical Clues As To The Rarity of Exoplanetary Tectonics
Comments: Submitted. v2: fixed typo in abstract. 18 pages, 7 figures, 1 Table
Submitted: 2017-06-30, last modified: 2017-07-02
Earth's tectonic processes regulate the formation of continental crust, control its unique deep water and carbon cycles, and are vital to its surface habitability. A major driver of steady-state plate tectonics on Earth is the sinking of the cold subducting plate into the underlying mantle. This sinking is the result of the combined effects of the thermal contraction of the lithosphere and of metamorphic transitions within the basaltic oceanic crust and lithospheric mantle. The latter of these effects is dependent on the bulk composition of the planet, e.g., the major, terrestrial planet-building elements Mg, Si, Fe, Ca, Al, and Na, which vary in abundance across the Galaxy. We present thermodynamic phase-equilibria calculations of planetary differentiation to calculate both melt composition and mantle mineralogy, and show that a planet's refractory and moderately-volatile elemental abundances control a terrestrial planet's likelihood to produce mantle-derived, melt-extracted crusts that sink. Those planets forming with a higher concentration of Si and Na abundances are less likely to undergo sustained tectonics compared to the Earth. We find only 1/3 of the range of stellar compositions observed in the Galaxy is likely to host planets able to sustain density-driven tectonics compared to the Sun/Earth. Systems outside of this compositional range are less likely to produce planets able to tectonically regulate their climate and may be inhospitable to life as we know it.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.00052  [pdf] - 1581688
Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Mapping the Milky Way, Nearby Galaxies, and the Distant Universe
Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Abolfathi, Bela; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Alonso-García, Javier; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett; Aquino-Ortíz, Erik; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barger, Kathleen A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Bates, Dominic; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Médéric; Borissova, Jura; Bosch, Remco van den; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam J.; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cappellari, Michele; Carigi, Maria Leticia Delgado; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Carrera, Ricardo; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Chew, Yilen Gómez Maqueo; Chiappini, Cristina; Choi, Peter Doohyun; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comparat, Johan; da Costa, Luiz; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Cuadra, Daniel Garrido; Cunha, Katia; Damke, Guillermo J.; Darling, Jeremy; Davies, Roger; Dawson, Kyle; de la Macorra, Axel; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Di Mille, Francesco; Diamond-Stanic, Aleks; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Donor, John; Downes, Juan José; Drory, Niv; Bourboux, Hélion du Mas des; Duckworth, Christopher J.; Dwelly, Tom; Dyer, Jamie; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Mike; Escoffier, Stephanie; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Feuillet, Diane K.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Fredrickson, Alexander; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbany, Lluís; Garcia-Dias, R.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Gaulme, Patrick; Geisler, Doug; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Goddard, Daniel; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul J.; Grier, Catherine J.; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hahn, ChangHoon; Hall, Matthew; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Fred; Hernández, Jonay I. Gonzalez; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Holzer, Parker H.; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Héctor J.; Ilha, Gabriele da Silva; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivory, KeShawn; Jackson, Kelly; Jensen, Trey W.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jönsson, Henrik; Jullo, Eric; Kamble, Vikrant; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Klaene, Mark; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Law, David R.; Lazarz, Daniel; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Liang, Fu-Heng; Li, Cheng; LI, Hongyu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Yen-Ting; de Lis, Sara Bertran; Liu, Chao; Lizaola, Miguel Angel C. de Icaza; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; MacDonald, Nicholas K.; Machado, Alice Deconto; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio Antonio Geimba; Maiolino, Roberto; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, Arturo; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McDermid, Richard M.; McGrath, Brianne; McGreer, Ian D.; Peña, Nicolás Medina; Melendez, Matthew; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Minchev, Ivan; Minniti, Dante; Miyaji, Takamitsu; More, Surhud; Mulchaey, John; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Muna, Demitri; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Nascimento, Janaina Correa do; Negrete, Alenka; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Ntelis, Pierros; O'Connell, Julia E.; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palicio, Pedro Alonso; Pan, Kaike; Parikh, Taniya; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patten, Alim Y.; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Pisani, Alice; Poleski, Radosław; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Queiroz, Anna Bárbara de Andrade; Raddick, M. Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Rembold, Sandro Barboza; Richstein, Hannah; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Roman-Lopes, A.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Rosado, Margarita; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Rykoff, Eli S.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Aguado, David Sánchez; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Santana, Felipe A.; Santiago, Basílio Xavier; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schimoia, Jaderson da Silva; Schlafly, Edward F.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schuster, William J.; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shao, Zhengyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Simon, Joshua D.; Skinner, Danielle; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sobreira, Flavia; Somers, Garrett; Souto, Diogo; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan; Stauffer, Fritz; Steinmetz, Matthias; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suárez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Suzuki, Nao; Szigeti, Laszlo; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Teske, Johanna; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Toledo, Hector Hernandez; de la Torre, Sylvain; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas W.; Valenzuela, Octavio; Valpuesta, Inma Martinez; Vargas-González, Jaime; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vivek, M.; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wild, Vivienne; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yèche, Christophe; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zoccali, Manuela; Zou, Hu
Comments: Published in Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2017-02-28, last modified: 2017-06-29
We describe the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV), a project encompassing three major spectroscopic programs. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2) is observing hundreds of thousands of Milky Way stars at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio in the near-infrared. The Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey is obtaining spatially-resolved spectroscopy for thousands of nearby galaxies (median redshift of z = 0.03). The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) is mapping the galaxy, quasar, and neutral gas distributions between redshifts z = 0.6 and 3.5 to constrain cosmology using baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions, and the shape of the power spectrum. Within eBOSS, we are conducting two major subprograms: the SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources (SPIDERS), investigating X-ray AGN and galaxies in X-ray clusters, and the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), obtaining spectra of variable sources. All programs use the 2.5-meter Sloan Foundation Telescope at Apache Point Observatory; observations there began in Summer 2014. APOGEE-2 also operates a second near-infrared spectrograph at the 2.5-meter du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, with observations beginning in early 2017. Observations at both facilities are scheduled to continue through 2020. In keeping with previous SDSS policy, SDSS-IV provides regularly scheduled public data releases; the first one, Data Release 13, was made available in July 2016.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.10375  [pdf] - 1582244
The California-Kepler Survey. III. A Gap in the Radius Distribution of Small Planets
Comments: Paper III in the California-Kepler Survey series, accepted to the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2017-03-30, last modified: 2017-06-16
The size of a planet is an observable property directly connected to the physics of its formation and evolution. We used precise radius measurements from the California-Kepler Survey (CKS) to study the size distribution of 2025 $\textit{Kepler}$ planets in fine detail. We detect a factor of $\geq$2 deficit in the occurrence rate distribution at 1.5-2.0 R$_{\oplus}$. This gap splits the population of close-in ($P$ < 100 d) small planets into two size regimes: R$_P$ < 1.5 R$_{\oplus}$ and R$_P$ = 2.0-3.0 R$_{\oplus}$, with few planets in between. Planets in these two regimes have nearly the same intrinsic frequency based on occurrence measurements that account for planet detection efficiencies. The paucity of planets between 1.5 and 2.0 R$_{\oplus}$ supports the emerging picture that close-in planets smaller than Neptune are composed of rocky cores measuring 1.5 R$_{\oplus}$ or smaller with varying amounts of low-density gas that determine their total sizes.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.10400  [pdf] - 1582247
The California-Kepler Survey. I. High Resolution Spectroscopy of 1305 Stars Hosting Kepler Transiting Planets
Comments: 20 pages, 19 figures, accepted for publication in AJ; a full version of Table 5 is included as tab_cks.csv and tab_cks.tex
Submitted: 2017-03-30, last modified: 2017-06-16
The California-Kepler Survey (CKS) is an observational program to improve our knowledge of the properties of stars found to host transiting planets by NASA's Kepler Mission. The improvement stems from new high-resolution optical spectra obtained using HIRES at the W. M. Keck Observatory. The CKS stellar sample comprises 1305 stars classified as Kepler Objects of Interest, hosting a total of 2075 transiting planets. The primary sample is magnitude-limited (Kp < 14.2) and contains 960 stars with 1385 planets. The sample was extended to include some fainter stars that host multiple planets, ultra short period planets, or habitable zone planets. The spectroscopic parameters were determined with two different codes, one based on template matching and the other on direct spectral synthesis using radiative transfer. We demonstrate a precision of 60 K in effective temperature, 0.10 dex in surface gravity, 0.04 dex in [Fe/H], and 1.0 km/s in projected rotational velocity. In this paper we describe the CKS project and present a uniform catalog of spectroscopic parameters. Subsequent papers in this series present catalogs of derived stellar properties such as mass, radius and age; revised planet properties; and statistical explorations of the ensemble. CKS is the largest survey to determine the properties of Kepler stars using a uniform set of high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. The HIRES spectra are available to the community for independent analyses.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.10402  [pdf] - 1582248
The California-Kepler Survey. II. Precise Physical Properties of 2025 Kepler Planets and Their Host Stars
Comments: 13 pages, 4 figures, 4 tables, accepted for publication in AJ; full versions of tables 3 and 4 are included
Submitted: 2017-03-30, last modified: 2017-06-16
We present stellar and planetary properties for 1305 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) hosting 2025 planet candidates observed as part of the California-Kepler Survey. We combine spectroscopic constraints, presented in Paper I, with stellar interior modeling to estimate stellar masses, radii, and ages. Stellar radii are typically constrained to 11%, compared to 40% when only photometric constraints are used. Stellar masses are constrained to 4%, and ages are constrained to 30%. We verify the integrity of the stellar parameters through comparisons with asteroseismic studies and Gaia parallaxes. We also recompute planetary radii for 2025 planet candidates. Because knowledge of planetary radii is often limited by uncertainties in stellar size, we improve the uncertainties in planet radii from typically 42% to 12%. We also leverage improved knowledge of stellar effective temperature to recompute incident stellar fluxes for the planets, now precise to 21%, compared to a factor of two when derived from photometry.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.01892  [pdf] - 1584322
Three's Company: An additional non-transiting super-Earth in the bright HD 3167 system, and masses for all three planets
Comments: 22 pages, 14 figures, 5 tables. Submitted to AJ March 3rd, 2017. Accepted April 28th, 2017. In press
Submitted: 2017-06-06
HD 3167 is a bright (V = 8.9), nearby K0 star observed by the NASA K2 mission (EPIC 220383386), hosting two small, short-period transiting planets. Here we present the results of a multi-site, multi-instrument radial velocity campaign to characterize the HD 3167 system. The masses of the transiting planets are 5.02+/-0.38 MEarth for HD 3167 b, a hot super-Earth with a likely rocky composition (rho_b = 5.60+2.15-1.43 g/cm^3), and 9.80+1.30-1.24 MEarth for HD 3167 c, a warm sub-Neptune with a likely substantial volatile complement (rho_c = 1.97+0.94-0.59 g/cm^3). We explore the possibility of atmospheric composition analysis and determine that planet c is amenable to transmission spectroscopy measurements, and planet b is a potential thermal emission target. We detect a third, non-transiting planet, HD 3167 d, with a period of 8.509+/-0.045 d (between planets b and c) and a minimum mass of 6.90+/-0.71 MEarth. We are able to constrain the mutual inclination of planet d with planets b and c: we rule out mutual inclinations below 1.3 degrees as we do not observe transits of planet d. From 1.3-40 degrees, there are viewing geometries invoking special nodal configurations which result in planet d not transiting some fraction of the time. From 40-60 degrees, Kozai-Lidov oscillations increase the system's instability, but it can remain stable for up to 100Myr. Above 60 degrees, the system is unstable. HD 3167 promises to be a fruitful system for further study and a preview of the many exciting systems expected from the upcoming NASA TESS mission.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.08605  [pdf] - 1566795
Effects of binary stellar populations on direct collapse black hole formation
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures. accepted MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-09-27, last modified: 2017-04-24
The critical Lyman--Werner flux required for direct collapse blackholes (DCBH) formation, or J$_{crit}$, depends on the shape of the irradiating spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs employed thus far have been representative of {{realistic}} single stellar populations. We study the effect of binary stellar populations on the formation of DCBH, as a result of their contribution to the Lyman--Werner radiation field. Although binary populations with ages $>$ 10 Myr yield a larger LW photon output, we find that the corresponding values of J$_{crit}$ can be up to 100 times higher than single stellar populations. We attribute this to the shape of the binary SEDs as they produce a sub--critical rate of H$^-$ photodetaching 0.76 eV photons as compared to single stellar populations, reaffirming the role that H$^-$ plays in DCBH formation. This further corroborates the idea that DCBH formation is better understood in terms of a critical region in the H$_2$--H$^-$ photo--destruction rate parameter space, rather than a single value of LW flux.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.00407  [pdf] - 1566876
Metallicity evolution of direct collapse black hole hosts: CR7 as a case study
Comments: 6 pages, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2017-02-01, last modified: 2017-04-24
In this study we focus on the $z\sim6.6$ Lyman-$\alpha$ CR7 consisting of clump A that is host to a potential direct collapse black hole (DCBH), and two metal enriched star forming clumps B and C. In contrast to claims that signatures of metals rule out the existence of DCBHs, we show that metal pollution of A from star forming clumps clumps B and C is inevitable, and that A can form a DCBH well before its metallicity exceeds the critical threshold of $10^{-5}-10^{-6}\ \rm Z_{\odot}$. Assuming metal mixing happens instantaneously, we derive the metallicity of A based on the star formation history of B and C. We find that treating a final accreting black hole of $10^6-10^7\ \rm M_{\odot}$ in A for nebular emission already pushes its $H_{160}$ - [3.6] and [3.6]-[4.5] colours into the 3$\sigma$ limit of observations. Hence, we show that the presence of metals in DCBH hosts is inevitable, and that it is the coevolution of the LW radiation field and metals originating from neighbouring galaxies that governs DCBH formation in a neighbouring {initially} pristine atomic cooling haloes.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.5267  [pdf] - 1566736
The First Billion Years project: birthplaces of direct collapse black holes
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, accepted MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-03-20, last modified: 2017-04-24
We investigate the environment in which direct-collapse black holes may form by analysing a cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation that is part of the First Billion Years project. This simulation includes the most relevant physical processes leading to direct collapse of haloes, most importantly, molecular hydrogen depletion by dissociation of $H_2$ and $H^-$ from the evolving Lyman-Werner radiation field. We selected a sample of pristine atomic cooling haloes that have never formed stars in their past, have not been polluted with heavy elements and are cooling predominantly via atomic hydrogen lines. Amongst them we identified six haloes that could potentially harbour massive seed black holes formed via direct collapse (with masses in the range of $10^{4-6} M_{sun}$). These potential hosts of direct-collapse black holes form as satellites and are found within 15 physical kpc of proto-galaxies, with stellar masses in the range $10^{5-7} M_{sun}$ and maximal star formation rates of 0.1 Msun/yr over the past 5 Myr, and are exposed to the highest flux of Lyman-Werner radiation emitted from the neighbouring galaxies. It is the proximity to these proto-galaxies that differentiates these haloes from rest of the sample.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.01794  [pdf] - 1582391
Weighing in on the masses of retired A stars with asteroseismology: K2 observations of the exoplanet-host star HD 212771
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS; 10 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2017-04-06
Doppler-based planet surveys point to an increasing occurrence rate of giant planets with stellar mass. Such surveys rely on evolved stars for a sample of intermediate-mass stars (so-called retired A stars), which are more amenable to Doppler observations than their main-sequence progenitors. However, it has been hypothesised that the masses of subgiant and low-luminosity red-giant stars targeted by these surveys --- typically derived from a combination of spectroscopy and isochrone fitting --- may be systematically overestimated. Here, we test this hypothesis for the particular case of the exoplanet-host star HD 212771 using K2 asteroseismology. The benchmark asteroseismic mass ($1.45^{+0.10}_{-0.09}\:\text{M}_{\odot}$) is significantly higher than the value reported in the discovery paper ($1.15\pm0.08\:\text{M}_{\odot}$), which has been used to inform the stellar mass-planet occurrence relation. This result, therefore, does not lend support to the above hypothesis. Implications for the fates of planetary systems are sensitively dependent on stellar mass. Based on the derived asteroseismic mass, we predict the post-main-sequence evolution of the Jovian planet orbiting HD 212771 under the effects of tidal forces and stellar mass loss.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.01164  [pdf] - 1574718
The Correlation Between Mixing Length and Metallicity on the Giant Branch: Implications for Ages in the Gaia Era
Comments: 13 pages, 10 figures. Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. For a brief video discussing key results from this paper see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cV_0AhPAIRo . The data and models used in this paper are available at http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~tayar/MixingLength.htm
Submitted: 2017-04-04
In the updated APOGEE-Kepler catalog, we have asteroseismic and spectroscopic data for over 3000 first ascent red giants. Given the size and accuracy of this sample, these data offer an unprecedented test of the accuracy of stellar models on the post-main-sequence. When we compare these data to theoretical predictions, we find a metallicity dependent temperature offset with a slope of around 100 K per dex in metallicity. We find that this effect is present in all model grids tested and that theoretical uncertainties in the models, correlated spectroscopic errors, and shifts in the asteroseismic mass scale are insufficient to explain this effect. Stellar models can be brought into agreement with the data if a metallicity dependent convective mixing length is used, with $ \Delta\alpha_{\rm ML, YREC} \sim 0.2$ per dex in metallicity, a trend inconsistent with the predictions of three dimensional stellar convection simulations. If this effect is not taken into account, isochrone ages for red giants from the Gaia data will be off by as much as a factor of 2 even at modest deviations from solar metallicity ([Fe/H]=$-$0.5).
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.06885  [pdf] - 1571060
The Kepler-19 system: a thick-envelope super-Earth with two Neptune-mass companions characterized using Radial Velocities and Transit Timing Variations
Comments: Accepted by AJ, 15 pages, 10 figures, 6 tables. Mass-Radius diagram for Exoplanets and code available at https://github.com/LucaMalavolta and https://github.com/lucaborsato
Submitted: 2017-03-20
We report a detailed characterization of the Kepler-19 system. This star was previously known to host a transiting planet with a period of 9.29 days, a radius of 2.2 R$_\oplus$ and an upper limit on the mass of 20 M$_\oplus$. The presence of a second, non-transiting planet was inferred from the transit time variations (TTVs) of Kepler-19b, over 8 quarters of Kepler photometry, although neither mass nor period could be determined. By combining new TTVs measurements from all the Kepler quarters and 91 high-precision radial velocities obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph, we measured through dynamical simulations a mass of $8.4 \pm 1.6$ M$_\oplus$ for Kepler-19b. From the same data, assuming system coplanarity, we determined an orbital period of 28.7 days and a mass of $13.1 \pm 2.7$ M$_\oplus$ for Kepler-19c and discovered a Neptune-like planet with a mass of $20.3 \pm 3.4$ M$_\oplus$ on a 63 days orbit. By comparing dynamical simulations with non-interacting Keplerian orbits, we concluded that neglecting interactions between planets may lead to systematic errors that could hamper the precision in the orbital parameters when the dataset spans several years. With a density of $4.32 \pm 0.87$ g cm$^{-3}$ ($0.78 \pm 0.16$ $\rho_\oplus$) Kepler-19b belongs to the group of planets with a rocky core and a significant fraction of volatiles, in opposition to low-density planets characterized by transit-time variations only and the increasing number of rocky planets with Earth-like density. Kepler-19 joins the small number of systems that reconcile transit timing variation and radial velocity measurements.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.00780  [pdf] - 1580521
Enhanced direct collapse due to Lyman alpha feedback
Comments: 7 pages, 6 figures, 1 table; recommended by editor for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2016-11-02, last modified: 2017-02-27
We assess the impact of trapped Lyman alpha cooling radiation on the formation of direct collapse black holes (DCBHs). We apply a one-zone chemical and thermal evolution model, accounting for the photodetachment of H- ions, precursors to the key coolant H2, by Lyman alpha photons produced during the collapse of a cloud of primordial gas in an atomic cooling halo at high redshift. We find that photodetachment of H- by trapped Lyman alpha photons may lower the level of the H2-dissociating background radiation field required for DCBH formation substantially, dropping the critical flux by up to a factor of a few. This translates into a potentially large increase in the expected number density of DCBHs in the early Universe, and supports the view that DCBHs may be the seeds for the BHs residing in the centers of a significant fraction of galaxies today. We find that detachment of H- by Lyman alpha has the strongest impact on the critical flux for the relatively high background radiation temperatures expected to characterize the emission from young, hot stars in the early Universe. This lends support to the DCBH origin of the highest redshift quasars.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.05765  [pdf] - 1580424
The Habitability of Planets Orbiting M-dwarf Stars
Comments: 44 pages, 11 figures, minor typesetting corrections made to match published version
Submitted: 2016-10-18, last modified: 2017-02-27
The prospects for the habitability of M-dwarf planets have long been debated, due to key differences between the unique stellar and planetary environments around these low-mass stars, as compared to hotter, more luminous Sun-like stars. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made by both space- and ground-based observatories to measure the likelihood of small planets to orbit in the habitable zones of M-dwarf stars. We now know that most M dwarfs are hosts to closely-packed planetary systems characterized by a paucity of Jupiter-mass planets and the presence of multiple rocky planets, with roughly a third of these rocky M-dwarf planets orbiting within the habitable zone, where they have the potential to support liquid water on their surfaces. Theoretical studies have also quantified the effect on climate and habitability of the interaction between the spectral energy distribution of M-dwarf stars and the atmospheres and surfaces of their planets. These and other recent results fill in knowledge gaps that existed at the time of the previous overview papers published nearly a decade ago by Tarter et al. (2007) and Scalo et al. (2007). In this review we provide a comprehensive picture of the current knowledge of M-dwarf planet occurrence and habitability based on work done in this area over the past decade, and summarize future directions planned in this quickly evolving field.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.01598  [pdf] - 1533026
Chemical Abundances of M-dwarfs from the APOGEE Survey. I. The Exoplanet Hosting Stars Kepler-138 and Kepler-186
Comments: 28 pages, 5 figures, 4 tables. Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2016-12-05, last modified: 2017-02-06
We report the first detailed chemical abundance analysis of the exoplanet-hosting M-dwarf stars Kepler-138 and Kepler-186 from the analysis of high-resolution ($R$ $\sim$ 22,500) $H$-band spectra from the SDSS IV - APOGEE survey. Chemical abundances of thirteen elements - C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, and Fe - are extracted from the APOGEE spectra of these early M-dwarfs via spectrum syntheses computed with an improved line list that takes into account H$_{2}$O and FeH lines. This paper demonstrates that APOGEE spectra can be analyzed to determine detailed chemical compositions of M-dwarfs. Both exoplanet-hosting M-dwarfs display modest sub-solar metallicities: [Fe/H]$_{Kepler-138}$ = -0.09 $\pm$ 0.09 dex and [Fe/H]$_{Kepler-186}$ = -0.08 $\pm$ 0.10 dex. The measured metallicities resulting from this high-resolution analysis are found to be higher by $\sim$0.1-0.2 dex than previous estimates from lower-resolution spectra. The C/O ratios obtained for the two planet-hosting stars are near-solar, with values of 0.55 $\pm$ 0.10 for Kepler-138 and 0.52 $\pm$ 0.12 for Kepler-186. Kepler-186 exhibits a marginally enhanced [Si/Fe] ratio.
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.03044  [pdf] - 1542887
The Mysterious Dimmings of the T Tauri Star V1334 Tau
Comments: 11 pages, 5 Figures, 2 Tables, Accepted for Publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2017-01-11, last modified: 2017-01-30
We present the discovery of two extended $\sim$0.12 mag dimming events of the weak-lined T-Tauri star V1334. The start of the first event was missed but came to an end in late 2003, and the second began in February 2009, and continues as of November 2016. Since the egress of the current event has not yet been observed, it suggests a period of $>$13 years if this event is periodic. Spectroscopic observations suggest the presence of a small inner disk, although the spectral energy distribution shows no infrared excess. We explore the possibility that the dimming events are caused by an orbiting body (e.g. a disk warp or dust trap), enhanced disk winds, hydrodynamical fluctuations of the inner disk, or a significant increase in the magnetic field flux at the surface of the star. We also find a $\sim$0.32 day periodic photometric signal that persists throughout the 2009 dimming which appears to not be due to ellipsoidal variations from a close stellar companion. High precision photometric observations of V1334 Tau during K2 campaign 13, combined with simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic observations from the ground, will provide crucial information about the photometric variability and its origin.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.6330  [pdf] - 1530153
Detecting Ancient Supernovae at z ~ 5 - 12 with CLASH
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, submitted to ApJL
Submitted: 2013-12-21, last modified: 2017-01-17
Supernovae are important probes of the properties of stars at high redshifts because they can be detected at early epochs and their masses can be inferred from their light curves. Finding the first cosmic explosions in the universe will only be possible with the James Webb Space Telescope, the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope and the next generation of extremely large telescopes. But strong gravitational lensing by massive clusters, like those in the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble (CLASH), could reveal such events now by magnifying their flux by factors of 10 or more. We find that CLASH will likely discover at least 2 - 3 core-collapse supernovae at 5 < z < 12 and perhaps as many as ten. Future surveys of cluster lenses similar in scope to CLASH by the James Webb Space Telescope might find hundreds of these events out to z ~ 15 - 17. Besides revealing the masses of early stars, these ancient supernovae will also constrain cosmic star formation rates in the era of first galaxy formation.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.08613  [pdf] - 1530647
Inflow, Outflow, Yields, and Stellar Population Mixing in Chemical Evolution Models
Comments: 30 pages, 20 figures, 1 table, submitted to ApJ. v3: fixes typos and clarifies a few minor points that the referee noted. The flexCE chemical evolution model is available at https://github.com/bretthandrews/flexCE
Submitted: 2016-04-28, last modified: 2016-12-21
Chemical evolution models are powerful tools for interpreting stellar abundance surveys and understanding galaxy evolution. However, their predictions depend heavily on the treatment of inflow, outflow, star formation efficiency (SFE), the stellar initial mass function, the Type Ia supernova delay time distribution, stellar yields, and stellar population mixing. Using flexCE, a flexible one-zone chemical evolution code, we investigate the effects of and trade-offs between parameters. Two critical parameters are SFE and the outflow mass-loading parameter, which shift the knee in [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] and the equilibrium abundances that the simulations asymptotically approach, respectively. One-zone models with simple star formation histories follow narrow tracks in [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] unlike the observed bimodality (separate high-alpha and low-alpha sequences) in this plane. A mix of one-zone models with inflow timescale and outflow mass-loading parameter variations, motivated by the inside-out galaxy formation scenario with radial mixing, reproduces the two sequences better than a one-zone model with two infall epochs. We present [X/Fe]-[Fe/H] tracks for 20 elements assuming three different supernova yield models and find some significant discrepancies with solar neighborhood observations, especially for elements with strongly metallicity-dependent yields. We apply principal component abundance analysis (PCAA) to the simulations and existing data to reveal the main correlations amongst abundances and quantify their contributions to variation in abundance space. For the stellar population mixing scenario, the abundances of alpha-elements and elements with metallicity-dependent yields dominate the first and second principal components, respectively, and collectively explain 99% of the variance in the model. flexCE is a python package available at https://github.com/bretthandrews/flexCE.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.00036  [pdf] - 1532357
The DESI Experiment Part I: Science,Targeting, and Survey Design
DESI Collaboration; Aghamousa, Amir; Aguilar, Jessica; Ahlen, Steve; Alam, Shadab; Allen, Lori E.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Annis, James; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Ballester, Otger; Baltay, Charles; Beaufore, Lucas; Bebek, Chris; Beers, Timothy C.; Bell, Eric F.; Bernal, José Luis; Besuner, Robert; Beutler, Florian; Blake, Chris; Bleuler, Hannes; Blomqvist, Michael; Blum, Robert; Bolton, Adam S.; Briceno, Cesar; Brooks, David; Brownstein, Joel R.; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolas G.; Cahn, Robert N.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Carton, Pierre-Henri; Casas, Ricard; Castander, Francisco J.; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Claybaugh, Todd M.; Close, Madeline; Coker, Carl T.; Cole, Shaun; Comparat, Johan; Cooper, Andrew P.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Crocce, Martin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel; Cunningham, Daniel P.; Davis, Tamara M.; Dawson, Kyle S.; de la Macorra, Axel; De Vicente, Juan; Delubac, Timothée; Derwent, Mark; Dey, Arjun; Dhungana, Govinda; Ding, Zhejie; Doel, Peter; Duan, Yutong T.; Ealet, Anne; Edelstein, Jerry; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elliott, Ann; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Evatt, Matthew; Fagrelius, Parker; Fan, Xiaohui; Fanning, Kevin; Farahi, Arya; Farihi, Jay; Favole, Ginevra; Feng, Yu; Fernandez, Enrique; Findlay, Joseph R.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Fitzpatrick, Michael J.; Flaugher, Brenna; Flender, Samuel; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Fosalba, Pablo; Frenk, Carlos S.; Fumagalli, Michele; Gaensicke, Boris T.; Gallo, Giuseppe; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Fusillo, Nicola Pietro Gentile; Gerard, Terry; Gershkovich, Irena; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Gillet, Denis; Gonzalez-de-Rivera, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Gott, Shelby; Graur, Or; Gutierrez, Gaston; Guy, Julien; Habib, Salman; Heetderks, Henry; Heetderks, Ian; Heitmann, Katrin; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Herrera, David A.; Ho, Shirley; Holland, Stephen; Honscheid, Klaus; Huff, Eric; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Huterer, Dragan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Laguna, Joseph Maria Illa; Ishikawa, Yuzo; Jacobs, Dianna; Jeffrey, Niall; Jelinsky, Patrick; Jennings, Elise; Jiang, Linhua; Jimenez, Jorge; Johnson, Jennifer; Joyce, Richard; Jullo, Eric; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kama, Sami; Karcher, Armin; Karkar, Sonia; Kehoe, Robert; Kennamer, Noble; Kent, Stephen; Kilbinger, Martin; Kim, Alex G.; Kirkby, David; Kisner, Theodore; Kitanidis, Ellie; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koposov, Sergey; Kovacs, Eve; Koyama, Kazuya; Kremin, Anthony; Kron, Richard; Kronig, Luzius; Kueter-Young, Andrea; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lafever, Robin; Lahav, Ofer; Lambert, Andrew; Lampton, Michael; Landriau, Martin; Lang, Dustin; Lauer, Tod R.; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Guillou, Laurent Le; Van Suu, Auguste Le; Lee, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Su-Jeong; Leitner, Daniela; Lesser, Michael; Levi, Michael E.; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Li, Baojiu; Liang, Ming; Lin, Huan; Linder, Eric; Loebman, Sarah R.; Lukić, Zarija; Ma, Jun; MacCrann, Niall; Magneville, Christophe; Makarem, Laleh; Manera, Marc; Manser, Christopher J.; Marshall, Robert; Martini, Paul; Massey, Richard; Matheson, Thomas; McCauley, Jeremy; McDonald, Patrick; McGreer, Ian D.; Meisner, Aaron; Metcalfe, Nigel; Miller, Timothy N.; Miquel, Ramon; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam; Naik, Milind; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nicola, Andrina; da Costa, Luiz Nicolati; Nie, Jundan; Niz, Gustavo; Norberg, Peder; Nord, Brian; Norman, Dara; Nugent, Peter; O'Brien, Thomas; Oh, Minji; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Padilla, Cristobal; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palmese, Antonella; Pappalardo, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patej, Anna; Peacock, John A.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Peng, Xiyan; Percival, Will J.; Perruchot, Sandrine; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pogge, Richard; Pollack, Jennifer E.; Poppett, Claire; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Probst, Ronald G.; Rabinowitz, David; Raichoor, Anand; Ree, Chang Hee; Refregier, Alexandre; Regal, Xavier; Reid, Beth; Reil, Kevin; Rezaie, Mehdi; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie; Ronayette, Samuel; Roodman, Aaron; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rozo, Eduardo; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina; Rykoff, Eli S.; Sabiu, Cristiano; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez, Eusebio; Sanchez, Javier; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Michael; Schubnell, Michael; Secroun, Aurélia; Seljak, Uros; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serrano, Santiago; Shafieloo, Arman; Shan, Huanyuan; Sharples, Ray; Sholl, Michael J.; Shourt, William V.; Silber, Joseph H.; Silva, David R.; Sirk, Martin M.; Slosar, Anze; Smith, Alex; Smoot, George F.; Som, Debopam; Song, Yong-Seon; Sprayberry, David; Staten, Ryan; Stefanik, Andy; Tarle, Gregory; Tie, Suk Sien; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Valdes, Francisco; Valenzuela, Octavio; Valluri, Monica; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Verde, Licia; Walker, Alistair R.; Wang, Jiali; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wechsler, Risa H.; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Yang, Qian; Yeche, Christophe; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhimin; Zhu, Yaling; Zou, Hu; Zu, Ying
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-10-31, last modified: 2016-12-13
DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. To trace the underlying dark matter distribution, spectroscopic targets will be selected in four classes from imaging data. We will measure luminous red galaxies up to $z=1.0$. To probe the Universe out to even higher redshift, DESI will target bright [O II] emission line galaxies up to $z=1.7$. Quasars will be targeted both as direct tracers of the underlying dark matter distribution and, at higher redshifts ($ 2.1 < z < 3.5$), for the Ly-$\alpha$ forest absorption features in their spectra, which will be used to trace the distribution of neutral hydrogen. When moonlight prevents efficient observations of the faint targets of the baseline survey, DESI will conduct a magnitude-limited Bright Galaxy Survey comprising approximately 10 million galaxies with a median $z\approx 0.2$. In total, more than 30 million galaxy and quasar redshifts will be obtained to measure the BAO feature and determine the matter power spectrum, including redshift space distortions.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.00037  [pdf] - 1532358
The DESI Experiment Part II: Instrument Design
DESI Collaboration; Aghamousa, Amir; Aguilar, Jessica; Ahlen, Steve; Alam, Shadab; Allen, Lori E.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Annis, James; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Ballester, Otger; Baltay, Charles; Beaufore, Lucas; Bebek, Chris; Beers, Timothy C.; Bell, Eric F.; Bernal, José Luis; Besuner, Robert; Beutler, Florian; Blake, Chris; Bleuler, Hannes; Blomqvist, Michael; Blum, Robert; Bolton, Adam S.; Briceno, Cesar; Brooks, David; Brownstein, Joel R.; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolas G.; Cahn, Robert N.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Carton, Pierre-Henri; Casas, Ricard; Castander, Francisco J.; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Claybaugh, Todd M.; Close, Madeline; Coker, Carl T.; Cole, Shaun; Comparat, Johan; Cooper, Andrew P.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Crocce, Martin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel; Cunningham, Daniel P.; Davis, Tamara M.; Dawson, Kyle S.; de la Macorra, Axel; De Vicente, Juan; Delubac, Timothée; Derwent, Mark; Dey, Arjun; Dhungana, Govinda; Ding, Zhejie; Doel, Peter; Duan, Yutong T.; Ealet, Anne; Edelstein, Jerry; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elliott, Ann; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Evatt, Matthew; Fagrelius, Parker; Fan, Xiaohui; Fanning, Kevin; Farahi, Arya; Farihi, Jay; Favole, Ginevra; Feng, Yu; Fernandez, Enrique; Findlay, Joseph R.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Fitzpatrick, Michael J.; Flaugher, Brenna; Flender, Samuel; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Fosalba, Pablo; Frenk, Carlos S.; Fumagalli, Michele; Gaensicke, Boris T.; Gallo, Giuseppe; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Fusillo, Nicola Pietro Gentile; Gerard, Terry; Gershkovich, Irena; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Gillet, Denis; Gonzalez-de-Rivera, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Gott, Shelby; Graur, Or; Gutierrez, Gaston; Guy, Julien; Habib, Salman; Heetderks, Henry; Heetderks, Ian; Heitmann, Katrin; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Herrera, David A.; Ho, Shirley; Holland, Stephen; Honscheid, Klaus; Huff, Eric; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Huterer, Dragan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Laguna, Joseph Maria Illa; Ishikawa, Yuzo; Jacobs, Dianna; Jeffrey, Niall; Jelinsky, Patrick; Jennings, Elise; Jiang, Linhua; Jimenez, Jorge; Johnson, Jennifer; Joyce, Richard; Jullo, Eric; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kama, Sami; Karcher, Armin; Karkar, Sonia; Kehoe, Robert; Kennamer, Noble; Kent, Stephen; Kilbinger, Martin; Kim, Alex G.; Kirkby, David; Kisner, Theodore; Kitanidis, Ellie; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koposov, Sergey; Kovacs, Eve; Koyama, Kazuya; Kremin, Anthony; Kron, Richard; Kronig, Luzius; Kueter-Young, Andrea; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lafever, Robin; Lahav, Ofer; Lambert, Andrew; Lampton, Michael; Landriau, Martin; Lang, Dustin; Lauer, Tod R.; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Guillou, Laurent Le; Van Suu, Auguste Le; Lee, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Su-Jeong; Leitner, Daniela; Lesser, Michael; Levi, Michael E.; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Li, Baojiu; Liang, Ming; Lin, Huan; Linder, Eric; Loebman, Sarah R.; Lukić, Zarija; Ma, Jun; MacCrann, Niall; Magneville, Christophe; Makarem, Laleh; Manera, Marc; Manser, Christopher J.; Marshall, Robert; Martini, Paul; Massey, Richard; Matheson, Thomas; McCauley, Jeremy; McDonald, Patrick; McGreer, Ian D.; Meisner, Aaron; Metcalfe, Nigel; Miller, Timothy N.; Miquel, Ramon; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam; Naik, Milind; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nicola, Andrina; da Costa, Luiz Nicolati; Nie, Jundan; Niz, Gustavo; Norberg, Peder; Nord, Brian; Norman, Dara; Nugent, Peter; O'Brien, Thomas; Oh, Minji; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Padilla, Cristobal; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palmese, Antonella; Pappalardo, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patej, Anna; Peacock, John A.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Peng, Xiyan; Percival, Will J.; Perruchot, Sandrine; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pogge, Richard; Pollack, Jennifer E.; Poppett, Claire; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Probst, Ronald G.; Rabinowitz, David; Raichoor, Anand; Ree, Chang Hee; Refregier, Alexandre; Regal, Xavier; Reid, Beth; Reil, Kevin; Rezaie, Mehdi; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie; Ronayette, Samuel; Roodman, Aaron; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rozo, Eduardo; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina; Rykoff, Eli S.; Sabiu, Cristiano; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez, Eusebio; Sanchez, Javier; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Michael; Schubnell, Michael; Secroun, Aurélia; Seljak, Uros; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serrano, Santiago; Shafieloo, Arman; Shan, Huanyuan; Sharples, Ray; Sholl, Michael J.; Shourt, William V.; Silber, Joseph H.; Silva, David R.; Sirk, Martin M.; Slosar, Anze; Smith, Alex; Smoot, George F.; Som, Debopam; Song, Yong-Seon; Sprayberry, David; Staten, Ryan; Stefanik, Andy; Tarle, Gregory; Tie, Suk Sien; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Valdes, Francisco; Valenzuela, Octavio; Valluri, Monica; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Verde, Licia; Walker, Alistair R.; Wang, Jiali; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wechsler, Risa H.; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Yang, Qian; Yeche, Christophe; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhimin; Zhu, Yaling; Zou, Hu; Zu, Ying
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-10-31, last modified: 2016-12-13
DESI (Dark Energy Spectropic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. The DESI instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking up to 5,000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 360 nm to 980 nm. The fibers feed ten three-arm spectrographs with resolution $R= \lambda/\Delta\lambda$ between 2000 and 5500, depending on wavelength. The DESI instrument will be used to conduct a five-year survey designed to cover 14,000 deg$^2$. This powerful instrument will be installed at prime focus on the 4-m Mayall telescope in Kitt Peak, Arizona, along with a new optical corrector, which will provide a three-degree diameter field of view. The DESI collaboration will also deliver a spectroscopic pipeline and data management system to reduce and archive all data for eventual public use.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.01616  [pdf] - 1553948
The metallicity distribution and hot Jupiter rate of the Kepler field: Hectochelle High-resolution spectroscopy for 776 Kepler target stars
Comments: 19 pages, 17 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2016-12-05
The occurrence rate of hot Jupiters from the Kepler transit survey is roughly half that of radial velocity surveys targeting solar neighborhood stars. One hypothesis to explain this difference is that the two surveys target stars with different stellar metallicity distributions. To test this hypothesis, we measure the metallicity distribution of the Kepler targets using the Hectochelle multi-fiber, high-resolution spectrograph. Limiting our spectroscopic analysis to 610 dwarf stars in our sample with log(g)>3.5, we measure a metallicity distribution characterized by a mean of [M/H]_{mean} = -0.045 +/- 0.00, in agreement with previous studies of the Kepler field target stars. In comparison, the metallicity distribution of the California Planet Search radial velocity sample has a mean of [M/H]_{CPS, mean} = -0.005 +/- 0.006, and the samples come from different parent populations according to a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We refit the exponential relation between the fraction of stars hosting a close-in giant planet and the host star metallicity using a sample of dwarf stars from the California Planet Search with updated metallicities. The best-fit relation tells us that the difference in metallicity between the two samples is insufficient to explain the discrepant Hot Jupiter occurrence rates; the metallicity difference would need to be $\simeq$0.2-0.3 dex for perfect agreement. We also show that (sub)giant contamination in the Kepler sample cannot reconcile the two occurrence calculations. We conclude that other factors, such as binary contamination and imperfect stellar properties, must also be at play.
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.07648  [pdf] - 1532785
The Pan-Pacific Planet Search VI: Giant planets orbiting HD 86950 and HD 222076
Comments: Accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2016-11-23
We report the detection of two new planets orbiting the K giants HD 86950 and HD 222076, based on precise radial velocities obtained with three instruments: AAT/UCLES, FEROS, and CHIRON. HD 86950b has a period of 1270$\pm$57 days at $a=2.72\pm$0.08 AU, and m sin $i=3.6\pm$0.7 Mjup. HD 222076b has $P=871\pm$19 days at $a=1.83\pm$0.03 AU, and m sin $i=1.56\pm$0.11 Mjup. These two giant planets are typical of the population of planets known to orbit evolved stars. In addition, we find a high-amplitude periodic velocity signal ($K\sim$50 m/s) in HD 29399, and show that it is due to stellar variability rather than Keplerian reflex motion. We also investigate the relation between planet occurrence and host-star metallicity for the 164-star Pan-Pacific Planet Search sample of evolved stars. In spite of the small sample of PPPS detections, we confirm the trend of increasing planet occurrence as a function of metallicity found by other studies of planets orbiting evolved stars.
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.03086  [pdf] - 1532533
APOGEE Chemical Abundances of Globular Cluster Giants in the Inner Galaxy
Comments: 10 Pages, 2 Figures, 2 Tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-11-09
We report chemical abundances obtained by SDSS-III/APOGEE for giant stars in five globular clusters located within 2.2 kpc of the Galactic centre. We detect the presence of multiple stellar populations in four of those clusters (NGC 6553, NGC 6528, Terzan 5, and Palomar 6) and find strong evidence for their presence in NGC 6522. All clusters present a significant spread in the abundances of N, C, Na, and Al, with the usual correlations and anti-correlations between various abundances seen in other globular clusters. Our results provide important quantitative constraints on theoretical models for self-enrichment of globular clusters, by testing their predictions for the dependence of yields of elements such as Na, N, C, and Al on metallicity. They also confirm that, under the assumption that field N-rich stars originate from globular cluster destruction, they can be used as tracers of their parental systems in the high- metallicity regime.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.01279  [pdf] - 1530582
Discovery of a Metal-Poor Field Giant with a Globular Cluster Second-Generation Abundance Pattern
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-04-05, last modified: 2016-10-06
We report on detection, from observations obtained with the APOGEE spectroscopic survey, of a metal-poor ([Fe/H] $= -1.3$ dex) field giant star with an extreme Mg-Al abundance ratio ([Mg/Fe] $= -0.31$ dex; [Al/Fe] $= 1.49$ dex). Such low Mg/Al ratios are seen only among the second-generation population of globular clusters, and are not present among Galactic disk field stars. The light element abundances of this star, 2M16011638-1201525, suggest that it could have been born in a globular cluster. We explore several origin scenarios, in particular studying the orbit of the star to check the probability of it being kinematically related to known globular clusters. We performed simple orbital integrations assuming the estimated distance of 2M16011638-1201525 and the available six-dimensional phase-space coordinates of 63 globular clusters, looking for close encounters in the past with a minimum distance approach within the tidal radius of each cluster. We found a very low probability that 2M16011638-1201525 was ejected from most globular clusters; however, we note that the best progenitor candidate to host this star is globular cluster $\omega$ Centauri (NGC 5139). Our dynamical investigation demonstrates that 2M16011638-1201525 reaches a distance $|Z_{max}| < 3 $ kpc from the Galactic plane and a minimum and maximum approach to the Galactic center of $R_{min}<0.62$ kpc and $R_{max}<7.26$ kpc in an eccentric ($e\sim0.53$) and retrograde orbit. Since the extreme chemical anomaly of 2M16011638-1201525 has also been observed in halo field stars, this object could also be considered a halo contaminant, likely been ejected into the Milky Way disk from the halo. We conclude that, 2M16011638-20152 is also kinematically consistent with the disk but chemically consistent with halo field stars.
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.09074  [pdf] - 1528253
Evidence for the Direct Detection of the Thermal Spectrum of the Non-Transiting Hot Gas Giant HD 88133 b
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures; accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-09-28
We target the thermal emission spectrum of the non-transiting gas giant HD 88133 b with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, by treating the planet and its host star as a spectroscopic binary. For sufficiently deep summed flux observations of the star and planet across multiple epochs, it is possible to resolve the signal of the hot gas giant's atmosphere compared to the brighter stellar spectrum, at a level consistent with the aggregate shot noise of the full data set. To do this, we first perform a principal component analysis to remove the contribution of the Earth's atmosphere to the observed spectra. Then, we use a cross-correlation analysis to tease out the spectra of the host star and HD 88133 b to determine its orbit and identify key sources of atmospheric opacity. In total, six epochs of Keck NIRSPEC L band observations and three epochs of Keck NIRSPEC K band observations of the HD 88133 system were obtained. Based on an analysis of the maximum likelihood curves calculated from the multi-epoch cross correlation of the full data set with two atmospheric models, we report the direct detection of the emission spectrum of the non-transiting exoplanet HD 88133 b and measure a radial projection of the Keplerian orbital velocity of 40 $\pm$ 15 km/s, a true mass of 1.02$^{+0.61}_{-0.28}M_J$, a nearly face-on orbital inclination of 15${^{+6}_{-5}}^{\circ}$, and an atmosphere opacity structure at high dispersion dominated by water vapor. This, combined with eleven years of radial velocity measurements of the system, provides the most up-to-date ephemeris for HD 88133.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.07617  [pdf] - 1531727
Kepler-21b: A rocky planet around a V = 8.25 magnitude star
Comments: 52 pages, 13 figures, 1 long table. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-09-24
HD 179070, aka Kepler-21, is a V = 8.25 F6IV star and the brightest exoplanet host discovered by Kepler. An early detailed analysis by Howell et al. (2012) of the first thirteen months (Q0 - Q5) of Kepler light curves revealed transits of a planetary companion, Kepler-21b, with a radius of about 1.60 +/- 0.04 R_earth and an orbital period of about 2.7857 days. However, they could not determine the mass of the planet from the initial radial velocity observations with Keck-HIRES, and were only able to impose a 2-sigma upper limit of 10 M_earth. Here we present results from the analysis of 82 new radial velocity observations of this system obtained with HARPS-N, together with the existing 14 HIRES data points. We detect the Doppler signal of Kepler-21b with a radial velocity semi-amplitude K = 2.00 +/- 0.65 m/s, which corresponds to a planetary mass of 5.1 +/- 1.7 M_earth. We also measure an improved radius for the planet of 1.639 (+0.019, -0.015) R_earth, in agreement with the radius reported by Howell et al. (2012). We conclude that Kepler-21b, with a density of 6.4 +/- 2.1 g/cm^3, belongs to the population of terrestrial planets with iron, magnesium silicate interiors, which have lost the majority of their envelope volatiles via stellar winds or gravitational escape. The radial velocity analysis presented in this paper serves as example of the type of analysis that will be necessary to confirm the masses of TESS small planet candidates.
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.07512  [pdf] - 1528236
Kinematics in the Galactic Bulge with APOGEE: II. High-Order Kinematical Moments and Comparison to Extragalactic Bar Diagnostics
Comments: 15 pages, 17 figures. Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2016-09-23
Much of the inner Milky Way's (MW) global rotation and velocity dispersion patterns can be reproduced by models of secularly-evolved, bar-dominated bulges. More sophisticated constraints, including the higher moments of the line-of-sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs) and limits on the chemodynamical substructure, are critical for interpreting observations of the unresolved inner regions of extragalactic systems and for placing the MW in context with other galaxies. Here, we use SDSS-APOGEE data to develop these constraints, by presenting the first maps of the LOSVD skewness and kurtosis of metal-rich and metal-poor inner MW stars (divided at [Fe/H] = -0.4), and comparing the observed patterns to those that are seen both in N-body models and in extragalactic bars. Despite closely matching the mean velocity and dispersion, the models do not reproduce the observed LOSVD skewness patterns in different ways, which demonstrates that our understanding of the detailed orbital structure of the inner MW remains an important regime for improvement. We find evidence in the MW of the skewness-velocity correlation that is used as a diagnostic of extragalactic bar/bulges. This correlation appears in metal-rich stars only, providing further evidence for different evolutionary histories of chemically differentiated populations. We connect these skewness measurements to previous work on high-velocity "peaks" in the inner Galaxy, confirming the presence of that phenomenon, and we quantify the cylindrical rotation of the inner Galaxy, finding that the latitude-independent rotation vanishes outside of lon ~ 7 deg. Finally, we evaluate the MW data in light of select extragalactic bar diagnostics and discuss progress and challenges of using the MW as a resolved analog of unresolved stellar populations.
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.03627  [pdf] - 1521296
The Orbit and Mass of the Third Planet in the Kepler-56 System
Comments: 7 pages, 1 figure, 2 tables; accepted for publication in AJ. Minor edits made after referee report
Submitted: 2016-08-11, last modified: 2016-09-22
While the vast majority of multiple-planet systems have their orbital angular momentum axes aligned with the spin axis of their host star, Kepler-56 is an exception: its two transiting planets are coplanar yet misaligned by at least 40 degrees with respect to their host star. Additional follow-up observations of Kepler-56 suggest the presence of a massive, non-transiting companion that may help explain this misalignment. We model the transit data along with Keck/HIRES and HARPS-N radial velocity data to update the masses of the two transiting planets and infer the physical properties of the third, non-transiting planet. We employ a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler to calculate the best-fitting orbital parameters and their uncertainties for each planet. We find the outer planet has a period of 1002 $\pm$ 5 days and minimum mass of 5.61 $\pm$ 0.38 Jupiter masses. We also place a 95% upper limit of 0.80 m/s/yr on long-term trends caused by additional, more distant companions.
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.01733  [pdf] - 1472867
Detecting Direct Collapse Black Holes: making the case for CR7
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-10-06, last modified: 2016-09-01
We propose that one of the sources in the recently detected system CR7 by Sobral et al. (2015) through spectro-photometric measurements at $z = 6.6$ harbors a direct collapse blackhole (DCBH). We argue that the LW radiation field required for direct collapse in source A is provided by sources B and C. By tracing the LW production history and star formation rate over cosmic time for the halo hosting CR7 in a $\Lambda$CDM universe, we demonstrate that a DCBH could have formed at $z\sim 20$. The spectrum of source A is well fit by nebular emission from primordial gas around a BH with MBH $\sim 4.4 \times 10^6 \ \rm M_{\odot}$ accreting at a 40 % of the Eddington rate, which strongly supports our interpretation of the data. Combining these lines of evidence, we argue that CR7 might well be the first DCBH candidate.
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.06836  [pdf] - 1521311
A 1.9 Earth radius rocky planet and the discovery of a non-transiting planet in the Kepler-20 system
Comments: 33 pages, 8 figures. Accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2016-08-24
Kepler-20 is a solar-type star (V = 12.5) hosting a compact system of five transiting planets, all packed within the orbital distance of Mercury in our own Solar System. A transition from rocky to gaseous planets with a planetary transition radius of ~1.6 REarth has recently been proposed by several publications in the literature (Rogers 2015;Weiss & Marcy 2014). Kepler-20b (Rp ~ 1.9 REarth) has a size beyond this transition radius, however previous mass measurements were not sufficiently precise to allow definite conclusions to be drawn regarding its composition. We present new mass measurements of three of the planets in the Kepler-20 system facilitated by 104 radial velocity measurements from the HARPS-N spectrograph and 30 archival Keck/HIRES observations, as well as an updated photometric analysis of the Kepler data and an asteroseismic analysis of the host star (MStar = 0.948+-0.051 Msun and Rstar = 0.964+-0.018 Rsun). Kepler-20b is a 1.868+0.066-0.034 REarth planet in a 3.7 day period with a mass of 9.70+1.41-1.44 MEarth resulting in a mean density of 8.2+1.5-1.3 g/cc indicating a rocky composition with an iron to silicate ratio consistent with that of the Earth. This makes Kepler-20b the most massive planet with a rocky composition found to date. Furthermore, we report the discovery of an additional non-transiting planet with a minimum mass of 19.96+3.08-3.61 MEarth and an orbital period of ~34 days in the gap between Kepler-20f (P ~ 11 days) and Kepler-20d (P ~ 78 days).
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.07763  [pdf] - 1530636
Galactic Archaeology with asteroseismology and spectroscopy: Red giants observed by CoRoT and APOGEE
Comments: 16 pages + references and appendix, 17 figures, accepted for publication in A&A. Data described in Appendix B will be published through the CDS upon publication
Submitted: 2016-04-26, last modified: 2016-08-17
With the advent of the space missions CoRoT and Kepler, it has become feasible to determine precise asteroseismic masses and ages for large samples of red-giant stars. In this paper, we present the CoRoGEE dataset -- obtained from CoRoT lightcurves for 606 red giant stars in two fields of the Galactic disc which have been co-observed for an ancillary project of APOGEE. We have used the Bayesian parameter estimation code PARAM to calculate distances, extinctions, masses, and ages for these stars in a homogeneous analysis, resulting in relative statistical uncertainties of $\sim2\%$ in distance, $\sim4\%$ in radius, $\sim9\%$ in mass and $\sim25\%$ in age. We also assess systematic age uncertainties due to different input physics and mass loss. We discuss the correlation between ages and chemical abundance patterns of field stars over a large radial range of the Milky Way's disc (5 kpc $<R_{\rm Gal}<$ 14 kpc), focussing on the [$\alpha$/Fe]-[Fe/H]-age plane in five radial bins of the Galactic disc. We find an overall agreement with the expectations of chemical-evolution models computed before the present data were available, especially for the outer regions. However, our data also indicate that a significant fraction of stars now observed near and beyond the Solar Neighbourhood migrated from inner regions. Mock CoRoGEE observations of a chemo-dynamical Milky Way disc model show that the number of high-metallicity stars in the outer disc is too high to be accounted for even by the strong radial mixing present in the model. The mock observations also reveal that the age distribution of the [$\alpha$/Fe]-enhanced sequence in the CoRoGEE inner-disc field is much broader than expected from a combination of radial mixing and observational errors. We suggest that a thick disc/bulge component that formed stars for more than 3 Gyr may account for these discrepancies.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.00398  [pdf] - 1510232
The TRENDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey. VI. Discovery of a Mass, Age, and Metallicity Benchmark Brown Dwarf
Comments: Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2016-04-01, last modified: 2016-08-10
The mass and age of substellar objects are degenerate parameters leaving the evolutionary state of brown dwarfs ambiguous without additional information. Theoretical models are normally used to help distinguish between old, massive brown dwarfs and young, low mass brown dwarfs but these models have yet to be properly calibrated. We have carried out an infrared high-contrast imaging program with the goal of detecting substellar objects as companions to nearby stars to help break degeneracies in inferred physical properties such as mass, age, and composition. Rather than using imaging observations alone, our targets are pre-selected based on the existence of dynamical accelerations informed from years of stellar radial velocity (RV) measurements. In this paper, we present the discovery of a rare benchmark brown dwarf orbiting the nearby ($d=18.69\pm0.19$ pc), solar-type (G9V) star HD 4747 ([Fe/H]=$-0.22\pm0.04$) with a projected separation of only $\rho=11.3\pm0.2$ AU ($\theta \approx$ 0.6"). Precise Doppler measurements taken over 18 years reveal the companion's orbit and allow us to place strong constraints on its mass using dynamics ($m \sin(i) = 55.3\pm1.9M_J$). Relative photometry ($\Delta K_s=9.05\pm0.14$, $M_{K_s}=13.00\pm0.14$, $K_s - L' = 1.34\pm0.46$) indicates that HD 4747 B is most-likely a late-type L-dwarf and, if near the L/T transition, an intriguing source for studying cloud physics, variability, and polarization. We estimate a model-dependent mass of $m=72^{+3}_{-13}M_J$ for an age of $3.3^{+2.3}_{-1.9}$ Gyr based on gyrochronology. Combining astrometric measurements with RV data, we calculate the companion dynamical mass ($m=60.2\pm3.3M_J$) and orbit ($e=0.740\pm0.002$) directly. As a new mass, age, and metallicity benchmark, HD 4747 B will serve as a laboratory for precision astrophysics to test theoretical models that describe the emergent radiation of brown dwarfs.
[116]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.00888  [pdf] - 1483274
Ab Initio Cosmological Simulations of CR7 as an Active Black Hole
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures, Accepted by ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2016-03-02, last modified: 2016-07-27
We present the first ab initio cosmological simulations of a CR7-like object which approximately reproduce the observed line widths and strengths. In our model, CR7 is powered by a massive ($3.23 \times 10^7$ $M_\odot$) black hole (BH) the accretion rate of which varies between $\simeq$ 0.25 and $\simeq$ 0.9 times the Eddington rate on timescales as short as 10$^3$ yr. Our model takes into account multi-dimensional effects, X-ray feedback, secondary ionizations and primordial chemistry. We estimate Ly-$\alpha$ line widths by post-processing simulation output with Monte Carlo radiative transfer and calculate emissivity contributions from radiative recombination and collisional excitation. We find the luminosities in the Lyman-$\alpha$ and He II 1640 angstrom lines to be $5.0\times10^{44}$ and $2.4\times10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$, respectively, in agreement with the observed values of $>$ $8.3\times10^{43}$ and $2.0\times10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$. We also find that the black hole heats the halo and renders it unable to produce stars as required to keep the halo metal free. These results demonstrate the viability of the BH hypothesis for CR7 in a cosmological context. Assuming the BH mass and accretion rate that we find, we estimate the synchrotron luminosity of CR7 to be $P \simeq 10^{40} - 10^{41}$ erg s$^{-1}$, which is sufficiently luminous to be observed in $\mu$Jy observations and would discriminate this scenario from one where the luminosity is driven by Population III stars.
[117]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.01755  [pdf] - 1567567
KELT-11b: A Highly Inflated Sub-Saturn Exoplanet Transiting the V=8 Subgiant HD 93396
Comments: 15 pages, Submitted to AAS Journals
Submitted: 2016-07-06
We report the discovery of a transiting exoplanet, KELT-11b, orbiting the bright ($V=8.0$) subgiant HD 93396. A global analysis of the system shows that the host star is an evolved subgiant star with $T_{\rm eff} = 5370\pm51$ K, $M_{*} = 1.438_{-0.052}^{+0.061} M_{\odot}$, $R_{*} = 2.72_{-0.17}^{+0.21} R_{\odot}$, log $g_*= 3.727_{-0.046}^{+0.040}$, and [Fe/H]$ = 0.180\pm0.075$. The planet is a low-mass gas giant in a $P = 4.736529\pm0.00006$ day orbit, with $M_{P} = 0.195\pm0.018 M_J$, $R_{P}= 1.37_{-0.12}^{+0.15} R_J$, $\rho_{P} = 0.093_{-0.024}^{+0.028}$ g cm$^{-3}$, surface gravity log ${g_{P}} = 2.407_{-0.086}^{+0.080}$, and equilibrium temperature $T_{eq} = 1712_{-46}^{+51}$ K. KELT-11 is the brightest known transiting exoplanet host in the southern hemisphere by more than a magnitude, and is the 6th brightest transit host to date. The planet is one of the most inflated planets known, with an exceptionally large atmospheric scale height (2763 km), and an associated size of the expected atmospheric transmission signal of 5.6%. These attributes make the KELT-11 system a valuable target for follow-up and atmospheric characterization, and it promises to become one of the benchmark systems for the study of inflated exoplanets.
[118]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.07102  [pdf] - 1449989
Friends of Hot Jupiters. IV. Stellar companions beyond 50 AU might facilitate giant planet formation, but most are unlikely to cause Kozai-Lidov migration
Comments: accepted for publication in ApJ; 23 pages including 9 figures and 6 tables
Submitted: 2016-06-22
Stellar companions can influence the formation and evolution of planetary systems, but there are currently few observational constraints on the properties of planet-hosting binary star systems. We search for stellar companions around 77 transiting hot Jupiter systems to explore the statistical properties of this population of companions as compared to field stars of similar spectral type. After correcting for survey incompleteness, we find that $47\%\pm7\%$ of hot Jupiter systems have stellar companions with semi-major axes between 50-2000 AU. This is 2.9 times larger than the field star companion fraction in this separation range, with a significance of $4.4\sigma$. In the 1-50AU range, only $3.9^{+4.5}_{-2.0}\%$ of hot Jupiters host stellar companions compared to the field star value of $16.4\%\pm0.7\%$, which is a $2.7\sigma$ difference. We find that the distribution of mass ratios for stellar companions to hot Jupiter systems peaks at small values and therefore differs from that of field star binaries which tend to be uniformly distributed across all mass ratios. We conclude that either wide separation stellar binaries are more favorable sites for gas giant planet formation at all separations, or that the presence of stellar companions preferentially causes the inward migration of gas giant planets that formed farther out in the disk via dynamical processes such as Kozai-Lidov oscillations. We determine that less than 20% of hot Jupiters have stellar companions capable of inducing Kozai-Lidov oscillations assuming initial semi-major axes between 1-5 AU, implying that the enhanced companion occurrence is likely correlated with environments where gas giants can form efficiently.
[119]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.05651  [pdf] - 1475377
Chemical tagging with APOGEE: Discovery of a large population of N-rich stars in the inner Galaxy
Comments: 29 pages, 9 Figures. Submitted to MNRAS, revised after second referee pass
Submitted: 2016-06-17
Formation of globular clusters (GCs), the Galactic bulge, or galaxy bulges in general, are important unsolved problems in Galactic astronomy. Homogeneous infrared observations of large samples of stars belonging to GCs and the Galactic bulge field are one of the best ways to study these problems. We report the discovery by APOGEE of a population of field stars in the inner Galaxy with abundances of N, C, and Al that are typically found in GC stars. The newly discovered stars have high [N/Fe], which is correlated with [Al/Fe] and anti-correlated with [C/Fe]. They are homogeneously distributed across, and kinematically indistinguishable from, other field stars in the same volume. Their metallicity distribution is seemingly unimodal, peaking at [Fe/H]~-1, thus being in disagreement with that of the Galactic GC system. Our results can be understood in terms of different scenarios. N-rich stars could be former members of dissolved GCs, in which case the mass in destroyed GCs exceeds that of the surviving GC system by a factor of ~8. In that scenario, the total mass contained in so-called "first-generation" stars cannot be larger than that in "second-generation" stars by more than a factor of ~9 and was certainly smaller. Conversely, our results may imply the absence of a mandatory genetic link between "second generation" stars and GCs. Last, but not least, N-rich stars could be the oldest stars in the Galaxy, the by-products of chemical enrichment by the first stellar generations formed in the heart of the Galaxy.
[120]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.09180  [pdf] - 1509333
The K2-ESPRINT Project V: a short-period giant planet orbiting a subgiant star
Comments: Accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2016-05-30
We report on the discovery and characterization of the transiting planet K2-39b (EPIC 206247743b). With an orbital period of 4.6 days, it is the shortest-period planet orbiting a subgiant star known to date. Such planets are rare, with only a handful of known cases. The reason for this is poorly understood, but may reflect differences in planet occurrence around the relatively high-mass stars that have been surveyed, or may be the result of tidal destruction of such planets. K2-39 is an evolved star with a spectroscopically derived stellar radius and mass of $3.88^{+0.48}_{-0.42}~\mathrm{R_\odot}$ and $1.53^{+0.13}_{-0.12}~\mathrm{M_\odot}$, respectively, and a very close-in transiting planet, with $a/R_\star = 3.4$. Radial velocity (RV) follow-up using the HARPS, FIES and PFS instruments leads to a planetary mass of $50.3^{+9.7}_{-9.4}~\mathrm{M_\oplus}$. In combination with a radius measurement of $8.3 \pm 1.1~\mathrm{R_\oplus}$, this results in a mean planetary density of $0.50^{+0.29}_{-0.17}$ g~cm$^{-3}$. We furthermore discover a long-term RV trend, which may be caused by a long-period planet or stellar companion. Because K2-39b has a short orbital period, its existence makes it seem unlikely that tidal destruction is wholly responsible for the differences in planet populations around subgiant and main-sequence stars. Future monitoring of the transits of this system may enable the detection of period decay and constrain the tidal dissipation rates of subgiant stars.
[121]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.03732  [pdf] - 1443957
Examining the relationships between colour, $T_{\rm eff}$, and [M/H] for APOGEE K and M dwarfs
Comments: 14 pages, 6 tables, 5 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-05-12
We present the effective temperatures ($T_{\rm eff}$), metallicities, and colours in SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE filters, of a sample of 3834 late-K and early-M dwarfs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey APOGEE spectroscopic survey ASPCAP catalog. We confirm that ASPCAP $T_{\rm eff}$ values between 3550 K$<T_{\rm eff}<$4200 K are accurate to $\sim$100 K compared to interferometric $T_{\rm eff}$ values. In that same $T_{\rm eff}$ range, ASPCAP metallicities are accurate to 0.18 dex between $-1.0<$[M/H]$<0.2$. For these cool dwarfs, nearly every colour is sensitive to both $T_{\rm eff}$ and metallicity. Notably, we find that $g-r$ is not a good indicator of metallicity for near-solar metallicity early-M dwarfs. We confirm that $J-K_S$ colour is strongly dependent on metallicity, and find that $W1-W2$ colour is a promising metallicity indicator. Comparison of the late-K and early-M dwarf colours, metallicities, and $T_{\rm eff}$ to those from three different model grids shows reasonable agreement in $r-z$ and $J-K_S$ colours, but poor agreement in $u-g$, $g-r$, and $W1-W2$. Comparison of the metallicities of the KM dwarf sample to those from previous colour-metallicity relations reveals a lack of consensus in photometric metallicity indicators for late-K and early-M dwarfs. We also present empirical relations for $T_{\rm eff}$ as a function of $r-z$ colour combined with either [M/H] or $W1-W2$ colour, and for [M/H] as a function of $r-z$ and $W1-W2$ colour. These relations yield $T_{\rm eff}$ to $\sim$100 K and [M/H] to $\sim$0.18 dex precision with colours alone, for $T_{\rm eff}$ in the range of 3550-4200 K and [M/H] in the range of $-$0.5-0.2.
[122]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.01413  [pdf] - 1418838
Doppler Monitoring of five K2 Transiting Planetary Systems
Comments: 20 pages, 14 figures, 10 tables. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2016-04-05, last modified: 2016-05-05
In an effort to measure the masses of planets discovered by the NASA {\it K2} mission, we have conducted precise Doppler observations of five stars with transiting planets. We present the results of a joint analysis of these new data and previously published Doppler data. The first star, an M dwarf known as K2-3 or EPIC~201367065, has three transiting planets ("b", with radius $2.1~R_{\oplus}$; "c", $1.7~R_{\oplus}$; and "d", $1.5~R_{\oplus}$). Our analysis leads to the mass constraints: $M_{b}=8.1^{+2.0}_{-1.9}~M_{\oplus}$ and $M_{c}$ < $ 4.2~M_{\oplus}$~(95\%~conf.). The mass of planet d is poorly constrained because its orbital period is close to the stellar rotation period, making it difficult to disentangle the planetary signal from spurious Doppler shifts due to stellar activity. The second star, a G dwarf known as K2-19 or EPIC~201505350, has two planets ("b", $7.7~R_{\oplus}$; and "c", $4.9~R_{\oplus}$) in a 3:2 mean-motion resonance, as well as a shorter-period planet ("d", $1.1~R_{\oplus}$). We find $M_{b}$= $28.5^{+5.4}_{-5.0} ~M_{\oplus}$, $M_{c}$= $25.6^{+7.1}_{-7.1} ~M_{\oplus}$ and $M_{d}$ < $14.0~M_{\oplus} $~(95\%~conf.). The third star, a G dwarf known as K2-24 or EPIC~203771098, hosts two transiting planets ("b", $5.7~R_{\oplus}$; and "c", $7.8~R_{\oplus}$) with orbital periods in a nearly 2:1 ratio. We find $M_{b}$= $19.8^{+4.5}_{-4.4} ~M_{\oplus}$ and $M_{c}$ = $26.0^{+5.8}_{-6.1}~M_{\oplus}$.....
[123]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.00323  [pdf] - 1433049
The Pan-Pacific Planet Search V. Fundamental Parameters for 164 Evolved Stars
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2016-05-01
We present spectroscopic stellar parameters for the complete target list of 164 evolved stars from the Pan-Pacific Planet Search, a five-year radial velocity campaign using the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope. For 87 of these bright giants, our work represents the first determination of their fundamental parameters. Our results carry typical uncertainties of 100 K, 0.15 dex, and 0.1 dex in $T_{\rm eff}$, $\log g$, and [Fe/H] and are consistent with literature values where available. The derived stellar masses have a mean of $1.31^{+0.28}_{-0.25}$ Msun, with a tail extending to $\sim$2 Msun, consistent with the interpretation of these targets as "retired" A-F type stars.
[124]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.03143  [pdf] - 1397012
Radial Velocity Planet Detection Biases at the Stellar Rotational Period
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures. Accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-04-11
Future generations of precise radial velocity (RV) surveys aim to achieve sensitivity sufficient to detect Earth mass planets orbiting in their stars' habitable zones. A major obstacle to this goal is astrophysical radial velocity noise caused by active areas moving across the stellar limb as a star rotates. In this paper, we quantify how stellar activity impacts exoplanet detection with radial velocities as a function of orbital and stellar rotational periods. We perform data-driven simulations of how stellar rotation affects planet detectability and compile and present relations for the typical timescale and amplitude of stellar radial velocity noise as a function of stellar mass. We show that the characteristic timescales of quasi-periodic radial velocity jitter from stellar rotational modulations coincides with the orbital period of habitable zone exoplanets around early M-dwarfs. These coincident periods underscore the importance of monitoring the targets of RV habitable zone planet surveys through simultaneous photometric measurements for determining rotation periods and activity signals, and mitigating activity signals using spectroscopic indicators and/or RV measurements at different wavelengths.
[125]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.09343  [pdf] - 1396980
Benchmark Transiting Brown Dwarf LHS 6343 C: Spitzer Secondary Eclipse Observations Yield Brightness Temperature and mid-T Spectral Class
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in ApJL
Submitted: 2016-03-30
There are no field brown dwarf analogs with measured masses, radii, and luminosities, precluding our ability to connect the population of transiting brown dwarfs with measurable masses and radii and field brown dwarfs with measurable luminosities and atmospheric properties. LHS 6343 C, a weakly-irradiated brown dwarf transiting one member of an M+M binary in the Kepler field, provides the first opportunity to probe the atmosphere of a non-inflated brown dwarf with a measured mass and radius. Here, we analyze four Spitzer observations of secondary eclipses of LHS 6343 C behind LHS 6343 A. Jointly fitting the eclipses with a Gaussian process noise model of the instrumental systematics, we measure eclipse depths of 1.06 \pm 0.21 ppt at 3.6 microns and 2.09 \pm 0.08 ppt at 4.5 microns, corresponding to brightness temperatures of 1026 \pm 57 K and 1249 \pm 36 K, respectively. We then apply brown dwarf evolutionary models to infer a bolometric luminosity log(L_star / L_sun) = -5.16 \pm 0.04. Given the known physical properties of the brown dwarf and the two M dwarfs in the LHS 6343 C system, these depths are consistent with models of a 1100 K T dwarf at an age of 5 Gyr and empirical observations of field T5-6 dwarfs with temperatures of 1070 \pm 130 K. We investigate the possibility that the orbit of LHS 6343 C has been altered by the Kozai-Lidov mechanism and propose additional astrometric or Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements of the system to probe the dynamical history of the system.
[126]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.05997  [pdf] - 1457198
Retrieval of Precise Radial Velocities from Near-Infrared High Resolution Spectra of Low Mass Stars
Comments: 64 pages, 28 figures, 5 tables. Accepted for publication in PASP
Submitted: 2016-03-18
Given that low-mass stars have intrinsically low luminosities at optical wavelengths and a propensity for stellar activity, it is advantageous for radial velocity (RV) surveys of these objects to use near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. In this work we describe and test a novel RV extraction pipeline dedicated to retrieving RVs from low mass stars using NIR spectra taken by the CSHELL spectrograph at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, where a methane isotopologue gas cell is used for wavelength calibration. The pipeline minimizes the residuals between the observations and a spectral model composed of templates for the target star, the gas cell, and atmospheric telluric absorption; models of the line spread function, continuum curvature, and sinusoidal fringing; and a parameterization of the wavelength solution. The stellar template is derived iteratively from the science observations themselves without a need for separate observations dedicated to retrieving it. Despite limitations from CSHELL's narrow wavelength range and instrumental systematics, we are able to (1) obtain an RV precision of 35 m/s for the RV standard star GJ 15 A over a time baseline of 817 days, reaching the photon noise limit for our attained SNR, (2) achieve ~3 m/s RV precision for the M giant SV Peg over a baseline of several days and confirm its long-term RV trend due to stellar pulsations, as well as obtain nightly noise floors of ~2 - 6 m/s, and (3) show that our data are consistent with the known masses, periods, and orbital eccentricities of the two most massive planets orbiting GJ 876. Future applications of our pipeline to RV surveys using the next generation of NIR spectrographs, such as iSHELL, will enable the potential detection of Super-Earths and Mini-Neptunes in the habitable zones of M dwarfs.
[127]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.05999  [pdf] - 1382174
Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities
Comments: To appear in "Young Stars and Planets Near the Sun", Proceedings of IAU Symposium No. 314 (Cambridge University Press), J.H. Kastner, B. Stelzer, S.A. Metchev, eds
Submitted: 2016-03-18
We present the results of two 2.3 micron near-infrared radial velocity surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility, combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m/s on our survey targets.
[128]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.05998  [pdf] - 1439773
A High-Precision NIR Survey for RV Variable Low-Mass Stars
Comments: 29 pages, 16 figures, 6 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2016-03-18
We present the results of a precise near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) survey of 32 low-mass stars with spectral types K2-M4 using CSHELL at the NASA IRTF in the $K$-band with an isotopologue methane gas cell to achieve wavelength calibration and a novel iterative RV extraction method. We surveyed 14 members of young ($\approx$ 25-150 Myr) moving groups, the young field star $\varepsilon$ Eridani as well as 18 nearby ($<$ 25 pc) low-mass stars and achieved typical single-measurement precisions of 8-15 m s$^{-1}$ with a long-term stability of 15-50 m s$^{-1}$. We obtain the best NIR RV constraints to date on 27 targets in our sample, 19 of which were never followed by high-precision RV surveys. Our results indicate that very active stars can display long-term RV variations as low as $\sim$ 25-50 m s$^{-1}$ at $\approx$ 2.3125 $\mu$m, thus constraining the effect of jitter at these wavelengths. We provide the first multi-wavelength confirmation of GJ 876 bc and independently retrieve orbital parameters consistent with previous studies. We recovered RV variability for HD 160934 AB and GJ 725 AB that are consistent with their known binary orbits, and nine other targets are candidate RV variables with a statistical significance of 3-5$\sigma$. Our method combined with the new iSHELL spectrograph will yield long-term RV precisions of $\lesssim$ 5 m s$^{-1}$ in the NIR, which will allow the detection of Super-Earths near the habitable zone of mid-M dwarfs.
[129]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.07939  [pdf] - 1411343
State of the Field: Extreme Precision Radial Velocities
Comments: 45 pages, 23 Figures, workshop summary proceedings
Submitted: 2016-02-25, last modified: 2016-02-27
The Second Workshop on Extreme Precision Radial Velocities defined circa 2015 the state of the art Doppler precision and identified the critical path challenges for reaching 10 cm/s measurement precision. The presentations and discussion of key issues for instrumentation and data analysis and the workshop recommendations for achieving this precision are summarized here. Beginning with the HARPS spectrograph, technological advances for precision radial velocity measurements have focused on building extremely stable instruments. To reach still higher precision, future spectrometers will need to produce even higher fidelity spectra. This should be possible with improved environmental control, greater stability in the illumination of the spectrometer optics, better detectors, more precise wavelength calibration, and broader bandwidth spectra. Key data analysis challenges for the precision radial velocity community include distinguishing center of mass Keplerian motion from photospheric velocities, and the proper treatment of telluric contamination. Success here is coupled to the instrument design, but also requires the implementation of robust statistical and modeling techniques. Center of mass velocities produce Doppler shifts that affect every line identically, while photospheric velocities produce line profile asymmetries with wavelength and temporal dependencies that are different from Keplerian signals. Exoplanets are an important subfield of astronomy and there has been an impressive rate of discovery over the past two decades. Higher precision radial velocity measurements are required to serve as a discovery technique for potentially habitable worlds and to characterize detections from transit missions. The future of exoplanet science has very different trajectories depending on the precision that can ultimately be achieved with Doppler measurements.
[130]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.05473  [pdf] - 1378835
The Early Growth of the First Black Holes
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures, invited review accepted for publication in PASA
Submitted: 2016-01-20, last modified: 2016-01-30
With detections of quasars powered by increasingly massive black holes (BHs) at increasingly early times in cosmic history over the past decade, there has been correspondingly rapid progress made on the theory of early BH formation and growth. Here we review the emerging picture of how the first massive BHs formed from the primordial gas and then grew to supermassive scales. We discuss the initial conditions for the formation of the progenitors of these seed BHs, the factors dictating the initial masses with which they form, and their initial stages of growth via accretion, which may occur at super-Eddington rates. Finally, we briefly discuss how these results connect to large-scale simulations of the growth of supermassive BHs over the course of the first billion years following the Big Bang.
[131]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.07595  [pdf] - 1396832
Statistics of Long Period Gas Giant Planets in Known Planetary Systems
Comments: Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2016-01-27, last modified: 2016-01-28
We conducted a Doppler survey at Keck combined with NIRC2 K-band AO imaging to search for massive, long-period companions to 123 known exoplanet systems with one or two planets detected using the radial velocity (RV) method. Our survey is sensitive to Jupiter mass planets out to 20 AU for a majority of stars in our sample, and we report the discovery of eight new long-period planets, in addition to 20 systems with statistically significant RV trends indicating the presence of an outer companion beyond 5 AU. We combine our RV observations with AO imaging to determine the range of allowed masses and orbital separations for these companions, and account for variations in our sensitivity to companions among stars in our sample. We estimate the total occurrence rate of companions in our sample to be 52 +/- 5% over the range 1 - 20 M_Jup and 5 - 20 AU. Our data also suggest a declining frequency for gas giant planets in these systems beyond 3-10 AU, in contrast to earlier studies that found a rising frequency for giant planets in the range 0.01-3 AU. This suggests either that the frequency of gas giant planets peaks between 3-10 AU, or that outer companions in these systems have a different semi-major axis distribution than the overall gas giant planet population. Our results also suggest that hot gas giants may be more likely to have an outer companion than cold gas giants. We find that planets with an outer companion have higher average eccentricities than their single counterparts, suggesting that dynamical interactions between planets may play an important role in these systems.
[132]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.03099  [pdf] - 1498249
Chemical abundance gradients from open clusters in the Milky Way disk: results from the APOGEE survey
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, To appear in Astronomische Nachrichten, special issue "Reconstruction the Milky Way's History: Spectroscopic surveys, Asteroseismology and Chemo-dynamical models", Guest Editors C. Chiappini, J. Montalb\'an, and M. Steffen, AN 2016 (in press)"
Submitted: 2016-01-12
Metallicity gradients provide strong constraints for understanding the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. We report on radial abundance gradients of Fe, Ni, Ca, Si, and Mg obtained from a sample of 304 red-giant members of 29 disk open clusters, mostly concentrated at galactocentric distances between ~8 - 15 kpc, but including two open clusters in the outer disk. The observations are from the APOGEE survey. The chemical abundances were derived automatically by the ASPCAP pipeline and these are part of the SDSS III Data Release 12. The gradients, obtained from least squares fits to the data, are relatively flat, with slopes ranging from -0.026 to -0.033 dex/kpc for the alpha-elements [O/H], [Ca/H], [Si/H] and [Mg/H] and -0.035 dex/kpc and -0.040 dex/kpc for [Fe/H] and [Ni/H], respectively. Our results are not at odds with the possibility that metallicity ([Fe/H]) gradients are steeper in the inner disk (R_GC ~7 - 12 kpc) and flatter towards the outer disk. The open cluster sample studied spans a significant range in age. When breaking the sample into age bins, there is some indication that the younger open cluster population in our sample (log age < 8.7) has a flatter metallicity gradient when compared with the gradients obtained from older open clusters.
[133]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.01459  [pdf] - 1359158
Spectroscopic Survey of G and K Dwarfs in the Hipparcos Catalog. I. Comparison between the Hipparcos and Photometric Parallaxes
Comments: 34 pages, 17 figures, 7 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJS
Submitted: 2016-01-07
The tension between the Hipparcos parallax of the Pleiades and other independent distance estimates continues even after the new reduction of the Hipparcos astrometric data and the development of a new geometric distance measurement for the cluster. A short Pleiades distance from the Hipparcos parallax predicts a number of stars in the solar neighborhood that are sub-luminous at a given photospheric abundance. We test this hypothesis using spectroscopic abundances for a subset of stars in the Hipparcos catalog, which occupy the same region as the Pleiades in the color-magnitude diagram. We derive stellar parameters for 170 nearby G and K type field dwarfs in the Hipparcos catalog based on high-resolution spectra obtained using KPNO 4-m echelle spectrograph. Our analysis shows that, when the Hipparcos parallaxes are adopted, most of our sample stars follow empirical color-magnitude relations. A small fraction of stars are too faint compared to main-sequence fitting relations by $\Delta M_V \geq 0.3$ mag, but the differences are marginal at a $2\sigma$ level partly due to relatively large parallax errors. On the other hand, we find that photometric distances of stars showing signatures of youth as determined from lithium absorption line strengths and $R'_{\rm HK}$ chromospheric activity indices are consistent with the Hipparcos parallaxes. Our result is contradictory to a suggestion that the Pleiades distance from main-sequence fitting is significantly altered by stellar activity and/or the young age of its stars, and provides an additional supporting evidence for the long distance scale of the Pleiades.
[134]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.07316  [pdf] - 1359107
The Pan-Pacific Planet Search. IV. Two super-Jupiters in a 3:5 resonance orbiting the giant star HD33844
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-12-22
We report the discovery of two giant planets orbiting the K giant HD 33844 based on radial velocity data from three independent campaigns. The planets move on nearly circular orbits with semimajor axes $a_b=1.60\pm$0.02 AU and $a_c=2.24\pm$0.05 AU, and have minimum masses (m sin $i$) of $M_b=1.96\pm$0.12 Mjup and $M_c=1.76\pm$0.18 Mjup. Detailed N-body dynamical simulations show that the two planets remain on stable orbits for more than $10^6$ years for low eccentricities, and are most likely trapped in a mutual 3:5 mean-motion resonance.
[135]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.04948  [pdf] - 1374219
APOGEE Kinematics I: Overview of the Kinematics of the Galactic Bulge as Mapped by APOGEE
Comments: Accepted by ApJ 15 December 2015
Submitted: 2015-12-15
We present the stellar kinematics across the Galactic bulge and into the disk at positive longitudes from the SDSS-III APOGEE spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way. APOGEE includes extensive coverage of the stellar populations of the bulge along the mid-plane and near-plane regions. From these data, we have produced kinematic maps of 10,000 stars across longitudes 0 deg < l < 65 deg, and primarily across latitudes of |b| < 5 deg in the bulge region. The APOGEE data reveal that the bulge is cylindrically rotating across all latitudes and is kinematically hottest at the very centre of the bulge, with the smallest gradients in both kinematic and chemical space inside the inner-most region (l,|b|) < (5,5) deg. The results from APOGEE show good agreement with data from other surveys at higher latitudes and a remarkable similarity to the rotation and dispersion maps of barred galaxies viewed edge on. The thin bar that is reported to be present in the inner disk within a narrow latitude range of |b| < 2 deg appears to have a corresponding signature in [Fe/H] and [alpha/Fe]. Stars with [Fe/H] > -0.5 have dispersion and rotation profiles that are similar to that of N-body models of boxy/peanut bulges. There is a smooth kinematic transition from the thin bar and boxy bulge (l,|b|) < (15,12) deg out into the disk for stars with [Fe/H] > -1.0, and the chemodynamics across (l,b) suggests the stars in the inner Galaxy with [Fe/H] > -1.0 have an origin in the disk.
[136]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.09097  [pdf] - 1347708
The Kepler-454 System: A Small, Not-rocky Inner Planet, a Jovian World, and a Distant Companion
Comments: 40 pages, 13 figures, 6 pages; ApJ in press
Submitted: 2015-11-29
Kepler-454 (KOI-273) is a relatively bright (V = 11.69 mag), Sun-like starthat hosts a transiting planet candidate in a 10.6 d orbit. From spectroscopy, we estimate the stellar temperature to be 5687 +/- 50 K, its metallicity to be [m/H] = 0.32 +/- 0.08, and the projected rotational velocity to be v sin i <2.4 km s-1. We combine these values with a study of the asteroseismic frequencies from short cadence Kepler data to estimate the stellar mass to be 1.028+0:04-0:03 M_Sun, the radius to be 1.066 +/- 0.012 R_Sun and the age to be 5.25+1:41-1:39 Gyr. We estimate the radius of the 10.6 d planet as 2.37 +/- 0.13 R_Earth. Using 63 radial velocity observations obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and 36 observations made with the HIRES spectrograph at Keck Observatory, we measure the mass of this planet to be 6.8 +/- 1.4M_Earth. We also detect two additional non-transiting companions, a planet with a minimum mass of 4.46 +/- 0.12 M_J in a nearly circular 524 d orbit and a massive companion with a period >10 years and mass >12.1M_J . The twelve exoplanets with radii <2.7 R_Earth and precise mass measurements appear to fall into two populations, with those <1.6 R_Earth following an Earth-like composition curve and larger planets requiring a significant fraction of volatiles. With a density of 2.76 +/- 0.73 g cm-3, Kepler-454b lies near the mass transition between these two populations and requires the presence of volatiles and/or H/He gas.
[137]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.04080  [pdf] - 1319525
The SDSS-III APOGEE Spectral Line List for H-band Spectroscopy
Comments: Accepted to ApJ Sup
Submitted: 2015-02-13, last modified: 2015-11-17
We present the $H$-band spectral line lists adopted by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). The APOGEE line lists comprise astrophysical, theoretical, and laboratory sources from the literature, as well as newly evaluated astrophysical oscillator strengths and damping parameters. We discuss the construction of the APOGEE line list, which is one of the critical inputs for the APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline, and present three different versions that have been used at various stages of the project. The methodology for the newly calculated astrophysical line lists is reviewed. The largest of these three line lists contains 134,457 molecular and atomic transitions. In addition to the format adopted to store the data, the line lists are available in MOOG, Synspec and Turbospectrum formats. We also present a list of $H$-band spectral features that are either poorly represented or completely missing in our line list. This list is based on the average of a large number of spectral fit residuals for APOGEE observations spanning a wide range of stellar parameters.
[138]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.03606  [pdf] - 1331119
Globular and Open Clusters Observed by SDSS/SEGUE: the Giant Stars
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, Astronomical Journal in press
Submitted: 2015-11-11
We present griz observations for the clusters M92, M13 and NGC 6791 and gr photometry for M71, Be 29 and NGC 7789. In addition we present new membership identifications for all these clusters, which have been observed spectroscopically as calibrators for the SDSS/SEGUE survey; this paper focuses in particular on the red giant branch stars in the clusters. In a number of cases, these giants were too bright to be observed in the normal SDSS survey operations, and we describe the procedure used to obtain spectra for these stars. For M71, also present a new variable reddening map and a new fiducial for the gr giant branch. For NGC 7789, we derived a transformation from Teff to g-r for giants of near solar abundance, using IRFM Teff measures of stars with good ugriz and 2MASS photometry and SEGUE spectra. The result of our analysis is a robust list of known cluster members with correctly dereddened and (if needed) transformed gr photometry for crucial calibration efforts for SDSS and SEGUE.
[139]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.09133  [pdf] - 1347439
The SEGUE K Giant Survey. III. Quantifying Galactic Halo Substructure
Comments: 49 pages; 24 figures. Accepted to ApJ; revisions made due to the referee's comments, notably an updated result: K giants and BHBs have similar substructure over similar distance ranges; previously we concluded that K giants were more highly structured (see Section 4.3). Additionally, we have updated the discussion on false positive groups and group membership trends in Section 5.3
Submitted: 2015-03-31, last modified: 2015-11-11
We statistically quantify the amount of substructure in the Milky Way stellar halo using a sample of 4568 halo K giant stars at Galactocentric distances ranging over 5-125 kpc. These stars have been selected photometrically and confirmed spectroscopically as K giants from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's SEGUE project. Using a position-velocity clustering estimator (the 4distance) and a model of a smooth stellar halo, we quantify the amount of substructure in the halo, divided by distance and metallicity. Overall, we find that the halo as a whole is highly structured. We also confirm earlier work using BHB stars which showed that there is an increasing amount of substructure with increasing Galactocentric radius, and additionally find that the amount of substructure in the halo increases with increasing metallicity. Comparing to resampled BHB stars, we find that K giants and BHBs have similar amounts of substructure over equivalent ranges of Galactocentric radius. Using a friends-of-friends algorithm to identify members of individual groups, we find that a large fraction (~33%) of grouped stars are associated with Sgr, and identify stars belonging to other halo star streams: the Orphan Stream, the Cetus Polar Stream, and others, including previously unknown substructures. A large fraction of sample K giants (more than 50%) are not grouped into any substructure. We find also that the Sgr stream strongly dominates groups in the outer halo for all except the most metal-poor stars, and suggest that this is the source of the increase of substructure with Galactocentric radius and metallicity.
[140]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.08839  [pdf] - 1327528
HAT-P-57b: A Short-Period Giant Planet Transiting A Bright Rapidly Rotating A8V Star Confirmed Via Doppler Tomography
Comments: 18 pages, 14 figures, 5 tables, accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2015-10-29
We present the discovery of HAT-P-57b, a P = 2.4653 day transiting planet around a V = 10.465 +- 0.029 mag, Teff = 7500 +- 250 K main sequence A8V star with a projected rotation velocity of v sin i = 102.1 +- 1.3 km s^-1. We measure the radius of the planet to be R = 1.413 +- 0.054 R_J and, based on RV observations, place a 95% confidence upper limit on its mass of M < 1.85 M_J . Based on theoretical stellar evolution models, the host star has a mass and radius of 1.47 +- 0.12 M_sun, and 1.500 +- 0.050 R_sun, respectively. Spectroscopic observations made with Keck-I/HIRES during a partial transit event show the Doppler shadow of HAT-P-57b moving across the average spectral line profile of HAT-P- 57, confirming the object as a planetary system. We use these observations, together with analytic formulae that we derive for the line profile distortions, to determine the projected angle between the spin axis of HAT-P-57 and the orbital axis of HAT-P-57b. The data permit two possible solutions, with -16.7 deg < lambda < 3.3 deg or 27.6 deg < lambda < 57.4 deg at 95% confidence, and with relative probabilities for the two modes of 26% and 74%, respectively. Adaptive optics imaging with MMT/Clio2 reveals an object located 2.7" from HAT-P-57 consisting of two point sources separated in turn from each other by 0.22". The H and L -band magnitudes of the companion stars are consistent with their being physically associated with HAT-P-57, in which case they are stars of mass 0.61 +- 0.10 M_sun and 0.53 +- 0.08 M_sun. HAT-P-57 is the most rapidly rotating star, and only the fourth main sequence A star, known to host a transiting planet.
[141]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.03811  [pdf] - 1312090
Doppler Monitoring of the WASP-47 Multiplanet System
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, accepted for ApJL
Submitted: 2015-10-13, last modified: 2015-10-28
We present precise Doppler observations of WASP-47, a transiting planetary system featuring a hot Jupiter with both inner and outer planetary companions. This system has an unusual architecture and also provides a rare opportunity to measure planet masses in two different ways: the Doppler method, and the analysis of transit-timing variations (TTV). Based on the new Doppler data, obtained with the Planet Finder Spectrograph on the Magellan/Clay 6.5m telescope, the mass of the hot Jupiter is $370 \pm 29~M_{\oplus}$. This is consistent with the previous Doppler determination as well as the TTV determination. For the inner planet WASP-47e, the Doppler data lead to a mass of $12.2\pm 3.7~ M_{\oplus}$, in agreement with the TTV-based upper limit of $<$22~$M_{\oplus}$ ($95\%$ confidence). For the outer planet WASP-47d, the Doppler mass constraint of $10.4\pm 8.4~M_{\oplus}$ is consistent with the TTV-based measurement of $15.2^{+6.7}_{-7.6}~ M_{\oplus}$.
[142]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.07635  [pdf] - 1414991
ASPCAP: The Apogee Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundances Pipeline
Comments: 19 pages,11 figures - Submitted to The Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2015-10-26
The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has built the largest moderately high-resolution (R=22, 500) spectroscopic map of the stars across the Milky Way, and including dust-obscured areas. The APOGEE Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) is the software developed for the automated analysis of these spectra. ASPCAP determines atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances from observed spectra by comparing observed spectra to libraries of theoretical spectra, using chi-2 minimization in a multidimensional parameter space. The package consists of a fortran90 code that does the actual minimization, and a wrapper IDL code for book-keeping and data handling. This paper explains in detail the ASPCAP components and functionality, and presents results from a number of tests designed to check its performance. ASPCAP provides stellar effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities precise to 2%, 0.1 dex, and 0.05 dex, respectively, for most APOGEE stars, which are predominantly giants. It also provides abundances for up to 15 chemical elements with various levels of precision, typically under 0.1 dex. The final data release (DR12) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III contains an APOGEE database of more than 150,000 stars. ASPCAP development continues in the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 survey.
[143]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.06434  [pdf] - 1546201
Multiwavelength Transit Observations of the Candidate Disintegrating Planetesimals Orbiting WD 1145+017
Comments: 16 pages, 12 figures, submitted to ApJ on October 8th, 2015
Submitted: 2015-10-21
We present multiwavelength, multi-telescope, ground-based follow-up photometry of the white dwarf WD 1145+017, that has recently been suggested to be orbited by up to six or more, short-period, low-mass, disintegrating planetesimals. We detect 9 significant dips in flux of between 10% and 30% of the stellar flux from our ground-based photometry. We observe transits deeper than 10% on average every ~3.6 hr in our photometry. This suggests that WD 1145+017 is indeed being orbited by multiple, short-period objects. Through fits to the multiple asymmetric transits that we observe, we confirm that the transit egress timescale is usually longer than the ingress timescale, and that the transit duration is longer than expected for a solid body at these short periods, all suggesting that these objects have cometary tails streaming behind them. The precise orbital periods of the planetesimals in this system are unclear from the transit-times, but at least one object, and likely more, have orbital periods of ~4.5 hours. We are otherwise unable to confirm the specific periods that have been reported, bringing into question the long-term stability of these periods. Our high precision photometry also displays low amplitude variations suggesting that dusty material is consistently passing in front of the white dwarf, either from discarded material from these disintegrating planetesimals or from the detected dusty debris disk. For the significant transits we observe, we compare the transit depths in the V- and R-bands of our multiwavelength photometry, and find no significant difference; therefore, for likely compositions the radius of single-size particles in the cometary tails streaming behind the planetesimals in this system must be ~0.15 microns or larger, or ~0.06 microns or smaller, with 2-sigma confidence.
[144]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.06387  [pdf] - 1297789
A disintegrating minor planet transiting a white dwarf
Comments: Published in Nature on October 22, 2015, available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature15527 . This is the authors' version of the manuscript. 33 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2015-10-21
White dwarfs are the end state of most stars, including the Sun, after they exhaust their nuclear fuel. Between 1/4 and 1/2 of white dwarfs have elements heavier than helium in their atmospheres, even though these elements should rapidly settle into the stellar interiors unless they are occasionally replenished. The abundance ratios of heavy elements in white dwarf atmospheres are similar to rocky bodies in the Solar system. This and the existence of warm dusty debris disks around about 4% of white dwarfs suggest that rocky debris from white dwarf progenitors' planetary systems occasionally pollute the stars' atmospheres. The total accreted mass can be comparable to that of large asteroids in the solar system. However, the process of disrupting planetary material has not yet been observed. Here, we report observations of a white dwarf being transited by at least one and likely multiple disintegrating planetesimals with periods ranging from 4.5 hours to 4.9 hours. The strongest transit signals occur every 4.5 hours and exhibit varying depths up to 40% and asymmetric profiles, indicative of a small object with a cometary tail of dusty effluent material. The star hosts a dusty debris disk and the star's spectrum shows prominent lines from heavy elements like magnesium, aluminium, silicon, calcium, iron, and nickel. This system provides evidence that heavy element pollution of white dwarfs can originate from disrupted rocky bodies such as asteroids and minor planets.
[145]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.05602  [pdf] - 1312107
Attaining Doppler Precision of 10 cm/s with a Lock-In Amplified Spectrometer
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures, 2 tables. Accepted to PASP
Submitted: 2015-10-19
We explore the radial velocity performance benefits of coupling starlight to a fast-scanning interferometer and a fast-readout spectrometer with zero readout noise. By rapidly scanning an interferometer we can decouple wavelength calibration errors from precise radial velocity measurements, exploiting the advantages of lock-in amplification. In a Bayesian framework, we investigate the correlation between wavelength calibration errors and resulting radial velocity errors. We construct an end-to-end simulation of this approach to address the feasibility of achieving 10 cm/s radial velocity precision on a typical Sun-like star using existing, 5-meter-class telescopes. We find that such a precision can be reached in a single night, opening up possibilities for ground-based detections of Earth-Sun analog systems.
[146]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.2995  [pdf] - 1293994
Probing the stellar initial mass function with high-$z$ supernovae
Comments: 17 pages, 11 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-01-13, last modified: 2015-10-15
The first supernovae will soon be visible at the edge of the observable universe, revealing the birthplaces of Population III stars. With upcoming near-infrared missions, a broad analysis of the detectability of high-$z$ supernovae is paramount. We combine cosmological and radiation transport simulations, instrument specifications, and survey strategies to create synthetic observations of primeval core-collapse, Type IIn and pair-instability supernovae with the James Webb Space Telescope ($JWST$). We show that a dedicated observational campaign with the $JWST$ can detect up to $\sim 15$ pair-instability explosions, $\sim 300$ core-collapse supernovae, but less than one Type IIn explosion per year, depending on the Population III star formation history. Our synthetic survey also shows that $\approx 1-2 \times10^2$ supernovae detections, depending on the accuracy of the classification, are sufficient to discriminate between a Salpeter and flat mass distribution for high redshift stars with a confidence level greater than 99.5 per cent. We discuss how the purity of the sample affects our results and how supervised learning methods may help to discriminate between CC and PI SNe.
[147]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.2081  [pdf] - 1293999
The impact of reionization on the formation of supermassive black hole seeds
Comments: 9 pages, 8 figures; published in MNRAS; Figure 1 slightly degraded to reduce size; acknowledgement added
Submitted: 2014-05-08, last modified: 2015-10-14
Direct collapse black holes (DCBHs) formed from the collapse of atomically-cooled primordial gas in the early Universe are strong candidates for the seeds of supermassive BHs. DCBHs are thought to form in atomic cooling haloes in the presence of a strong molecule-dissociating, Lyman-Werner (LW) radiation field. Given that star forming galaxies are likely to be the source of the LW radiation in this scenario, ionizing radiation from these galaxies may accompany the LW radiation. We present cosmological simulations resolving the collapse of primordial gas into an atomic cooling halo, including the effects of both LW and ionizing radiation. We find that in cases where the gas is not self-shielded from the ionizing radiation, the collapse can be delayed by ~ 25 Myr. When the ionized gas does collapse, the free electrons that are present catalyze H2 formation. In turn, H2 cooling becomes efficient in the center of the halo, and DCBH formation is prevented. We emphasize, however, that in many cases the gas collapsing into atomic cooling haloes at high redshift is self-shielding to ionizing radiation. Therefore, it is only in a fraction of such haloes in which DCBH formation is prevented due to reionization.
[148]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.5837  [pdf] - 1293996
Population III Hypernovae
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2014-01-22, last modified: 2015-10-14
Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. But until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25 - 50 M$_{\odot}$ hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10 - 15 to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and z = 4 - 5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ~ 20, in the first generation of stars.
[149]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.04343  [pdf] - 1312094
The Pan-Pacific Planet Search III: Five companions orbiting giant stars
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-10-14
We report a new giant planet orbiting the K giant HD 155233, as well as four stellar-mass companions from the Pan-Pacific Planet Search, a southern hemisphere radial velocity survey for planets orbiting nearby giants and subgiants. We also present updated velocities and a refined orbit for HD 47205b (7 CMa b), the first planet discovered by this survey. HD 155233b has a period of 885$\pm$63 days, eccentricity e=0.03$\pm$0.20, and m sin i=2.0$\pm$0.5 M_jup. The stellar-mass companions range in m sin i from 0.066 M_sun to 0.33 M_sun. Whilst HD 104358B falls slightly below the traditional 0.08 M_sun hydrogen-burning mass limit, and is hence a brown dwarf candidate, we estimate only a 50% a priori probability of a truly substellar mass.
[150]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.00015  [pdf] - 1358886
KELT-4Ab: An inflated Hot Jupiter transiting the bright (V~10) component of a hierarchical triple
Comments: 16 pages, 14 figures. Submitted to AJ
Submitted: 2015-09-30
We report the discovery of KELT-4Ab, an inflated, transiting Hot Jupiter orbiting the brightest component of a hierarchical triple stellar system. The host star is an F star with $T_{\rm eff}=6206\pm75$ K, $\log g=4.108\pm0.014$, $\left[{\rm Fe}/{\rm H}\right]=-0.116_{-0.069}^{+0.065}$, ${\rm M_*}=1.201_{-0.061}^{+0.067} \ {\rm M}_{\odot}$, and ${\rm R_*}=1.610_{-0.068}^{+0.078} \ {\rm R}_{\odot}$. The best-fit linear ephemeris is $\rm {BJD_{TDB}} = 2456193.29157 \pm 0.00021 + E\left(2.9895936 \pm 0.0000048\right)$. With a magnitude of $V\sim10$, a planetary radius of $1.699_{-0.045}^{+0.046} \ {\rm R_J}$, and a mass of $0.902_{-0.059}^{+0.060} \ {\rm M_J}$, it is the brightest host among the population of inflated Hot Jupiters ($R_P > 1.5R_J$), making it a valuable discovery for probing the nature of inflated planets. In addition, its existence within a hierarchical triple and its proximity to Earth ($210$ pc) provides a unique opportunity for dynamical studies with continued monitoring with high resolution imaging and precision radial velocities. In particular, the motion of the binary stars around each other and of both stars around the primary star relative to the measured epoch in this work should be detectable when it rises in October 2015.
[151]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.05420  [pdf] - 1579712
The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)
Comments: Submitted to The Astronomical Journal: 50 pages, including 38 figures, 4 tables, and 5 appendices
Submitted: 2015-09-17
The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), one of the programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), has now completed its systematic, homogeneous spectroscopic survey sampling all major populations of the Milky Way. After a three year observing campaign on the Sloan 2.5-m Telescope, APOGEE has collected a half million high resolution (R~22,500), high S/N (>100), infrared (1.51-1.70 microns) spectra for 146,000 stars, with time series information via repeat visits to most of these stars. This paper describes the motivations for the survey and its overall design---hardware, field placement, target selection, operations---and gives an overview of these aspects as well as the data reduction, analysis and products. An index is also given to the complement of technical papers that describe various critical survey components in detail. Finally, we discuss the achieved survey performance and illustrate the variety of potential uses of the data products by way of a number of science demonstrations, which span from time series analysis of stellar spectral variations and radial velocity variations from stellar companions, to spatial maps of kinematics, metallicity and abundance patterns across the Galaxy and as a function of age, to new views of the interstellar medium, the chemistry of star clusters, and the discovery of rare stellar species. As part of SDSS-III Data Release 12, all of the APOGEE data products are now publicly available.
[152]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.07866  [pdf] - 1276996
Stellar and Planetary Properties of K2 Campaign 1 Candidates and Validation of 17 Planets, Including a Planet Receiving Earth-like Insolation
Comments: 17 pages, 5 figures, 5 tables, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. Updated to closely reflect published version in ApJ (2015, 809, 25)
Submitted: 2015-03-26, last modified: 2015-09-14
The extended Kepler mission, K2, is now providing photometry of new fields every three months in a search for transiting planets. In a recent study, Foreman-Mackey and collaborators presented a list of 36 planet candidates orbiting 31 stars in K2 Campaign 1. In this contribution, we present stellar and planetary properties for all systems. We combine ground-based seeing-limited survey data and adaptive optics imaging with an automated transit analysis scheme to validate 21 candidates as planets, 17 for the first time, and identify 6 candidates as likely false positives. Of particular interest is K2-18 (EPIC 201912552), a bright (K=8.9) M2.8 dwarf hosting a 2.23 \pm 0.25 R_Earth planet with T_eq = 272 \pm 15 K and an orbital period of 33 days. We also present two new open-source software packages which enable this analysis. The first, isochrones, is a flexible tool for fitting theoretical stellar models to observational data to determine stellar properties using a nested sampling scheme to capture the multimodal nature of the posterior distributions of the physical parameters of stars that may plausibly be evolved. The second is vespa, a new general-purpose procedure to calculate false positive probabilities and statistically validate transiting exoplanets.
[153]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.5701  [pdf] - 1275978
Formation of the First Galaxies: Theory and Simulations
Comments: 31 pages, 19 figures; chapter to appear in 'The First Galaxies - Theoretical Predictions and Observational Clues'; corrected typo in equation (32); some figures downgraded
Submitted: 2011-05-28, last modified: 2015-09-14
The properties of the first galaxies are shaped in large part by the first generations of stars, which emit high energy radiation and unleash both large amounts of mechanical energy and the first heavy elements when they explode as supernovae. We survey the theory of the formation of the first galaxies in this context, focusing on the results of cosmological simulations to illustrate a number of the key processes that define their properties. We first discuss the evolution of the primordial gas as it is incorporated into the earliest galaxies under the influence of the high energy radiation emitted by the earliest stars; we then turn to consider how the injection of heavy elements by the first supernovae transforms the evolution of the primordial gas and alters the character of the first galaxies. Finally, we discuss the prospects for the detection of the first galaxies by future observational missions, in particular focusing on the possibility that primordial star-forming galaxies may be uncovered.
[154]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.04189  [pdf] - 1304110
Measuring the Number of M-Dwarfs per M-Dwarf Using Kepler Eclipsing Binaries
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2015-09-14
We measure the binarity of detached M-dwarfs in the Kepler field with orbital periods in the range of 1-90 days. Kepler's photometric precision and nearly continuous monitoring of stellar targets over time baselines ranging from 3 months to 4 years make its detection efficiency for eclipsing binaries nearly complete over this period range and for all radius ratios. Our investigation employs a statistical framework akin to that used for inferring planetary occurrence rates from planetary transits. The obvious simplification is that eclipsing binaries have a vastly improved detection efficiency that is limited chiefly by their geometric probabilities to eclipse. For the M-dwarf sample observed by the Kepler Mission, the fractional incidence of eclipsing binaries implies that there are $0.11 ^{+0.02} _{-0.04}$ close stellar companions per apparently single M-dwarf. Our measured binarity is higher than previous inferences of the occurrence rate of close binaries via radial velocity techniques, at roughly the 2$\sigma$ level. This study represents the first use of eclipsing binary detections from a high quality transiting planet mission to infer binary statistics. Application of this statistical framework to the eclipsing binaries discovered by future transit surveys will establish better constraints on short-period M$+$M binary rate, as well as binarity measurements for stars of other spectral types.
[155]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.01254  [pdf] - 1296237
Beyond the Main Sequence: Testing the accuracy of stellar masses predicted by the PARSEC evolutionary tracks
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ. Complete tables 1 and 2 are available at https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_C74xx43AOHTXBKNDh1YVI4RDA/view?usp=sharing. Changes from v1 to v2: Section 4.5 and Figure 7 (about the Retired A Stars) were removed as per referee's request, but main results remain unchanged; minor edits to the text
Submitted: 2015-08-05, last modified: 2015-09-10
Characterizing the physical properties of exoplanets, and understanding their formation and orbital evolution requires precise and accurate knowledge of their host stars. Accurately measuring stellar masses is particularly important because they likely influence planet occurrence and the architectures of planetary systems. Single main-sequence stars typically have masses estimated from evolutionary tracks, which generally provide accurate results due to their extensive empirical calibration. However, the validity of this method for subgiants and giants has been called into question by recent studies, with suggestions that the masses of these evolved stars could have been overestimated. We investigate these concerns using a sample of 59 benchmark evolved stars with model-independent masses (from binary systems or asteroseismology) obtained from the literature. We find very good agreement between these benchmark masses and the ones estimated using evolutionary tracks. The average fractional difference in the mass interval $\sim$0.7 - 4.5 M$_{\odot}$, is consistent with zero (-1.30 $\pm$ 2.42%), with no significant trends in the residuals relative to the input parameters. A good agreement between model-dependent and -independent radii (-4.81 $\pm$ 1.32%) and surface gravities (0.71 $\pm$ 0.51%) is also found. The consistency between independently determined ages for members of binary systems adds further support for the accuracy of the method employed to derive the stellar masses. Taken together, our results indicate that determination of masses of evolved stars using grids of evolutionary tracks is not significantly affected by systematic errors, and is thus valid for estimating the masses of isolated stars beyond the main sequence.
[156]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.4189  [pdf] - 1276950
The chemical signature of surviving Population III stars in the Milky Way
Comments: 9 pages, 9 figures, 1 table; accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-11-15, last modified: 2015-08-05
Cosmological simulations of Population (Pop) III star formation suggest that the primordial initial mass function may have extended to sub-solar masses. If Pop III stars with masses < 0.8 M_Sun did form, then they should still be present in the Galaxy today as either main sequence or red giant stars. Despite broad searches, however, no primordial stars have yet been identified. It has long been recognized that the initial metal-free nature of primordial stars could be masked due to accretion of metal-enriched material from the interstellar medium (ISM). Here we point out that while gas accretion from the ISM may readily occur, the accretion of dust from the ISM can be prevented due to the pressure of the radiation emitted from low-mass stars. This implies a possible unique chemical signature for stars polluted only via accretion, namely an enhancement in gas phase elements relative to those in the dust phase. Using Pop III stellar models, we outline the conditions in which this signature could be exhibited, and we derive the expected signature for the case of accretion from the local ISM. Intriguingly, due to the large fraction of iron depleted into dust relative to that of carbon and other elements, this signature is similar to that observed in many of the so-called carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars. We therefore suggest that some fraction of the observed CEMP stars may, in fact, be accretion-polluted Pop III stars.
[157]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.08532  [pdf] - 1317011
The HARPS-N Rocky Planet Search I. HD219134b: A transiting rocky planet in a multi-planet system at 6.5 pc from the Sun
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2015-07-30
We present here the detection of a system of four low-mass planets around the bright (V=5.5) and close-by (6.5 pc) star HD219134. This is the first result of the Rocky Planet Search program with HARPS-N on the TNG in La Palma. The inner planet orbits the star in 3.0937 +/-0.0004 days, on a quasi-circular orbit with a semi-major axis of 0.0382 +/- 0.0003 AU. Spitzer observations allowed us to detect the transit of the planet in front of the star making HD219134b the nearest known transiting planet to date. From the amplitude of the radial-velocity variation (2.33 +/- 0.24 m/s) and observed depth of the transit (359 +/- 38 ppm), the planet mass and radius are estimated to be 4.46 +/- 0.47 M_{\oplus} and 1.606 +/- 0.086 R_{\oplus} leading to a mean density of 5.89 +/- 1.17 g/cc, suggesting a rocky composition. One additional planet with minimum mass of 2.67 +/- 0.59 M_{\oplus} moves on a close-in, quasi-circular orbit with a period of 6.765 +/- 0.005 days. The third planet in the system has a period of 46.78 +/- 0.16 days and a minimum mass of 8.7 +/- 1.1 M{\oplus}, at 0.234 +/- 0.002 AU from the star. Its eccentricity is 0.32 +/- 0.14. The period of this planet is close to the rotational period of the star estimated from variations of activity indicators (42.3 +/- 0.1 days). The planetary origin of the signal is, however, the preferred solution as no indication of variation at the corresponding frequency is observed for activity-sensitive parameters. Finally, a fourth additional longer-period planet of mass of 62 +/- 6 M_{\oplus} orbits the star in 1190 days, on an eccentric orbit (e=0.27 +/- 0.11) at a distance of 2.14 +/- 0.27 AU.
[158]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.08931  [pdf] - 1264088
Oscillating red giants observed during Campaign 1 of the Kepler K2 mission: New prospects for galactic archaeology
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, submitted to ApJL
Submitted: 2015-06-30, last modified: 2015-07-20
NASA's re-purposed Kepler mission -- dubbed K2 -- has brought new scientific opportunities that were not anticipated for the original Kepler mission. One science goal that makes optimal use of K2's capabilities, in particular its 360-degree ecliptic field of view, is galactic archaeology -- the study of the evolution of the Galaxy from the fossil stellar record. The thrust of this research is to exploit high-precision, time-resolved photometry from K2 in order to detect oscillations in red giant stars. This asteroseismic information can provide estimates of stellar radius (hence distance), mass and age of vast numbers of stars across the Galaxy. Here we present the initial analysis of a subset of red giants, observed towards the North Galactic Gap, during the mission's first full science campaign. We investigate the feasibility of using K2 data for detecting oscillations in red giants that span a range in apparent magnitude and evolutionary state (hence intrinsic luminosity). We demonstrate that oscillations are detectable for essentially all cool giants within the $\log g$ range $\sim 1.9-3.2$. Our detection is complete down to $\mathit{Kp}\sim 14.5$, which results in a seismic sample with little or no detection bias. This sample is ideally suited to stellar population studies that seek to investigate potential shortcomings of contemporary Galaxy models.
[159]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.01593  [pdf] - 1242310
Probing Galactic Structure with the Spatial Correlation Function of SEGUE G-dwarf Stars
Comments: 8 pages, 10 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2015-07-06
We measure the two-point correlation function of G-dwarf stars within 1-3 kpc of the Sun in multiple lines-of-sight using the Schlesinger et al. G-dwarf sample from the SDSS SEGUE survey. The shapes of the correlation functions along individual SEGUE lines-of-sight depend sensitively on both the stellar-density gradients and the survey geometry. We fit smooth disk galaxy models to our SEGUE clustering measurements, and obtain strong constraints on the thin- and thick-disk components of the Milky Way. Specifically, we constrain the values of the thin- and thick-disk scale heights with 3% and 2% precision, respectively, and the values of the thin- and thick-disk scale lengths with 20% and 8% precision, respectively. Moreover, we find that a two-disk model is unable to fully explain our clustering measurements, which exhibit an excess of clustering at small scales (< 50 pc). This suggests the presence of small-scale substructure in the disk system of the Milky Way.
[160]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.3724  [pdf] - 1223164
Miniature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) I. Design, Commissioning, and First Science Results
Comments: Updated to match accepted and published version in JATIS
Submitted: 2014-11-13, last modified: 2015-06-22
The MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) is a US-based observational facility dedicated to the discovery and characterization of exoplanets around a nearby sample of bright stars. MINERVA employs a robotic array of four 0.7 m telescopes outfitted for both high-resolution spectroscopy and photometry, and is designed for completely autonomous operation. The primary science program is a dedicated radial velocity survey and the secondary science objective is to obtain high precision transit light curves. The modular design of the facility and the flexibility of our hardware allows for both science programs to be pursued simultaneously, while the robotic control software provides a robust and efficient means to carry out nightly observations. In this article, we describe the design of MINERVA including major hardware components, software, and science goals. The telescopes and photometry cameras are characterized at our test facility on the Caltech campus in Pasadena, CA, and their on-sky performance is validated. New observations from our test facility demonstrate sub-mmag photometric precision of one of our radial velocity survey targets, and we present new transit observations and fits of WASP-52b -- a known hot-Jupiter with an inflated radius and misaligned orbit. The facility is now in the process of being relocated to its final destination at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona, and science operations will begin in 2015.
[161]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.3453  [pdf] - 1161811
Young alpha-enriched giant stars in the solar neighbourhood
Comments: 15 pages, 12 figures, 2 tables. MNRAS in press
Submitted: 2014-12-10, last modified: 2015-06-11
We derive age constraints for 1639 red giants in the APOKASC sample for which seismic parameters from Kepler, as well as effective temperatures, metallicities and [alpha/Fe] values from APOGEE DR12 are available. We investigate the relation between age and chemical abundances for these stars, using a simple and robust approach to obtain ages. We first derive stellar masses using standard seismic scaling relations, then determine the maximum possible age for each star as function of its mass and metallicity, independently of its evolutionary stage. While the overall trend between maximum age and chemical abundances is a declining fraction of young stars with increasing [alpha/Fe], at least 14 out of 241 stars with [alpha/Fe]>0.13 are younger than 6 Gyr. Five stars with [alpha/Fe]>0.2 have ages below 4 Gyr. We examine the effect of modifications in the standard seismic scaling relations, as well as the effect of very low helium fractions, but these changes are not enough to make these stars as old as usually expected for alpha-rich stars (i.e., ages greater than 8-9 Gyr). Such unusual alpha-rich young stars have also been detected by other surveys, but defy simple explanations in a galaxy evolution context.
[162]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.01441  [pdf] - 1396674
Two Stars Two Ways: Confirming a Microlensing Binary Lens Solution with a Spectroscopic Measurement of the Orbit
Comments: 24 pages, 4 figures. Submitted to ApJ. High-resolution versions of Figures 2, 3, and 4 are available here: https://www.cfa.harvard.edu/~jyee/ob020/
Submitted: 2015-06-03
Light curves of microlensing events involving stellar binaries and planetary systems can provide information about the orbital elements of the system due to orbital modulations of the caustic structure. Accurately measuring the orbit in either the stellar or planetary case requires detailed modeling of subtle deviations in the light curve. At the same time, the natural, Cartesian parameterization of a microlensing binary is partially degenerate with the microlens parallax. Hence, it is desirable to perform independent tests of the predictions of microlens orbit models using radial velocity time series of the lens binary system. To this end, we present 3.5 years of RV monitoring of the binary lens system OGLE-2009-BLG-020L, for which Skowron et al. (2011) constrained all internal parameters of the 200--700 day orbit. Our RV measurements reveal an orbit that is consistent with the predictions of the microlens light curve analysis, thereby providing the first confirmation of orbital elements inferred from microlensing events.
[163]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.07105  [pdf] - 1358784
Systematics-insensitive periodic signal search with K2
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-05-26
From pulsating stars to transiting exoplanets, the search for periodic signals in K2 data, Kepler's 2-wheeled extension, is relevant to a long list of scientific goals. Systematics affecting K2 light curves due to the decreased spacecraft pointing precision inhibit the easy extraction of periodic signals from the data. We here develop a method for producing periodograms of K2 light curves that are insensitive to pointing-induced systematics; the Systematics-Insensitive Periodogram (SIP). Traditional sine-fitting periodograms use a generative model to find the frequency of a sinusoid that best describes the data. We extend this principle by including systematic trends, based on a set of 'Eigen light curves', following Foreman-Mackey et al. (2015), in our generative model as well as a sum of sine and cosine functions over a grid of frequencies. Using this method we are able to produce periodograms with vastly reduced systematic features. The quality of the resulting periodograms are such that we can recover acoustic oscillations in giant stars and measure stellar rotation periods without the need for any detrending. The algorithm is also applicable to the detection of other periodic phenomena such as variable stars, eclipsing binaries and short-period exoplanet candidates. The SIP code is available at https://github.com/RuthAngus/SIPK2.
[164]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.00963  [pdf] - 1449756
The Eleventh and Twelfth Data Releases of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Final Data from SDSS-III
Alam, Shadab; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, F.; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Beers, Timothy C.; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, A. Shelden; Brandt, W. N.; Brauer, D. E.; Brinkmann, J.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cai, Zheng; Capozzi, Diego; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Carrera, Ricardo; Chen, Yen-Chi; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Clerc, Nicolas; Comparat, Johan; Covey, Kevin; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Cunha, Katia; da Costa, Luiz N.; Da Rio, Nicola; Davenport, James R. A.; Dawson, Kyle S.; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Dwelly, Tom; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Feuillet, Diane; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Finoguenov, Alexis; Flaherty, Kevin; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foster, Jonathan; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbraith-Frew, J. G.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, Ana E. García; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Ghezzi, Luan; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; Goddard, Daniel; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Hernández, Jonay I. González; Grebel, Eva K.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Grieves, Nolan; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Fred R.; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Jiang, Linhua; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Klaene, Mark A.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koenig, Xavier P.; Lam, Charles R.; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Licquia, Timothy C.; Liu, Jian; Long, Daniel C.; López-Corredoira, Martín; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H.; Mack, Claude E.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Manera, Marc; Mao, Qingqing; Maraston, Claudia; Marchwinski, Robert C.; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; Martig, Marie; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McGehee, Peregrine M.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Miller, Adam A.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; More, Surhud; Morice-Atkinson, Xan; Morrison, Heather L.; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam D.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Neyrinck, Mark; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; O'Connell, Julia E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; O'Connell, Ross; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Audrey E.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Osumi, Keisuke; Owen, Russell; Padgett, Deborah L.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Paegert, Martin; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Park, Changbom; Pâris, Isabelle; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Pellejero-Ibanez, M.; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; de Mello, Gustavo F. Porto; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Reid, Beth A.; Rich, James; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Rodríguez-Rottes, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John J.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schwope, Axel D.; Scóccola, C. G.; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shane, Neville; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Sobreira, Flávia; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Tayar, Jamie; Terrien, Ryan C.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Verde, Licia; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; White, Martin; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhimin; Zhu, Guangtun; Zou, Hu
Comments: DR12 data are available at http://www.sdss3.org/dr12. 30 pages. 11 figures. Accepted to ApJS
Submitted: 2015-01-05, last modified: 2015-05-21
The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 sq. deg of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 stars from the Multi-Object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The APOGEE outputs now include measured abundances of 15 different elements for each star. In total, SDSS-III added 2350 sq. deg of ugriz imaging; 155,520 spectra of 138,099 stars as part of the Sloan Exploration of Galactic Understanding and Evolution 2 (SEGUE-2) survey; 2,497,484 BOSS spectra of 1,372,737 galaxies, 294,512 quasars, and 247,216 stars over 9376 sq. deg; 618,080 APOGEE spectra of 156,593 stars; and 197,040 MARVELS spectra of 5,513 stars. Since its first light in 1998, SDSS has imaged over 1/3 of the Celestial sphere in five bands and obtained over five million astronomical spectra.
[165]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.03536  [pdf] - 1245780
Rapid Rotation of Low-Mass Red Giants Using APOKASC: A Measure of Interaction Rates on the Post-main-sequence
Comments: 39 pages, 8 figures, 4 tables. Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. For a brief video discussing key results from this paper see http://youtu.be/ym_0nV7_YqI . The full table 1 is available at http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~tayar/tab1_full.txt
Submitted: 2015-05-13
We investigate the occurrence rate of rapidly rotating ($v\sin i$$>$10 km s$^{-1}$), low-mass giant stars in the APOGEE-Kepler (APOKASC) fields with asteroseismic mass and surface gravity measurements. Such stars are likely merger products and their frequency places interesting constraints on stellar population models. We also identify anomalous rotators, i.e. stars with 5 km s$^{-1}$$<$$v\sin i$$<$10 km s$^{-1}$ that are rotating significantly faster than both angular momentum evolution predictions and the measured rates of similar stars. Our data set contains fewer rapid rotators than one would expect given measurements of the Galactic field star population, which likely indicates that asteroseismic detections are less common in rapidly rotating red giants. The number of low-mass moderate (5-10 km s$^{-1}$) rotators in our sample gives a lower limit of 7% for the rate at which low-mass stars interact on the upper red giant branch because single stars in this mass range are expected to rotate slowly. Finally, we classify the likely origin of the rapid or anomalous rotation where possible. KIC 10293335 is identified as a merger product and KIC 6501237 is a possible binary system of two oscillating red giants.
[166]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.01494  [pdf] - 1183002
Planets Around Low-Mass Stars (PALMS). V. Age-Dating Low-Mass Companions to Members and Interlopers of Young Moving Groups
Comments: Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2015-05-06
We present optical and near-infrared adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of 13 ultracool (>M6) companions to late-type stars (K7-M4.5), most of which have recently been identified as candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs; 8-120 Myr) in the literature. The inferred masses of the companions (~10-100 Mjup) are highly sensitive to the ages of the primary stars so we critically examine the kinematic and spectroscopic properties of each system to distinguish bona fide YMG members from old field interlopers. 2MASS J02155892-0929121 C is a new M7 substellar companion (40-60 Mjup) with clear spectroscopic signs of low gravity and hence youth. The primary, possibly a member of the ~40 Myr Tuc-Hor moving group, is visually resolved into three components, making it a young low-mass quadruple system in a compact (<100 AU) configuration. In addition, Li 1 $\lambda$6708 absorption in the intermediate-gravity M7.5 companion 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B provides unambiguous evidence that it is young (<200 Myr) and resides below the hydrogen burning limit. Three new close-separation (<1") companions (2MASS J06475229-2523304 B, PYC J11519+0731 B, and GJ 4378 Ab) orbit stars previously reported as candidate YMG members, but instead are likely old (>1 Gyr) tidally-locked spectroscopic binaries without convincing kinematic associations with any known moving group. The high rate of false positives in the form of old active stars with YMG-like kinematics underscores the importance of radial velocity and parallax measurements to validate candidate young stars identified via proper motion and activity selection alone. Finally, we spectroscopically confirm the cool temperature and substellar nature of HD 23514 B, a recently discovered M8 benchmark brown dwarf orbiting the dustiest-known member of the Pleiades. [Abridged]
[167]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.00280  [pdf] - 987904
Thorium Abundances in Solar Twins and Analogues: Implications for the Habitability of Extrasolar Planetary Systems
Comments: 7 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2015-05-01
We present the first investigation of Th abundances in Solar twins and analogues to understand the possible range of this radioactive element and its effect on rocky planet interior dynamics and potential habitability. The abundances of the radioactive elements Th and U are key components of a planet's energy budget, making up 30% to 50% of the Earth's (Korenaga 2008; All\`egre et al. 2001; Schubert et al. 1980; Lyubetskaya & Korenaga 2007; The KamLAND Collaboration 2011; Huang et al. 2013). Radiogenic heat drives interior mantle convection and surface plate tectonics, which sustains a deep carbon and water cycle and thereby aides in creating Earth's habitable surface. Unlike other heat sources that are dependent on the planet's specific formation history, the radiogenic heat budget is directly related to the mantle concentration of these nuclides. As a refractory element, the stellar abundance of Th is faithfully reflected in the terrestrial planet's concentration. We find that log eps Th varies from 59% to 251% that of Solar, suggesting extrasolar planetary systems may possess a greater energy budget with which to support surface to interior dynamics and thus increase their likelihood to be habitable compared to our Solar System.
[168]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.04149  [pdf] - 1308166
HAT-P-50b, HAT-P-51b, HAT-P-52b, and HAT-P-53b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters and a Transiting Hot Saturn From the HATNet Survey
Comments: Submitted to AJ. 20 pages, 9 figures, 5 tables. Data available at http://hatnet.org/
Submitted: 2015-03-13
We report the discovery and characterization of four transiting exoplanets by the HATNet survey. The planet HAT-P-50b has a mass of 1.35 M_J and a radius of 1.29 R_J, and orbits a bright (V = 11.8 mag) M = 1.27 M_sun, R = 1.70 R_sun star every P = 3.1220 days. The planet HAT-P-51b has a mass of 0.31 M_J and a radius of 1.29 R_J, and orbits a V = 13.4 mag, M = 0.98 M_sun, R = 1.04 R_sun star with a period of P = 4.2180 days. The planet HAT-P-52b has a mass of 0.82 M_J and a radius of 1.01 R_J, and orbits a V = 14.1 mag, M = 0.89 M_sun, R = 0.89 R_sun star with a period of P = 2.7536 days. The planet HAT-P-53b has a mass of 1.48 M_J and a radius of 1.32 R_J, and orbits a V = 13.7 mag, M = 1.09 M_sun, R = 1.21 R_sun star with a period of P = 1.9616 days. All four planets are consistent with having circular orbits and have masses and radii measured to better than 10% precision. The low stellar jitter and favorable R_P/R_star ratio for HAT-P-51 make it a promising target for measuring the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for a Saturn-mass planet.
[169]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.03874  [pdf] - 1232021
Extracting Radial Velocities of A- and B-type Stars from Echelle Spectrograph Calibration Spectra
Comments: Accepted to ApJS
Submitted: 2015-03-12
We present a technique to extract radial velocity measurements from echelle spectrograph observations of rapidly rotating stars ($V\sin{i} \gtrsim 50$ km s$^{-1}$). This type of measurement is difficult because the line widths of such stars are often comparable to the width of a single echelle order. To compensate for the scarcity of lines and Doppler information content, we have developed a process that forward-models the observations, fitting the radial velocity shift of the star for all echelle orders simultaneously with the echelle blaze function. We use our technique to extract radial velocity measurements from a sample of rapidly rotating A- and B-type stars used as calibrator stars observed by the California Planet Survey observations. We measure absolute radial velocities with a precision ranging from 0.5-2.0 km s$^{-1}$ per epoch for more than 100 A- and B-type stars. In our sample of 10 well-sampled stars with radial velocity scatter in excess of their measurement uncertainties, three of these are single-lined binaries with long observational baselines. From this subsample, we present detections of two previously unknown spectroscopic binaries and one known astrometric system. Our technique will be useful in measuring or placing upper limits on the masses of sub-stellar companions discovered by wide-field transit surveys, and conducting future spectroscopic binarity surveys and Galactic space-motion studies of massive and/or young, rapidly-rotating stars.
[170]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.02110  [pdf] - 1258764
Chemical Cartography with APOGEE: Metallicity Distribution Functions and the Chemical Structure of the Milky Way Disk
Comments: Submitted, 18 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2015-03-06
Using a sample of 69,919 red giants from the SDSS-III/APOGEE Data Release 12, we measure the distribution of stars in the [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plane and the metallicity distribution functions (MDF) across an unprecedented volume of the Milky Way disk, with radius $3<R<15$ kpc and height $|z|<2$ kpc. Stars in the inner disk ($R<5$ kpc) lie along a single track in [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H], starting with $\alpha$-enhanced, metal-poor stars and ending at [$\alpha$/Fe]$\sim0$ and [Fe/H]$\sim+0.4$. At larger radii we find two distinct sequences in [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] space, with a roughly solar-$\alpha$ sequence that spans a decade in metallicity and a high-$\alpha$ sequence that merges with the low-$\alpha$ sequence at super-solar [Fe/H]. The location of the high-$\alpha$ sequence is nearly constant across the disk, however there are very few high-$\alpha$ stars at $R>11$ kpc. The peak of the midplane MDF shifts to lower metallicity at larger $R$, reflecting the Galactic metallicity gradient. Most strikingly, the shape of the midplane MDF changes systematically with radius, with a negatively skewed distribution at $3<R<7$ kpc, to a roughly Gaussian distribution at the solar annulus, to a positively skewed shape in the outer Galaxy. For stars with $|z|>1$ kpc or [$\alpha$/Fe]$>0.18$, the MDF shows little dependence on $R$. The positive skewness of the outer disk MDF may be a signature of radial migration; we show that blurring of stellar populations by orbital eccentricities is not enough to explain the reversal of MDF shape but a simple model of radial migration can do so.
[171]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.01115  [pdf] - 943866
Characterizing the Cool KOIs VIII. Parameters of the Planets Orbiting Kepler's Coolest Dwarfs
Comments: 26 Pages, 10 Figures, accepted to ApJ Supp
Submitted: 2015-03-03
The coolest dwarf stars targeted by the Kepler Mission constitute a relatively small but scientifically valuable subset of the Kepler target stars, and provide a high-fidelity and nearby sample of transiting planetary systems. Using archival Kepler data spanning the entire primary mission we perform a uniform analysis to extract, confirm and characterize the transit signals discovered by the Kepler pipeline toward M-type dwarf stars. We recover all but two of the signals reported in a recent listing from the Exoplanet Archive resulting in 165 planet candidates associated with a sample of 106 low-mass stars. We fitted the observed light curves to transit models using Markov Chain Monte Carlo and we have made the posterior samples publicly available to facilitate further studies. We fitted empirical transit times to individual transit signals with significantly non-linear ephemerides for accurate recovery of transit parameters and measuring precise transit timing variations. We also provide the physical parameters for the stellar sample, including new measurements of stellar rotation, allowing the conversion of transit parameters into planet radii and orbital parameters.
[172]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.04110  [pdf] - 1296105
Abundances, Stellar Parameters, and Spectra From the SDSS-III/APOGEE Survey
Comments: 29 pages, 18 figures, submitted to Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2015-01-16
The SDSS-III/APOGEE survey operated from 2011-2014 using the APOGEE spectrograph, which collects high-resolution (R~22,500), near-IR (1.51-1.70 microns) spectra with a multiplexing (300 fiber-fed objects) capability. We describe the survey data products that are publicly available, which include catalogs with radial velocity, stellar parameters, and 15 elemental abundances for over 150,000 stars, as well as the more than 500,000 spectra from which these quantities are derived. Calibration relations for the stellar parameters (Teff, log g, [M/H], [alpha/M]) and abundances (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Ni) are presented and discussed. The internal scatter of the abundances within clusters indicates that abundance precision is generally between 0.05 and 0.09 dex across a broad temperature range; within more limited ranges and at high S/N, it is smaller for some elemental abundances. We assess the accuracy of the abundances using comparison of mean cluster metallicities with literature values, APOGEE observations of the solar spectrum and of Arcturus, comparison of individual star abundances with other measurements, and consideration of the locus of derived parameters and abundances of the entire sample, and find that it is challenging to determine the absolute abundance scale; external accuracy may be good to 0.1-0.2 dex. Uncertainties may be larger at cooler temperatures (Teff<4000K). Access to the public data release and data products is described, and some guidance for using the data products is provided.
[173]  oai:arXiv.org:1501.00013  [pdf] - 938195
Friends of Hot Jupiters II: No Correspondence Between Hot-Jupiter Spin-Orbit Misalignment and the Incidence of Directly Imaged Stellar Companions
Comments: typos and references updated; 25 pages, 7 figures and 10 tables, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-12-30, last modified: 2015-01-13
Multi-star systems are common, yet little is known about a stellar companion's influence on the formation and evolution of planetary systems. For instance, stellar companions may have facilitated the inward migration of hot Jupiters towards to their present day positions. Many observed short period gas giant planets also have orbits that are misaligned with respect to their star's spin axis, which has also been attributed to the presence of a massive outer companion on a non-coplanar orbit. We present the results of a multi-band direct imaging survey using Keck NIRC2 to measure the fraction of short period gas giant planets found in multi-star systems. Over three years, we completed a survey of 50 targets ("Friends of Hot Jupiters") with 27 targets showing some signature of multi-body interaction (misaligned or eccentric orbits) and 23 targets in a control sample (well-aligned and circular orbits). We report the masses, projected separations, and confirmed common proper motion for the 19 stellar companions found around 17 stars. Correcting for survey incompleteness, we report companion fractions of $48\%\pm9\%$, $47\%\pm12\%$, and $51\%\pm13\%$ in our total, misaligned/eccentric, and control samples, respectively. This total stellar companion fraction is $2.8\,\sigma$ larger than the fraction of field stars with companions approximately $50-2000\,$AU. We observe no correlation between misaligned/eccentric hot Jupiter systems and the incidence of stellar companions. Combining this result with our previous radial velocity survey, we determine that $72\% \pm 16\%$ of hot Jupiters are part of multi-planet and/or multi-star systems.
[174]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.8687  [pdf] - 1223821
The Mass of Kepler-93b and The Composition of Terrestrial Planets
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-12-30
Kepler-93b is a 1.478 +/- 0.019 Earth radius planet with a 4.7 day period around a bright (V=10.2), astroseismically-characterized host star with a mass of 0.911+/-0.033 solar masses and a radius of 0.919+/-0.011 solar radii. Based on 86 radial velocity observations obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and 32 archival Keck/HIRES observations, we present a precise mass estimate of 4.02+/-0.68 Earth masses. The corresponding high density of 6.88+/-1.18 g/cc is consistent with a rocky composition of primarily iron and magnesium silicate. We compare Kepler-93b to other dense planets with well-constrained parameters and find that between 1-6 Earth masses, all dense planets including the Earth and Venus are well-described by the same fixed ratio of iron to magnesium silicate. There are as of yet no examples of such planets with masses > 6 Earth masses: All known planets in this mass regime have lower densities requiring significant fractions of volatiles or H/He gas. We also constrain the mass and period of the outer companion in the Kepler-93 system from the long-term radial velocity trend and archival adaptive optics images. As the sample of dense planets with well-constrained masses and radii continues to grow, we will be able to test whether the fixed compositional model found for the seven dense planets considered in this paper extends to the full population of 1-6 Earth mass planets.
[175]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.4047  [pdf] - 1223181
Characterizing the Cool KOIs. VII. Refined Physical Properties of the Transiting Brown Dwarf LHS 6343 C
Comments: 13 pages, 8 figures, ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2014-11-14, last modified: 2014-12-28
We present an updated analysis of LHS 6343, a triple system in the Kepler field which consists of a brown dwarf transiting one member of a widely-separated M+M binary system. By analyzing the full Kepler dataset and 34 Keck/HIRES radial velocity observations, we measure both the observed transit depth and Doppler semiamplitude to 0.5% precision. With Robo-AO and Palomar/PHARO adaptive optics imaging as well as TripleSpec spectroscopy, we measure a model-dependent mass for LHS 6343 C of 62.1 +/- 1.2 M_Jup and a radius of 0.783 +/- 0.011 R_Jup. We detect the secondary eclipse in the Kepler data at 3.5 sigma, measuring e cos omega = 0.0228 +/- 0.0008. We also derive a method to measure the mass and radius of a star and transiting companion directly, without any reliance on stellar models. The mass and radius of both objects depend only on the orbital period, stellar density, reduced semimajor axis, Doppler semiamplitude, eccentricity, and inclination, as well as the knowledge that the primary star falls on the main sequence. With this method, we calculate a model-independent mass and radius for LHS 6343 C to a precision of 3% and 2%, respectively.
[176]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.6889  [pdf] - 1223758
The Pan-Pacific Planet Search. II. Confirmation of a two-planet system around HD 121056
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-12-22
Precise radial velocities from the Anglo-Australian Telescope confirm the presence of a rare short-period planet around the K0 giant HD 121056. An independent two-planet solution using the AAT data shows that the inner planet has P=89.1+/-0.1 days, and m sin i=1.35+/-0.17 Mjup. These data also confirm the planetary nature of the outer companion, with m sin i=3.9+/-0.6 Mjup and a=2.96+/-0.16 AU. HD 121056 is the most-evolved star to host a confirmed multiple-planet system, and is a valuable example of a giant star hosting both a short-period and a long-period planet.
[177]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.5674  [pdf] - 1223702
Characterizing K2 Planet Discoveries: A super-Earth transiting the bright K-dwarf HIP 116454
Comments: 16 pages, 8 figures. Accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2014-12-17
We report the first planet discovery from the two-wheeled Kepler (K2) mission: HIP 116454 b. The host star HIP 116454 is a bright (V = 10.1, K = 8.0) K1-dwarf with high proper motion, and a parallax-based distance of 55.2 +/- 5.4 pc. Based on high-resolution optical spectroscopy, we find that the host star is metal-poor with [Fe/H] = -.16 +/- .18, and has a radius R = 0.716 +/- .0024 R_sun and mass M = .775 +/- .027 Msun. The star was observed by the Kepler spacecraft during its Two-Wheeled Concept Engineering Test in February 2014. During the 9 days of observations, K2 observed a single transit event. Using a new K2 photometric analysis technique we are able to correct small telescope drifts and recover the observed transit at high confidence, corresponding to a planetary radius of Rp = 2.53 +/- 0.18 Rearth. Radial velocity observations with the HARPS-N spectrograph reveal a 11.82 +/- 1.33 Mearth planet in a 9.1 day orbit, consistent with the transit depth, duration, and ephemeris. Follow-up photometric measurements from the MOST satellite confirm the transit observed in the K2 photometry and provide a refined ephemeris, making HIP 116454 b amenable for future follow-up observations of this latest addition to the growing population of transiting super-Earths around nearby, bright stars.
[178]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.0014  [pdf] - 1223394
How Low Can You Go? The Photoeccentric Effect for Planets of Various Sizes
Comments:
Submitted: 2014-11-28
It is well-known that the light curve of a transiting planet contains information about the planet's orbital period and size relative to the host star. More recently, it has been demonstrated that a tight constraint on an individual planet's eccentricity can sometimes be derived from the light curve via the "photoeccentric effect," the effect of a planet's eccentricity on the shape and duration of its light curve. This has only been studied for large planets and high signal-to-noise scenarios, raising the question of how well it can be measured for smaller planets or low signal-to-noise cases. We explore the limits of the photoeccentric effect over a wide range of planet parameters. The method hinges upon measuring $g$ directly from the light curve, where $g$ is the ratio of the planet's speed (projected on the plane of the sky) during transit to the speed expected for a circular orbit. We find that when the signal-to-noise in the measurement of $g$ is $< 10$, the ability to measure eccentricity with the photoeccentric effect decreases. We develop a "rule of thumb" that for per-point relative photometric uncertainties $\sigma = \{ 10^{-3}, 10^{-4}, 10^{-5} \}$, the critical values of planet-star radius ratio are $R_p / R_\star \approx \{ 0.1, 0.05, 0.03 \}$ for Kepler-like 30-minute integration times. We demonstrate how to predict the best-case uncertainty in eccentricity that can be found with the photoeccentric effect for any light curve. This clears the path to study eccentricities of individual planets of various sizes in the Kepler sample and future transit surveys.
[179]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.5374  [pdf] - 1223258
Newly-Discovered Planets Orbiting HD~5319, HD~11506, HD~75784 and HD~10442 from the N2K Consortium
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-11-19
Initially designed to discover short-period planets, the N2K campaign has since evolved to discover new worlds at large separations from their host stars. Detecting such worlds will help determine the giant planet occurrence at semi-major axes beyond the ice line, where gas giants are thought to mostly form. Here we report four newly-discovered gas giant planets (with minimum masses ranging from 0.4 to 2.1 MJup) orbiting stars monitored as part of the N2K program. Two of these planets orbit stars already known to host planets: HD 5319 and HD 11506. The remaining discoveries reside in previously-unknown planetary systems: HD 10442 and HD 75784. The refined orbital period of the inner planet orbiting HD 5319 is 641 days. The newly-discovered outer planet orbits in 886 days. The large masses combined with the proximity to a 4:3 mean motion resonance make this system a challenge to explain with current formation and migration theories. HD 11506 has one confirmed planet, and here we confirm a second. The outer planet has an orbital period of 1627.5 days, and the newly-discovered inner planet orbits in 223.6 days. A planet has also been discovered orbiting HD 75784 with an orbital period of 341.7 days. There is evidence for a longer period signal; however, several more years of observations are needed to put tight constraints on the Keplerian parameters for the outer planet. Lastly, an additional planet has been detected orbiting HD 10442 with a period of 1043 days.
[180]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.2034  [pdf] - 1223069
Sodium and Oxygen Abundances in the Open Cluster NGC 6791 from APOGEE H-Band Spectroscopy
Comments: Accepted for publication at ApJ Letters
Submitted: 2014-11-07
The open cluster NGC 6791 is among the oldest, most massive and metal-rich open clusters in the Galaxy. High-resolution $H$-band spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) of 11 red giants in NGC 6791 are analyzed for their chemical abundances of iron, oxygen, and sodium. The abundances of these three elements are found to be homogeneous (with abundance dispersions at the level of $\sim$ 0.05 - 0.07 dex) in these cluster red giants, which span much of the red-giant branch (T$_{\rm eff}$ $\sim$ 3500K - 4600K), and include two red-clump giants. From the infrared spectra, this cluster is confirmed to be among the most metal-rich clusters in the Galaxy ($<$[Fe/H]$>$ = 0.34 $\pm$ 0.06), and is found to have a roughly solar value of [O/Fe] and slightly enhanced [Na/Fe]. Non-LTE calculations for the studied Na I lines in the APOGEE spectral region ($\lambda$16373.86\AA\ and $\lambda$16388.85\AA) indicate only small departures from LTE ($\leq$ 0.04 dex) for the parameter range and metallicity of the studied stars. The previously reported double population of cluster members with different Na abundances is not found among the studied sample.
[181]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.1195  [pdf] - 1209960
Mapping the Interstellar Medium with Near-Infrared Diffuse Interstellar Bands
Comments: accepted to ApJ, 16 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2014-06-04, last modified: 2014-10-29
We map the distribution and properties of the Milky Way's interstellar medium as traced by diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) detected in near-infrared stellar spectra from the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey. Focusing exclusively on the strongest DIB in the H-band, at ~1.527 microns, we present a projected map of the DIB absorption field in the Galactic plane, using a set of about 60,000 sightlines that reach up to 15 kpc from the Sun and probe up to 30 magnitudes of visual extinction. The strength of this DIB is linearly correlated with dust reddening over three orders of magnitude in both DIB equivalent width (W_DIB) and extinction, with a power law index of 1.01 +/- 0.01, a mean relationship of W_DIB/A_V = 0.1 Angstrom mag^-1, and a dispersion of ~0.05 Angstrom mag^-1 at extinctions characteristic of the Galactic midplane. These properties establish this DIB as a powerful, independent probe of dust extinction over a wide range of A_V values. The subset of about 14,000 robustly detected DIB features have an exponential W_DIB distribution. We empirically determine the intrinsic rest wavelength of this transition to be lambda_0 = 15,272.42 Angstrom, and then calculate absolute radial velocities of the carrier, which display the kinematical signature of the rotating Galactic disk. We probe the DIB carrier distribution in three dimensions and show that it can be characterized by an exponential disk model with a scaleheight of about 100 pc and a scalelength of about 5 kpc. Finally, we show that the DIB distribution also traces large-scale Galactic structures, including the central long bar and the warp of the outer disk.
[182]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.0151  [pdf] - 888489
The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite
Comments: accepted for publication in the new, peer-reviewed SPIE Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems (JATIS)
Submitted: 2014-06-01, last modified: 2014-10-28
The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will search for planets transiting bright and nearby stars. TESS has been selected by NASA for launch in 2017 as an Astrophysics Explorer mission. The spacecraft will be placed into a highly elliptical 13.7-day orbit around the Earth. During its two-year mission, TESS will employ four wide-field optical CCD cameras to monitor at least 200,000 main-sequence dwarf stars with I = 4-13 for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. Each star will be observed for an interval ranging from one month to one year, depending mainly on the star's ecliptic latitude. The longest observing intervals will be for stars near the ecliptic poles, which are the optimal locations for follow-up observations with the James Webb Space Telescope. Brightness measurements of preselected target stars will be recorded every 2 min, and full frame images will be recorded every 30 min. TESS stars will be 10-100 times brighter than those surveyed by the pioneering Kepler mission. This will make TESS planets easier to characterize with follow-up observations. TESS is expected to find more than a thousand planets smaller than Neptune, including dozens that are comparable in size to the Earth. Public data releases will occur every four months, inviting immediate community-wide efforts to study the new planets. The TESS legacy will be a catalog of the nearest and brightest stars hosting transiting planets, which will endure as highly favorable targets for detailed investigations.
[183]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.0554  [pdf] - 919819
A paucity of proto-hot Jupiters on super-eccentric orbits
Comments: Accepted to ApJ on October 20, 2014. We adopted more conservative assumptions about completeness and waited for a candidate sample based on double the number of Kepler quarters. With the updated sample and assumptions, the conclusions remain the same
Submitted: 2012-11-02, last modified: 2014-10-21
Gas giant planets orbiting within 0.1 AU of their host stars, unlikely to have formed in situ, are evidence for planetary migration. It is debated whether the typical hot Jupiter smoothly migrated inward from its formation location through the proto-planetary disk or was perturbed by another body onto a highly eccentric orbit, which tidal dissipation subsequently shrank and circularized during close stellar passages. Socrates and collaborators predicted that the latter class of model should produce a population of super-eccentric proto-hot Jupiters readily observable by Kepler. We find a paucity of such planets in the Kepler sample, inconsistent with the theoretical prediction with 96.9% confidence. Observational effects are unlikely to explain this discrepancy. We find that the fraction of hot Jupiters with orbital period P > 3 days produced by the star-planet Kozai mechanism does not exceed (at two-sigma) 44%. Our results may indicate that disk migration is the dominant channel for producing hot Jupiters with P > 3 days. Alternatively, the typical hot Jupiter may have been perturbed to a high eccentricity by interactions with a planetary rather than stellar companion and began tidal circularization much interior to 1 AU after multiple scatterings. A final alternative is that tidal circularization occurs much more rapidly early in the tidal circularization process at high eccentricities than later in the process at low eccentricities, contrary to current tidal theories.
[184]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.4286  [pdf] - 1222602
Near-infrared Thermal Emission Detections of a number of hot Jupiters and the Systematics of Ground-based Near-infrared Photometry
Comments: 27 pages, 23 figures, ApJ submitted June 16th, 2014. Version revised to address referee comments
Submitted: 2014-10-15
We present detections of the near-infrared thermal emission of three hot Jupiters and one brown-dwarf using the Wide-field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). These include Ks-band secondary eclipse detections of the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and Qatar-1b and the brown dwarf KELT-1b. We also report Y-band, $K_{CONT}$-band, and two new and one reanalyzed Ks-band detections of the thermal emission of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b. We present a new reduction pipeline for CFHT/WIRCam data, which is optimized for high precision photometry. We also describe novel techniques for constraining systematic errors in ground-based near-infrared photometry, so as to return reliable secondary eclipse depths and uncertainties. We discuss the noise properties of our ground-based photometry for wavelengths spanning the near-infrared (the YJHK-bands), for faint and bright-stars, and for the same object on several occasions. For the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and WASP-12b we demonstrate the repeatability of our eclipse depth measurements in the Ks-band; we therefore place stringent limits on the systematics of ground-based, near-infrared photometry, and also rule out violent weather changes in the deep, high pressure atmospheres of these two hot Jupiters at the epochs of our observations.
[185]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.4192  [pdf] - 1542632
The Kepler Dichotomy among the M Dwarfs: Half of Systems Contain Five or More Coplanar Planets
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2014-10-15
We present a statistical analysis of the Kepler M dwarf planet hosts, with a particular focus on the fractional number of systems hosting multiple transiting planets. We manufacture synthetic planetary systems within a range of planet multiplicity and mutual inclination for comparison to the Kepler yield. We recover the observed number of systems containing between 2 and 5 transiting planets if every M dwarf hosts 6.1+/-1.9 planets with typical mutual inclinations of 2.0 +4.0-2.0 degrees. This range includes the Solar System in its coplanarity and multiplicity. However, similar to studies of Kepler exoplanetary systems around more massive stars, we report that the number of singly-transiting planets found by Kepler is too high to be consistent with a single population of multi-planet systems: a finding that cannot be attributed to selection biases. To account for the excess singleton planetary systems we adopt a mixture model and find that 55 +23-12% of planetary systems are either single or contain multiple planets with large mutual inclinations. Thus, we find that the so-called "Kepler dichotomy" holds for planets orbiting M dwarfs as well as Sun-like stars. Additionally, we compare stellar properties of the hosts to single and multiple transiting planets. For the brightest subset of stars in our sample we find intriguing, yet marginally significant evidence that stars hosting multiply-transiting systems are rotating more quickly, are closer to the midplane of the Milky Way, and are comparatively metal poor. This preliminary finding warrants further investigation.
[186]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.2503  [pdf] - 911086
The APOKASC Catalog: An Asteroseismic and Spectroscopic Joint Survey of Targets in the Kepler Fields
Comments: 49 pages. ApJSupp, in press. Full machine-readable ascii files available under ancillary data. Categories: Kepler targets, asteroseismology, large spectroscopic surveys
Submitted: 2014-10-09
We present the first APOKASC catalog of spectroscopic and asteroseismic properties of 1916 red giants observed in the Kepler fields. The spectroscopic parameters provided from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment project are complemented with asteroseismic surface gravities, masses, radii, and mean densities determined by members of the Kepler Asteroseismology Science Consortium. We assess both random and systematic sources of error and include a discussion of sample selection for giants in the Kepler fields. Total uncertainties in the main catalog properties are of order 80 K in Teff , 0.06 dex in [M/H], 0.014 dex in log g, and 12% and 5% in mass and radius, respectively; these reflect a combination of systematic and random errors. Asteroseismic surface gravities are substantially more precise and accurate than spectroscopic ones, and we find good agreement between their mean values and the calibrated spectroscopic surface gravities. There are, however, systematic underlying trends with Teff and log g. Our effective temperature scale is between 0-200 K cooler than that expected from the Infrared Flux Method, depending on the adopted extinction map, which provides evidence for a lower value on average than that inferred for the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We find a reasonable correspondence between the photometric KIC and spectroscopic APOKASC metallicity scales, with increased dispersion in KIC metallicities as the absolute metal abundance decreases, and offsets in Teff and log g consistent with those derived in the literature. We present mean fitting relations between APOKASC and KIC observables and discuss future prospects, strengths, and limitations of the catalog data.
[187]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.1350  [pdf] - 1451807
Bayesian distances and extinctions for giants observed by Kepler and APOGEE
Comments: 21 pages, 20 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2014-10-06
We present a first determination of distances and extinctions for individual stars in the first release of the APOKASC catalogue, built from the joint efforts of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) and the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). Our method takes into account the spectroscopic constraints derived from the APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline, together with the asteroseismic parameters from KASC. These parameters are then employed to estimate intrinsic stellar properties, including absolute magnitudes, using the Bayesian tool PARAM. We then find the distance and extinction that best fit the observed photometry in SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE passbands. The first 1989 giants targeted by APOKASC are found at typical distances between 0.5 and 5 kpc, with individual uncertainties of just ~1.8 per cent. Our extinction estimates are systematically smaller than provided in the Kepler Input Catalogue and by the Schlegel, Finkbeiner and Davis maps. Distances to individual stars in the NGC 6791 and NGC 6819 star clusters agree to within their credible intervals. Comparison with the APOGEE red clump and SAGA catalogues provide another useful check, exhibiting agreement with our measurements to within a few percent. Overall, present methods seem to provide excellent distance and extinction determinations for the bulk of the APOKASC sample. Approximately one third of the stars present broad or multiple-peaked probability density functions and hence increased uncertainties. Uncertainties are expected to be reduced in future releases of the catalogue, when a larger fraction of the stars will have seismically-determined evolutionary status classifications.
[188]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.3566  [pdf] - 1216895
Tracing chemical evolution over the extent of the Milky Way's Disk with APOGEE Red Clump Stars
Comments: 18 pages, 17 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-09-11
We employ the first two years of data from the near-infrared, high-resolution SDSS-III/APOGEE spectroscopic survey to investigate the distribution of metallicity and alpha-element abundances of stars over a large part of the Milky Way disk. Using a sample of ~10,000 kinematically-unbiased red-clump stars with ~5% distance accuracy as tracers, the [alpha/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] distribution of this sample exhibits a bimodality in [alpha/Fe] at intermediate metallicities, -0.9<[Fe/H]<-0.2, but at higher metallicities ([Fe/H]=+0.2) the two sequences smoothly merge. We investigate the effects of the APOGEE selection function and volume filling fraction and find that these have little qualitative impact on the alpha-element abundance patterns. The described abundance pattern is found throughout the range 5<R<11 kpc and 0<|Z|<2 kpc across the Galaxy. The [alpha/Fe] trend of the high-alpha sequence is surprisingly constant throughout the Galaxy, with little variation from region to region (~10%). Using simple galactic chemical evolution models we derive an average star formation efficiency (SFE) in the high-alpha sequence of ~4.5E-10 1/yr, which is quite close to the nearly-constant value found in molecular-gas-dominated regions of nearby spirals. This result suggests that the early evolution of the Milky Way disk was characterized by stars that shared a similar star formation history and were formed in a well-mixed, turbulent, and molecular-dominated ISM with a gas consumption timescale (1/SFE) of ~2 Gyr. Finally, while the two alpha-element sequences in the inner Galaxy can be explained by a single chemical evolutionary track this cannot hold in the outer Galaxy, requiring instead a mix of two or more populations with distinct enrichment histories.
[189]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.2285  [pdf] - 1216791
The APOKASC Catalog
Comments: Proc. of the workshop "Asteroseismology of stellar populations in the Milky Way" (Sesto, 22-26 July 2013), Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings, (eds. A. Miglio, L. Girardi, P. Eggenberger, J. Montalban)
Submitted: 2014-09-08
I report on the APOKASC catalog, a joint effort between the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium and the SDSS-III APOGEE spectroscopic survey. It will contain both seismic and spectroscopic values for stars observed by both surveys. I discuss the derivation of spectroscopic parameters and their uncertainties from the H-band spectra delivered by the APOGEE spectrograph, illustrating the sensitivity of stellar spectra to some parameters, such as Teff, and lack of sensitivity to others, such as logg.
[190]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.5645  [pdf] - 1216490
The NASA-UC-UH Eta-Earth Program: IV. A Low-mass Planet Orbiting an M Dwarf 3.6 PC from Earth
Comments: ApJ accepted, 11 pages, 8 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2014-08-24
We report the discovery of a low-mass planet orbiting Gl 15 A based on radial velocities from the Eta-Earth Survey using HIRES at Keck Observatory. Gl 15 Ab is a planet with minimum mass Msini = 5.35 $\pm$ 0.75 M$_\oplus$, orbital period P = 11.4433 $\pm$ 0.0016 days, and an orbit that is consistent with circular. We characterize the host star using a variety of techniques. Photometric observations at Fairborn Observatory show no evidence for rotational modulation of spots at the orbital period to a limit of ~0.1 mmag, thus supporting the existence of the planet. We detect a second RV signal with a period of 44 days that we attribute to rotational modulation of stellar surface features, as confirmed by optical photometry and the Ca II H & K activity indicator. Using infrared spectroscopy from Palomar-TripleSpec, we measure an M2 V spectral type and a sub-solar metallicity ([M/H] = -0.22, [Fe/H] = -0.32). We measure a stellar radius of 0.3863 $\pm$ 0.0021 R$_\odot$ based on interferometry from CHARA.
[191]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.2249  [pdf] - 1215505
The Dynamics of the Multi-planet System Orbiting Kepler-56
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-07-08, last modified: 2014-08-24
Kepler-56 is a multi-planet system containing two coplanar inner planets that are in orbits misaligned with respect to the spin axis of the host star, and an outer planet. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the broad distribution of spin-orbit angles among exoplanets, and these theories fall under two broad categories. The first is based on dynamical interactions in a multi-body system, while the other assumes that disk migration is the driving mechanism in planetary configuration and that the star (or disk) is titled with respect to the planetary plane. Here we show that the large observed obliquity of Kepler-56 system is consistent with a dynamical origin. In addition, we use observations by Huber et al. (2013) to derive the obliquity's probability distribution function, thus improving the constrained lower limit. The outer planet may be the cause of the inner planets' large obliquities, and we give the probability distribution function of its inclination, which depends on the initial orbital configuration of the planetary system. We show that even in the presence of precise measurement of the true obliquity, one cannot distinguish the initial configurations. Finally we consider the fate of the system as the star continues to evolve beyond the main sequence, and we find that the obliquity of the system will not undergo major variations as the star climbs the red giant branch. We follow the evolution of the system and find that the innermost planet will be engulfed in ~129 Myr. Furthermore we put an upper limit of ~155 Myr for the engulfment of the second planet. This corresponds to ~ 3% of the current age of the star.
[192]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3853  [pdf] - 893265
A Technique for Extracting Highly Precise Photometry for the Two-Wheeled Kepler Mission
Comments: 11 pages, 8 figures. Submitted to PASP and revised based on reviewer suggestions. All processed K2 engineering data is made available to the community at http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/~avanderb/k2.html
Submitted: 2014-08-17
The original Kepler mission achieved high photometric precision thanks to ultra-stable pointing enabled by use of four reaction wheels. The loss of two of these reaction wheels reduced the telescope's ability to point precisely for extended periods of time, and as a result, the photometric precision has suffered. We present a technique for generating photometric light curves from pixel-level data obtained with the two-wheeled extended Kepler mission, K2. Our photometric technique accounts for the non-uniform pixel response function of the Kepler detectors by correlating flux measurements with the spacecraft's pointing and removing the dependence. When we apply our technique to the ensemble of stars observed during the Kepler Two-Wheel Concept Engineering Test, we find improvements over raw K2 photometry by factors of 2-5, with noise properties qualitatively similar to Kepler targets at the same magnitudes. We find evidence that the improvement in photometric precision depends on each target's position in the Kepler field of view, with worst precision near the edges of the field. Overall, this technique restores the median attainable photometric precision to within a factor of two of the original Kepler photometric precision for targets ranging from 10$^{th}$ to 15$^{th}$ magnitude in the Kepler bandpass, peaking with a median precision within 35% that of Kepler for stars between 12$^{th}$ and 13$^{th}$ magnitude in the Kepler bandpass.
[193]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3143  [pdf] - 863504
On the Spectroscopic Properties of the Retired A Star HD 185351
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures, to appear in the proceedings for the 18th Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun
Submitted: 2014-08-13
Doppler-based planet surveys have shown that, besides metallicity, the planet occurrence is also correlated with stellar mass, increasing from M to F-A spectral types. However, it has recently been argued that the subgiants (which represent A stars after they evolve off the main sequence) may not be as massive as suggested initially, which would significantly change the correlation found. To start investigating this claim, we have studied the subgiant star HD 185351, which has precisely measured physical properties based on asteroseismology and interferometry. An independent spectroscopic differential analysis based on excitation and ionization balance of iron lines yielded the atmospheric parameters $T_{\rm eff}$ = 5035 $\pm$ 29 K, $\log$ g = 3.30 $\pm$ 0.08 and [Fe/H] = 0.10 $\pm$ 0.04. These were used in conjunction with the PARSEC stellar evolutionary tracks to infer a mass M = 1.77 $\pm$ 0.04 M$_{\odot}$, which agrees well with the previous estimates. Lithium abundance was also estimated from spectral synthesis (A(Li) = 0.77 $\pm$ 0.07) and, together with $T_{\rm eff}$ and [Fe/H], allowed to determine a mass M = 1.64 $\pm$ 0.06 M$_{\odot}$, which is independent of the star's parallax and surface gravity. Our new measurements of the stellar mass support the notion that HD185351 is a Retired A Star with a mass in excess of 1.6 M$_{\odot}$.
[194]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.1032  [pdf] - 862747
The APOGEE red-clump catalog: Precise distances, velocities, and high-resolution elemental abundances over a large area of the Milky Way's disk
Comments:
Submitted: 2014-05-05, last modified: 2014-08-12
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III's Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey covering all of the major components of the Galaxy, including the dust-obscured regions of the inner Milky Way disk and bulge. Here we present a sample of 10,341 likely red-clump stars (RC) from the first two years of APOGEE operations, selected based on their position in color-metallicity-surface-gravity-effective-temperature space using a new method calibrated using stellar-evolution models and high-quality asteroseismology data. The narrowness of the RC locus in color-metallicity-luminosity space allows us to assign distances to the stars with an accuracy of 5 to 10%. The sample extends to typical distances of about 3 kpc from the Sun, with some stars out to 8 kpc, and spans a volume of approximately 100 kpc^3 over 5 kpc <~ R <~ 14 kpc, |Z| <~ 2 kpc, and -15 deg <~ Galactocentric azimuth <~ 30 deg. The APOGEE red-clump (APOGEE-RC) catalog contains photometry from 2MASS, reddening estimates, distances, line-of-sight velocities, stellar parameters and elemental abundances determined from the high-resolution APOGEE spectra, and matches to major proper motion catalogs. We determine the survey selection function for this data set and discuss how the RC selection samples the underlying stellar populations. We use this sample to limit any azimuthal variations in the median metallicity within the ~45 degree-wide azimuthal region covered by the current sample to be <= 0.02 dex, which is more than an order of magnitude smaller than the radial metallicity gradient. This result constrains coherent non-axisymmetric flows within a few kpc from the Sun.
[195]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.0280  [pdf] - 1180424
The TRENDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey. V. Discovery of an Old and Cold Benchmark T-dwarf Orbiting the Nearby G-star HD 19467
Comments: Updated to reflect ApJ version
Submitted: 2013-11-01, last modified: 2014-08-12
The nearby Sun-like star HD 19467 shows a subtle radial velocity (RV) acceleration of -1.37+/-0.09 m/s/yr over an 16.9 year time baseline (an RV trend), hinting at the existence of a distant orbiting companion. We have obtained high-contrast adaptive optics images of the star using NIRC2 at Keck Observatory and report the direct detection of the body that causes the acceleration. The companion, HD 19467 B, is dK=12.57+/-0.09 mag fainter than its parent star (contrast ratio of 9.4e-6), has blue colors J-K_s=-0.36+/-0.14 (J-H=-0.29+/-0.15), and is separated by 1.653+/-0.004" (51.1+/-1.0 AU). Follow-up astrometric measurements obtained over an 1.1 year time baseline demonstrate physical association through common parallactic and proper motion. We calculate a firm lower-limit of m>51.9^{+3.6}_{-4.3}Mjup for the companion mass from orbital dynamics using a combination of Doppler observations and imaging. We estimate a model-dependent mass of m=56.7^{+4.6}_{-7.2}Mjup from a gyrochronological age of 4.3^{+1.0}_{-1.2} Gyr. Isochronal analysis suggests a much older age of $9\pm1$ Gyr, which corresponds to a mass of m=67.4^{+0.9}_{-1.5}Mjup. HD 19467 B's measured colors and absolute magnitude are consistent with a late T-dwarf [~T5-T7]. We may infer a low metallicity of [Fe/H]=-0.15+/-0.04 for the companion from its G3V parent star. HD 19467 B is the first directly imaged benchmark T-dwarf found orbiting a Sun-like star with a measured RV acceleration.
[196]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.5229  [pdf] - 859872
Large eccentricity, low mutual inclination: the three-dimensional architecture of a hierarchical system of giant planets
Comments: ApJ, in press. 12 pages plus appendices/references. Submitted March 12, 2014. Accepted June 12, 2014. Very similar to previous version except revised Figure 10 (diagram of angles), fixed incorrect bolding, and system renamed Kepler-419
Submitted: 2014-05-20, last modified: 2014-07-11
We establish the three-dimensional architecture of the Kepler-419 (previously KOI-1474) system to be eccentric yet with a low mutual inclination. Kepler-419b is a warm Jupiter at semi-major axis a = 0.370 +0.007/-0.006 AU with a large eccentricity e=0.85 +0.08/-0.07 measured via the "photoeccentric effect." It exhibits transit timing variations induced by the non-transiting Kepler-419c, which we uniquely constrain to be a moderately eccentric (e=0.184 +/- 0.002), hierarchically-separated (a=1.68 +/- 0.03 AU) giant planet (7.3 +/- 0.4 MJup). We combine sixteen quarters of Kepler photometry, radial-velocity (RV) measurements from the HIgh Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) on Keck, and improved stellar parameters that we derive from spectroscopy and asteroseismology. From the RVs, we measure the mass of inner planet to be 2.5+/-0.3MJup and confirm its photometrically-measured eccentricity, refining the value to e=0.83+/-0.01. The RV acceleration is consistent with the properties of the outer planet derived from TTVs. We find that, despite their sizable eccentricities, the planets are coplanar to within 9 +8/-6 degrees, and therefore the inner planet's large eccentricity and close-in orbit are unlikely to be the result of Kozai migration. Moreover, even over many secular cycles, the inner planet's periapse is most likely never small enough for tidal circularization. Finally, we present and measure a transit time and impact parameter from four simultaneous ground-based light curves from 1m-class telescopes, demonstrating the feasibility of ground-based follow-up of Kepler giant planets exhibiting large TTVs.
[197]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.2329  [pdf] - 1215538
The Physical Parameters of the Retired A Star HD185351
Comments: ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2014-07-08
We report here an analysis of the physical stellar parameters of the giant star HD185351 using Kepler short-cadence photometry, optical and near infrared interferometry from CHARA, and high-resolution spectroscopy. Asteroseismic oscillations detected in the Kepler short-cadence photometry combined with an effective temperature calculated from the interferometric angular diameter and bolometric flux yield a mean density, rho_star = 0.0130 +- 0.0003 rho_sun and surface gravity, logg = 3.280 +- 0.011. Combining the gravity and density we find Rstar = 5.35 +- 0.20 Rsun and Mstar = 1.99 +- 0.23 Msun. The trigonometric parallax and CHARA angular diameter give a radius Rstar = 4.97 +- 0.07 Rsun. This smaller radius,when combined with the mean stellar density, corresponds to a stellar mass Mstar = 1.60 +- 0.08 Msun, which is smaller than the asteroseismic mass by 1.6-sigma. We find that a larger mass is supported by the observation of mixed modes in our high-precision photometry, the spacing of which is consistent only for Mstar =~ 1.8 Msun. Our various and independent mass measurements can be compared to the mass measured from interpolating the spectroscopic parameters onto stellar evolution models, which yields a model-based mass M_star = 1.87 +- 0.07 Msun. This mass agrees well with the asteroseismic value,but is 2.6-sigma higher than the mass from the combination of asteroseismology and interferometry. The discrepancy motivates future studies with a larger sample of giant stars. However, all of our mass measurements are consistent with HD185351 having a mass in excess of 1.5 Msun.
[198]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.4777  [pdf] - 1203441
General Relativistic Instability Supernova of a Supermassive Population III Star
Comments: 23 pages, 4 figures (accepted to ApJ)
Submitted: 2014-02-19, last modified: 2014-07-06
The formation of supermassive Population III stars with masses $\gtrsim$ 10,000 Msun in primeval galaxies in strong UV backgrounds at $z \sim$ 15 may be the most viable pathway to the formation of supermassive black holes by $z \sim$ 7. Most of these stars are expected to live for short times and then directly collapse to black holes, with little or no mass loss over their lives. But we have now discovered that non-rotating primordial stars with masses close to 55,000 Msun can instead die as highly energetic thermonuclear supernovae powered by explosive helium burning, releasing up to 10$ ^{55}$ erg, or about 10,000 times the energy of a Type Ia supernova. The explosion is triggered by the general relativistic contribution of thermal photons to gravity in the core of the star, which causes the core to contract and explosively burn. The energy release completely unbinds the star, leaving no compact remnant, and about half of the mass of the star is ejected into the early cosmos in the form of heavy elements. The explosion would be visible in the near infrared at $z \lesssim$ 20 to {\it Euclid} and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), perhaps signaling the birth of supermassive black hole seeds and the first quasars.
[199]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.2718  [pdf] - 1210083
Characterizing the Cool KOIs. VI. H- and K-band Spectra of Kepler M Dwarf Planet-Candidate Hosts
Comments: Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (ApJS). Data and table are available in the source
Submitted: 2014-06-10
We present H- and K-band spectra for late-type Kepler Objects of Interest (the "Cool KOIs"): low-mass stars with transiting-planet candidates discovered by NASA's Kepler Mission that are listed on the NASA Exoplanet Archive. We acquired spectra of 103 Cool KOIs and used the indices and calibrations of Rojas-Ayala et al. to determine their spectral types, stellar effective temperatures and metallicities, significantly augmenting previously published values. We interpolate our measured effective temperatures and metallicities onto evolutionary isochrones to determine stellar masses, radii, luminosities and distances, assuming the stars have settled onto the main-sequence. As a choice of isochrones, we use a new suite of Dartmouth predictions that reliably include mid-to-late M dwarf stars. We identify five M4V stars: KOI-961 (confirmed as Kepler 42), KOI-2704, KOI-2842, KOI-4290, and the secondary component to visual binary KOI-1725, which we call KOI-1725 B. We also identify a peculiar star, KOI-3497, which has a Na and Ca lines consistent with a dwarf star but CO lines consistent with a giant. Visible-wavelength adaptive optics imaging reveals two objects within a 1 arc second diameter; however, the objects' colors are peculiar. The spectra and properties presented in this paper serve as a resource for prioritizing follow-up observations and planet validation efforts for the Cool KOIs, and are all available for download online using the "data behind the figure" feature.
[200]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.4958  [pdf] - 1202324
Robotic Laser-Adaptive-Optics Imaging of 715 Kepler Exoplanet Candidates using Robo-AO
Comments: Accepted by ApJ. Minor updates & improved statistical analysis; no changes to results. 15 pages, 13 figures
Submitted: 2013-12-17, last modified: 2014-06-03
The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is designed to observe every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper we present the results from the 2012 observing season, searching for stars close to 715 representative Kepler planet candidate hosts. We find 53 companions, 44 of which are new discoveries. We detail the Robo-AO survey data reduction methods including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for large adaptive optics surveys. Our survey is sensitive to objects from 0.15" to 2.5" separation, with contrast ratios up to delta-m~6. We measure an overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates of 7.4% +/- 1.0%, and calculate the effects of each detected nearby star on the Kepler-measured planetary radius. We discuss several KOIs of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are "coincident multiple" systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we detect 2.6-sigma evidence for <15d-period giant planets being 2-3 times more likely be found in wide stellar binaries than smaller close-in planets and all sizes of further-out planets.
[201]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.6724  [pdf] - 1209744
The Vertical Metallicity Gradient of the Milky Way Disk: Transitions in [a/Fe] Populations
Comments: 62 pages, 12 figures, accepted by The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2014-05-26
Using G dwarfs from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) survey, we have determined a vertical metallicity gradient over a large volume of the Milky Way's disk, and examined how this gradient varies for different [a/Fe] subsamples. This sample contains over 40,000 stars with low-resolution spectroscopy over 144 lines of sight. We employ the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP) to obtain estimates of effective temperature, surface gravity, [Fe/H], and [a/Fe] for each star and extract multiple volume-complete subsamples of approximately 1000 stars each. Based on the survey's consistent target-selection algorithm, we adjust each subsample to determine an unbiased picture of the disk in [Fe/H] and [a/Fe]; consequently, each individual star represents the properties of many. The SEGUE sample allows us to constrain the vertical metallicity gradient for a large number of stars over a significant volume of the disk, between ~0.3 and 1.6 kpc from the Galactic plane, and examine the in situ structure, in contrast to previous analyses which are more limited in scope. This work does not pre-suppose a disk structure, whether composed of a single complex population or a distinct thin and thick disk component. The metallicity gradient is -0.243 +0.039 -0.053 dex/kpc for the sample as a whole, which we compare to various literature results. Each [a/Fe] subsample dominates at a different range of heights above the plane of the Galaxy, which is exhibited in the gradient found in the sample as a whole. Stars over a limited range in [a/Fe] show little change in median [Fe/H] with height. If we associate [a/Fe] with age, our consistent vertical metallicity gradients with [a/Fe] suggest that stars formed in different epochs exhibit comparable vertical structure, implying similar star-formation processes and evolution.
[202]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.4290  [pdf] - 1209595
The Catalina Surveys Periodic Variable Star Catalog
Comments: Accepted ApJS, 43 pages, 9 tables, 44 figures (some at reduced resolution)
Submitted: 2014-05-16
We present ~47,000 periodic variables found during the analysis of 5.4 million variable star candidates within a 20,000 square degree region covered by the Catalina Surveys Data Release-1 (CSDR1). Combining these variables with type-ab RR Lyrae from our previous work, we produce an on-line catalog containing periods, amplitudes, and classifications for ~61,000 periodic variables. By cross-matching these variables with those from prior surveys, we find that > 90% of the ~8,000 known periodic variables in the survey region are recovered. For these sources we find excellent agreement between our catalog and prior values of luminosity, period and amplitude, as well as classification. We investigate the rate of confusion between objects classified as contact binaries and type-c RR Lyrae (RRc's) based on periods, colours, amplitudes, metalicities, radial velocities and surface gravities. We find that no more than few percent of these variables in these classes are misidentified. By deriving distances for this clean sample of ~5,500 RRc's, we trace the path of the Sagittarius tidal streams within the Galactic halo. Selecting 146 outer-halo RRc's with SDSS radial velocities, we confirm the presence of a coherent halo structure that is inconsistent with current N-body simulations of the Sagittarius tidal stream. We also find numerous long-period variables that are very likely associated within the Sagittarius tidal streams system. Based on the examination of 31,000 contact binary light curves we find evidence for two subgroups exhibiting irregular lightcurves. One subgroup presents significant variations in mean brightness that are likely due to chromospheric activity. The other subgroup shows stable modulations over more than a thousand days and thereby provides evidence that the O'Connell effect is not due to stellar spots.
[203]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.6857  [pdf] - 1172985
WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b are Members of Triple Star Systems
Comments: Accepted to ApJ
Submitted: 2013-07-25, last modified: 2014-04-17
We present high spatial resolution images that demonstrate the hot Jupiters WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b orbit the primary star of hierarchical triple star systems. In each case, two distant companions with colors and brightness consistent with M dwarfs co-orbit the planet host as well as one another. Our adaptive optics images spatially resolve the secondary around WASP-12, previously identified by Bergfors et al. 2011 and Crossfield et al. 2012, into two distinct sources separated by 84.3+/-0.6 mas (21 +/- 3 AU). We find that the secondary to HAT-P-8, also identified by Bergfors et al. 2011, is in fact composed of two stars separated by 65.3+/-0.5 mas (15+/-1 AU). Our follow-up observations demonstrate physical association through common proper-motion. HAT-P-8 C has a particularly low mass, which we estimate to be 0.18+/-0.02Msun using photometry. Due to their hierarchy, WASP-12 BC and HAT-P-8 BC will enable the first dynamical mass determination for hot Jupiter stellar companions. These previously well-studied planet hosts now represent higher-order multi-star systems with potentially complex dynamics, underscoring the importance of diffraction-limited imaging and providing additional context for understanding the migrant population of transiting hot Jupiters.
[204]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.4417  [pdf] - 1209016
HAT-P-54b: A hot jupiter transiting a 0.64 Msun star in field 0 of the K2 mission
Comments: Submitted to AJ 2014 April 16
Submitted: 2014-04-16
We report the discovery of HAT-P-54b, a planet transiting a late K dwarf star in field 0 of the NASA K2 mission. We combine ground-based photometric light curves with radial velocity measurements to determine the physical parameters of the system. HAT-P-54b has a mass of 0.760 $\pm$ 0.032 $M_J$, a radius of 0.944 $\pm$ 0.028 $R_J$, and an orbital period of 3.7998 d. The star has V = 13.505 $\pm$ 0.060, a mass of 0.645 $\pm$ 0.020 $M_{\odot}$, a radius of 0.617 $\pm$ 0.013 $R_{\odot}$, an effective temperature of Teff = 4390 $\pm$ 50K, and a subsolar metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.127 $\pm$ 0.080. HAT-P-54b has a radius that is smaller than 92% of the known transiting planets with masses greater than that of Saturn, while HAT-P-54 is one of the lowest-mass stars known to host a hot Jupiter. Follow-up high-precision photometric observations by the K2 mission promise to make this a well-studied planetary system.
[205]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.2954  [pdf] - 1202157
Friends of Hot Jupiters I: A Radial Velocity Search for Massive, Long-Period Companions to Close-In Gas Giant Planets
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ. Final paper will include an electronic table with the full set of radial velocity measurements used in this study
Submitted: 2013-12-10, last modified: 2014-03-13
In this paper we search for distant massive companions to known transiting gas giant planets that may have influenced the dynamical evolution of these systems. We present new radial velocity observations for a sample of 51 planets obtained using the Keck HIRES instrument, and find statistically significant accelerations in fifteen systems. Six of these systems have no previously reported accelerations in the published literature: HAT-P-10, HAT-P-22, HAT-P-29, HAT-P-32, WASP-10, and XO-2. We combine our radial velocity fits with Keck NIRC2 adaptive optics (AO) imaging data to place constraints on the allowed masses and orbital periods of the companions responsible for the detected accelerations. The estimated masses of the companions range between 1-500 M_Jup, with orbital semi-major axes typically between 1-75 AU. A significant majority of the companions detected by our survey are constrained to have minimum masses comparable to or larger than those of the transiting planets in these systems, making them candidates for influencing the orbital evolution of the inner gas giant. We estimate a total occurrence rate of 51 +/- 10% for companions with masses between 1-13 M_Jup and orbital semi-major axes between 1-20 AU in our sample. We find no statistically significant difference between the frequency of companions to transiting planets with misaligned or eccentric orbits and those with well-aligned, circular orbits. We combine our expanded sample of radial velocity measurements with constraints from transit and secondary eclipse observations to provide improved measurements of the physical and orbital characteristics of all of the planets included in our survey.
[206]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.1872  [pdf] - 1453154
Testing the Asteroseismic Mass Scale Using Metal-Poor Stars Characterized with APOGEE and Kepler
Comments: 4 figures; 1 table. Accepted to ApJL
Submitted: 2014-03-07
Fundamental stellar properties, such as mass, radius, and age, can be inferred using asteroseismology. Cool stars with convective envelopes have turbulent motions that can stochastically drive and damp pulsations. The properties of the oscillation frequency power spectrum can be tied to mass and radius through solar-scaled asteroseismic relations. Stellar properties derived using these scaling relations need verification over a range of metallicities. Because the age and mass of halo stars are well-constrained by astrophysical priors, they provide an independent, empirical check on asteroseismic mass estimates in the low-metallicity regime. We identify nine metal-poor red giants (including six stars that are kinematically associated with the halo) from a sample observed by both the Kepler space telescope and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III APOGEE spectroscopic survey. We compare masses inferred using asteroseismology to those expected for halo and thick-disk stars. Although our sample is small, standard scaling relations, combined with asteroseismic parameters from the APOKASC Catalog, produce masses that are systematically higher (<{\Delta}M>=0.17+/-0.05 Msun) than astrophysical expectations. The magnitude of the mass discrepancy is reduced by known theoretical corrections to the measured large frequency separation scaling relationship. Using alternative methods for measuring asteroseismic parameters induces systematic shifts at the 0.04 Msun level. We also compare published asteroseismic analyses with scaling relationship masses to examine the impact of using the frequency of maximum power as a constraint. Upcoming APOKASC observations will provide a larger sample of ~100 metal-poor stars, important for detailed asteroseismic characterization of Galactic stellar populations.
[207]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.0549  [pdf] - 1546154
The SEGUE K giant survey II: A Catalog of Distance Determinations for the SEGUE K giants in the Galactic Halo
Comments: accepted by APJ
Submitted: 2012-11-02, last modified: 2014-02-26
We present an online catalog of distance determinations for $\rm 6036$ K giants, most of which are members of the Milky Way's stellar halo. Their medium-resolution spectra from SDSS/SEGUE are used to derive metallicities and rough gravity estimates, along with radial velocities. Distance moduli are derived from a comparison of each star's apparent magnitude with the absolute magnitude of empirically calibrated color-luminosity fiducials, at the observed $(g-r)_0$ color and spectroscopic [Fe/H]. We employ a probabilistic approach that makes it straightforward to properly propagate the errors in metallicities, magnitudes, and colors into distance uncertainties. We also fold in ${\it prior}$ information about the giant-branch luminosity function and the different metallicity distributions of the SEGUE K-giant targeting sub-categories. We show that the metallicity prior plays a small role in the distance estimates, but that neglecting the luminosity prior could lead to a systematic distance modulus bias of up to 0.25 mag, compared to the case of using the luminosity prior. We find a median distance precision of $16\%$, with distance estimates most precise for the least metal-poor stars near the tip of the red-giant branch. The precision and accuracy of our distance estimates are validated with observations of globular and open clusters. The stars in our catalog are up to 125 kpc distant from the Galactic center, with 283 stars beyond 50 kpc, forming the largest available spectroscopic sample of distant tracers in the Galactic halo.
[208]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.4549  [pdf] - 780659
Chemodynamics of the Milky Way. I. The first year of APOGEE data
Comments: 25 pages, 17 figures. A&A, in press
Submitted: 2013-11-18, last modified: 2014-02-05
We investigate the chemo-kinematic properties of the Milky Way disc by exploring the first year of data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and compare our results to smaller optical high-resolution samples in the literature, as well as results from lower resolution surveys such as GCS, SEGUE and RAVE. We start by selecting a high-quality sample in terms of chemistry ($\sim$ 20.000 stars) and, after computing distances and orbital parameters for this sample, we employ a number of useful subsets to formulate constraints on Galactic chemical and chemodynamical evolution processes in the Solar neighbourhood and beyond (e.g., metallicity distributions -- MDFs, [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams, and abundance gradients). Our red giant sample spans distances as large as 10 kpc from the Sun. We find remarkable agreement between the recently published local (d $<$ 100 pc) high-resolution high-S/N HARPS sample and our local HQ sample (d $<$ 1 kpc). The local MDF peaks slightly below solar metallicity, and exhibits an extended tail towards [Fe/H] $= -$1, whereas a sharper cut-off is seen at larger metallicities. The APOGEE data also confirm the existence of a gap in the [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] abundance diagram. When expanding our sample to cover three different Galactocentric distance bins, we find the high-[$\alpha$/Fe] stars to be rare towards the outer zones, as previously suggested in the literature. For the gradients in [Fe/H] and [$\alpha$/Fe], measured over a range of 6 $ < $ R $ <$ 11 kpc in Galactocentric distance, we find a good agreement with the gradients traced by the GCS and RAVE dwarf samples. For stars with 1.5 $<$ z $<$ 3 kpc, we find a positive metallicity gradient and a negative gradient in [$\alpha$/Fe].
[209]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.0846  [pdf] - 791964
Near-IR Direct Detection of Water Vapor in Tau Boo b
Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures Accepted for publication in ApJL
Submitted: 2014-02-04
We use high dynamic range, high-resolution L-band spectroscopy to measure the radial velocity variations of the hot Jupiter in the tau Bootis planetary system. The detection of an exoplanet by the shift in the stellar spectrum alone provides a measure of the planet's minimum mass, with the true mass degenerate with the unknown orbital inclination. Treating the tau Boo system as a high flux ratio double-lined spectroscopic binary permits the direct measurement of the planet's true mass as well as its atmospheric properties. After removing telluric absorption and cross-correlating with a model planetary spectrum dominated by water opacity, we measure a 6-sigma detection of the planet at K_p = 111 +- 5 km/s, with a 1-sigma upper limit on the spectroscopic flux ratio of 10^-4. This radial velocity leads to a planetary orbital inclination of i = 45+3-4degrees and a mass of M_P = 5.90+0.35-0.20 M_ Jup. We report the first detection of water vapor in the atmosphere of a non-transiting hot Jupiter, tau Boo b.
[210]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.5849  [pdf] - 774613
The TRENDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey. IV. The Occurrence Rate of Giant Planets around M-Dwarfs
Comments: 29 Pages, 19 Figures, published in ApJ
Submitted: 2013-07-22, last modified: 2014-01-21
Doppler-based planet surveys have discovered numerous giant planets but are incomplete beyond several AU. At larger star-planet separations, direct planet detection through high-contrast imaging has proven successful, but this technique is sensitive only to young planets and characterization relies upon theoretical evolution models. Here we demonstrate that radial velocity measurements and high-contrast imaging can be combined to overcome these issues. The presence of widely separated companions can be deduced by identifying an acceleration (long-term trend) in the radial velocity of a star. By obtaining high spatial resolution follow-up imaging observations, we rule out scenarios in which such accelerations are caused by stellar binary companions with high statistical confidence. We report results from an analysis of Doppler measurements of a sample of 111 M-dwarf stars with a median of 29 radial velocity observations over a median time baseline of 11.8 yr. By targeting stars that exhibit a radial velocity acceleration ("trend") with adaptive optics imaging, we determine that 6.5% +/- 3.0% of M-dwarf stars host one or more massive companions with 1 < m/M_Jupiter < 13 and 0 < a < 20 AU. These results are lower than analyses of the planet occurrence rate around higher-mass stars. We find the giant planet occurrence rate is described by a double power law in stellar mass M and metallicity F = [Fe/H] such that f(M,F) = 0.039(+0.056,-0.028) M^(0.8(+1.1,-0.9)) 10^((3.8 +/- 1.2)F). Our results are consistent with gravitational microlensing measurements of the planet occurrence rate; this study represents the first model-independent comparison with microlensing observations.
[211]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.7735  [pdf] - 1173047
The Tenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment
Ahn, Christopher P.; Alexandroff, Rachael; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Bautista, Julian E.; Beers, Timothy C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Borde, Arnaud; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, Alaina Shelden; Brandt, W. N.; Brauer, Dorothée; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Busca, Nicolás G.; Carithers, William; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Carnero, Aurelio R.; Carr, Michael A.; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Crepp, Justin R.; Cristiani, Stefano; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Cunha, Katia; da Costa, Luiz N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; De Lee, Nathan; Dean, Janice D. R.; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Epstein, Courtney R.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fabbian, D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Favole, Ginevra; Castellá, Bruno Femenía; Alvar, Emma Fernández; Feuillet, Diane; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbraith-Frew, J. G.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, Ana E. García; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; Hernández, Jonay I. González; Gott, J. Richard; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Halverson, Samuel; Harding, Paul; Harris, David W.; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Frederick R.; Davó, Artemio Herrero; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Ivans, Inese I.; Jackson, Kelly M.; Jiang, Peng; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kirkby, David; Kinemuchi, K.; Klaene, Mark A.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koesterke, Lars; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Long, Daniel C.; Loomis, Craig P.; Lucatello, Sara; Lupton, Robert H.; Ma, Bo; Mack, Claude E.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Mészáros, Sz.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Montesano, Francesco; More, Surhud; Morrison, Heather L.; Muna, Demitri; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Myers, Adam D.; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; O'Connell, Julia E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; O'Connell, Ross; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Pâris, Isabelle; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Perottoni, Hélio Dotto; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Rebolo, Rafael; Reid, Beth A.; Richards, Jonathan C.; Riffel, Rogério; Robin, Annie C.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Roy, Arpita; Rubiño-Martin, J. A.; Sabiu, Cristiano G.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Simmons, Audrey E.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sobreira, Flavia; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Terrien, Ryan C.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Vandenberg, Jan; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; White, Martin; White, Simon D. M.; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun
Comments: 15 figures; 1 table. Accepted to ApJS. DR10 is available at http://www.sdss3.org/dr10 v3 fixed 3 diacritic markings in the arXiv HTML listing of the author names
Submitted: 2013-07-29, last modified: 2014-01-17
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has been in operation since 2000 April. This paper presents the tenth public data release (DR10) from its current incarnation, SDSS-III. This data release includes the first spectroscopic data from the Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), along with spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) taken through 2012 July. The APOGEE instrument is a near-infrared R~22,500 300-fiber spectrograph covering 1.514--1.696 microns. The APOGEE survey is studying the chemical abundances and radial velocities of roughly 100,000 red giant star candidates in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. DR10 includes 178,397 spectra of 57,454 stars, each typically observed three or more times, from APOGEE. Derived quantities from these spectra (radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities) are also included.DR10 also roughly doubles the number of BOSS spectra over those included in the ninth data release. DR10 includes a total of 1,507,954 BOSS spectra, comprising 927,844 galaxy spectra; 182,009 quasar spectra; and 159,327 stellar spectra, selected over 6373.2 square degrees.
[212]  oai:arXiv.org:1401.4195