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Jennings, Elise

Normalized to: Jennings, E.

30 article(s) in total. 463 co-authors, from 1 to 9 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 2,5.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.11779  [pdf] - 2005643
Enabling real-time multi-messenger astrophysics discoveries with deep learning
Comments: Invited Expert Recommendation for Nature Reviews Physics. The art work produced by E. A. Huerta and Shawn Rosofsky for this article was used by Carl Conway to design the cover of the October 2019 issue of Nature Reviews Physics
Submitted: 2019-11-26
Multi-messenger astrophysics is a fast-growing, interdisciplinary field that combines data, which vary in volume and speed of data processing, from many different instruments that probe the Universe using different cosmic messengers: electromagnetic waves, cosmic rays, gravitational waves and neutrinos. In this Expert Recommendation, we review the key challenges of real-time observations of gravitational wave sources and their electromagnetic and astroparticle counterparts, and make a number of recommendations to maximize their potential for scientific discovery. These recommendations refer to the design of scalable and computationally efficient machine learning algorithms; the cyber-infrastructure to numerically simulate astrophysical sources, and to process and interpret multi-messenger astrophysics data; the management of gravitational wave detections to trigger real-time alerts for electromagnetic and astroparticle follow-ups; a vision to harness future developments of machine learning and cyber-infrastructure resources to cope with the big-data requirements; and the need to build a community of experts to realize the goals of multi-messenger astrophysics.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.01998  [pdf] - 1961545
Deterministic and Bayesian Neural Networks for Low-latency Gravitational Wave Parameter Estimation of Binary Black Hole Mergers
Comments: v2: 13 pages, 5 figures, First application of Bayesian Neural Networks for gravitational wave parameter estimation of simulated and real astrophysical events
Submitted: 2019-03-05, last modified: 2019-09-15
We present the first application of deep learning for gravitational wave parameter estimation of binary black hole mergers evolving on quasi-circular orbits with aligned or anti-aligned spins. We use root-leaf structured networks to ensure that common physical features are shared across all parameters. In order to cover a broad range of astrophysically motivated scenarios, we use a training dataset with over $10^7$ modeled waveforms to ensure local time- and scale-invariance. The trained models are applied to estimate the astrophysical parameters of the existing catalog of detected binary black hole mergers, and their corresponding black hole remnants, including the final spin and the gravitational wave quasi-normal frequencies. Using a deterministic neural network model, we are able to efficiently provide point-parameter estimation results, along with statistical errors caused by the noise spectrum uncertainty. We also introduce the first application of Bayesian neural networks for gravitational wave parameter estimation of real astrophysical events. These probabilistic models were trained with over $10^7$ modeled waveforms and using 1024 nodes (65,536 core processors) on the Theta supercomputer at Argonne Leadership Computing Facility to reduce the training stage to just thirty minutes. In inference mode, both the deterministic and Bayesian neural networks estimate the astrophysical parameters of binary black hole mergers within 2 milliseconds using a single Tesla V100 GPU. Both deterministic and Bayesian neural networks produce agreeing parameter estimation results, which are also consistent with Bayesian analyses used to characterize the catalog of binary black hole mergers observed by the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.02183  [pdf] - 1911715
Deep Learning at Scale for the Construction of Galaxy Catalogs in the Dark Energy Survey
Comments: 14 pages, 12 Figures, 6 appendices, 2 visualizations see \<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5rI573i6ws> and \<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1F3q7M8QjTQ>
Submitted: 2018-12-05, last modified: 2019-07-08
The scale of ongoing and future electromagnetic surveys pose formidable challenges to classify astronomical objects. Pioneering efforts on this front include citizen science campaigns adopted by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). SDSS datasets have been recently used to train neural network models to classify galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) that overlap the footprint of both surveys. Herein, we demonstrate that knowledge from deep learning algorithms, pre-trained with real-object images, can be transferred to classify galaxies that overlap both SDSS and DES surveys, achieving state-of-the-art accuracy $\gtrsim99.6\%$. We demonstrate that this process can be completed within just eight minutes using distributed training. While this represents a significant step towards the classification of DES galaxies that overlap previous surveys, we need to initiate the characterization of unlabelled DES galaxies in new regions of parameter space. To accelerate this program, we use our neural network classifier to label over ten thousand unlabelled DES galaxies, which do not overlap previous surveys. Furthermore, we use our neural network model as a feature extractor for unsupervised clustering and find that unlabeled DES images can be grouped together in two distinct galaxy classes based on their morphology, which provides a heuristic check that the learning is successfully transferred to the classification of unlabelled DES images. We conclude by showing that these newly labeled datasets can be combined with unsupervised recursive training to create large-scale DES galaxy catalogs in preparation for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope era.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.00522  [pdf] - 1826217
Deep Learning for Multi-Messenger Astrophysics: A Gateway for Discovery in the Big Data Era
Comments: 15 pages, no figures. White paper based on the "Deep Learning for Multi-Messenger Astrophysics: Real-time Discovery at Scale" workshop, hosted at NCSA, October 17-19, 2018 http://www.ncsa.illinois.edu/Conferences/DeepLearningLSST/
Submitted: 2019-02-01
This report provides an overview of recent work that harnesses the Big Data Revolution and Large Scale Computing to address grand computational challenges in Multi-Messenger Astrophysics, with a particular emphasis on real-time discovery campaigns. Acknowledging the transdisciplinary nature of Multi-Messenger Astrophysics, this document has been prepared by members of the physics, astronomy, computer science, data science, software and cyberinfrastructure communities who attended the NSF-, DOE- and NVIDIA-funded "Deep Learning for Multi-Messenger Astrophysics: Real-time Discovery at Scale" workshop, hosted at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, October 17-19, 2018. Highlights of this report include unanimous agreement that it is critical to accelerate the development and deployment of novel, signal-processing algorithms that use the synergy between artificial intelligence (AI) and high performance computing to maximize the potential for scientific discovery with Multi-Messenger Astrophysics. We discuss key aspects to realize this endeavor, namely (i) the design and exploitation of scalable and computationally efficient AI algorithms for Multi-Messenger Astrophysics; (ii) cyberinfrastructure requirements to numerically simulate astrophysical sources, and to process and interpret Multi-Messenger Astrophysics data; (iii) management of gravitational wave detections and triggers to enable electromagnetic and astro-particle follow-ups; (iv) a vision to harness future developments of machine and deep learning and cyberinfrastructure resources to cope with the scale of discovery in the Big Data Era; (v) and the need to build a community that brings domain experts together with data scientists on equal footing to maximize and accelerate discovery in the nascent field of Multi-Messenger Astrophysics.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.00591  [pdf] - 1751774
New Science, New Media: An Assessment of the Online Education and Public Outreach Initiatives of The Dark Energy Survey
Comments: 50 pages, 3 appendices, 15 total figures
Submitted: 2018-04-02, last modified: 2018-09-18
As large-scale international collaborations become the standard for astronomy research, a wealth of opportunities have emerged to create innovative education and public outreach (EPO) programming. In the past two decades, large collaborations have focused EPO strategies around published data products. Newer collaborations have begun to explore other avenues of public engagement before and after data are made available. We present a case study of the online EPO program of The Dark Energy Survey, currently one of the largest international astronomy collaborations actively taking data. DES EPO is unique at this scale in astronomy, as far as we are aware, as it evolved organically from scientists' passion for EPO and is entirely organized and implemented by the volunteer efforts of collaboration scientists. We summarize the strategy and implementation of eight EPO initiatives. For content distributed via social media, we present reach and user statistics over the 2016 calendar year. DES EPO online products reached ~2,500 users per post, and 94% of these users indicate a predisposition to science-related interests. We find no obvious correlation between post type and post reach, with the most popular posts featuring the intersections of science and art and/or popular culture. We conclude that one key issue of the online DES EPO program was designing material which would inspire new interest in science. The greatest difficulty of the online DES EPO program was sustaining scientist participation and collaboration support; the most successful programs are those which capitalized on the hobbies of participating scientists. We present statistics and recommendations, along with observations from individual experience, as a potentially instructive resource for scientists or EPO professionals interested in organizing EPO programs and partnerships for large science collaborations or organizations.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.3409  [pdf] - 1659486
CosmoSIS: modular cosmological parameter estimation
Comments: Finally got around to updating to refereed version. 31 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2014-09-11, last modified: 2018-04-03
Cosmological parameter estimation is entering a new era. Large collaborations need to coordinate high-stakes analyses using multiple methods; furthermore such analyses have grown in complexity due to sophisticated models of cosmology and systematic uncertainties. In this paper we argue that modularity is the key to addressing these challenges: calculations should be broken up into interchangeable modular units with inputs and outputs clearly defined. We present a new framework for cosmological parameter estimation, CosmoSIS, designed to connect together, share, and advance development of inference tools across the community. We describe the modules already available in CosmoSIS, including CAMB, Planck, cosmic shear calculations, and a suite of samplers. We illustrate it using demonstration code that you can run out-of-the-box with the installer available at http://bitbucket.org/joezuntz/cosmosis
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.05024  [pdf] - 1732557
Umbrella sampling: a powerful method to sample tails of distributions
Comments: submitted to MNRAS, 10 pages, 6 figures. Code implementing the umbrella sampling method with examples of use is available at https://github.com/c-matthews/usample
Submitted: 2017-12-13
We present the umbrella sampling (US) technique and show that it can be used to sample extremely low probability areas of the posterior distribution that may be required in statistical analyses of data. In this approach sampling of the target likelihood is split into sampling of multiple biased likelihoods confined within individual umbrella windows. We show that the US algorithm is efficient and highly parallel and that it can be easily used with other existing MCMC samplers. The method allows the user to capitalize on their intuition and define umbrella windows and increase sampling accuracy along specific directions in the parameter space. Alternatively, one can define umbrella windows using an approach similar to parallel tempering. We provide a public code that implements umbrella sampling as a standalone python package. We present a number of tests illustrating the power of the US method in sampling low probability areas of the posterior and show that this ability allows a considerably more robust sampling of multi-modal distributions compared to the standard sampling methods. We also present an application of the method in a real world example of deriving cosmological constraints using the supernova type Ia data. We show that umbrella sampling can sample the posterior accurately down to the $\approx 15\sigma$ credible region in the $\Omega_{\rm m}-\Omega_\Lambda$ plane, while for the same computational work the affine-invariant MCMC sampling implemented in the {\tt emcee} code samples the posterior reliably only to $\approx 3\sigma$.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.04106  [pdf] - 1579979
Forward Modeling of Large-Scale Structure: An open-source approach with Halotools
Comments: Revisions match version accepted for publication in AAS
Submitted: 2016-06-13, last modified: 2017-09-22
We present the first stable release of Halotools (v0.2), a community-driven Python package designed to build and test models of the galaxy-halo connection. Halotools provides a modular platform for creating mock universes of galaxies starting from a catalog of dark matter halos obtained from a cosmological simulation. The package supports many of the common forms used to describe galaxy-halo models: the halo occupation distribution (HOD), the conditional luminosity function (CLF), abundance matching, and alternatives to these models that include effects such as environmental quenching or variable galaxy assembly bias. Satellite galaxies can be modeled to live in subhalos, or to follow custom number density profiles within their halos, including spatial and/or velocity bias with respect to the dark matter profile. The package has an optimized toolkit to make mock observations on a synthetic galaxy population, including galaxy clustering, galaxy-galaxy lensing, galaxy group identification, RSD multipoles, void statistics, pairwise velocities and others, allowing direct comparison to observations. Halotools is object-oriented, enabling complex models to be built from a set of simple, interchangeable components, including those of your own creation. Halotools has an automated testing suite and is exhaustively documented on http://halotools.readthedocs.io, which includes quickstart guides, source code notes and a large collection of tutorials. The documentation is effectively an online textbook on how to build and study empirical models of galaxy formation with Python.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.07606  [pdf] - 1542710
astroABC: An Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo sampler for cosmological parameter estimation
Comments: 19 pages, 3 figures. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2016-08-26, last modified: 2017-03-07
Given the complexity of modern cosmological parameter inference where we are faced with non-Gaussian data and noise, correlated systematics and multi-probe correlated data sets, the Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) method is a promising alternative to traditional Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches in the case where the Likelihood is intractable or unknown. The ABC method is called "Likelihood free" as it avoids explicit evaluation of the Likelihood by using a forward model simulation of the data which can include systematics. We introduce astroABC, an open source ABC Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler for parameter estimation. A key challenge in astrophysics is the efficient use of large multi-probe datasets to constrain high dimensional, possibly correlated parameter spaces. With this in mind astroABC allows for massive parallelization using MPI, a framework that handles spawning of jobs across multiple nodes. A key new feature of astroABC is the ability to create MPI groups with different communicators, one for the sampler and several others for the forward model simulation, which speeds up sampling time considerably. For smaller jobs the Python multiprocessing option is also available. Other key features include: a Sequential Monte Carlo sampler, a method for iteratively adapting tolerance levels, local covariance estimate using scikit-learn's KDTree, modules for specifying optimal covariance matrix for a component-wise or multivariate normal perturbation kernel, output and restart files are backed up every iteration, user defined metric and simulation methods, a module for specifying heterogeneous parameter priors including non-standard prior PDFs, a module for specifying a constant, linear, log or exponential tolerance level, well-documented examples and sample scripts. This code is hosted online at https://github.com/EliseJ/astroABC
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.00036  [pdf] - 1532357
The DESI Experiment Part I: Science,Targeting, and Survey Design
DESI Collaboration; Aghamousa, Amir; Aguilar, Jessica; Ahlen, Steve; Alam, Shadab; Allen, Lori E.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Annis, James; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Ballester, Otger; Baltay, Charles; Beaufore, Lucas; Bebek, Chris; Beers, Timothy C.; Bell, Eric F.; Bernal, José Luis; Besuner, Robert; Beutler, Florian; Blake, Chris; Bleuler, Hannes; Blomqvist, Michael; Blum, Robert; Bolton, Adam S.; Briceno, Cesar; Brooks, David; Brownstein, Joel R.; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolas G.; Cahn, Robert N.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Carton, Pierre-Henri; Casas, Ricard; Castander, Francisco J.; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Claybaugh, Todd M.; Close, Madeline; Coker, Carl T.; Cole, Shaun; Comparat, Johan; Cooper, Andrew P.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Crocce, Martin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel; Cunningham, Daniel P.; Davis, Tamara M.; Dawson, Kyle S.; de la Macorra, Axel; De Vicente, Juan; Delubac, Timothée; Derwent, Mark; Dey, Arjun; Dhungana, Govinda; Ding, Zhejie; Doel, Peter; Duan, Yutong T.; Ealet, Anne; Edelstein, Jerry; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elliott, Ann; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Evatt, Matthew; Fagrelius, Parker; Fan, Xiaohui; Fanning, Kevin; Farahi, Arya; Farihi, Jay; Favole, Ginevra; Feng, Yu; Fernandez, Enrique; Findlay, Joseph R.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Fitzpatrick, Michael J.; Flaugher, Brenna; Flender, Samuel; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Fosalba, Pablo; Frenk, Carlos S.; Fumagalli, Michele; Gaensicke, Boris T.; Gallo, Giuseppe; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Fusillo, Nicola Pietro Gentile; Gerard, Terry; Gershkovich, Irena; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Gillet, Denis; Gonzalez-de-Rivera, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Gott, Shelby; Graur, Or; Gutierrez, Gaston; Guy, Julien; Habib, Salman; Heetderks, Henry; Heetderks, Ian; Heitmann, Katrin; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Herrera, David A.; Ho, Shirley; Holland, Stephen; Honscheid, Klaus; Huff, Eric; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Huterer, Dragan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Laguna, Joseph Maria Illa; Ishikawa, Yuzo; Jacobs, Dianna; Jeffrey, Niall; Jelinsky, Patrick; Jennings, Elise; Jiang, Linhua; Jimenez, Jorge; Johnson, Jennifer; Joyce, Richard; Jullo, Eric; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kama, Sami; Karcher, Armin; Karkar, Sonia; Kehoe, Robert; Kennamer, Noble; Kent, Stephen; Kilbinger, Martin; Kim, Alex G.; Kirkby, David; Kisner, Theodore; Kitanidis, Ellie; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koposov, Sergey; Kovacs, Eve; Koyama, Kazuya; Kremin, Anthony; Kron, Richard; Kronig, Luzius; Kueter-Young, Andrea; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lafever, Robin; Lahav, Ofer; Lambert, Andrew; Lampton, Michael; Landriau, Martin; Lang, Dustin; Lauer, Tod R.; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Guillou, Laurent Le; Van Suu, Auguste Le; Lee, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Su-Jeong; Leitner, Daniela; Lesser, Michael; Levi, Michael E.; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Li, Baojiu; Liang, Ming; Lin, Huan; Linder, Eric; Loebman, Sarah R.; Lukić, Zarija; Ma, Jun; MacCrann, Niall; Magneville, Christophe; Makarem, Laleh; Manera, Marc; Manser, Christopher J.; Marshall, Robert; Martini, Paul; Massey, Richard; Matheson, Thomas; McCauley, Jeremy; McDonald, Patrick; McGreer, Ian D.; Meisner, Aaron; Metcalfe, Nigel; Miller, Timothy N.; Miquel, Ramon; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam; Naik, Milind; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nicola, Andrina; da Costa, Luiz Nicolati; Nie, Jundan; Niz, Gustavo; Norberg, Peder; Nord, Brian; Norman, Dara; Nugent, Peter; O'Brien, Thomas; Oh, Minji; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Padilla, Cristobal; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palmese, Antonella; Pappalardo, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patej, Anna; Peacock, John A.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Peng, Xiyan; Percival, Will J.; Perruchot, Sandrine; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pogge, Richard; Pollack, Jennifer E.; Poppett, Claire; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Probst, Ronald G.; Rabinowitz, David; Raichoor, Anand; Ree, Chang Hee; Refregier, Alexandre; Regal, Xavier; Reid, Beth; Reil, Kevin; Rezaie, Mehdi; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie; Ronayette, Samuel; Roodman, Aaron; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rozo, Eduardo; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina; Rykoff, Eli S.; Sabiu, Cristiano; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez, Eusebio; Sanchez, Javier; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Michael; Schubnell, Michael; Secroun, Aurélia; Seljak, Uros; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serrano, Santiago; Shafieloo, Arman; Shan, Huanyuan; Sharples, Ray; Sholl, Michael J.; Shourt, William V.; Silber, Joseph H.; Silva, David R.; Sirk, Martin M.; Slosar, Anze; Smith, Alex; Smoot, George F.; Som, Debopam; Song, Yong-Seon; Sprayberry, David; Staten, Ryan; Stefanik, Andy; Tarle, Gregory; Tie, Suk Sien; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Valdes, Francisco; Valenzuela, Octavio; Valluri, Monica; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Verde, Licia; Walker, Alistair R.; Wang, Jiali; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wechsler, Risa H.; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Yang, Qian; Yeche, Christophe; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhimin; Zhu, Yaling; Zou, Hu; Zu, Ying
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-10-31, last modified: 2016-12-13
DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. To trace the underlying dark matter distribution, spectroscopic targets will be selected in four classes from imaging data. We will measure luminous red galaxies up to $z=1.0$. To probe the Universe out to even higher redshift, DESI will target bright [O II] emission line galaxies up to $z=1.7$. Quasars will be targeted both as direct tracers of the underlying dark matter distribution and, at higher redshifts ($ 2.1 < z < 3.5$), for the Ly-$\alpha$ forest absorption features in their spectra, which will be used to trace the distribution of neutral hydrogen. When moonlight prevents efficient observations of the faint targets of the baseline survey, DESI will conduct a magnitude-limited Bright Galaxy Survey comprising approximately 10 million galaxies with a median $z\approx 0.2$. In total, more than 30 million galaxy and quasar redshifts will be obtained to measure the BAO feature and determine the matter power spectrum, including redshift space distortions.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.00037  [pdf] - 1532358
The DESI Experiment Part II: Instrument Design
DESI Collaboration; Aghamousa, Amir; Aguilar, Jessica; Ahlen, Steve; Alam, Shadab; Allen, Lori E.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Annis, James; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Ballester, Otger; Baltay, Charles; Beaufore, Lucas; Bebek, Chris; Beers, Timothy C.; Bell, Eric F.; Bernal, José Luis; Besuner, Robert; Beutler, Florian; Blake, Chris; Bleuler, Hannes; Blomqvist, Michael; Blum, Robert; Bolton, Adam S.; Briceno, Cesar; Brooks, David; Brownstein, Joel R.; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolas G.; Cahn, Robert N.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Carton, Pierre-Henri; Casas, Ricard; Castander, Francisco J.; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Claybaugh, Todd M.; Close, Madeline; Coker, Carl T.; Cole, Shaun; Comparat, Johan; Cooper, Andrew P.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Crocce, Martin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel; Cunningham, Daniel P.; Davis, Tamara M.; Dawson, Kyle S.; de la Macorra, Axel; De Vicente, Juan; Delubac, Timothée; Derwent, Mark; Dey, Arjun; Dhungana, Govinda; Ding, Zhejie; Doel, Peter; Duan, Yutong T.; Ealet, Anne; Edelstein, Jerry; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elliott, Ann; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Evatt, Matthew; Fagrelius, Parker; Fan, Xiaohui; Fanning, Kevin; Farahi, Arya; Farihi, Jay; Favole, Ginevra; Feng, Yu; Fernandez, Enrique; Findlay, Joseph R.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Fitzpatrick, Michael J.; Flaugher, Brenna; Flender, Samuel; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Fosalba, Pablo; Frenk, Carlos S.; Fumagalli, Michele; Gaensicke, Boris T.; Gallo, Giuseppe; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Fusillo, Nicola Pietro Gentile; Gerard, Terry; Gershkovich, Irena; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Gillet, Denis; Gonzalez-de-Rivera, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Gott, Shelby; Graur, Or; Gutierrez, Gaston; Guy, Julien; Habib, Salman; Heetderks, Henry; Heetderks, Ian; Heitmann, Katrin; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Herrera, David A.; Ho, Shirley; Holland, Stephen; Honscheid, Klaus; Huff, Eric; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Huterer, Dragan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Laguna, Joseph Maria Illa; Ishikawa, Yuzo; Jacobs, Dianna; Jeffrey, Niall; Jelinsky, Patrick; Jennings, Elise; Jiang, Linhua; Jimenez, Jorge; Johnson, Jennifer; Joyce, Richard; Jullo, Eric; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kama, Sami; Karcher, Armin; Karkar, Sonia; Kehoe, Robert; Kennamer, Noble; Kent, Stephen; Kilbinger, Martin; Kim, Alex G.; Kirkby, David; Kisner, Theodore; Kitanidis, Ellie; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koposov, Sergey; Kovacs, Eve; Koyama, Kazuya; Kremin, Anthony; Kron, Richard; Kronig, Luzius; Kueter-Young, Andrea; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lafever, Robin; Lahav, Ofer; Lambert, Andrew; Lampton, Michael; Landriau, Martin; Lang, Dustin; Lauer, Tod R.; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Guillou, Laurent Le; Van Suu, Auguste Le; Lee, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Su-Jeong; Leitner, Daniela; Lesser, Michael; Levi, Michael E.; L'Huillier, Benjamin; Li, Baojiu; Liang, Ming; Lin, Huan; Linder, Eric; Loebman, Sarah R.; Lukić, Zarija; Ma, Jun; MacCrann, Niall; Magneville, Christophe; Makarem, Laleh; Manera, Marc; Manser, Christopher J.; Marshall, Robert; Martini, Paul; Massey, Richard; Matheson, Thomas; McCauley, Jeremy; McDonald, Patrick; McGreer, Ian D.; Meisner, Aaron; Metcalfe, Nigel; Miller, Timothy N.; Miquel, Ramon; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam; Naik, Milind; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nicola, Andrina; da Costa, Luiz Nicolati; Nie, Jundan; Niz, Gustavo; Norberg, Peder; Nord, Brian; Norman, Dara; Nugent, Peter; O'Brien, Thomas; Oh, Minji; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Padilla, Cristobal; Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Palmese, Antonella; Pappalardo, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patej, Anna; Peacock, John A.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Peng, Xiyan; Percival, Will J.; Perruchot, Sandrine; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pogge, Richard; Pollack, Jennifer E.; Poppett, Claire; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Probst, Ronald G.; Rabinowitz, David; Raichoor, Anand; Ree, Chang Hee; Refregier, Alexandre; Regal, Xavier; Reid, Beth; Reil, Kevin; Rezaie, Mehdi; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie; Ronayette, Samuel; Roodman, Aaron; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rozo, Eduardo; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina; Rykoff, Eli S.; Sabiu, Cristiano; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez, Eusebio; Sanchez, Javier; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Michael; Schubnell, Michael; Secroun, Aurélia; Seljak, Uros; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serrano, Santiago; Shafieloo, Arman; Shan, Huanyuan; Sharples, Ray; Sholl, Michael J.; Shourt, William V.; Silber, Joseph H.; Silva, David R.; Sirk, Martin M.; Slosar, Anze; Smith, Alex; Smoot, George F.; Som, Debopam; Song, Yong-Seon; Sprayberry, David; Staten, Ryan; Stefanik, Andy; Tarle, Gregory; Tie, Suk Sien; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Valdes, Francisco; Valenzuela, Octavio; Valluri, Monica; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Verde, Licia; Walker, Alistair R.; Wang, Jiali; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wechsler, Risa H.; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Yang, Qian; Yeche, Christophe; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhimin; Zhu, Yaling; Zou, Hu; Zu, Ying
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-10-31, last modified: 2016-12-13
DESI (Dark Energy Spectropic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. The DESI instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking up to 5,000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 360 nm to 980 nm. The fibers feed ten three-arm spectrographs with resolution $R= \lambda/\Delta\lambda$ between 2000 and 5500, depending on wavelength. The DESI instrument will be used to conduct a five-year survey designed to cover 14,000 deg$^2$. This powerful instrument will be installed at prime focus on the 4-m Mayall telescope in Kitt Peak, Arizona, along with a new optical corrector, which will provide a three-degree diameter field of view. The DESI collaboration will also deliver a spectroscopic pipeline and data management system to reduce and archive all data for eventual public use.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1611.03087  [pdf] - 1511907
A new approach for obtaining cosmological constraints from Type Ia Supernovae using Approximate Bayesian Computation
Comments: 22 pages, 11 figures. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2016-11-09
Cosmological parameter estimation techniques that robustly account for systematic measurement uncertainties will be crucial for the next generation of cosmological surveys. We present a new analysis method, superABC, for obtaining cosmological constraints from Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves using Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) without any likelihood assumptions. The ABC method works by using a forward model simulation of the data where systematic uncertainties can be simulated and marginalized over. A key feature of the method presented here is the use of two distinct metrics, the `Tripp' and `Light Curve' metrics, which allow us to compare the simulated data to the observed data set. The Tripp metric takes as input the parameters of models fit to each light curve with the SALT-II method, whereas the Light Curve metric uses the measured fluxes directly without model fitting. We apply the superABC sampler to a simulated data set of $\sim$1000 SNe corresponding to the first season of the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program. Varying $\Omega_m, w_0, \alpha$ and $\beta$ and a magnitude offset parameter, with no systematics we obtain $\Delta(w_0) = w_0^{\rm true} - w_0^{\rm best \, fit} = -0.036\pm0.109$ (a $\sim11$% 1$\sigma$ uncertainty) using the Tripp metric and $\Delta(w_0) = -0.055\pm0.068$ (a $\sim7$% 1$\sigma$ uncertainty) using the Light Curve metric. Including 1% calibration uncertainties in four passbands, adding 4 more parameters, we obtain $\Delta(w_0) = -0.062\pm0.132$ (a $\sim14$% 1$\sigma$ uncertainty) using the Tripp metric. Overall we find a $17$% increase in the uncertainty on $w_0$ with systematics compared to without. We contrast this with a MCMC approach where systematic effects are approximately included. We find that the MCMC method slightly underestimates the impact of calibration uncertainties for this simulated data set.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.09321  [pdf] - 1504570
Biased Tracers in Redshift Space in the EFT of Large-Scale Structure
Comments: 38 pages, 8 figures. Code available at http://web.stanford.edu/~senatore/
Submitted: 2016-10-28
The Effective Field Theory of Large-Scale Structure (EFTofLSS) provides a novel formalism that is able to accurately predict the clustering of large-scale structure (LSS) in the mildly non-linear regime. Here we provide the first computation of the power spectrum of biased tracers in redshift space at one loop order, and we make the associated code publicly available. We compare the multipoles $\ell=0,2$ of the redshift-space halo power spectrum, together with the real-space matter and halo power spectra, with data from numerical simulations at $z=0.67$. For the samples we compare to, which have a number density of $\bar n=3.8 \cdot 10^{-2}(h \ {\rm Mpc}^{-1})^3$ and $\bar n=3.9 \cdot 10^{-4}(h \ {\rm Mpc}^{-1})^3$, we find that the calculation at one-loop order matches numerical measurements to within a few percent up to $k\simeq 0.43 \ h \ {\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, a significant improvement with respect to former techniques. By performing the so-called IR-resummation, we find that the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation peak is accurately reproduced. Based on the results presented here, long-wavelength statistics that are routinely observed in LSS surveys can be finally computed in the EFTofLSS. This formalism thus is ready to start to be compared directly to observational data.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.01661  [pdf] - 1492861
Maximizing Science in the Era of LSST: A Community-Based Study of Needed US Capabilities
Comments: 174 pages; one chapter of this report was previously published as arXiv:1607.04302
Submitted: 2016-10-05
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a discovery machine for the astronomy and physics communities, revealing astrophysical phenomena from the Solar System to the outer reaches of the observable Universe. While many discoveries will be made using LSST data alone, taking full scientific advantage of LSST will require ground-based optical-infrared (OIR) supporting capabilities, e.g., observing time on telescopes, instrumentation, computing resources, and other infrastructure. This community-based study identifies, from a science-driven perspective, capabilities that are needed to maximize LSST science. Expanding on the initial steps taken in the 2015 OIR System Report, the study takes a detailed, quantitative look at the capabilities needed to accomplish six representative LSST-enabled science programs that connect closely with scientific priorities from the 2010 decadal surveys. The study prioritizes the resources needed to accomplish the science programs and highlights ways that existing, planned, and future resources could be positioned to accomplish the science goals.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.01803  [pdf] - 1351467
Disentangling redshift-space distortions and nonlinear bias using the 2D power spectrum
Comments: 15 pages, 11 figures, published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-08-07, last modified: 2016-01-18
We present the nonlinear 2D galaxy power spectrum, $P(k,\mu)$, in redshift space, measured from the Dark Sky simulations, using galaxy catalogs constructed with both halo occupation distribution and subhalo abundance matching methods, chosen to represent an intermediate redshift sample of luminous red galaxies. We find that the information content in individual $\mu$ (cosine of the angle to the line of sight) bins is substantially richer then multipole moments, and show that this can be used to isolate the impact of nonlinear growth and redshift space distortion (RSD) effects. Using the $\mu<0.2$ simulation data, which we show is not impacted by RSD effects, we can successfully measure the nonlinear bias to an accuracy of $\sim 5$% at $k<0.6 h$Mpc$^{-1}$. This use of individual $\mu $ bins to extract the nonlinear bias successfully removes a large parameter degeneracy when constraining the linear growth rate of structure. We carry out a joint parameter estimation, using the low $\mu$ simulation data to constrain the nonlinear bias, and $\mu\ge0.2$ to constrain the growth rate and show that $f$ can be constrained to $\sim 26\, (22)$% to a $k_{\rm max}< 0.4\, (0.6) h$Mpc$^{-1}$ from clustering alone using a simple dispersion model, for a range of galaxy models. Our analysis of individual $\mu $ bins also reveals interesting physical effects which arise simply from different methods of populating halos with galaxies. We find a prominent turnaround scale, at which RSD damping effects are greater then the nonlinear growth, which differs not only for each $\mu$ bin but also for each galaxy model. These features may provide unique signatures which could be used to shed light on the galaxy-dark matter connection.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.03468  [pdf] - 1579640
Galaxy cluster lensing masses in modified lensing potentials
Comments: 21 pages, 9 figures, 2 tables. Comments welcome
Submitted: 2015-05-13
We determine the concentration-mass relation of 19 X-ray selected galaxy clusters from the CLASH survey in theories of gravity that directly modify the lensing potential. We model the clusters as NFW haloes and fit their lensing signal, in the Cubic Galileon and Nonlocal gravity models, to the lensing convergence profiles of the clusters. We discuss a number of important issues that need to be taken into account, associated with the use of nonparametric and parametric lensing methods, as well as assumptions about the background cosmology. Our results show that the concentration and mass estimates in the modified gravity models are, within the errorbars, the same as in $\Lambda$CDM. This result demonstrates that, for the Nonlocal model, the modifications to gravity are too weak at the cluster redshifts, and for the Galileon model, the screening mechanism is very efficient inside the cluster radius. However, at distances $\sim \left[2-20\right] {\rm Mpc}/h$ from the cluster center, we find that the surrounding force profiles are enhanced by $\sim20-40\%$ in the Cubic Galileon model. This has an impact on dynamical mass estimates, which means that tests of gravity based on comparisons between lensing and dynamical masses can also be applied to the Cubic Galileon model.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.02052  [pdf] - 1224356
Nonlinear stochastic growth rates and redshift space distortions
Comments: 14 pages, 9 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-02-06, last modified: 2015-03-09
The linear growth rate is commonly defined through a simple deterministic relation between the velocity divergence and the matter overdensity in the linear regime. We introduce a formalism that extends this to a nonlinear, stochastic relation between $\theta = \nabla \cdot v({\bf x},t)/aH$ and $\delta$. This provides a new phenomenological approach that examines the conditional mean $< \theta|\delta>$, together with the fluctuations of $\theta$ around this mean. We measure these stochastic components using N-body simulations and find they are non-negative and increase with decreasing scale from $\sim$10% at $k<0.2 h $Mpc$^{-1}$ to 25% at $k\sim0.45h$Mpc$^{-1}$ at $z = 0$. Both the stochastic relation and nonlinearity are more pronounced for halos, $M \le 5 \times 10^{12}M_\odot h^{-1}$, compared to the dark matter at $z=0$ and $1$. Nonlinear growth effects manifest themselves as a rotation of the mean $< \theta|\delta>$ away from the linear theory prediction $-f_{\tiny \rm LT}\delta$, where $f_{\tiny \rm LT}$ is the linear growth rate. This rotation increases with wavenumber, $k$, and we show that it can be well-described by second order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) for $k < 0.1 h$Mpc$^{-1}$. The stochasticity in the $\theta$ -- $\delta$ relation is not so simply described by 2LPT, and we discuss its impact on measurements of $f_{\tiny \rm LT}$ from two point statistics in redshift space. Given that the relationship between $\delta$ and $\theta$ is stochastic and nonlinear, this will have implications for the interpretation and precision of $f_{\tiny \rm LT}$ extracted using models which assume a linear, deterministic expression.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.7296  [pdf] - 1215941
Velocity and mass bias in the distribution of dark matter halos
Comments: 11 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2014-07-27
The non-linear, scale-dependent bias in the mass distribution of galaxies and the underlying dark matter is a key systematic affecting the extraction of cosmological parameters from galaxy clustering. Using 95 million halos from the Millennium-XXL N-body simulation, we find that the mass bias is scale independent only for $k<0.1 h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ today ($z=0$) and for $k<0.2 h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ at $z=0.7$. We test analytic halo bias models against our simulation measurements and find that the model of Tinker et al. 2005 is accurate to better then 5% at $z=0$. However, the simulation results are better fit by an ellipsoidal collapse model at $z=0.7$. We highlight, for the first time, another potentially serious systematic due to a sampling bias in the halo velocity divergence power spectra which will affect the comparison between observations and any redshift space distortion model which assumes dark matter velocity statistics with no velocity bias. By measuring the velocity divergence power spectra for different sized halo samples, we find that there is a significant bias which increases with decreasing number density. This bias is approximately 20% at $k=0.1h$Mpc$^{-1}$ for a halo sample of number density $\bar{n} = 10^{-3} (h/$Mpc$)^3$ at both $z=0$ and $z=0.7$ for the velocity divergence auto power spectrum. Given the importance of redshift space distortions as a probe of dark energy and the on-going major effort to advance models for the clustering signal in redshift space, our results show this velocity bias introduces another systematic, alongside scale-dependent halo mass bias, which cannot be neglected.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.6768  [pdf] - 1180224
Galaxy Infall Kinematics as a Test of Modified Gravity
Comments: 14 pages, 10 figures, comments welcom
Submitted: 2013-10-24
Infrared modifications of General Relativity (GR) can be revealed by comparing the mass of galaxy clusters estimated from weak lensing to that from infall kinematics. We measure the 2D galaxy velocity distribution in the cluster infall region by applying the galaxy infall kinematics (GIK) model developed by Zu and Weinberg (2013) to two suites of f(R) and Galileon modified gravity simulations. Despite having distinct screening mechanisms, namely, the Chameleon and the Vainshtein effects, the f(R) and Galileon clusters exhibit very similar deviations in their GIK profiles from GR, with ~ 100-200 k/s enhancement in the characteristic infall velocity at r=5 Mpc/h and 50-100 km/s broadening in the radial and tangential velocity dispersions across the entire infall region, for clusters with mass ~ 10^{14} Msol/h at z=0.25. These deviations are detectable via the GIK reconstruction of the redshift--space cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function, xi_cg^s(r_p,r_\pi), which shows ~ 1-2 Mpc/h increase in the characteristic line-of-sight distance r_\pi^c at r_p<6 Mpc/h from GR predictions. With overlapping deep imaging and large redshift surveys in the future, we expect that the GIK modelling of xi_cg^s, in combination with the stacked weak lensing measurements, will provide powerful diagnostics of modified gravity theories and the origin of cosmic acceleration.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.7905  [pdf] - 725792
Modelling the relative velocities of isolated pairs of galaxies
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures, SF2A 2013 Proceeding
Submitted: 2013-09-30
We study the comoving relative velocities, v12, of model isolated galaxy pairs at z=0.5. For this purpose, we use the predictions from the GALFORM semi-analytical model of galaxy formation and evolution based on a Lambda cold dark matter cosmology consistent with the results from WMAP7. In real space, we find that isolated pairs of galaxies are predicted to form an angle t with the line-of-sight that is uniformily distributed as expected if the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic. We also find that isolated pairs of galaxies separated by a comoving distance between 1 and 3 Mpc/h are predicted to have <v12>=0. For galaxies in this regime, the distribution of the angle t is predicted to change minimally from real to redshift space, with a change smaller than 5% in <sin^2 t>. However, the distances defining the comoving regime strongly depends on the applied isolation criteria.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.6087  [pdf] - 814725
The abundance of voids and the excursion set formalism
Comments: 17 pages, 13 figures, matches published version in MNRAS
Submitted: 2013-04-22, last modified: 2013-07-17
We present measurements of the number density of voids in the dark matter distribution from a series of N-body simulations of a \Lambda CDM cosmology. We define voids as spherical regions of \rho_v = 0.2\rho_m around density minima in order to relate our results to the predicted abundances using the excursion set formalism. Using a linear underdensity of \delta_v = -2.7, from a spherical evolution model, we find that a volume conserving model, which does not conserve number density in the mapping from the linear to nonlinear regime, matches the measured abundance to within 16% for a range of void radii 1< r(Mpc/h)<15. This model fixes the volume fraction of the universe which is in voids and assumes that voids of a similar size merge as they expand by a factor of 1.7 to achieve a nonlinear density of \rho_v = 0.2\rho_m today. We find that the model of Sheth & van de Weygaert (2004) for the number density of voids greatly overpredicts the abundances over the same range of scales. We find that the volume conserving model works well at matching the number density of voids measured from the simulations at higher redshifts, z=0.5 and 1, as well as correctly predicting the abundances to within 25% in a simulation of a matter dominated \Omega_m = 1 universe. We examine the abundance of voids in the halo distribution and find fewer small, r<10 Mpc/h, voids and many more large, r>10 Mpc/h, voids compared to the dark matter. These results indicate that voids identified in the halo or galaxy distribution are related to the underlying void distribution in the dark matter in a complicated way which merits further study if voids are to be used as a precision probe of cosmology.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.6630  [pdf] - 738990
Simulations of Galileon modified gravity: Clustering statistics in real and redshift space
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2013-03-26
We use N-body simulations to study the statistics of massive halos and redshift space distortions for theories with a standard \Lambda CDM expansion history and a galileon-type scalar field. The extra scalar field increases the gravitational force, leading to enhanced structure formation. We compare our measurements of the real space matter power spectrum and halo properties with fitting formula for estimating these quantities analytically. We find that a model for power spectrum, halo mass-function and halo bias, derived from \Lambda CDM simulations can fit the results from our simulations of modified gravity when \sigma_8 is appropriately adjusted. We also study the redshift space distortions in the two point correlation function measured from these simulations, finding a difference in the ratio of the redshift space to real space clustering amplitude relative to standard gravity on all scales. We find enhanced clustering on scales r>10 Mpc/h and increased damping of the correlation function for scales r<9 Mpc/h. The boost in the clustering on large scales due to the enhanced gravitational forces cannot be mimicked in a standard gravity model by simply changing \sigma_8. This result illustrates the usefulness of redshift space distortion measurements as a probe of modifications to General Relativity.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1206.4317  [pdf] - 667098
The nonlinear matter and velocity power spectra in f(R) gravity
Comments: 13 pages, 8 figures, 1 table; references added; version to appear in MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-06-19, last modified: 2012-09-24
We study the matter and velocity divergence power spectra in a f(R) gravity theory and their time evolution measured from several large-volume N-body simulations with varying box sizes and resolution. We find that accurate prediction of the matter power spectrum in f(R) gravity places stronger requirements on the simulation than is the case with LCDM, because of the nonlinear nature of the fifth force. Linear perturbation theory is shown to be a poor approximation for the f(R) models, except when the chameleon effect is very weak. We show that the relative differences from the fiducial LCDM model are much more pronounced in the nonlinear tail of the velocity divergence power spectrum than in the matter power spectrum, which suggests that future surveys which target the collection of peculiar velocity data will open new opportunities to constrain modified gravity theories. A close investigation of the time evolution of the power spectra shows that there is a pattern in the evolution history, which can be explained by the properties of the chameleon-type fifth force in f(R) gravity. Varying the model parameter |f_R0|, which quantifies the strength of the departure from standard gravity, mainly varies the epoch marking the onset of the fifth force, as a result of which the different f(R) models are in different stages of the same evolutionary path at any given time
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.1439  [pdf] - 667102
An improved model for the nonlinear velocity power spectrum
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures, Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-07-05, last modified: 2012-09-12
The velocity divergence power spectrum is a key ingredient in modelling redshift space distortion effects on quasi-linear and nonlinear scales. We present an improved model for the z=0 velocity divergence auto and cross power spectrum which was originally suggested by Jennings et al. 2011. Using numerical simulations we measure the velocity fields using a Delaunay tesselation and obtain an accurate prediction of the velocity divergence power spectrum on scales k < 1 hMpc^{-1}. We use this to update the model which is now accurate to 2% for both P_{\theta \theta} and P_{\theta \delta} at z=0 on scales k <0.7 hMpc^{-1} and k <0.5 hMpc^{-1} respectively. We find that the formula for the redshift dependence of the velocity divergence power spectra proposed by Jennings et al. 2011 recovers the measured z>0 P(k) to markedly greater accuracy with the new model. The nonlinear P_{\theta \theta} and P_{\theta \delta} at z =1 are recovered accurately to better than 2% on scales k<0.2 hMpc^{-1}. Recently it was shown that the velocity field shows larger differences between modified gravity cosmologies and \Lambda CDM compared to the matter field. An accurate model for the velocity divergence power spectrum, such as the one presented here, is a valuable tool for analysing redshift space distortion effects in future galaxy surveys and for constraining deviations from general relativity.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.2698  [pdf] - 667096
Redshift space distortions in f(R) gravity
Comments: 19 pages, 14 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-05-11, last modified: 2012-07-05
We use large volume N-body simulations to predict the clustering of dark matter in redshift space in f(R) modified gravity cosmologies. This is the first time that the nonlinear matter and velocity fields have been resolved to such a high level of accuracy over a broad range of scales in this class of models. We find significant deviations from the clustering signal in standard gravity, with an enhanced boost in power on large scales and stronger damping on small scales in the f(R) models compared to GR at redshifts z<1. We measure the velocity divergence (P_\theta \theta) and matter (P_\delta \delta) power spectra and find a large deviation in the ratios \sqrt{P_\theta \theta/P_\delta \delta} and P_\delta \theta/P_\delta\delta, between the f(R) models and GR for 0.03<k/(h/Mpc)<0.5. In linear theory these ratios equal the growth rate of structure on large scales. Our results show that the simulated ratios agree with the growth rate for each cosmology (which is scale dependent in the case of modified gravity) only for extremely large scales, k<0.06h/Mpc at z=0. The velocity power spectrum is substantially different in the f(R) models compared to GR, suggesting that this observable is a sensitive probe of modified gravity. We demonstrate how to extract the matter and velocity power spectra from the 2D redshift space power spectrum, P(k,\mu), and can recover the nonlinear matter power spectrum to within a few percent for k<0.1h/Mpc. However, the model fails to describe the shape of the 2D power spectrum demonstrating that an improved model is necessary in order to reconstruct the velocity power spectrum accurately. The same model can match the monopole moment to within 3% for GR and 10% for the f(R) cosmology at k<0.2 h/Mpc at z=1. Our results suggest that the extraction of the velocity power spectrum from future galaxy surveys is a promising method to constrain deviations from GR.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1108.0932  [pdf] - 461563
Testing dark energy using pairs of galaxies in redshift space
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS; 15 pages
Submitted: 2011-08-03, last modified: 2011-11-30
The distribution of angles subtended between pairs of galaxies and the line of sight,which is uniform in real space, is distorted by their peculiar motions, and has been proposed as a probe of cosmic expansion. We test this idea using N-body simulations of structure formation in a cold dark matter universe with a cosmological constant and in two variant cosmologies with different dark energy models. We find that the distortion of the distribution of angles is sensitive to the nature of dark energy. However, for the first time, our simulations also reveal dependences of the normalization of the distribution on both redshift and cosmology that have been neglected in previous work. This introduces systematics that severely limit the usefulness of the original method. Guided by our simulations, we devise a new, improved test of the nature of dark energy. We demonstrate that this test does not require prior knowledge of the background cosmology and that it can even distinguish between models that have the same baryonic acoustic oscillations and dark matter halo mass functions. Our technique could be applied to the completed BOSS galaxy redshift survey to constrain the expansion history of the Universe to better than 2%. The method will also produce different signals for dark energy and modified gravity cosmologies even when they have identical expansion histories, through the different peculiar velocities induced in these cases.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1011.2842  [pdf] - 287043
Testing gravity using the growth of large scale structure in the Universe
Comments: 15 pages, 5 figures, matches published version in ApJL
Submitted: 2010-11-12, last modified: 2011-01-04
Future galaxy surveys hope to distinguish between the dark energy and modified gravity scenarios for the accelerating expansion of the Universe using the distortion of clustering in redshift space. The aim is to model the form and size of the distortion to infer the rate at which large scale structure grows. We test this hypothesis and assess the performance of current theoretical models for the redshift space distortion using large volume N-body simulations of the gravitational instability process. We simulate competing cosmological models which have identical expansion histories - one is a quintessence dark energy model with a scalar field and the other is a modified gravity model with a time varying gravitational constant - and demonstrate that they do indeed produce different redshift space distortions. This is the first time this approach has been verified using a technique that can follow the growth of structure at the required level of accuracy. Our comparisons show that theoretical models for the redshift space distortion based on linear perturbation theory give a surprisingly poor description of the simulation results. Furthermore, the application of such models can give rise to catastrophic systematic errors leading to incorrect interpretation of the observations. We show that an improved model is able to extract the correct growth rate. Further enhancements to theoretical models of redshift space distortions, calibrated against simulations, are needed to fully exploit the forthcoming high precision clustering measurements.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1003.4282  [pdf] - 249006
Modelling redshift space distortions in hierarchical cosmologies
Comments: 15 pages, 9 figures, appendix added, matches published version in MNRAS
Submitted: 2010-03-22, last modified: 2010-09-22
The anisotropy of clustering in redshift space provides a direct measure of the growth rate of large scale structure in the Universe. Future galaxy redshift surveys will make high precision measurements of these distortions, and will potentially allow us to distinguish between different scenarios for the accelerating expansion of the Universe. Accurate predictions are needed in order to distinguish between competing cosmological models. We study the distortions in the redshift space power spectrum in $\Lambda$CDM and quintessence dark energy models, using large volume N-body simulations, and test predictions for the form of the redshift space distortions. We find that the linear perturbation theory prediction by Kaiser (1987) is a poor fit to the measured distortions, even on surprisingly large scales $k \ge 0.05 h$Mpc$^{-1}$. An improved model for the redshift space power spectrum, including the non-linear velocity divergence power spectrum, is presented and agrees with the power spectra measured from the simulations up to $k \sim 0.2 h$Mpc$^{-1}$. We have found a density-velocity relation which is cosmology independent and which relates the non-linear velocity divergence spectrum to the non-linear matter power spectrum. We provide a formula which generates the non-linear velocity divergence $P(k)$ at any redshift, using only the non-linear matter power spectrum and the linear growth factor at the desired redshift. This formula is accurate to better than 5% on scales $k<0.2 h $Mpc$^{-1}$ for all the cosmological models discussed in this paper. Our results will extend the statistical power of future galaxy surveys.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.3255  [pdf] - 1025230
How BAO measurements can fail to detect quintessence
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, to appear in the Invisible Univers International Conference AIP proceedings series
Submitted: 2010-02-17
We model the nonlinear growth of cosmic structure in different dark energy models, using large volume N-body simulations. We consider a range of quintessence models which feature both rapidly and slowly varying dark energy equations of state, and compare the growth of structure to that in a universe with a cosmological constant. The adoption of a quintessence model changes the expansion history of the universe, the form of the linear theory power spectrum and can alter key observables, such as the horizon scale and the distance to last scattering. The difference in structure formation can be explained to first order by the difference in growth factor at a given epoch; this scaling also accounts for the nonlinear growth at the 15% level. We find that quintessence models which feature late $(z<2)$, rapid transitions towards $w=-1$ in the equation of state, can have identical baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak positions to those in $\Lambda$CDM, despite being very different from $\Lambda$CDM both today and at high redshifts $(z \sim 1000)$. We find that a second class of models which feature non-negligible amounts of dark energy at early times cannot be distinguished from $\Lambda$CDM using measurements of the mass function or the BAO. These results highlight the need to accurately model quintessence dark energy in N-body simulations when testing cosmological probes of dynamical dark energy.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:0908.1394  [pdf] - 27187
Simulations of Quintessential Cold Dark Matter: beyond the cosmological constant
Comments: 24 pages, 17 figures. MNRAS in press
Submitted: 2009-08-10, last modified: 2009-10-05
We study the nonlinear growth of cosmic structure in different dark energy models, using large volume N-body simulations. We consider a range of quintessence models which feature both rapidly and slowly varying dark energy equations of state, and compare the growth of structure to that in a universe with a cosmological constant. The adoption of a quintessence model changes the expansion history of the universe, the form of the linear theory power spectrum and can alter key observables, such as the horizon scale and the distance to last scattering. We incorporate these effects into our simulations in stages to isolate the impact of each on the growth of structure. The difference in structure formation can be explained to first order by the difference in growth factor at a given epoch; this scaling also accounts for the nonlinear growth at the 15% level. We find that quintessence models that are different from $\Lambda$CDM both today and at high redshifts $(z \sim 1000)$ and which feature late $(z<2)$, rapid transitions in the equation of state, can have identical baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak positions to those in $\Lambda$CDM. We find that these models have higher abundances of dark matter haloes at $z>0$ compared to $\Lambda$CDM and so measurements of the mass function should allow us to distinguish these quintessence models from a cosmological constant. However, we find that a second class of quintessence models, whose equation of state makes an early $(z>2)$ rapid transition to $w=-1$, cannot be distinguished from $\Lambda$CDM using measurements of the mass function or the BAO, even if these models have non-negligible amounts of dark energy at early times.