sort results by

Use logical operators AND, OR, NOT and round brackets to construct complex queries. Whitespace-separated words are treated as ANDed.

Show articles per page in mode

Jørgensen, Uffe G.

Normalized to: Jørgensen, U.

65 article(s) in total. 619 co-authors, from 1 to 51 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 20,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.07544  [pdf] - 1999757
GravityCam: Wide-field Imaging Surveys in the Visible from the Ground
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures. Paper presented at the Scientific Detector Workshop, Baltimore, 2017
Submitted: 2019-11-18
GravityCam is a new concept of ground-based imaging instrument capable of delivering significantly sharper images from the ground than is normally possible without adaptive optics. Advances in optical and near infrared imaging technologies allow images to be acquired at high speed without significant noise penalty. Aligning these images before they are combined can yield a 3-5 fold improvement in image resolution. By using arrays of such detectors, survey fields may be as wide as the telescope optics allows. We describe the instrument and detail its application to accelerate greatly the rate of detection of Earth size planets by gravitational microlensing. GravityCam will improve substantially the quality of weak shear studies of dark matter distribution in distant clusters of galaxies. An extensive microlensing survey will also provide a vast dataset for asteroseismology studies, and GravityCam promises to generate a unique data set on the population of the Kuiper belt and possibly the Oort cloud.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.08520  [pdf] - 1988589
Spitzer Microlensing Program as a Probe for Globular Cluster Planets. Analysis of OGLE-2015-BLG-0448
Comments: ApJ submitted, 12 pages, 8 figures, 2 tabels
Submitted: 2015-12-28, last modified: 2019-10-29
The microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0448 was observed by Spitzer and lay within the tidal radius of the globular cluster NGC 6558. The event had moderate magnification and was intensively observed, hence it had the potential to probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters. We measure the proper motion of NGC 6558 ($\mu_{\rm cl}$(N,E) = (+0.36+-0.10, +1.42+-0.10) mas/yr) as well as the source and show that the lens is not a cluster member. Even though this particular event does not probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters, other potential cluster lens events can be verified using our methodology. Additionally, we find that microlens parallax measured using OGLE photometry is consistent with the value found based on the light curve displacement between Earth and Spitzer.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.11536  [pdf] - 2025645
OGLE-2015-BLG-1649Lb: A gas giant planet around a low-mass dwarf
Comments: 24 pages, 5 figures, 3 tables. Accepted for publication in AJ
Submitted: 2019-07-25, last modified: 2019-10-02
We report the discovery of an exoplanet in microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1649. The planet/host-star mass ratio is $q =7.2 \times 10^{-3}$ and the projected separation normalized by the Einstein radius is $s = 0.9$. The upper limit of the lens flux is obtained from adaptive optics observations by IRCS/Subaru, which excludes the probability of a G-dwarf or more massive host star and helps to put a tighter constraint on the lens mass as well as commenting on the formation scenarios of giant planets orbiting low-mass stars. We conduct a Bayesian analysis including constraints on the lens flux to derive the probability distribution of the physical parameters of the lens system. We thereby find that the masses of the host star and planet are $M_{L} = 0.34 \pm 0.19 M_{\odot}$ and $M_{p} = 2.5^{+1.5}_{-1.4} M_{Jup}$, respectively. The distance to the system is $D_{L} = 4.23^{+1.51}_{-1.64}$kpc. The projected star-planet separation is $a_{\perp} = 2.07^{+0.65}_{-0.77}$AU. The lens-source relative proper motion of the event is quite high, at $\sim 7.1 \, {\rm mas/yr}$. Therefore, we may be able to determine the lens physical parameters uniquely or place much stronger constraints on them by measuring the color-dependent centroid shift and/or the image elongation with additional high resolution imaging already a few years from now.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.07718  [pdf] - 1922977
OGLE-2017-BLG-1186: first application of asteroseismology and Gaussian processes to microlensing
Li, Shun-Sheng; Zang, Weicheng; Udalski, Andrzej; Shvartzvald, Yossi; Huber, Daniel; Lee, Chung-Uk; Sumi, Takahiro; Gould, Andrew; Mao, Shude; Fouqué, Pascal; Wang, Tianshu; Dong, Subo; Jørgensen, Uffe G.; Cole, Andrew; Mróz, Przemek; Szymański, Michał K.; Skowron, Jan; Poleski, Radosław; Soszyński, Igor; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Kozłowski, Szymon; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Rybicki, Krzysztof A.; Iwanek, Patryk; Yee, Jennifer C.; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; Beichman, Charles A.; Bryden, Geoffery; Carey, Sean; Gaudi, B. Scott; Henderson, Calen B.; Zhu, Wei; Albrow, Michael D.; Chung, Sun-Ju; Han, Cheongho; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Jung, Youn Kil; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Shin, In-Gu; Cha, Sang-Mok; Kim, Dong-Jin; Kim, Hyoun-Woo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Lee, Dong-Joo; Lee, Yongseok; Park, Byeong-Gon; Pogge, Richard W.; Bond, Ian A.; Abe, Fumio; Barry, Richard; Bennett, David P.; Bhattacharya, Aparna; Donachie, Martin; Fukui, Akihiko; Hirao, Yuki; Itow, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Iona; Koshimoto, Naoki; Li, Man Cheung Alex; Matsubara, Yutaka; Muraki, Yasushi; Miyazaki, Shota; Nagakane, Masayuki; Ranc, Clément; Rattenbury, Nicholas J.; Suematsu, Haruno; Sullivan, Denis J.; Suzuki, Daisuke; Tristram, Paul J.; Yonehara, Atsunori; Christie, Grant; Drummond, John; Green, Jonathan; Hennerley, Steve; Natusch, Tim; Porritt, Ian; Bachelet, Etienne; Maoz, Dan; Street, Rachel A.; Tsapras, Yiannis; Bozza, Valerio; Dominik, Martin; Hundertmark, Markus; Peixinho, Nuno; Sajadian, Sedighe; Burgdorf, Martin J.; Evans, Daniel F.; Jaimes, Roberto Figuera; Fujii, Yuri I.; Haikala, Lauri K.; Helling, Christiane; Henning, Thomas; Hinse, Tobias C.; Mancini, Luigi; Longa-Peña, Penelope; Rahvar, Sohrab; Rabus, Markus; Skottfelt, Jesper; Snodgrass, Colin; Southworth, John; Unda-Sanzana, Eduardo; von Essen, Carolina; Beaulieu, Jean-Phillipe; Blackman, Joshua; Hill, Kym
Comments: 18 pages, 4 figures, 5 tables. Revised to match version published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-04-16, last modified: 2019-07-24
We present the analysis of the event OGLE-2017-BLG-1186 from the 2017 Spitzer microlensing campaign. This is a remarkable microlensing event because its source is photometrically bright and variable, which makes it possible to perform an asteroseismic analysis using ground-based data. We find that the source star is an oscillating red giant with average timescale of $\sim 9$ d. The asteroseismic analysis also provides us source properties including the source angular size ($\sim 27~\mu{\rm as}$) and distance ($\sim 11.5$ kpc), which are essential for inferring the properties of the lens. When fitting the light curve, we test the feasibility of Gaussian Processes (GPs) in handling the correlated noise caused by the variable source. We find that the parameters from the GP model are generally more loosely constrained than those from the traditional $\chi^2$ minimization method. We note that this event is the first microlensing system for which asteroseismology and GPs have been used to account for the variable source. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measured, we find that the lens is likely a $\sim 0.045~M_{\odot}$ brown dwarf at distance $\sim 9.0$ kpc, or a $\sim 0.073~M_{\odot}$ ultracool dwarf at distance $\sim 9.8$ kpc. Combining the estimated lens properties with a Bayesian analysis using a Galactic model, we find a $\sim 35$ per cent probability for the lens to be a bulge object and $\sim 65$ per cent to be a background disc object.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.02630  [pdf] - 1896102
An analysis of binary microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0060
Comments: 13 pages, 5 figures, Published in MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-06-06
We present the analysis of stellar binary microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0060 based on observations obtained from 13 different telescopes. Intensive coverage of the anomalous parts of the light curve was achieved by automated follow-up observations from the robotic telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory. We show that, for the first time, all main features of an anomalous microlensing event are well covered by follow-up data, allowing us to estimate the physical parameters of the lens. The strong detection of second-order effects in the event light curve necessitates the inclusion of longer-baseline survey data in order to constrain the parallax vector. We find that the event was most likely caused by a stellar binary-lens with masses $M_{\star1} = 0.87 \pm 0.12 M_{\odot}$ and $M_{\star2} = 0.77 \pm 0.11 M_{\odot}$. The distance to the lensing system is 6.41 $\pm 0.14$ kpc and the projected separation between the two components is 13.85 $\pm 0.16$ AU. Alternative interpretations are also considered.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.12695  [pdf] - 1905774
The EBLM Project VI. The mass and radius of five low-mass stars in F+M binaries discovered by the WASP survey
Comments: 36 pages, 29 Figures. Accepted for publication in Section 7. Stellar structure and evolution of Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2019-04-29
Some M-dwarfs around F-/G-type stars have been measured to be hotter and larger than predicted by stellar evolution models. Inconsistencies between observations and models need addressing with more mass, radius and luminosity measurements of low-mass stars to test and refine evolutionary models. Our aim is to measure the masses, radii and ages of the stars in five low-mass eclipsing binary systems discovered by the WASP survey. We use WASP photometry to establish eclipse-time ephemerides and to obtain initial estimates for the transit depth and width. Radial velocity measurements were simultaneously fitted with follow-up photometry to find the best-fitting orbital solution. This solution was combined with measurements of atmospheric parameters to interpolate evolutionary models and estimate the mass of the primary star, and the mass and radius of the M-dwarf companion. We assess how the best fitting orbital solution changes if an alternative limb-darkening law is used and quantify the systematic effects of unresolved companions. We also gauge how the best-fitting evolutionary model changes if different values are used for the mixing length parameter and helium enhancement. We report the mass and radius of five M-dwarfs and find little evidence of inflation with respect to evolutionary models. The primary stars in two systems are near the ``blue hook'' stage of their post sequence evolution, resulting in two possible solutions for mass and age. We find that choices in helium enhancement and mixing-length parameter can introduce an additional 3-5\,\% uncertainty in measured M-dwarf mass. Unresolved companions can introduce an additional 3-8\% uncertainty in the radius of an M-dwarf, while the choice of limb-darkening law can introduce up to an additional 2\% uncertainty.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.11204  [pdf] - 2057686
Spitzer Microlensing parallax reveals two isolated stars in the Galactic bulge
Zang, Weicheng; Shvartzvald, Yossi; Wang, Tianshu; Udalski, Andrzej; Lee, Chung-Uk; Sumi, Takahiro; Skottfelt, Jesper; Li, Shun-Sheng; Mao, Shude; Zhu, Wei; Yee, Jennifer C.; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; Beichman, Charles A.; Bryden, Geoffery; Carey, Sean; Gaudi, B. Scott; Henderson, Calen B.; Mróz, Przemek; Skowron, Jan; Poleski, Radoslaw; Szymański, Michał K.; Soszyński, Igor; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Kozłowski, Szymon; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Rybicki, Krzysztof A.; Iwanek, Patryk; Bachelet, Etienne; Christie, Grant; Green, Jonathan; Hennerley, Steve; Maoz, Dan; Natusch, Tim; Pogge, Richard W.; Street, Rachel A.; Tsapras, Yiannis; Albrow, Michael D.; Chung, Sun-Ju; Gould, Andrew; Han, Cheongho; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Jung, Youn Kil; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Shin, In-Gu; Cha, Sang-Mok; Kim, Dong-Jin; Kim, Hyoun-Woo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Lee, Dong-Joo; Lee, Yongseok; Park, Byeong-Gon; Pogge, Richard W.; Bond, Ian A.; be, Fumio; Barry, Richard; Bennett, David P.; Bhattacharya, Aparna; Donachie, Martin; Fukui, Akihiko; Hirao, Yuki; Itow, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Iona; Koshimoto, Naoki; Li, Man Cheung Alex; Matsubara, Yutaka; Muraki, Yasushi; Miyazaki, Shota; Nagakane, Masayuki; Ranc, Clément; Rattenbury, Nicholas J.; Suematsu, Haruno; Sullivan, Denis J.; Suzuki, Daisuke; Tristram, Paul J.; Yonehara, Atsunori; Dominik, Martin; Hundertmark, Markus; Jørgensen, Uffe G.; Rahvar, Sohrab; Sajadian, Sedighe; Snodgrass, Colin; Bozza, Valerio; Burgdorf, Martin J.; Evans, Daniel F.; Jaimes, Roberto Figuera; Fujii, Yuri I.; Mancini, Luigi; Longa-Peña, Penelope; Helling, hristiane; Peixinho, Nuno; Rabus, Markus; Southworth, John; Unda-Sanzana, Eduardo; von Essen, Carolina
Comments: 16 pages, 6 Figures. Submitted to AAS journal
Submitted: 2019-04-25
We report the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2017 Spitzer microlensing campaign. The ground-based observations yield the detection of finite-source effects, and the microlens parallaxes are derived from the joint analysis of ground-based observations and Spitzer observations. We find that the lens of OGLE-2017-BLG-1254 is a $0.60 \pm 0.03 M_{\odot}$ star with $D_{\rm LS} = 0.53 \pm 0.11~\text{kpc}$, where $D_{\rm LS}$ is the distance between the lens and the source. The second event, OGLE-2017-BLG-1161, is subject to the known satellite parallax degeneracy, and thus is either a $0.51^{+0.12}_{-0.10} M_{\odot}$ star with $D_{\rm LS} = 0.40 \pm 0.12~\text{kpc}$ or a $0.38^{+0.13}_{-0.12} M_{\odot}$ star with $D_{\rm LS} = 0.53 \pm 0.19~\text{kpc}$. Both of the lenses are therefore isolated stars in the Galactic bulge. By comparing the mass and distance distributions of the eight published Spitzer finite-source events with the expectations from a Galactic model, we find that the Spitzer sample is in agreement with the probability of finite-source effects occurrence in single lens events.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.06187  [pdf] - 1836564
Asteroseismology of the Hyades red giant and planet host epsilon Tauri
Comments: 13 pages, 13 figures, 4 tables, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2019-01-18, last modified: 2019-02-22
Asteroseismic analysis of solar-like stars allows us to determine physical parameters such as stellar mass, with a higher precision compared to most other methods. Even in a well-studied cluster such as the Hyades, the masses of the red giant stars are not well known, and previous mass estimates are based on model calculations (isochrones). The four known red giants in the Hyades are assumed to be clump (core-helium-burning) stars based on their positions in colour-magnitude diagrams, however asteroseismology offers an opportunity to test this assumption. Using asteroseismic techniques combined with other methods, we aim to derive physical parameters and the evolutionary stage for the planet hosting star epsilon Tau, which is one of the four red giants located in the Hyades. We analysed time-series data from both ground and space to perform the asteroseismic analysis. By combining high signal-to-noise (S/N) radial-velocity data from the ground-based SONG network with continuous space-based data from the revised Kepler mission K2, we derive and characterize 27 individual oscillation modes for epsilon Tau, along with global oscillation parameters such as the large frequency separation and the ratio between the amplitude of the oscillations measured in radial velocity and intensity as a function of frequency. The latter has been measured previously for only two stars, the Sun and Procyon. Combining the seismic analysis with interferometric and spectroscopic measurements, we derive physical parameters for epsilon Tau, and discuss its evolutionary status.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.08300  [pdf] - 1820717
Hardware and software for a robotic network of telescopes - SONG
Comments: 4 pages, 5 figures, 2 tables, Published 2014
Submitted: 2019-01-24
SONG aims at setting up a network of small 1m telescopes around the globe to observe stars uninterrupted throughout days, weeks and even months. This paper describes the fundamental aspects for putting up such a network and how we will operate each site as part of the full network. The SONG observatories will be working autonomously and automatic and can be fully controlled remotely.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.08778  [pdf] - 1833997
$Spitzer$ Microlensing Parallax for OGLE-2017-BLG-0896 Reveals a Counter-Rotating Low-Mass Brown Dwarf
Comments: 17 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables. Accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal
Submitted: 2018-05-22, last modified: 2019-01-18
The kinematics of isolated brown dwarfs in the Galaxy, beyond the solar neighborhood, is virtually unknown. Microlensing has the potential to probe this hidden population, as it can measure both the mass and five of the six phase-space coordinates (all except the radial velocity) even of a dark isolated lens. However, the measurements of both the microlens parallax and finite-source effects are needed in order to recover the full information. Here, we combine $Spitzer$ satellite parallax measurement with the ground-based light curve, which exhibits strong finite-source effects, of event OGLE-2017-BLG-0896. We find two degenerate solutions for the lens (due to the known satellite-parallax degeneracy), which are consistent with each other except for their proper motion. The lens is an isolated brown dwarf with a mass of either $18\pm1M_J$ or $20\pm1M_J$. This is the lowest isolated-object mass measurement to date, only $\sim$45\% more massive than the theoretical deuterium-fusion boundary at solar metallicity, which is the common definition of a free-floating planet. The brown dwarf is located at either $3.9\pm0.1$ kpc or $4.1\pm0.1$ kpc toward the Galactic bulge, but with proper motion in the opposite direction of disk stars, with one solution suggesting it is moving within the Galactic plane. While it is possibly a halo brown dwarf, it might also represent a different, unknown population.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.00244  [pdf] - 1812387
GravityCam: Wide-Field High-Resolution High-Cadence Imaging Surveys in the Visible from the Ground
Comments: 23 pages, 15 figures. Revision submitted to Proceedings of the Astronomical Society of Australia, 25 September 2018
Submitted: 2017-09-01, last modified: 2018-09-25
GravityCam is a new concept of ground-based imaging instrument capable of delivering significantly sharper images from the ground than is normally possible without adaptive optics. Advances in optical and near infrared imaging technologies allow images to be acquired at high speed without significant noise penalty. Aligning these images before they are combined can yield a 2.5 to 3 fold improvement in image resolution. By using arrays of such detectors, survey fields may be as wide as the telescope optics allows. Consequently, GravityCam enables both wide-field high-resolution imaging and high-speed photometry. We describe the instrument and detail its application to provide demographics of planets and satellites down to Lunar mass (or even below) across the Milky Way. GravityCam is also suited to improve the quality of weak shear studies of dark matter distribution in distant clusters of galaxies and multiwavelength follow-ups of background sources that are strongly lensed by galaxy clusters. The photometric data arising from an extensive microlensing survey will also be useful for asteroseismology studies, while GravityCam can be used to monitor fast multiwavelength flaring in accreting compact objects, and promises to generate a unique data set on the population of the Kuiper belt and possibly the Oort cloud.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.03149  [pdf] - 1838164
OGLE-2014-BLG-1186: gravitational microlensing providing evidence for a planet orbiting the foreground star or for a close binary source?
Comments: 26 pages, 14 figures
Submitted: 2018-08-09
(abridged) Using the particularly long gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-1186 with a time-scale $t_\mathrm{E}$ ~ 300 d, we present a methodology for identifying the nature of localised deviations from single-lens point-source light curves, which ensures that 1) the claimed signal is substantially above the noise floor, 2) the inferred properties are robustly determined and their estimation not subject to confusion with systematic noise in the photometry, 3) there are no alternative viable solutions within the model framework that might have been missed. Annual parallax and binarity could be separated and robustly measured from the wing and the peak data, respectively. We find matching model light curves that involve either a binary lens or a binary source. Our binary-lens models indicate a planet of mass $M_2$ = (45 $\pm$ 9) $M_\oplus$, orbiting a star of mass $M_1$ = (0.35 $\pm$ 0.06) $M_\odot$, located at a distance $D_\mathrm{L}$ = (1.7 $\pm$ 0.3) kpc from Earth, whereas our binary-source models suggest a brown-dwarf lens of $M$ = (0.046 $\pm$ 0.007) $M_\odot$, located at a distance $D_\mathrm{L}$ = (5.7 $\pm$ 0.9) kpc, with the source potentially being a (partially) eclipsing binary involving stars predicted to be of similar colour given the ratios between the luminosities and radii. The ambiguity in the interpretation would be resolved in favour of a lens binary by observing the luminous lens star separating from the source at the predicted proper motion of $\mu$ = (1.6 $\pm$ 0.3) mas yr$^{-1}$, whereas it would be resolved in favour of a source binary if the source could be shown to be a (partially) eclipsing binary matching the obtained model parameters. We experienced that close binary source stars pose a challenge for claiming the detection of planets by microlensing in events where the source passes very close to the lens star hosting the planet.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.02095  [pdf] - 1698279
The mass and age of the first SONG target: the red giant 46 LMi
Comments: 7 pages, 7 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2018-06-06
The Stellar Observation Network Group (SONG) is an initiative to build a worldwide network of 1m telescopes with highprecision radial-velocity spectrographs. Here we analyse the first radial-velocity time series of a red-giant star measured by the SONG telescope at Tenerife. The asteroseismic results demonstrate a major increase in the achievable precision of the parameters for redgiant stars obtainable from ground-based observations. Reliable tests of the validity of these results are needed, however, before the accuracy of the parameters can be trusted. We analyse the first SONG time series for the star 46 LMi, which has a precise parallax and an angular diameter measured from interferometry, and therefore a good determination of the stellar radius. We use asteroseismic scaling relations to obtain an accurate mass, and modelling to determine the age. A 55-day time series of high-resolution, high S/N spectra were obtained with the first SONG telescope. We derive the asteroseismic parameters by analysing the power spectrum. To give a best guess on the large separation of modes in the power spectrum, we have applied a new method which uses the scaling of Kepler red-giant stars to 46 LMi. Several methods have been applied: classical estimates, seismic methods using the observed time series, and model calculations to derive the fundamental parameters of 46 LMi. Parameters determined using the different methods are consistent within the uncertainties. We find the following values for the mass M (scaling), radius R (classical), age (modelling), and surface gravity (combining mass and radius): M = 1.09 +- 0.04Msun, R = 7.95 +- 0.11 Rsun, age t = 8.2 +- 1.9Gy, and log g = 2.674 +- 0.013.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.10196  [pdf] - 1694044
OGLE-2017-BLG-0329L: A Microlensing Binary Characterized with Dramatically Enhanced Precision Using Data from Space-based Observations
Comments: 9 pages, 4 tables, 6 figures
Submitted: 2018-02-27
Mass measurements of gravitational microlenses require one to determine the microlens parallax $\pie$, but precise $\pie$ measurement, in many cases, is hampered due to the subtlety of the microlens-parallax signal combined with the difficulty of distinguishing the signal from those induced by other higher-order effects. In this work, we present the analysis of the binary-lens event OGLE-2017-BLG-0329, for which $\pie$ is measured with a dramatically improved precision using additional data from space-based $Spitzer$ observations. We find that while the parallax model based on the ground-based data cannot be distinguished from a zero-$\pie$ model at 2$\sigma$ level, the addition of the $Spitzer$ data enables us to identify 2 classes of solutions, each composed of a pair of solutions according to the well-known ecliptic degeneracy. It is found that the space-based data reduce the measurement uncertainties of the north and east components of the microlens-parallax vector $\pivec_{\rm E}$ by factors $\sim 18$ and $\sim 4$, respectively. With the measured microlens parallax combined with the angular Einstein radius measured from the resolved caustic crossings, we find that the lens is composed of a binary with components masses of either $(M_1,M_2)\sim (1.1,0.8)\ M_\odot$ or $\sim (0.4,0.3)\ M_\odot$ according to the two solution classes. The first solution is significantly favored but the second cannot be securely ruled out based on the microlensing data alone. However, the degeneracy can be resolved from adaptive optics observations taken $\sim 10$ years after the event.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.02582  [pdf] - 1771498
OGLE-2017-BLG-1434Lb: Eighth q < 1 * 10^-4 Mass-Ratio Microlens Planet Confirms Turnover in Planet Mass-Ratio Function
Comments: 53 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2018-02-07
We report the discovery of a cold Super-Earth planet (m_p=4.4 +/- 0.5 M_Earth) orbiting a low-mass (M=0.23 +/- 0.03 M_Sun) M dwarf at projected separation a_perp = 1.18 +/- 0.10 AU, i.e., about 1.9 times the snow line. The system is quite nearby for a microlensing planet, D_Lens = 0.86 +/- 0.09 kpc. Indeed, it was the large lens-source relative parallax pi_rel=1.0 mas (combined with the low mass M) that gave rise to the large, and thus well-measured, "microlens parallax" that enabled these precise measurements. OGLE-2017-BLG-1434Lb is the eighth microlensing planet with planet-host mass ratio q < 1 * 10^-4. We apply a new planet-detection sensitivity method, which is a variant of "V/V_max", to seven of these eight planets to derive the mass-ratio function in this regime. We find dN/d(ln q) ~ q^p, with p = 1.05 (+0.78,-0.68), which confirms the "turnover" in the mass function found by Suzuki et al. relative to the power law of opposite sign n = -0.93 +/- 0.13 at higher mass ratios q >~ 2 * 10^-4. We combine our result with that of Suzuki et al. to obtain p = 0.73 (+0.42,-0.34).
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.07476  [pdf] - 1648634
High-resolution Imaging of Transiting Extrasolar Planetary systems (HITEP). II. Lucky Imaging results from 2015 and 2016
Comments: 32 pages, 14 figures, 12 tables. The contents of tables 2, 3, 4, 9 and 10 are included in the arXiv source. Updated to correct typos and include tables in final format
Submitted: 2017-09-21, last modified: 2017-10-13
The formation and dynamical history of hot Jupiters is currently debated, with wide stellar binaries having been suggested as a potential formation pathway. Additionally, contaminating light from both binary companions and unassociated stars can significantly bias the results of planet characterisation studies, but can be corrected for if the properties of the contaminating star are known. We search for binary companions to known transiting exoplanet host stars, in order to determine the multiplicity properties of hot Jupiter host stars. We also characterise unassociated stars along the line of sight, allowing photometric and spectroscopic observations of the planetary system to be corrected for contaminating light. We analyse lucky imaging observations of 97 Southern hemisphere exoplanet host stars, using the Two Colour Instrument on the Danish 1.54m telescope. For each detected companion star, we determine flux ratios relative to the planet host star in two passbands, and measure the relative position of the companion. The probability of each companion being physically associated was determined using our two-colour photometry. A catalogue of close companion stars is presented, including flux ratios, position measurements, and estimated companion star temperature. For companions that are potential binary companions, we review archival and catalogue data for further evidence. For WASP-77AB and WASP-85AB, we combine our data with historical measurements to determine the binary orbits, showing them to be moderately eccentric and inclined to the line of sight and planetary orbital axis. Combining our survey with the similar Friends of Hot Jupiters survey, we conclude that known hot Jupiter host stars show a deficit of high mass stellar companions compared to the field star population; however, this may be a result of the biases in detection and target selection by ground-based surveys.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.08248  [pdf] - 1587555
Near-Earth supernova activity during the past 35 Myr
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS. 14 pages, 3 tables, 8 figures
Submitted: 2017-08-28
Here we combine observations of open clusters (OCs) with single- and binary population synthesis models and a Galactic potential to reconstruct the SN activity of these OCs during the past 35 Myr. We find that several OCs potentially hosting SN progenitors have passed within 100 pc of the Sun during the past 35 Myr. In particular we find that ASCC 19, NGC 1981, and NGC 1976 are likely to have hosted one or more SNe while passing within 200 pc of the solar system in the period 17 - 12 Myr BP which might have affected Earths' geology and climate. Besides the stellar history of the individual OCs we also compute 1) a spatial and temporal 2D-probability density map showing the most likely position and time of SN from our sample of OCs within 1 kpc during the past 35 Myr, 2) the time series of the SN rate per volume and 3) the relative SN rate compared with today and corrected for OC evaporation of older generations. The SN rate today from core collapse is estimated to be 37.8$\pm$6.1$\rm kpc^{-3} Myr^{-1}$. During the past 35 Myr we find a peak SN rate around 10 Myr before present (BP) where the rate was 40% higher relative to the past 1 Myr. Finally we discuss possible effects of binary stellar evolution in relation to the history of SN production in the solar neighbourhood and the detected $\rm ^{60}Fe$ signal in terrestrial geological samples induced between $\sim$2.2 - 2.8Myr BP.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.06976  [pdf] - 1602599
Self-consistent atmosphere modeling with cloud formation for low-mass stars and exoplanets
Comments: 17 pages, 14 + 3 figures
Submitted: 2017-08-23
Context: Low-mass stars and extrasolar planets have ultra-cool atmospheres where a rich chemistry occurs and clouds form. The increasing amount of spectroscopic observations for extrasolar planets requires self-consistent model atmosphere simulations to consistently include the formation processes that determine cloud formation and their feedback onto the atmosphere. Aims: Complement the MARCS model atmosphere suit with simulations applicable to low-mass stars and exoplanets in preparation of E-ELT, JWST, PLATO and other upcoming facilities. Methods: The MARCS code calculates stellar atmosphere models, providing self-consistent solutions of the radiative transfer and the atmospheric structure and chemistry. We combine MARCS with DRIFT, a kinetic model that describes cloud formation in ultra-cool atmospheres (seed formation, growth/ evaporation, gravitational settling, convective mixing, element depletion). Results: We present a small grid of self-consistently calculated atmosphere models for $T_ \text{eff} = 2000 - 3000$ K with solar initial abundances and $\log(g) = 4.5$. Cloud formation in stellar and sub-stellar atmospheres appears for $T_\text{eff} < 2700$ K and has a significant effect on the structure and the spectrum of the atmosphere for $T_\text{eff} < 2400$ K. We have compared the synthetic spectra of our models with observed spectra and found that they fit the spectra of mid to late type M-dwarfs and early type L-dwarfs well. We also test DRIFT-MARCS for an example exoplanet and demonstrate that our simulations reproduce the Spitzer observations for WASP-19b rather well for $T_{\rm eff}=2600$ K, $\log(g)=3.2$ and solar abundances. Our model points at an exoplanet with a deep cloud-free atmosphere with a substantial day-night energy transport and no temperature inversion.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.03365  [pdf] - 1534463
First Results From The Hertzsprung Song Telescope: Asteroseismology Of The G5 Subgiant Star {\Mu}Her
Comments: 17 pages, 15 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2017-01-12
We report the first asteroseismic results obtained with the Hertzsprung SONG Telescope from an extensive high-precision radial-velocity observing campaign of the subgiant muHerculis. The data set was collected during 215 nights in 2014 and 2015. We detected a total of 49 oscillation modes with l values from 0 to 3, including some l = 1 mixed modes. Based on the rotational splitting observed in l = 1 modes, we determine a rotational period of 52 days and a stellar inclination angle of 63 degrees. The parameters obtained through modeling of the observed oscillation frequencies agree very well with independent observations and imply a stellar mass between 1.11 and 1.15M_sun and an age of 7.8+/-0.4 Gyr. Furthermore, the high-quality data allowed us to determine the acoustic depths of the He II ionization layer and the base of the convection zone.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.03732  [pdf] - 1532020
MiNDSTEp differential photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756: Microlensing and a new time delay
Comments: 16 pages, 15 figures, 10 tables. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2016-10-12
We present V and R photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756. The data were taken by the MiNDSTEp collaboration with the 1.54 m Danish telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory from 2008 to 2012. Differential photometry has been carried out using the image subtraction method as implemented in the HOTPAnTS package, additionally using GALFIT for quasar photometry. The quasar WFI2033-4723 showed brightness variations of order 0.5 mag in V and R during the campaign. The two lensed components of quasar HE0047-1756 varied by 0.2-0.3 mag within five years. We provide, for the first time, an estimate of the time delay of component B with respect to A of $\Delta t= 7.6\pm1.8$ days for this object. We also find evidence for a secular evolution of the magnitude difference between components A and B in both filters, which we explain as due to a long-duration microlensing event. Finally we find that both quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756 become bluer when brighter, which is consistent with previous studies.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1607.04479  [pdf] - 1514268
Partition functions 1: Improved partition functions and thermodynamic quantities for normal, equilibrium, and ortho and para molecular hydrogen
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics, 22 pages, 10 figures, 28 tables
Submitted: 2016-07-15
Aims. In this work we rigorously show the shortcomings of various simplifications that are used to calculate the total internal partition function. These shortcomings can lead to errors of up to 40 percent or more in the estimated partition function. These errors carry on to calculations of thermodynamic quantities. Therefore a more complicated approach has to be taken. Methods. Seven possible simplifications of various complexity are described, together with advantages and disadvantages of direct summation of experimental values. These were compared to what we consider the most accurate and most complete treatment (case 8). Dunham coefficients were determined from experimental and theoretical energy levels of a number of electronically excited states of H$_2$ . Both equilibrium and normal hydrogen was taken into consideration. Results. Various shortcomings in existing calculations are demonstrated, and the reasons for them are explained. New partition functions for equilibrium, normal, and ortho and para hydrogen are calculated and thermodynamic quantities are reported for the temperature range 1 - 20000 K. Our results are compared to previous estimates in the literature. The calculations are not limited to the ground electronic state, but include all bound and quasi-bound levels of excited electronic states. Dunham coefficients of these states of H$_2$ are also reported. Conclusions. For most of the relevant astrophysical cases it is strongly advised to avoid using simplifications, such as a harmonic oscillator and rigid rotor or ad hoc summation limits of the eigenstates to estimate accurate partition functions and to be particularly careful when using polynomial fits to the computed values. Reported internal partition functions and thermodynamic quantities in the present work are shown to be more accurate than previously available data.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.09357  [pdf] - 1475398
OGLE-2015-BLG-0479LA,B: Binary Gravitational Microlens Characterized by Simultaneous Ground-based and Space-based Observation
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2016-06-30
We present a combined analysis of the observations of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 taken both from the ground and by the {\it Spitzer Space Telescope}. The light curves seen from the ground and from space exhibit a time offset of $\sim 13$ days between the caustic spikes, indicating that the relative lens-source positions seen from the two places are displaced by parallax effects. From modeling the light curves, we measure the space-based microlens parallax. Combined with the angular Einstein radius measured by analyzing the caustic crossings, we determine the mass and distance of the lens. We find that the lens is a binary composed of two G-type stars with masses $\sim 1.0\ M_\odot$ and $\sim 0.9\ M_\odot$ located at a distance $\sim 3$ kpc. In addition, we are able to constrain the complete orbital parameters of the lens thanks to the precise measurement of the microlens parallax derived from the joint analysis. In contrast to the binary event OGLE-2014-BLG-1050, which was also observed by {\it Spitzer}, we find that the interpretation of OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 does not suffer from the degeneracy between $(\pm,\pm)$ and $(\pm,\mp)$ solutions, confirming that the four-fold parallax degeneracy in single-lens events collapses into the two-fold degeneracy for the general case of binary-lens events. The location of the blend in the color-magnitude diagram is consistent with the lens properties, suggesting that the blend is the lens itself. The blend is bright enough for spectroscopy and thus this possibility can be checked from future follow-up observations.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.02292  [pdf] - 1513546
First simultaneous microlensing observations by two space telescopes: $Spitzer$ & $Swift$ reveal a brown dwarf in event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319
Comments: 28 pages, 6 figures, 2 tables. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2016-06-07
Simultaneous observations of microlensing events from multiple locations allow for the breaking of degeneracies between the physical properties of the lensing system, specifically by exploring different regions of the lens plane and by directly measuring the "microlens parallax". We report the discovery of a 30-55$M_J$ brown dwarf orbiting a K dwarf in microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319. The system is located at a distance of $\sim$5 kpc toward the Galactic bulge. The event was observed by several ground-based groups as well as by $Spitzer$ and $Swift$, allowing the measurement of the physical properties. However, the event is still subject to an 8-fold degeneracy, in particular the well-known close-wide degeneracy, and thus the projected separation between the two lens components is either $\sim$0.25 AU or $\sim$45 AU. This is the first microlensing event observed by $Swift$, with the UVOT camera. We study the region of microlensing parameter space to which $Swift$ is sensitive, finding that while for this event $Swift$ could not measure the microlens parallax with respect to ground-based observations, it can be important for other events. Specifically, for detecting nearby brown dwarfs and free-floating planets in high magnification events.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.06141  [pdf] - 1451904
Many new variable stars discovered in the core of the globular cluster NGC 6715 (M54) with EMCCD observations
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics, 18 pages, 7 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2016-05-19
We show the benefits of using Electron-Multiplying CCDs and the shift-and-add technique as a tool to minimise the effects of the atmospheric turbulence such as blending between stars in crowded fields and to avoid saturated stars in the fields observed. We intend to complete, or improve, the census of the variable star population in globular cluster NGC~6715. Our aim is to obtain high-precision time-series photometry of the very crowded central region of this stellar system via the collection of better angular resolution images than has been previously achieved with conventional CCDs on ground-based telescopes. Observations were carried out using the Danish 1.54-m Telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory in Chile. The telescope is equipped with an Electron-Multiplying CCD that allowed to obtain short-exposure-time images (ten images per second) that were stacked using the shift-and-add technique to produce the normal-exposure-time images (minutes). The high precision photometry was performed via difference image analysis employing the DanDIA pipeline. We attempted automatic detection of variable stars in the field. We statistically analysed the light curves of 1405 stars in the crowded central region of NGC~6715 to automatically identify the variable stars present in this cluster. We found light curves for 17 previously known variable stars near the edges of our reference image (16 RR Lyrae and 1 semi-regular) and we discovered 67 new variables (30 RR Lyrae, 21 long-period irregular, 3 semi-regular, 1 W Virginis, 1 eclipsing binary, and 11 unclassified). Photometric measurements for these stars are available in electronic form through the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Centre.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1603.03274  [pdf] - 1388986
High-resolution Imaging of Transiting Extrasolar Planetary systems (HITEP). I. Lucky imaging observations of 101 systems in the southern hemisphere
Comments: 19 pages, 9 figures. Accepted in A&A. Minor correction
Submitted: 2016-03-10, last modified: 2016-03-15
(abridged) Context. Wide binaries are a potential pathway for the formation of hot Jupiters. The binary fraction among host stars is an important discriminator between competing formation theories, but has not been well characterised. Additionally, contaminating light from unresolved stars can significantly affect the accuracy of photometric and spectroscopic measurements in studies of transiting exoplanets. Aims. We observed 101 transiting exoplanet host systems in the Southern hemisphere in order to create a homogeneous catalogue of both bound companion stars and contaminating background stars. We investigate the binary fraction among the host stars in order to test theories for the formation of hot Jupiters, in an area of the sky where transiting exoplanetary systems have not been systematically searched for stellar companions. Methods. Lucky imaging observations from the Two Colour Instrument on the Danish 1.54m telescope at La Silla were used to search for previously unresolved stars at small angular separations. The separations and relative magnitudes of all detected stars were measured. For 12 candidate companions to 10 host stars, previous astrometric measurements were used to evaluate how likely the companions are to be physically associated. Results. We provide measurements of 499 candidate companions within 20 arcseconds of our sample of 101 planet host stars. 51 candidates are located within 5 arcseconds of a host star, and we provide the first published measurements for 27 of these. Calibrations for the plate scale and colour performance of the Two Colour Instrument are presented. Conclusions. We find that the overall multiplicity rate of the host stars is 38 +17 -13%, consistent with the rate among solar-type stars in our sensitivity range, suggesting that planet formation does not preferentially occur in long period binaries compared to a random sample of field stars.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.09142  [pdf] - 1521160
Campaign 9 of the $K2$ Mission: Observational Parameters, Scientific Drivers, and Community Involvement for a Simultaneous Space- and Ground-based Microlensing Survey
Henderson, Calen B.; Poleski, Radosław; Penny, Matthew; Street, Rachel A.; Bennett, David P.; Hogg, David W.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Zhu, W.; Barclay, T.; Barentsen, G.; Howell, S. B.; Mullally, F.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Mao, S.; Ranc, C.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Wambsganss, J.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Novati, S. Calchi; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Husser, T. -O.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Bryson, S. T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Haas, M. R.; Larson, K.; McCalmont, K.; Packard, M.; Peterson, C.; Putnam, D.; Reedy, L.; Ross, S.; Van Cleve, J. E.; Akeson, R.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Beichman, C. A.; Bryden, G.; Ciardi, D.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Foreman-Mackey, D.; Fouqué, P.; Friedmann, M.; Gelino, C.; Kaspi, S.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Lang, D.; Lee, C. -H.; Lineweaver, C. H.; Maoz, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Mogavero, F.; Morales, J. C.; Nataf, D.; Pogge, R. W.; Santerne, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Suzuki, D.; Tamura, M.; Tisserand, P.; Wang, D.
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures, 3 tables; submitted to PASP
Submitted: 2015-12-30, last modified: 2016-03-07
$K2$'s Campaign 9 ($K2$C9) will conduct a $\sim$3.7 deg$^{2}$ survey toward the Galactic bulge from 7/April through 1/July of 2016 that will leverage the spatial separation between $K2$ and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax $\pi_{\rm E}$ for $\gtrsim$127 microlensing events. These will include several that are planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this white paper we provide an overview of the $K2$C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of $K2$C9, and the array of resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues through which the larger community can become involved, and generally encourage participation in $K2$C9, which constitutes an important pathfinding mission and community exercise in anticipation of $WFIRST$.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1601.01699  [pdf] - 1385444
Spitzer Observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 Reveal a New Path to Breaking Strong Microlens Degeneracies
Comments: 27 pages, 6 figures, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2016-01-07, last modified: 2016-02-10
Spitzer microlensing parallax observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 decisively breaks a degeneracy between planetary and binary solutions that is somewhat ambiguous when only ground-based data are considered. Only eight viable models survive out of an initial set of 32 local minima in the parameter space. These models clearly indicate that the lens is a stellar binary system possibly located within the bulge of our Galaxy, ruling out the planetary alternative. We argue that several types of discrete degeneracies can be broken via such space-based parallax observations.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.07913  [pdf] - 1382100
Exploring the crowded central region of 10 Galactic globular clusters using EMCCDs. Variable star searches and new discoveries
Comments: 23 pages, 39 figures and 13 tables. Accepted for publication in the Astronomy & Astrophysics Journal (A&A)
Submitted: 2015-12-24
Obtain time-series photometry of the very crowded central regions of Galactic globular clusters with better angular resolution than previously achieved with conventional CCDs on ground-based telescopes to complete, or improve, the census of the variable star population in those stellar systems. Images were taken using the Danish 1.54-m Telescope at the ESO observatory at La Silla in Chile. The telescope was equipped with an electron-multiplying CCD and the short-exposure-time images obtained (10 images per second) were stacked using the shift-and-add technique to produce the normal-exposure-time images (minutes). Photometry was performed via difference image analysis. Automatic detection of variable stars in the field was attempted. The light curves of 12541 stars in the cores of 10 globular clusters were statistically analysed in order to automatically extract the variable stars. We obtained light curves for 31 previously known variable stars (3 L, 2 SR, 20 RR Lyrae, 1 SX Phe, 3 cataclysmic variables, 1 EW and 1 NC) and we discovered 30 new variables (16 L, 7 SR, 4 RR Lyrae, 1 SX Phe and 2 NC).
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1508.06636  [pdf] - 1330228
Spitzer Microlens Measurement of a Massive Remnant in a Well-Separated Binary
Comments: ApJ. accepted, 34 pages, 7 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2015-08-26, last modified: 2015-12-18
We report the detection and mass measurement of a binary lens OGLE-2015-BLG-1285La,b, with the more massive component having $M_1>1.35\,M_\odot$ (80% probability). A main-sequence star in this mass range is ruled out by limits on blue light, meaning that a primary in this mass range must be a neutron star or black hole. The system has a projected separation $r_\perp= 6.1\pm 0.4\,{\rm AU}$ and lies in the Galactic bulge. These measurements are based on the "microlens parallax" effect, i.e., comparing the microlensing light curve as seen from $Spitzer$, which lay at $1.25\,{\rm AU}$ projected from Earth, to the light curves from four ground-based surveys, three in the optical and one in the near infrared. Future adaptive optics imaging of the companion by 30m class telescopes will yield a much more accurate measurement of the primary mass. This discovery both opens the path and defines the challenges to detecting and characterizing black holes and neutron stars in wide binaries, with either dark or luminous companions. In particular, we discuss lessons that can be applied to future $Spitzer$ and $Kepler$ K2 microlensing parallax observations.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.03422  [pdf] - 1378732
MOA 2011-BLG-028Lb: a Neptune-mass Microlensing Planet in the Galactic Bulge
Comments: 35 pages, 5 figures, 4 tables. Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2015-12-10
We present the discovery of a Neptune-mass planet orbiting a 0.8 +- 0.3 M_Sun star in the Galactic bulge. The planet manifested itself during the microlensing event MOA 2011-BLG-028/OGLE-2011-BLG-0203 as a low-mass companion to the lens star. The analysis of the light curve provides the measurement of the mass ratio: (1.2 +- 0.2) x 10^-4, which indicates the mass of the planet to be 12-60 Earth masses. The lensing system is located at 7.3 +- 0.7 kpc away from the Earth near the direction to Baade's Window. The projected separation of the planet, at the time of the microlensing event, was 3.1-5.2 AU. Although the "microlens parallax" effect is not detected in the light curve of this event, preventing the actual mass measurement, the uncertainties of mass and distance estimation are narrowed by the measurement of the source star proper motion on the OGLE-III images spanning eight years, and by the low amount of blended light seen, proving that the host star cannot be too bright and massive. We also discuss the inclusion of undetected parallax and orbital motion effects into the models, and their influence onto the final physical parameters estimates.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.05171  [pdf] - 1339029
Physical properties of the planetary systems WASP-45 and WASP-46 from simultaneous multi-band photometry
Comments: 14 pages, 10 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2015-11-16
Accurate measurements of the physical characteristics of a large number of exoplanets are useful to strongly constrain theoretical models of planet formation and evolution, which lead to the large variety of exoplanets and planetary-system configurations that have been observed. We present a study of the planetary systems WASP-45 and WASP-46, both composed of a main-sequence star and a close-in hot Jupiter, based on 29 new high-quality light curves of transits events. In particular, one transit of WASP-45 b and four of WASP-46 b were simultaneously observed in four optical filters, while one transit of WASP-46 b was observed with the NTT obtaining precision of 0.30 mmag with a cadence of roughly three minutes. We also obtained five new spectra of WASP-45 with the FEROS spectrograph. We improved by a factor of four the measurement of the radius of the planet WASP-45 b, and found that WASP-46 b is slightly less massive and smaller than previously reported. Both planets now have a more accurate measurement of the density (0.959 +\- 0.077 \rho Jup instead of 0.64 +\- 0.30 \rho Jup for WASP-45 b, and 1.103 +\- 0.052 \rho Jup instead of 0.94 +\- 0.11 \rho Jup for WASP-46 b). We tentatively detected radius variations with wavelength for both planets, in particular in the case of WASP-45 b we found a slightly larger absorption in the redder bands than in the bluer ones. No hints for the presence of an additional planetary companion in the two systems were found either from the photometric or radial velocity measurements.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.08173  [pdf] - 1280907
Pluto's atmosphere from stellar occultations in 2012 and 2013
Comments: 41 pages, 13 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2015-06-26, last modified: 2015-08-14
We analyze two multi-chord stellar occultations by Pluto observed on July 18th, 2012 and May 4th, 2013, and monitored respectively from five and six sites. They provide a total of fifteen light-curves, twelve of them being used for a simultaneous fit that uses a unique temperature profile, assuming a clear (no-haze) and pure N_2 atmosphere, but allowing for a possible pressure variation between the two dates. We find a solution that fits satisfactorily (i.e. within the noise level) all the twelve light-curves, providing atmospheric constraints between ~1,190 km (pressure ~ 11 \mubar) and ~ 1,450 km (pressure ~0.1 \mubar) from Pluto's center. Our main results are: (1) the best-fitting temperature profile shows a stratosphere with strong positive gradient between 1,190 km (at 36 K, 11 \mubar) and r = 1,215 km (6.0 \mubar), where a temperature maximum of 110 K is reached; above it is a mesosphere with negative thermal gradient of -0.2 K/km up to ~ 1,390 km (0.25 \mubar), where, the mesosphere connects itself to a more isothermal upper branch around 81 K; (2) the pressure shows a small (6 %) but significant increase (6-\sigma level) between the two dates; (3) without troposphere, Pluto's radius is found to be R_P = 1,190 +/- 5km. Allowing for a troposphere, R_P is constrained to lie between 1,168 and 1,195 km; (4) the currently measured CO abundance is too small to explain the mesospheric negative thermal gradient. Cooling by HCN is possible, but only if this species is largely saturated; Alternative explanations like zonal winds or vertical compositional variations of the atmosphere are unable to explain the observed mesospheric trend.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.06037  [pdf] - 1264021
MOA-2007-BLG-197: Exploring the brown dwarf desert
Comments: 16 pages, 12 figures
Submitted: 2015-05-22
We present the analysis of MOA-2007-BLG-197Lb, the first brown dwarf companion to a Sun-like star detected through gravitational microlensing. The event was alerted and followed-up photometrically by a network of telescopes from the PLANET, MOA, and uFUN collaborations, and observed at high angular resolution using the NaCo instrument at the VLT. From the modelling of the microlensing light curve, we derived the binary lens separation in Einstein radius units (s~1.13) and a mass ratio of (4.732+/-0.020)x10^{-2}. Annual parallax, lens orbital motion and finite source effects were included in the models. To recover the lens system's physical parameters, we combined the resulting light curve best-fit parameters with (J,H,Ks) magnitudes obtained with VLT NaCo and calibrated using IRSF and 2MASS data. We derived a lens total mass of 0.86+/-0.04 Msun and a lens distance of 4.2+/-0.3 kpc. We find that the companion of MOA-2007-BLG-197L is a brown dwarf of 41+/-2 Mjup observed at a projected separation of 4.3+/-0.1 AU, and orbits a 0.82+/-0.04 Msun G-K dwarf star. We study the statistical properties of this population of brown dwarfs detected by microlensing, transit, radial velocity, and direct imaging (most of these objects orbit solar-type stars), and we performed a two-dimensional, non-parametric probability density distribution fit to the data, which draws a structured brown dwarf landscape. We confirm the existence of a region that is strongly depleted in objects at short periods and intermediate masses (P<30 d, M~30-60 Mjup), but also find an accumulation of objects around P~500 d and M~20 Mjup, as well as another depletion region at long orbital periods (P>500 d) and high masses (M>50 Mjup). While these data provide important clues on mechanisms of brown dwarfs formation, more data are needed to establish their relative importance, in particular as a function of host star mass.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.09184  [pdf] - 1935100
Transits and starspots in the WASP-6 planetary system
Comments: 11 Pages, 6 Figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2015-03-31
We present updates to \textsc{prism}, a photometric transit-starspot model, and \textsc{gemc}, a hybrid optimisation code combining MCMC and a genetic algorithm. We then present high-precision photometry of four transits in the WASP-6 planetary system, two of which contain a starspot anomaly. All four transits were modelled using \textsc{prism} and \textsc{gemc}, and the physical properties of the system calculated. We find the mass and radius of the host star to be $0.836\pm 0.063\,{\rm M}_\odot$ and $0.864\pm0.024\,{\rm R}_\odot$, respectively. For the planet we find a mass of $0.485\pm 0.027\,{\rm M}_{\rm Jup}$, a radius of $1.230\pm0.035\,{\rm R}_{\rm Jup}$ and a density of $0.244\pm0.014\,\rho_{\rm Jup}$. These values are consistent with those found in the literature. In the likely hypothesis that the two spot anomalies are caused by the same starspot or starspot complex, we measure the stars rotation period and velocity to be $23.80 \pm 0.15$\,d and $1.78 \pm 0.20$\,km\,s$^{-1}$, respectively, at a co-latitude of 75.8$^\circ$. We find that the sky-projected angle between the stellar spin axis and the planetary orbital axis is $\lambda = 7.2^{\circ} \pm 3.7^{\circ}$, indicating axial alignment. Our results are consistent with and more precise than published spectroscopic measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. These results suggest that WASP-6\,b formed at a much greater distance from its host star and suffered orbital decay through tidal interactions with the protoplanetary disc.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.06663  [pdf] - 1231850
Reanalyses of Anomalous Gravitational Microlensing Events in the OGLE-III Early Warning System Database with Combined Data
Comments: 10 pages, 4 tables, 9 figures. Accepted in ApJ, Author list updated
Submitted: 2015-02-23, last modified: 2015-03-02
We reanalyze microlensing events in the published list of anomalous events that were observed from the OGLE lensing survey conducted during 2004-2008 period. In order to check the existence of possible degenerate solutions and extract extra information, we conduct analyses based on combined data from other survey and follow-up observation and consider higher-order effects. Among the analyzed events, we present analyses of 8 events for which either new solutions are identified or additional information is obtained. We find that the previous binary-source interpretations of 5 events are better interpreted by binary-lens models. These events include OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2007-BLG-159, OGLE-2007-BLG-491, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, and OGLE-2008-BLG-210. With additional data covering caustic crossings, we detect finite-source effects for 6 events including OGLE-2006-BLG-215, OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2006-BLG-450, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. Among them, we are able to measure the Einstein radii of 3 events for which multi-band data are available. These events are OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. For OGLE-2008-BLG-143, we detect higher-order effect induced by the changes of the observer's position caused by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we present degenerate solutions resulting from the known close/wide or ecliptic degeneracy. Finally, we note that the masses of the binary companions of the lenses of OGLE-2006-BLG-450 and OGLE-2008-BLG-210 are in the brown-dwarf regime.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.07345  [pdf] - 1182884
A Census of Variability in Globular Cluster M68 (NGC 4590)
Comments: 25 pages, 18 figures, A&A in press
Submitted: 2015-02-25
We analyse 20 nights of CCD observations in the V and I bands of the globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590), using these to detect variable objects. We also obtained electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) observations for this cluster in order to explore its core with unprecedented spatial resolution from the ground. We reduced our data using difference image analysis, in order to achieve the best possible photometry in the crowded field of the cluster. In doing so, we showed that when dealing with identical networked telescopes, a reference image from any telescope may be used to reduce data from any other telescope, which facilitates the analysis significantly. We then used our light curves to estimate the properties of the RR Lyrae (RRL) stars in M68 through Fourier decomposition and empirical relations. The variable star properties then allowed us to derive the cluster's metallicity and distance. We determine new periods for the variable stars, and search for new variables, especially in the core of the cluster where our method performs particularly well. We detect an additional 4 SX Phe stars, and confirm the variability of another star, bringing the total number of confirmed variable stars in this cluster to 50. We also used archival data stretching back to 1951 in order to derive period changes for some of the single-mode RRL stars, and analyse the significant number of double-mode RRL stars in M68. Furthermore, we find evidence for double-mode pulsation in one of the SX Phe stars in this cluster. Using the different types of variables, we derived an estimate of the metallicity, [Fe/H]=$-2.07 \pm 0.06$ on the ZW scale, and 4 independent estimates of the distance modulus ($\mu_0 \sim$ 15.00 mag) for this cluster. Thanks to the first use of difference image analysis on time-series observations of M68, we are now confident that we have a complete census of the RRL stars in this cluster.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.8252  [pdf] - 1222886
OGLE-2011-BLG-0265Lb: a Jovian Microlensing Planet Orbiting an M Dwarf
Skowron, J.; Shin, I. -G.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Sumi, T.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Gould, A.; Dominis-Prester, D.; Street, R. A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Bennett, D. P.; Bozza, V.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Koshimoto, N.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Philpott, L. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, T.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Friedman, M.; Almeida, L. A.; Batista, V.; Christie, G.; Choi, J. -Y.; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Hwang, K. -H.; Jablonski, F.; Jung, Y. K.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Yee, J.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kains, N.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Ranc, C.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis; Harpsøe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lundkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wertz, O.
Comments: 10 pages, 2 tables, 5 figures. Accepted in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-10-30, last modified: 2015-02-23
We report the discovery of a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting an M-dwarf star that gave rise to the microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0265. Such a system is very rare among known planetary systems and thus the discovery is important for theoretical studies of planetary formation and evolution. High-cadence temporal coverage of the planetary signal combined with extended observations throughout the event allows us to accurately model the observed light curve. The final microlensing solution remains, however, degenerate yielding two possible configurations of the planet and the host star. In the case of the preferred solution, the mass of the planet is $M_{\rm p} = 0.9\pm 0.3\ M_{\rm J}$, and the planet is orbiting a star with a mass $M = 0.22\pm 0.06\ M_\odot$. The second possible configuration (2$\sigma$ away) consists of a planet with $M_{\rm p}=0.6\pm 0.3\ M_{\rm J}$ and host star with $M=0.14\pm 0.06\ M_\odot$. The system is located in the Galactic disk 3 -- 4 kpc towards the Galactic bulge. In both cases, with an orbit size of 1.5 -- 2.0 AU, the planet is a "cold Jupiter" -- located well beyond the "snow line" of the host star. Currently available data make the secure selection of the correct solution difficult, but there are prospects for lifting the degeneracy with additional follow-up observations in the future, when the lens and source star separate.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1410.8827  [pdf] - 919927
Searching for variable stars in the cores of five metal rich globular clusters using EMCCD observations
Comments: Accepted to A&A, 24 pages, 23 figures, 11 tables. Updated to match version published in A&A
Submitted: 2014-10-31, last modified: 2015-01-12
In this paper, we present the analysis of time-series observations from 2013 and 2014 of five metal rich ([Fe/H] $>$ -1) globular clusters: NGC~6388, NGC~6441, NGC~6528, NGC~6638, and NGC~6652. The data have been used to perform a census of the variable stars in the central parts of these clusters. The observations were made with the electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera at the Danish 1.54m Telescope at La Silla, Chile, and they were analysed using difference image analysis (DIA) to obtain high-precision light curves of the variable stars. It was possible to identify and classify all of the previously known or suspected variable stars in the central regions of the five clusters. Furthermore, we were able to identify, and in most cases classify 48, 49, 7, 8, and 2 previously unknown variables in NGC~6388, NGC~6441, NGC~6528, NGC~6638, and NGC~6652, respectively. Especially interesting is the case of NGC~6441, for which the variable star population of about 150 stars has been thoroughly examined by previous studies, including a Hubble Space Telescope study. In this paper we are able to present 49 new variable stars for this cluster, of which one (possibly two) are RR Lyrae stars, two are W Virginis stars, and the rest are long period semi-regular/irregular variables on the red giant branch. We have also detected the first double mode RR Lyrae in the cluster.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.7401  [pdf] - 926663
The Two-Colour EMCCD Instrument for the Danish 1.54m Telescope and SONG
Comments: Accepted to A&A, 17 pages, 15 figures
Submitted: 2014-11-26
We report on the implemented design of a two-colour instrument based on electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) detectors. This instrument is currently installed at the Danish 1.54m telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, and will be available at the SONG (Stellar Observations Network Group) 1m telescope node at Tenerife and at other SONG nodes as well. We present the software system for controlling the two-colour instrument and calibrating the high frame-rate imaging data delivered by the EMCCD cameras. An analysis of the performance of the Two-Colour Instrument at the Danish telescope shows an improvement in spatial resolution of up to a factor of two when doing shift-and-add compared with conventional imaging, and that it is possible to do high-precision photometry of EMCCD data in crowded fields. The Danish telescope, which was commissioned in 1979, is limited by a triangular coma at spatial resolutions below 0.5" and better results will thus be achieved at the near diffraction limited optical system on the SONG telescopes, where spatial resolutions close to 0.2" have been achieved. Regular EMCCD operations have been running at the Danish telescope for several years and have produced a number of scientific discoveries, including microlensing detected exoplanets, the detection of previously unknown variable stars in dense globular clusters and the discovery of two rings around the small asteroid-like object (10199) Chariklo.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.7259  [pdf] - 872274
A ring system detected around the Centaur (10199) Chariklo
Comments:
Submitted: 2014-09-25
Until now, rings have been detected in the Solar System exclusively around the four giant planets. Here we report the discovery of the first minor-body ring system around the Centaur object (10199) Chariklo, a body with equivalent radius 124$\pm$9 km. A multi-chord stellar occultation revealed the presence of two dense rings around Chariklo, with widths of about 7 km and 3 km, optical depths 0.4 and 0.06, and orbital radii 391 and 405 km, respectively. The present orientation of the ring is consistent with an edge-on geometry in 2008, thus providing a simple explanation for the dimming of Chariklo's system between 1997 and 2008, and for the gradual disappearance of ice and other absorption features in its spectrum over the same period. This implies that the rings are partially composed of water ice. These rings may be the remnants of a debris disk, which were possibly confined by embedded kilometre-sized satellites.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.2428  [pdf] - 1179818
A Super-Jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406
Tsapras, Y.; Choi, J. -Y.; Street, R. A.; Han, C.; Bozza, V.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Udalski, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Sumi, T.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Ipatov, S.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Andersen, J. M.; Novati, S. Calchi; Damerdji, Y.; Diehl, C.; Elyiv, A.; Giannini, E.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Juncher, D.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Vilela, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Barry, R.; Batista, V.; Bhattacharya, A.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J.; P`ere, C.; Pollard, K. R.; Wouters, D.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hwang, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kavka, A.; Koo, J. -R.; Lee, C. -U.; Maoz, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Shin, I. -G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Tan, T. G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yonehara, P. C. M. Yock A.
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2013-10-09, last modified: 2013-12-05
We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the lightcurve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a $2.73\pm 0.43\ M_{\rm J}$ planet orbiting a $0.44\pm 0.07\ M_{\odot}$ early M-type star. The distance to the lens is $4.97\pm 0.29$\ kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is $3.45\pm 0.26$ AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.2243  [pdf] - 713744
EMCCD photometry reveals two new variable stars in the crowded central region of the globular cluster NGC 6981
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, Submitted to A&A, Version 3 contains the correct celestial coordinates in Table 1
Submitted: 2013-04-08, last modified: 2013-09-02
Two previously unknown variable stars in the crowded central region of the globular cluster NGC 6981 are presented. The observations were made using the Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera at the Danish 1.54m Telescope at La Silla, Chile.The two variables were not previously detected by conventional CCD imaging because of their proximity to a bright star. This discovery demonstrates that EMCCDs are a powerful tool for performing high-precision time-series photometry in crowded fields and near bright stars, especially when combined with difference image analysis (DIA).
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1308.5762  [pdf] - 1178801
Interpretation of a Short-Term Anomaly in the Gravitational Microlensing Event MOA-2012-BLG-486
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures and ApJ submitted
Submitted: 2013-08-27
A planetary microlensing signal is generally characterized by a short-term perturbation to the standard single lensing light curve. A subset of binary-source events can produce perturbations that mimic planetary signals, thereby introducing an ambiguity between the planetary and binary-source interpretations. In this paper, we present analysis of the microlensing event MOA-2012-BLG-486, for which the light curve exhibits a short-lived perturbation. Routine modeling not considering data taken in different passbands yields a best-fit planetary model that is slightly preferred over the best-fit binary-source model. However, when allowed for a change in the color during the perturbation, we find that the binary-source model yields a significantly better fit and thus the degeneracy is clearly resolved. This event not only signifies the importance of considering various interpretations of short-term anomalies, but also demonstrates the importance of multi-band data for checking the possibility of false-positive planetary signals.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.3744  [pdf] - 1172078
Gravitational Binary-lens Events with Prominent Effects of Lens Orbital Motion
Comments: 6 pages and 4 figures
Submitted: 2013-06-17
Gravitational microlensing events produced by lenses composed of binary masses are important because they provide a major channel to determine physical parameters of lenses. In this work, we analyze the light curves of two binary-lens events OGLE-2006-BLG-277 and OGLE-2012-BLG-0031 for which the light curves exhibit strong deviations from standard models. From modeling considering various second-order effects, we find that the deviations are mostly explained by the effect of the lens orbital motion. We also find that lens parallax effects can mimic orbital effects to some extent. This implies that modeling light curves of binary-lens events not considering orbital effects can result in lens parallaxes that are substantially different from actual values and thus wrong determinations of physical lens parameters. This demonstrates the importance of routine consideration of orbital effects in interpreting light curves of binary-lens events. It is found that the lens of OGLE-2006-BLG-277 is a binary composed of a low-mass star and a brown dwarf companion.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.3206  [pdf] - 1172013
A detailed census of variable stars in the globular cluster NGC 6333 (M9) from CCD differential photometry
Comments: 20 pages, 17 figures, 5 tables, 1 electronic table
Submitted: 2013-06-13
We report CCD $V$ and $I$ time-series photometry of the globular cluster NGC 6333 (M9). The technique of difference image analysis has been used, which enables photometric precision better than 0.05 mag for stars brighter than $V \sim 19.0$ mag, even in the crowded central regions of the cluster. The high photometric precision has resulted in the discovery of two new RRc stars, three eclipsing binaries, seven long-term variables and one field RRab star behind the cluster. A detailed identification chart and equatorial coordinates are given for all the variable stars in the field of our images of the cluster. Our data together with literature $V$-data obtained in 1994 and 1995 allowed us to refine considerably the periods for all RR Lyrae stars. The nature of the new variables is discussed. We argue that variable V12 is a cluster member and an Anomalous Cepheid. Secular period variations, double mode pulsations and/or the Blazhko-like modulations in some RRc variables are addressed. Through the light curve Fourier decomposition of 12 RR Lyrae stars we have calculated a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]$_{\rm ZW}$=$-1.70 \pm 0.01{\rm(statistical)} \pm 0.14{\rm(systematic)}$ or [Fe/H]$_{UVES}=-1.67 \pm 0.01{\rm(statistical)} \pm 0.19{\rm(systematic)}$.Absolute magnitudes, radii and masses are also estimated for the RR Lyrae stars. A detailed search for SX Phe stars in the Blue Straggler region was conducted but none were discovered. If SX Phe exist in the cluster then their amplitudes must be smaller than the detection limit of our photometry. The CMD has been corrected for heavy differential reddening using the detailed extinction map of the cluster of Alonso-Garc\'ia et al. (2012). This has allowed us to set the mean cluster distance from two independent estimates; from the RRab and RRc absolute magnitudes, we find $8.04\pm 0.19$ kpc and $7.88\pm0.30$ kpc respectively.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1305.3606  [pdf] - 1382035
Estimating the parameters of globular cluster M 30 (NGC 7099) from time-series photometry
Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures, 10 tables, A&A in press
Submitted: 2013-05-15
We present the analysis of 26 nights of V and I time-series observations from 2011 and 2012 of the globular cluster M 30 (NGC 7099). We used our data to search for variable stars in this cluster and refine the periods of known variables; we then used our variable star light curves to derive values for the cluster's parameters. We used difference image analysis to reduce our data to obtain high-precision light curves of variable stars. We then estimated the cluster parameters by performing a Fourier decomposition of the light curves of RR Lyrae stars for which a good period estimate was possible. We also derive an estimate for the age of the cluster by fitting theoretical isochrones to our colour-magnitude diagram (CMD). Out of 13 stars previously catalogued as variables, we find that only 4 are bona fide variables. We detect two new RR Lyrae variables, and confirm two additional RR Lyrae candidates from the literature. We also detect four other new variables, including an eclipsing blue straggler system, and an SX Phoenicis star. This amounts to a total number of confirmed variable stars in M 30 of 12. We perform Fourier decomposition of the light curves of the RR Lyrae stars to derive cluster parameters using empirical relations. We find a cluster metallicity [Fe/H]_ZW=-2.01 +- 0.04, or [Fe/H]_UVES=-2.11 +- 0.06, and a distance of 8.32 +- 0.20 kpc (using RR0 variables), 8.10 kpc (using one RR1 variable), and 8.35 +- 0.42 kpc (using our SX Phoenicis star detection in M 30). Fitting isochrones to the CMD, we estimate an age of 13.0 +- 1.0 Gyr for M 30.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.0766  [pdf] - 659935
Flux and color variations of the doubly imaged quasar UM673
Comments: 7 pages, 8 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2013-02-04, last modified: 2013-05-06
With the aim of characterizing the flux and color variations of the multiple components of the gravitationally lensed quasar UM673 as a function of time, we have performed multi-epoch and multi-band photometric observations with the Danish 1.54m telescope at the La Silla Observatory. The observations were carried out in the VRi spectral bands during four seasons (2008--2011). We reduced the data using the PSF (Point Spread Function) photometric technique as well as aperture photometry. Our results show for the brightest lensed component some significant decrease in flux between the first two seasons (+0.09/+0.11/+0.05 mag) and a subsequent increase during the following ones (-0.11/-0.11/-0.10 mag) in the V/R/i spectral bands, respectively. Comparing our results with previous studies, we find smaller color variations between these seasons as compared with previous ones. We also separate the contribution of the lensing galaxy from that of the fainter and close lensed component.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1302.4169  [pdf] - 1164679
Microlensing Discovery of a Population of Very Tight, Very Low-mass Binary Brown Dwarfs
Choi, J. -Y.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Almeida, L. A.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gorbikov, E.; Jablonski, F.; Henderson, C. B.; Hwang, K. -H.; Janczak, J.; Jung, Y. -K.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Malamud, U.; Maoz, D.; McGregor, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Park, B. -G.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Shin, I. -G.; Yee, J. C.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Fang, X. -S.; Finet, F.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, S. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M. N.; Lundkvist, M.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Zimmer, F.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J. W.; Sahu, K. C.; Zub, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.
Comments: 7 pages, 5 figures, 3 tables, ApJ submitted
Submitted: 2013-02-18, last modified: 2013-03-20
Although many models have been proposed, the physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of low-mass brown dwarfs are poorly understood. The multiplicity properties and minimum mass of the brown-dwarf mass function provide critical empirical diagnostics of these mechanisms. We present the discovery via gravitational microlensing of two very low-mass, very tight binary systems. These binaries have directly and precisely measured total system masses of 0.025 Msun and 0.034 Msun, and projected separations of 0.31 AU and 0.19 AU, making them the lowest-mass and tightest field brown-dwarf binaries known. The discovery of a population of such binaries indicates that brown dwarf binaries can robustly form at least down to masses of ~0.02 Msun. Future microlensing surveys will measure a mass-selected sample of brown-dwarf binary systems, which can then be directly compared to similar samples of stellar binaries.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1208.2323  [pdf] - 1150645
Microlensig Binaries with Candidate Brown Dwarf Companions
Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Janczak, J.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G.; Polishook, D.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Shporer, A.; Thornley, G.; Malamud, U.; Yee, J. C.; Choi, J. -Y.; Jung, Y. -K.; Park, H.; Lee, C. -U.; Park, B. -G.; Koo, J. -R.; Bajek, D.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Ipatov, S.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Street, R.; Alsubai, K. A.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lundkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wertz, O.; Zimmer, F.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Calitz, J. J.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Cook, K. H.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Hill, K.; Hoffman, M.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Meintjes, P.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Vinter, C.; Zub, M.
Comments: 10 pages, 9 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2012-08-11, last modified: 2012-10-02
Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation history. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing events discovered during 2004 - 2011 observation seasons. Based on the low mass ratio criterion of q < 0.2, we found 7 candidate events, including OGLE-2004-BLG-035, OGLE-2004-BLG-039, OGLE-2007-BLG-006, OGLE-2007-BLG-399/MOA-2007-BLG-334, MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172, MOA-2011-BLG-149, and MOA-201-BLG-278/OGLE-2011-BLG-012N. Among them, we are able to confirm that the companions of the lenses of MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149 are brown dwarfs by determining the mass of the lens based on the simultaneous measurement of the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured mass of the brown dwarf companions are (0.02 +/- 0.01) M_Sun and (0.019 +/- 0.002) M_Sun for MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149, respectively, and both companions are orbiting low mass M dwarf host stars. More microlensing brown dwarfs are expected to be detected as the number of lensing events with well covered light curves increases with new generation searches.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.3064  [pdf] - 600754
The Transiting System GJ1214: High-Precision Defocused Transit Observations and a Search for Evidence of Transit Timing Variation
Comments: Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2012-07-12, last modified: 2012-09-10
Aims: We present 11 high-precision photometric transit observations of the transiting super-Earth planet GJ1214b. Combining these data with observations from other authors, we investigate the ephemeris for possible signs of transit timing variations (TTVs) using a Bayesian approach. Methods: The observations were obtained using telescope-defocusing techniques, and achieve a high precision with random errors in the photometry as low as 1mmag per point. To investigate the possibility of TTVs in the light curve, we calculate the overall probability of a TTV signal using Bayesian methods. Results: The observations are used to determine the photometric parameters and the physical properties of the GJ1214 system. Our results are in good agreement with published values. Individual times of mid-transit are measured with uncertainties as low as 10s, allowing us to reduce the uncertainty in the orbital period by a factor of two. Conclusions: A Bayesian analysis reveals that it is highly improbable that the observed transit times is explained by TTV, when compared with the simpler alternative of a linear ephemeris.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.2869  [pdf] - 1453901
Characterizing Low-Mass Binaries From Observation of Long Time-scale Caustic-crossing Gravitational Microlensing Events
Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Choi, J. -Y.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Fouqué, P.; Horne, K.; M.; Szymański, K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Kobara, S.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohmori, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Bramich, D. M.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lunkkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Almeida, L. A.; Batista, V.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Jablonski, F.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, S. -Y.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J. W.; Sahu, K. C.; Zub, M.
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures, 4 tables
Submitted: 2012-04-12, last modified: 2012-06-12
Despite astrophysical importance of binary star systems, detections are limited to those located in small ranges of separations, distances, and masses and thus it is necessary to use a variety of observational techniques for a complete view of stellar multiplicity across a broad range of physical parameters. In this paper, we report the detections and measurements of 2 binaries discovered from observations of microlensing events MOA-2011-BLG-090 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. Determinations of the binary masses are possible by simultaneously measuring the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the binary components are 0.43 $M_{\odot}$ and 0.39 $M_{\odot}$ for MOA-2011-BLG-090 and 0.57 $M_{\odot}$ and 0.17 $M_{\odot}$ for OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 and thus both lens components of MOA-2011-BLG-090 and one component of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 are M dwarfs, demonstrating the usefulness of microlensing in detecting binaries composed of low-mass components. From modeling of the light curves considering full Keplerian motion of the lens, we also measure the orbital parameters of the binaries. The blended light of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 comes very likely from the lens itself, making it possible to check the microlensing orbital solution by follow-up radial-velocity observation. For both events, the caustic-crossing parts of the light curves, which are critical for determining the physical lens parameters, were resolved by high-cadence survey observations and thus it is expected that the number of microlensing binaries with measured physical parameters will increase in the future.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.6323  [pdf] - 1123726
MOA-2010-BLG-477Lb: constraining the mass of a microlensing planet from microlensing parallax, orbital motion and detection of blended light
Bachelet, E.; Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Fouqué, P.; Gould, A.; Menzies, J. W.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Dong, Subo; Heyrovský, D.; Marquette, J. B.; Marshall, J.; Skowron, J.; Street, R. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Abe, L.; Agabi, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Allen, W.; Bertin, E.; Bos, M.; Bramich, D. M.; Chavez, J.; Christie, G. W.; Cole, A. A.; Crouzet, N.; Dieters, S.; Dominik, M.; Drummond, J.; Greenhill, J.; Guillot, T.; Henderson, C. B.; Hessman, F. V.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kandori, R.; Liebig, C.; Mékarnia, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Nagayama, T.; Nataf, D.; Natusch, T.; Nishiyama, S.; Rivet, J. -P.; Sahu, K. C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Thornley, G.; Tomczak, A. R.; Tsapras, Y.; Yee, J. C.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Kubas, D.; Martin, R.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; de Almeida, L. Andrade; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Lee, C. -U.; Lee, Y.; Koo, J. -R.; Maoz, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shporer, A.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Kobara, S.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Ohmori, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Kerins, E.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.
Comments: 3 Tables, 12 Figures, accepted in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-05-29
Microlensing detections of cool planets are important for the construction of an unbiased sample to estimate the frequency of planets beyond the snow line, which is where giant planets are thought to form according to the core accretion theory of planet formation. In this paper, we report the discovery of a giant planet detected from the analysis of the light curve of a high-magnification microlensing event MOA-2010-BLG-477. The measured planet-star mass ratio is $q=(2.181\pm0.004)\times 10^{-3}$ and the projected separation is $s=1.1228\pm0.0006$ in units of the Einstein radius. The angular Einstein radius is unusually large $\theta_{\rm E}=1.38\pm 0.11$ mas. Combining this measurement with constraints on the "microlens parallax" and the lens flux, we can only limit the host mass to the range $0.13<M/M_\odot<1.0$. In this particular case, the strong degeneracy between microlensing parallax and planet orbital motion prevents us from measuring more accurate host and planet masses. However, we find that adding Bayesian priors from two effects (Galactic model and Keplerian orbit) each independently favors the upper end of this mass range, yielding star and planet masses of $M_*=0.67^{+0.33}_{-0.13}\ M_\odot$ and $m_p=1.5^{+0.8}_{-0.3}\ M_{\rm JUP}$ at a distance of $D=2.3\pm0.6$ kpc, and with a semi-major axis of $a=2^{+3}_{-1}$ AU. Finally, we show that the lens mass can be determined from future high-resolution near-IR adaptive optics observations independently from two effects, photometric and astrometric.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1204.4789  [pdf] - 1118180
A New Type of Ambiguity in the Planet and Binary Interpretations of Central Perturbations of High-Magnification Gravitational Microlensing Events
Choi, J. -Y.; Shin, I. -G.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Fouqué, P.; Horne, K.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Kobara, S.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohmori, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Bramich, D. M.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lunkkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Almeida, L. A.; Batista, V.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C.; Jablonski, F.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, S. -Y.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Menzies, J. W.; Sahu, K. C.; Zub, M.
Comments: 8 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2012-04-21, last modified: 2012-04-25
High-magnification microlensing events provide an important channel to detect planets. Perturbations near the peak of a high-magnification event can be produced either by a planet or a binary companion. It is known that central perturbations induced by both types of companions can be generally distinguished due to the basically different magnification pattern around caustics. In this paper, we present a case of central perturbations for which it is difficult to distinguish the planetary and binary interpretations. The peak of a lensing light curve affected by this perturbation appears to be blunt and flat. For a planetary case, this perturbation occurs when the source trajectory passes the negative perturbation region behind the back end of an arrowhead-shaped central caustic. For a binary case, a similar perturbation occurs for a source trajectory passing through the negative perturbation region between two cusps of an astroid-shaped caustic. We demonstrate the degeneracy for 2 high-magnification events of OGLE-2011-BLG-0526 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0950/MOA-2011-BLG-336. For OGLE-2011-BLG-0526, the $\chi^2$ difference between the planetary and binary model is $\sim$ 3, implying that the degeneracy is very severe. For OGLE-2011-BLG-0950/MOA-2011-BLG-336, the stellar binary model is formally excluded with $\Delta \chi^2 \sim$ 105 and the planetary model is preferred. However, it is difficult to claim a planet discovery because systematic residuals of data from the planetary model are larger than the difference between the planetary and binary models. Considering that 2 events observed during a single season suffer from such a degeneracy, it is expected that central perturbations experiencing this type of degeneracy is common.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.3814  [pdf] - 496736
High Frame-rate Imaging Based Photometry, Photometric Reduction of Data from Electron-multiplying Charge Coupled Devices (EMCCDs)
Comments: Submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2012-02-16, last modified: 2012-04-01
The EMCCD is a type of CCD that delivers fast readout times and negligible readout noise, making it an ideal detector for high frame rate applications which improve resolution, like lucky imaging or shift-and-add. This improvement in resolution can potentially improve the photometry of faint stars in extremely crowded fields significantly by alleviating crowding. Alleviating crowding is a prerequisite for observing gravitational microlensing in main sequence stars towards the galactic bulge. However, the photometric stability of this device has not been assessed. The EMCCD has sources of noise not found in conventional CCDs, and new methods for handling these must be developed. We aim to investigate how the normal photometric reduction steps from conventional CCDs should be adjusted to be applicable to EMCCD data. One complication is that a bias frame cannot be obtained conventionally, as the output from an EMCCD is not normally distributed. Also, the readout process generates spurious charges in any CCD, but in EMCCD data, these charges are visible as opposed to the conventional CCD. Furthermore we aim to eliminate the photon waste associated with lucky imaging by combining this method with shift-and-add. A simple probabilistic model for the dark output of an EMCCD is developed. Fitting this model with the expectation-maximization algorithm allows us to estimate the bias, readout noise, amplification, and spurious charge rate per pixel and thus correct for these phenomena. To investigate the stability of the photometry, corrected frames of a crowded field are reduced with a PSF fitting photometry package, where a lucky image is used as a reference. We find that it is possible to develop an algorithm that elegantly reduces EMCCD data and produces stable photometry at the 1% level in an extremely crowded field.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1111.4032  [pdf] - 1091733
Characterizing Lenses and Lensed Stars of High-Magnification Single-lens Gravitational Microlensing Events With Lenses Passing Over Source Stars
Choi, J. -Y.; Shin, I. -G.; Park, S. -Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Street, R.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Janczak, J.; Lee, C. -U.; Mallia, F.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Tan, T. -G. "TG"; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Barnard, E.; Baudry, J.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Menzies, J.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Clay, N.; Fraser, S.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Mottram, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Zimmer, F.
Comments: 14 pages, 12 figures, 5 tables
Submitted: 2011-11-17, last modified: 2012-03-20
We present the analysis of the light curves of 9 high-magnification single-lens gravitational microlensing events with lenses passing over source stars, including OGLE-2004-BLG-254, MOA-2007-BLG-176, MOA-2007-BLG-233/OGLE-2007-BLG-302, MOA-2009-BLG-174, MOA-2010-BLG-436, MOA-2011-BLG-093, MOA-2011-BLG-274, OGLE-2011-BLG-0990/MOA-2011-BLG-300, and OGLE-2011-BLG-1101/MOA-2011-BLG-325. For all events, we measure the linear limb-darkening coefficients of the surface brightness profile of source stars by measuring the deviation of the light curves near the peak affected by the finite-source effect. For 7 events, we measure the Einstein radii and the lens-source relative proper motions. Among them, 5 events are found to have Einstein radii less than 0.2 mas, making the lenses candidates of very low-mass stars or brown dwarfs. For MOA-2011-BLG-274, especially, the small Einstein radius of $\theta_{\rm E}\sim 0.08$ mas combined with the short time scale of $t_{\rm E}\sim 2.7$ days suggests the possibility that the lens is a free-floating planet. For MOA-2009-BLG-174, we measure the lens parallax and thus uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens. We also find that the measured lens mass of $\sim 0.84\ M_\odot$ is consistent with that of a star blended with the source, suggesting that the blend is likely to be the lens. Although we find planetary signals for none of events, we provide exclusion diagrams showing the confidence levels excluding the existence of a planet as a function of the separation and mass ratio.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.4851  [pdf] - 492539
Absolute dimensions of solar-type eclipsing binaries. EF Aquarii: a G0 test for stellar evolution models
Comments: 11 pages, 8 figures, accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2012-02-22
Recent studies have shown that stellar chromospheric activity, and its effect on convective energy transport in the envelope, is most likely the cause of significant radius and temperature discrepancies between theoretical evolution models and observations. We aim to determine absolute dimensions and abundances for the solar-type detached eclipsing binary EF Aqr, and to perform a detailed comparison with results from recent stellar evolutionary models. uvby-beta standard photometry was obtained with the Stromgren Automatic Telescope. The broadening function formalism was applied on spectra observed with HERMES at the Mercator telescope in La Palma, to obtain radial velocity curves. Masses and radii with a precision of 0.6% and 1.0% respectively have been established for both components of EF Aqr. The active 0.956 M_sol secondary shows star spots and strong Ca II H and K emission lines. The 1.224 M_sol primary shows signs of activity as well, but at a lower level. An [Fe/H] abundance of 0.00+-0.10 is derived with similar abundances for Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Co, and Ni. Solar calibrated evolutionary models such as Yonsei-Yale, Victoria-Regina and BaSTI isochrones and evolutionary tracks are unable to reproduce EF Aqr, especially for the secondary, which is 9% larger and 400 K cooler than predicted. Models adopting significantly lower mixing length parameters l/H_p remove these discrepancies, as seen in other solar type binaries. For the observed metallicity, Granada models with a mixing length of l/H_p=1.30 (primary) and 1.05 (secondary) reproduce both components at a common age of 1.5+-0.6 Gyr. Observations of EF Aqr suggests that magnetic activity, and its effect on envelope convection, is likely to be the cause of discrepancies in both radius and temperature, which can be removed by adjusting the mixing length parameter of the models downwards.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.3295  [pdf] - 1084111
Microlensing Binaries Discovered through High-Magnification Channel
Shin, I. -G.; Choi, J. -Y.; Park, S. -Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Janczak, J.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Mallia, F.; Maoz, D.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Shporer, A.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Calitz, J. J.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Cook, K. H.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Hoffman, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Meintjes, P.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Vinter, C.; Zub, M.; Allan, A.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Street, R.; Tsapras, Y.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Zimmer, F.
Comments: 10 figures, 6 tables, 26 pages
Submitted: 2011-09-15, last modified: 2011-11-28
Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of 8 binary lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010. The perturbations, which are confined near the peak of the light curves, can be easily distinguished from the central perturbations caused by planets. However, the degeneracy between close and wide binary solutions cannot be resolved with a $3\sigma$ confidence level for 3 events, implying that the degeneracy would be an important obstacle in studying binary distributions. The dependence of the degeneracy on the lensing parameters is consistent with a theoretic prediction that the degeneracy becomes severe as the binary separation and the mass ratio deviate from the values of resonant caustics. The measured mass ratio of the event OGLE-2008-BLG-510/MOA-2008-BLG-369 is $q\sim 0.1$, making the companion of the lens a strong brown-dwarf candidate.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1101.3664  [pdf] - 1051539
I. Flux and color variations of the quadruply imaged quasar HE 0435-1223
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2011-01-19, last modified: 2011-02-16
aims: We present VRi photometric observations of the quadruply imaged quasar HE 0435-1223, carried out with the Danish 1.54m telescope at the La Silla Observatory. Our aim was to monitor and study the magnitudes and colors of each lensed component as a function of time. methods: We monitored the object during two seasons (2008 and 2009) in the VRi spectral bands, and reduced the data with two independent techniques: difference imaging and PSF (Point Spread Function) fitting.results: Between these two seasons, our results show an evident decrease in flux by ~0.2-0.4 magnitudes of the four lensed components in the three filters. We also found a significant increase (~0.05-0.015) in their V-R and R-i color indices. conclusions: These flux and color variations are very likely caused by intrinsic variations of the quasar between the observed epochs. Microlensing effects probably also affect the brightest "A" lensed component.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.0338  [pdf] - 1034634
OGLE-2009-BLG-092/MOA-2009-BLG-137: A Dramatic Repeating Event With the Second Perturbation Predicted by Real-Time Analysis
Comments: 18 pages, 5 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2010-09-02
We report the result of the analysis of a dramatic repeating gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2009-BLG-092/MOA-2009-BLG-137, for which the light curve is characterized by two distinct peaks with perturbations near both peaks. We find that the event is produced by the passage of the source trajectory over the central perturbation regions associated with the individual components of a wide-separation binary. The event is special in the sense that the second perturbation, occurring $\sim 100$ days after the first, was predicted by the real-time analysis conducted after the first peak, demonstrating that real-time modeling can be routinely done for binary and planetary events. With the data obtained from follow-up observations covering the second peak, we are able to uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event occurred on a bulge clump giant and it was produced by a binary lens composed of a K and M-type main-sequence stars. The estimated masses of the binary components are $M_1=0.69 \pm 0.11\ M_\odot$ and $M_2=0.36\pm 0.06\ M_\odot$, respectively, and they are separated in projection by $r_\perp=10.9\pm 1.3\ {\rm AU}$. The measured distance to the lens is $D_{\rm L}=5.6 \pm 0.7\ {\rm kpc}$. We also detect the orbital motion of the lens system.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:0806.1182  [pdf] - 867027
Photometry and spectroscopy of GRB 060526: A detailed study of the afterglow and host galaxy of a z=3.2 gamma-ray burst
Comments: 20 pages, 8 figures, A&A, in press, three additional authors, additional minor changes after second referee report
Submitted: 2008-06-06, last modified: 2010-07-20
Aims: With this paper we want to investigate the highly variable afterglow light curve and environment of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060526 at $z=3.221$. Methods: We present one of the largest photometric datasets ever obtained for a GRB afterglow, consisting of multi-color photometric data from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. The data set contains 412 data points in total to which we add additional data from the literature. Furthermore, we present low-resolution high signal-to-noise spectra of the afterglow. The afterglow light curve is modeled with both an analytical model using broken power law fits and with a broad-band numerical model which includes energy injections. The absorption lines detected in the spectra are used to derive column densities using a multi-ion single-component curve-of-growth analysis from which we derive the metallicity of the host of GRB 060526. Results: The temporal behaviour of the afterglow follows a double broken power law with breaks at $t=0.090\pm0.005$ and $t=2.401\pm0.061$ days. It shows deviations from the smooth set of power laws that can be modeled by additional energy injections from the central engine, although some significant microvariability remains. The broadband spectral-energy distribution of the afterglow shows no significant extinction along the line of sight. The metallicity derived from \ion{S}{II} and \ion{Fe}{II} of [S/H] = --0.57 $\pm$0.25 and [Fe/H] = --1.09$\pm$0.24 is relatively high for a galaxy at that redshift but comparable to the metallicity of other GRB hosts at similar redshifts. At the position of the afterglow, no host is detected to F775W(AB) = 28.5 mag with the HST, implying an absolute magnitude of the host M(1500 \AA{})$>$--18.3 mag which is fainter than most long-duration hosts, although the GRB may be associated with a faint galaxy at a distance of 11 kpc.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:0908.0436  [pdf] - 26979
The Stellar Observations Network Group - the Prototype
Comments: To be published in Proc. GONG2008/SOHO21 meeting: Solar-stellar Dynamos as revealed by Helio- and Asteroseismology, eds M. Dikpati, T. Arentoft, I. Gonzalez Hernandez, C. Lindsey and F. Hill, ASP Conf. Ser
Submitted: 2009-08-04
The Stellar Observations Network Group (SONG) has obtained full funding for the design, construction and implementation of a prototype telescope and instrumentation package for the first network node. We describe the layout of such a node and its instrumentation and expected performance for radial-velocity measurements. The instrumentation consists of a 1m telescope, equipped with two cameras for photometry of microlensing events with the lucky-imaging technique and a high-resolution spectrograph equipped with an iodine cell for obtaining high-precision radial velocities of solar-like stars, in order to do asteroseismology. The telescope will be located in a dome of ~ 4.5 m diameter, with two lucky-imaging cameras at one of the Nasmyth foci and the spectrograph and instrument control computers at a Coud{\'e} focus, located in an adjacent container. Currently the prototype telescope and instrumentation are undergoing detailed design. Installation at the first site (Tenerife) is expected during mid-late 2010, followed by extensive testing during 2011.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.3471  [pdf] - 243158
Mass measurement of a single unseen star and planetary detection efficiency for OGLE 2007-BLG-050
Comments: 20 pages, 23 figures
Submitted: 2009-07-20, last modified: 2009-07-22
We analyze OGLE-2007-BLG-050, a high magnification microlensing event (A ~ 432) whose peak occurred on 2 May, 2007, with pronounced finite-source and parallax effects. We compute planet detection efficiencies for this event in order to determine its sensitivity to the presence of planets around the lens star. Both finite-source and parallax effects permit a measurement of the angular Einstein radius \theta_E = 0.48 +/- 0.01 mas and the parallax \pi_E = 0.12 +/- 0.03, leading to an estimate of the lens mass M = 0.50 +/- 0.14 M_Sun and its distance to the observer D_L = 5.5 +/- 0.4 kpc. This is only the second determination of a reasonably precise (<30%) mass estimate for an isolated unseen object, using any method. This allows us to calculate the planetary detection efficiency in physical units (r_\perp, m_p), where r_\perp is the projected planet-star separation and m_p is the planet mass. When computing planet detection efficiency, we did not find any planetary signature and our detection efficiency results reveal significant sensitivity to Neptune-mass planets, and to a lesser extent Earth-mass planets in some configurations. Indeed, Jupiter and Neptune-mass planets are excluded with a high confidence for a large projected separation range between the planet and the lens star, respectively [0.6 - 10] and [1.4 - 4] AU, and Earth-mass planets are excluded with a 10% confidence in the lensing zone, i.e. [1.8 - 3.1] AU.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.0508  [pdf] - 315049
The properties of the host galaxy and the immediate environment of GRB 980425 / SN 1998bw from the multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution
Comments: 9 pages, 3 figures, accepted to ApJ, minor changes to match the published version; for SED templates, see http://archive.dark-cosmology.dk/
Submitted: 2008-09-02, last modified: 2009-02-22
We present an analysis of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the galaxy ESO 184-G82, the host of the closest known long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 980425 and its associated supernova (SN) 1998bw. We use our observations obtained at the Australia Telescope Compact Array (the third >3 sigma radio detection of a GRB host) as well as archival infrared and ultraviolet (UV) observations to estimate its star formation state. We find that ESO 184-G82 has a UV star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass consistent with the population of cosmological GRB hosts and of local dwarf galaxies. However, it has a higher specific SFR (per unit stellar mass) than luminous spiral galaxies. The mass of ESO 184-G82 is dominated by an older stellar population in contrast to the majority of GRB hosts. The Wolf-Rayet region ~800 pc from the SN site experienced a starburst episode during which the majority of its stellar population was built up. Unlike that of the entire galaxy, its SED is similar to those of cosmological submillimeter/radio-bright GRB hosts with hot dust content. These findings add to the picture that in general, the environments of GRBs on 1-3 kpc scales are associated with high specific SFR and hot dust.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0510096  [pdf] - 1468965
The optical afterglow of the short gamma-ray burst GRB 050709
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures, press material at http://www.astro.ku.dk/dark/
Submitted: 2005-10-04
It has long been known that there are two classes of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), mainly distinguished by their durations. The breakthrough in our understanding of long-duration GRBs (those lasting more than ~2 s), which ultimately linked them with energetic Type Ic supernovae, came from the discovery of their long-lived X-ray and optical afterglows, when precise and rapid localizations of the sources could finally be obtained. X-ray localizations have recently become available for short (duration <2 s) GRBs, which have evaded optical detection for more than 30 years. Here we report the first discovery of transient optical emission (R-band magnitude ~23) associated with a short burst; GRB 050709. The optical afterglow was localized with subarcsecond accuracy, and lies in the outskirts of a blue dwarf galaxy. The optical and X-ray afterglow properties 34 h after the GRB are reminiscent of the afterglows of long GRBs, which are attributable to synchrotron emission from ultrarelativistic ejecta. We did not, however, detect a supernova, as found in most nearby long GRB afterglows, which suggests a different origin for the short GRBs.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0401071  [pdf] - 61941
Probing the atmosphere of the bulge G5III star OGLE-2002-BUL-069 by analysis of microlense H alpha line
Comments: 4 pages Latex, 3 figures, accepted for publication to astronomy and astrophysics letters
Submitted: 2004-01-07, last modified: 2004-03-29
We discuss high-resolution, time-resolved spectra of the caustic exit of the binary microlensing event OGLE 2002-BUL-69 obtained with UVES on the VLT. The source star is a G5III giant in the Galactic Bulge. During such events, the source star is highly magnified, and a strong differential magnification around the caustic resolves its surface. Using an appropriate model stellar atmosphere generated by the NextGEN code we obtained a model light curve for the caustic exit and compared it with a dense set of photometric observations obtained by the PLANET microlensing follow up network. We further compared predicted variations in the H alpha equivalent width with those measured from our spectra. While the model and observations agree in the gross features, there are discrepancies suggesting shortcomings in the model, particularly for the H alpha line core, where we have detected amplified emission from the stellar chromosphere as the source star's trailing limb exited the caustic. This achievement became possible by the provision of the OGLE-III Early Warning System, a network of small telescopes capable of nearly-continuous round-the-clock photometric monitoring, on-line data reduction, daily near-real-time modelling in order to predict caustic crossing parameters, and a fast and efficient response of a 8m-class telescope to a ``Target-Of-Opportunity'' observation request.