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Huey, Greg

Normalized to: Huey, G.

21 article(s) in total. 432 co-authors, from 1 to 11 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 2,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.5062  [pdf] - 832330
Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bourdin, H.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carr, R.; Carvalho, P.; Casale, M.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Falgarone, E.; Falvella, M. C.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Frommert, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Galli, S.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jasche, J.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A.; Räth, C.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Riazuelo, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schiavon, F.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smith, K.; Smoot, G. F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Taylor, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J. -P.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Tuttlebee, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vibert, L.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, C.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Winkel, B.; Xia, J. -Q.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2013-03-20, last modified: 2014-06-05
The ESA's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the CMB and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the SZ effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter LCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25 sigma. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations derived from CMB data and that derived from SZ data. The Planck and WMAP power spectra are offset from each other by an average level of about 2% around the first acoustic peak.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.0315  [pdf] - 1165637
CMB likelihood approximation for banded probability distributions
Comments: 9 pages, 7 figures, 1 table, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2013-04-01
We investigate sets of random variables that can be arranged sequentially such that a given variable only depends conditionally on its immediate predecessor. For such sets, we show that the full joint probability distribution may be expressed exclusively in terms of uni- and bivariate marginals. Under the assumption that the CMB power spectrum likelihood only exhibits correlations within a banded multipole range, \Delta l, we apply this expression to two outstanding problems in CMB likelihood analysis. First, we derive a statistically well-defined hybrid likelihood estimator, merging two independent (e.g., low- and high-l) likelihoods into a single expression that properly accounts for correlations between the two. Applying this expression to the WMAP likelihood, we verify that the effect of correlations on cosmological parameters in the transition region is negligible in terms of cosmological parameters for WMAP; the largest relative shift seen for any parameter is 0.06\sigma. However, because this may not hold for other experimental setups (e.g., for different instrumental noise properties or analysis masks), but must rather be verified on a case-by-case basis, we recommend our new hybridization scheme for future experiments for statistical self-consistency reasons. Second, we use the same expression to improve the convergence rate of the Blackwell-Rao likelihood estimator, reducing the required number of Monte Carlo samples by several orders of magnitude, and thereby extend it to high-l applications.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.5072  [pdf] - 888437
Planck 2013 results. XII. Component separation
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Schiavon, F.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Xia, J. -Q.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 31 pages, 32 figures, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2013-03-20
Planck has produced detailed all-sky observations over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz. These observations allow robust reconstruction of the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuations over nearly the full sky, as well as new constraints on Galactic foregrounds. This paper describes the component separation framework adopted by Planck. We test four foreground-cleaned CMB maps derived using qualitatively different component separation algorithms. The quality of our reconstructions is evaluated through detailed simulations and internal comparisons, and shown through various tests to be internally consistent and robust for CMB power spectrum and cosmological parameter estimation up to l = 2000. The parameter constraints on LambdaCDM cosmologies derived from these maps are consistent with those presented in the cross-spectrum based Planck likelihood analysis. We choose two of the CMB maps for specific scientific goals. We also present maps and frequency spectra of the Galactic low-frequency, CO, and thermal dust emission. The component maps are found to provide a faithful representation of the sky, as evaluated by simulations. For the low-frequency component, the spectral index varies widely over the sky, ranging from about beta = -4 to -2. Considering both morphology and prior knowledge of the low frequency components, the index map allows us to associate a steep spectral index (beta < -3.2) with strong anomalous microwave emission, corresponding to a spinning dust spectrum peaking below 20 GHz, a flat index of beta > -2.3 with strong free-free emission, and intermediate values with synchrotron emission.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:0904.2554  [pdf] - 23396
Bayesian analysis of white noise levels in the 5-year WMAP data
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2009-04-16, last modified: 2009-06-19
We develop a new Bayesian method for estimating white noise levels in CMB sky maps, and apply this algorithm to the 5-year WMAP data. We assume that the amplitude of the noise RMS is scaled by a constant value, alpha, relative to a pre-specified noise level. We then derive the corresponding conditional density, P(alpha | s, Cl, d), which is subsequently integrated into a general CMB Gibbs sampler. We first verify our code by analyzing simulated data sets, and then apply the framework to the WMAP data. For the foreground-reduced 5-year WMAP sky maps and the nominal noise levels initially provided in the 5-year data release, we find that the posterior means typically range between alpha=1.005 +- 0.001 and alpha=1.010 +- 0.001 depending on differencing assembly, indicating that the noise level of these maps are biased low by 0.5-1.0%. The same problem is not observed for the uncorrected WMAP sky maps. After the preprint version of this letter appeared on astro-ph., the WMAP team has corrected the values presented on their web page, noting that the initially provided values were in fact estimates from the 3-year data release, not from the 5-year estimates. However, internally in their 5-year analysis the correct noise values were used, and no cosmological results are therefore compromised by this error. Thus, our method has already been demonstrated in practice to be both useful and accurate.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.4311  [pdf] - 22728
Bayesian component separation and CMB estimation for the 5-year WMAP temperature data
Comments: 18 pages, 19 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2009-03-25
A well-tested and validated Gibbs sampling code, that performs component separation and CMB power spectrum estimation, was applied to the {\it WMAP} 5-yr data. Using a simple model consisting of CMB, noise, monopoles and dipoles, a ``per pixel'' low-frequency power-law (fitting for both amplitude and spectral index), and a thermal dust template with fixed spectral index, we found that the low-$\ell$ ($\ell < 50$) CMB power spectrum is in good agreement with the published {\it WMAP}5 results. Residual monopoles and dipoles were found to be small ($\lesssim 3 \mu$K) or negligible in the 5-yr data. We comprehensively tested the assumptions that were made about the foregrounds (e.g. dust spectral index, power-law spectral index prior, templates), and found that the CMB power spectrum was insensitive to these choices. We confirm the asymmetry of power between the north and south ecliptic hemispheres, which appears to be robust against foreground modeling. The map of low frequency spectral indices indicates a steeper spectrum on average ($\beta=-2.97\pm0.21$) relative to those found at low ($\sim$GHz) frequencies.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:0809.4624  [pdf] - 315127
CMB likelihood approximation by a Gaussianized Blackwell-Rao estimator
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2008-09-26
We introduce a new CMB temperature likelihood approximation called the Gaussianized Blackwell-Rao (GBR) estimator. This estimator is derived by transforming the observed marginal power spectrum distributions obtained by the CMB Gibbs sampler into standard univariate Gaussians, and then approximate their joint transformed distribution by a multivariate Gaussian. The method is exact for full-sky coverage and uniform noise, and an excellent approximation for sky cuts and scanning patterns relevant for modern satellite experiments such as WMAP and Planck. A single evaluation of this estimator between l=2 and 200 takes ~0.2 CPU milliseconds, while for comparison, a single pixel space likelihood evaluation between l=2 and 30 for a map with ~2500 pixels requires ~20 seconds. We apply this tool to the 5-year WMAP temperature data, and re-estimate the angular temperature power spectrum, $C_{\ell}$, and likelihood, L(C_l), for l<=200, and derive new cosmological parameters for the standard six-parameter LambdaCDM model. Our spectrum is in excellent agreement with the official WMAP spectrum, but we find slight differences in the derived cosmological parameters. Most importantly, the spectral index of scalar perturbations is n_s=0.973 +/- 0.014, 1.9 sigma away from unity and 0.6 sigma higher than the official WMAP result, n_s = 0.965 +/- 0.014. This suggests that an exact likelihood treatment is required to higher l's than previously believed, reinforcing and extending our conclusions from the 3-year WMAP analysis. In that case, we found that the sub-optimal likelihood approximation adopted between l=12 and 30 by the WMAP team biased n_s low by 0.4 sigma, while here we find that the same approximation between l=30 and 200 introduces a bias of 0.6 sigma in n_s.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:0807.0624  [pdf] - 314979
A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Algorithm for analysis of low signal-to-noise CMB data
Comments: Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2008-07-03
We present a new Monte Carlo Markov Chain algorithm for CMB analysis in the low signal-to-noise regime. This method builds on and complements the previously described CMB Gibbs sampler, and effectively solves the low signal-to-noise inefficiency problem of the direct Gibbs sampler. The new algorithm is a simple Metropolis-Hastings sampler with a general proposal rule for the power spectrum, C_l, followed by a particular deterministic rescaling operation of the sky signal. The acceptance probability for this joint move depends on the sky map only through the difference of chi-squared between the original and proposed sky sample, which is close to unity in the low signal-to-noise regime. The algorithm is completed by alternating this move with a standard Gibbs move. Together, these two proposals constitute a computationally efficient algorithm for mapping out the full joint CMB posterior, both in the high and low signal-to-noise regimes.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:0705.3643  [pdf] - 260061
Bayesian analysis of the low-resolution polarized 3-year WMAP sky maps
Comments: 5 pages, 4 figures, submitted to ApJL
Submitted: 2007-05-24
We apply a previously developed Gibbs sampling framework to the foreground corrected 3-yr WMAP polarization data and compute the power spectrum and residual foreground template amplitude posterior distributions. We first analyze the co-added Q- and V-band data, and compare our results to the likelihood code published by the WMAP team. We find good agreement, and thus verify the numerics and data processing steps of both approaches. However, we also analyze the Q- and V-bands separately, allowing for non-zero EB cross-correlations and including two individual foreground template amplitudes tracing synchrotron and dust emission. In these analyses, we find tentative evidence of systematics: The foreground tracers correlate with each of the Q- and V-band sky maps individually, although not with the co-added QV map; there is a noticeable negative EB cross-correlation at l <~ 16 in the V-band map; and finally, when relaxing the constraints on EB and BB, noticeable differences are observed between the marginalized band powers in the Q- and V-bands. Further studies of these features are imperative, given the importance of the low-l EE spectrum on the optical depth of reionization tau and the spectral index of scalar perturbations n_s.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0606088  [pdf] - 82528
A re-analysis of the three-year WMAP temperature power spectrum and likelihood
Comments: 14 pages, 7 figures. Accepted for publication in ApJ. Numerical results unchanged, but interpretation sharpened: Likelihood approximation issues at l=13-30 far more important than potential foreground issues at l <= 12. Gibbs products (spectrum and sky samples, and "easy-to-use" likelihood module) available from http://www.astro.uio.no/~hke/ under "Research"
Submitted: 2006-06-05, last modified: 2006-10-02
We analyze the three-year WMAP temperature anisotropy data seeking to confirm the power spectrum and likelihoods published by the WMAP team. We apply five independent implementations of four algorithms to the power spectrum estimation and two implementations to the parameter estimation. Our single most important result is that we broadly confirm the WMAP power spectrum and analysis. Still, we do find two small but potentially important discrepancies: On large angular scales there is a small power excess in the WMAP spectrum (5-10% at l<~30) primarily due to likelihood approximation issues between 13 <= l <~30. On small angular scales there is a systematic difference between the V- and W-band spectra (few percent at l>~300). Recently, the latter discrepancy was explained by Huffenberger et al. (2006) in terms of over-subtraction of unresolved point sources. As far as the low-l bias is concerned, most parameters are affected by a few tenths of a sigma. The most important effect is seen in n_s. For the combination of WMAP, Acbar and BOOMERanG, the significance of n_s =/ 1 drops from ~2.7 sigma to ~2.3 sigma when correcting for this bias. We propose a few simple improvements to the low-l WMAP likelihood code, and introduce two important extensions to the Gibbs sampling method that allows for proper sampling of the low signal-to-noise regime. Finally, we make the products from the Gibbs sampling analysis publically available, thereby providing a fast and simple route to the exact likelihood without the need of expensive matrix inversions.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0608007  [pdf] - 83884
Estimation of Polarized Power Spectra by Gibbs sampling
Comments: 8 pages, 5 figures. High-resolution version available from http://www.astro.uio.no/~hke/docs/larson_et_al_2006.ps.gz; accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2006-07-31, last modified: 2006-10-02
Earlier papers introduced a method of accurately estimating the angular cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum based on Gibbs sampling. Here we extend this framework to polarized data. All advantages of the Gibbs sampler still apply, and exact analysis of mega-pixel polarized data sets is thus feasible. These advantages may be even more important for polarization measurements than for temperature measurements. While approximate methods can alias power from the larger E-mode spectrum into the weaker B-mode spectrum, the Gibbs sampler (or equivalently, exact likelihood evaluations) allows for a statistically optimal separation of these modes in terms of power spectra. To demonstrate the method, we analyze two simulated data sets: 1) a hypothetical future CMBPol mission, with the focus on B-mode estimation; and 2) a Planck-like mission, to highlight the computational feasibility of the method.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0411102  [pdf] - 68701
A Comprehensive Approach to Resolving the Nature of the Dark Energy
Comments: 12 pages, 1 figure in 2 files Added references & corrected typos
Submitted: 2004-11-04, last modified: 2005-02-09
A data-driven approach to elucidating the nature of the dark energy, in the form of a joint analysis of a full set of cosmological parameters, utilizing all available observational data is proposed. A parameterization of a generalized dark energy is developed with the extension of fluid perturbation theory to models which cross through an equation of state of -1. This parameterization is selected to be general enough to admit a wide variety of behavior, while still being physical and economical. A Fisher matrix analysis with future high-precision CMB, cluster survey, and SNIa data suggests the parameters will probably be resolvable in the foreseeable future. How accurately the parameters can be determined depends sensitively on the nature of the dark energy - particularly how significant of a fraction of the total energy density it has been in the past. Parameter space will be sampled at a large number of points, with cosmological information such as CMB, power spectra, etc of each point being archived. Thus the likelihood functions of an arbitrary set of experiments can be applied to parameter space with insignificant new computational cost, making a wide variety of analyses possible. The resulting tool for Analysis and Resolution of Dark-sector Attributes, ARDA, will be highly versatile and adaptable. ARDA will allow the scientific community to extract parameters with an arbitrary set of experiments and theoretical priors, test for tension between classes of observations and investigate the effectiveness of hypothetical experiments, while evolving in a data-driven manner. A proof-of-concept prototype web-tool, \underbar{The Cosmic Concordance Project}, is already available.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0307080  [pdf] - 57793
Precision Primordial $^4$He Measurement with CMB Experiments
Comments: 7 pages, 3 color figures made minor changes to bring inline with journal version
Submitted: 2003-07-03, last modified: 2004-11-02
Big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are two major pillars of cosmology. Standard BBN accurately predicts the primordial light element abundances ($^4$He, D, $^3$He and $^7$Li), depending on one parameter, the baryon density. Light element observations are used as a baryometers. The CMB anisotropies also contain information about the content of the universe which allows an important consistency check on the Big Bang model. In addition CMB observations now have sufficient accuracy to not only determine the total baryon density, but also resolve its principal constituents, H and $^4$He. We present a global analysis of all recent CMB data, with special emphasis on the concordance with BBN theory and light element observations. We find $\Omega_{B}h^{2}=0.025+0.0019-0.0026$ and $Y_{p}=0.250+0.010-0.014$ (fraction of baryon mass as $^4$He) using CMB data alone, in agreement with $^4$He abundance observations. With this concordance established we show that the inclusion of BBN theory priors significantly reduces the volume of parameter space. In this case, we find $\Omega_{B}h^2=0.0244+0.00137-0.00284$ and $Y_p = 0.2493+0.0006-0.001$. We also find that the inclusion of deuterium abundance observations reduces the $Y_p$ and $\Omega_{B}h^2$ ranges by a factor of $\sim $2. Further light element observations and CMB anisotropy experiments will refine this concordance and sharpen BBN and the CMB as tools for precision cosmology.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0407196  [pdf] - 1468664
Interacting Quintessence, Cosmic Acceleration and the Coincidence Problem
Comments: 4 pages and 3 figures, submitted to PRL on March 25 2004
Submitted: 2004-07-09, last modified: 2004-07-10
Faced by recent evidence for a flat universe dominated by dark energy, cosmologists grapple with deep cosmic enigmas such as the cosmological constant problem, extreme fine-tuning and the cosmic coincidence problem. The extent to which we observe the dimming of distant supernovae suggests that the cosmic acceleration is as least as severe as in cosmological constant models. Extrapolating this to our cosmic future implies terrifying visions of either a cold and empty universe or an explosive demise in a ``Big Rip.'' We construct a class of dynamical scalar field models of dark energy and dark matter. Within this class we can explain why supernovae imply a cosmic equation of state $w\lesssim-1$, address fine tuning issues, protect the universe from premature acceleration and predict a constant fraction of dark energy to dark matter in the future (thus solving the coincidence problem), satisfy the dominant energy condition, and ensure that gravitationally bound objects remain so forever (avoid a Big Rip). This is achieved with a string theory inspired Lagrangian containing standard kinetic terms, exponential potentials and couplings, and parameters of order unity.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0312610  [pdf] - 61822
The CMB Power Spectrum from the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) Experiment
Comments: 18 Pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2003-12-23
The Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) is a 2.2m off-axis telescope with an 8 element mixed Q (38-45GHz) and Ka (26-36GHz) band focal plane, designed for balloon borne and ground based studies of the Cosmic Microwave Background. Here we present the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) angular power spectrum calculated from 682 hours of data observed with the BEAST instrument. We use a binned pseudo-Cl estimator (the MASTER method). We find results that are consistent with other determinations of the CMB anisotropy for angular wavenumber l between 100 and 600. We also perform cosmological parameter estimation. The BEAST data alone produces a good constraint on Omega_k = 1-Omega_tot=-0.074 +/- 0.070, consistent with a flat Universe. A joint parameter estimation analysis with a number of previous CMB experiments produces results consistent with previous determinations.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0205236  [pdf] - 49310
Inflation and Braneworlds: Degeneracies and Consistencies
Comments: 10 pages
Submitted: 2002-05-15
Scalar and tensor perturbations arising in an inflationary braneworld scenario driven by a single scalar field are considered, where the bulk on either side of the brane corresponds to Anti-de Sitter spaces with different cosmological constants. A consistency relation between the two spectra is derived and found to have an identical form to that arising in standard single-field inflation based on conventional Einstein gravity. The dS/CFT correspondence may provide further insight into the origin of this degeneracy. Possible ways of lifting such a degeneracy are discussed.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0110562  [pdf] - 880562
Quintessence and variation of the fine structure constant in the CMBR
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures. Several references added and a few minor typos corrected in the revised version
Submitted: 2001-10-25, last modified: 2001-11-01
We study dependence of the CMB temperature anisotropy spectrum on the value of the fine structure constant $\alpha$ and the equation of state of the dark energy component of the total density of the universe. We find that bounds imposed on the variation of $\alpha$ from the analysis of currently available CMB data sets can be significantly relaxed if one also allows for a change in the equation of state.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0108517  [pdf] - 44493
Robustness of the Quintessence Scenario in Particle Cosmologies
Comments:
Submitted: 2001-08-31
We study the robustness of the quintessence tracking scenario in the context of more general cosmological models that derive from high-energy physics. We consider the effects of inclusion of multiple scalar fields, corrections to the Hubble expansion law (such as those that arise in brane cosmological models), and potentials that decay with expansion of the Universe. We find that in a successful tracking quintessence model the average equation of state must remain nearly constant. Overall, the conditions for successful tracking become more complex in these more general settings. Tracking can become more fragile in presence of multiple scalar fields, and more stable when temperature dependent potentials are present. Interestingly though, most of the cases where tracking is disrupted are those in which the cosmological model is itself non-viable due to other constraints. In this sense tracking remains robust in models that are cosmologically viable.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0104006  [pdf] - 41745
Inflation, braneworlds and quintessence
Comments: 15 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2001-03-31
Inflationary cosmology is developed in the second Randall-Sundrum braneworld scenario, where the accelerated expansion arises through potentials that are too steep to drive inflation in conventional cosmology. A relationship between the scalar and tensor perturbation spectra is derived that is independent of both the inflaton potential and the brane tension. It is found that a single field with an inverse power law potential can act as both the inflaton and the quintessence field for suitable values of the brane tension.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-th/0001112  [pdf] - 116661
A Cosmological Mechanism for Stabilizing Moduli
Comments: 15 pages, 3 figures, revised discussion
Submitted: 2000-01-18, last modified: 2000-02-04
In this paper, we show how the generic coupling of moduli to the kinetic energy of ordinary matter fields results in a cosmological mechanism that influences the evolution and stability of moduli. As an example, we reconsider the problem of stabilizing the dilaton in a non-perturbative potential induced by gaugino condensates. A well-known difficulty is that the potential is so steep that the dilaton field tends to overrun the correct minimum and to evolve to an observationally unacceptable vacuum. We show that the dilaton coupling to the thermal energy of matter fields produces a natural mechanism for gently relaxing the dilaton field into the correct minimum of the potential without fine-tuning of initial conditions. The same mechanism is potentially relevant for stabilizing other moduli fields.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9804285  [pdf] - 101166
Resolving the Cosmological Missing Energy Problem
Comments: 6 pages, Latex, 4 postscript figures; revised analysis to include gravitational lensing
Submitted: 1998-04-27, last modified: 1998-08-17
Some form of missing energy may account for the difference between the observed cosmic matter density and the critical density. Two leading candidates are a cosmological constant and quintessence (a time-varying, inhomogenous component with negative pressure). We show that an ideal, full-sky cosmic background anisotropy experiment may not be able to distinguish the two, even when non-linear effects due to gravitational lensing are included. Due to this ambiguity, microwave background experiments alone may not determine the matter density or Hubble constant very precisely. We further show that degeneracy may remain even after considering classical cosmological tests and measurements of large scale structure.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9709006  [pdf] - 98459
Parametric Resonance in an Expanding Universe
Comments: 18 pages, Latex, 4 figures
Submitted: 1997-09-01
Parametric resonance has been discussed as a mechanism for copious particle production following inflation. Here we present a simple and intuitive calculational method for estimating the efficiency of parametric amplification as a function of parameters. This is important for determining whether resonant amplification plays an important role in the reheating process. We find that significant amplification occurs only for a limited range of couplings and interactions.