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Huang, Zhiqi

Normalized to: Huang, Z.

146 article(s) in total. 1255 co-authors, from 1 to 39 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 3,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.02715  [pdf] - 2117023
New high-quality strong lens candidates with deep learning in the Kilo Degree Survey
Comments: Accepted by APJ
Submitted: 2020-04-06, last modified: 2020-06-17
We report new high-quality galaxy scale strong lens candidates found in the Kilo Degree Survey data release 4 using Machine Learning. We have developed a new Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) classifier to search for gravitational arcs, following the prescription by \cite{2019MNRAS.484.3879P} and using only $r-$band images. We have applied the CNN to two "predictive samples": a Luminous red galaxy (LRG) and a "bright galaxy" (BG) sample ($r<21$). We have found 286 new high probability candidates, 133 from the LRG sample and 153 from the BG sample. We have then ranked these candidates based on a value that combines the CNN likelihood to be a lens and the human score resulting from visual inspection (P-value) and we present here the highest 82 ranked candidates with P-values $\ge 0.5$. All these high-quality candidates have obvious arc or point-like features around the central red defector. Moreover, we define the best 26 objects, all with scores P-values $\ge 0.7$ as a "golden sample" of candidates. This sample is expected to contain very few false positives and thus it is suitable for follow-up observations. The new lens candidates come partially from the the more extended footprint adopted here with respect to the previous analyses, partially from a larger predictive sample (also including the BG sample). These results show that machine learning tools are very promising to find strong lenses in large surveys and more candidates that can be found by enlarging the predictive samples beyond the standard assumption of LRGs. In the future, we plan to apply our CNN to the data from next-generation surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Euclid, and the Chinese Space Station Optical Survey.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.02017  [pdf] - 2107397
New timing measurement results of 16 pulsars
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-06-02
Pulsar's position, proper motion and parallax are important parameters in timing equations. It is a really challenging work to fit astrometric parameters accurately through pulsar timing, especially for pulsars that show irregular timing properties. As the fast development of related techniques, it is possible to measure astrometric parameters of more and more pulsars in a model$\textrm{-}$independent manner with the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). In this work, we select 16 normal pulsars, whose parallax and proper motion have not been successfully fitted with timing observations or show obvious differences with corresponding latest VLBI solutions, and do further studies on their timing properties. After updating astrometric parameters in pulsar ephemerides with the latest VLBI measurements, we derive the latest rotation solutions of these pulsars with observation data at S and C$\textrm{-}$band obtained from the Shanghai Tian Ma Radio Telescope (TMRT). Compared with spin frequency $\nu$ inferred from previous rotation solutions, the newly$\textrm{-}$fitted $\nu$ show differences larger than 10$^{-9}$ Hz for most pulsars. The contribution of the Shklovsky effect to period derivative $\dot{P}$ can be properly removed taking advantages of accurate proper motion and distance of target pulsars measured by VLBI astrometry. This further leads to a precise estimate of intrinsic characteristic age $\tau_{\rm c}$. Differences between the newly$\textrm{-}$measured $\tau_{\rm c}$ and corresponding previous results are as large as 2% for some pulsars. VLBI astrometric parameter solutions also lead to better measurements of timing irregularities. For PSR B0154$+$61, the glitch epoch (MJD 58279.5) measured with previous ephemeris is about 13 d later than the result (MJD 58266.4) obtained with VLBI astrometric parameter solutions.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.02973  [pdf] - 2105592
Examining the secondary product origin of cosmic ray positrons with the latest AMS-02 data
Comments: Accepted by ApJ, 5 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2020-01-09, last modified: 2020-04-08
Measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) positron fraction by PAMELA and other experiments have found an excess above 10 GeV relative to the standard predictions for secondary production in the interstellar medium (ISM). Although the excess has been mostly suggested to arise from some primary sources of positrons (such as pulsars and or annihilating dark matter particles), the almost constant flux ratio of $e^{+}/ \bar{p}$ argues for an alternative possibility that the excess positrons and antiprotons up to the highest energies are secondary products generated in hadronic interactions. Recently, Yang \& Aharonian (2019) revisit this possibility by assuming the presence of an additional population of CR nuclei sources. Here we examine this secondary product scenario using the \texttt{DRAGON} code, where the radiative loss of positrons is taken into account consistently. We confirm that the CR proton spectrum and the antiproton data can be explained by assuming the presence of an additional population of CR sources. However, the corresponding positron spectrum deviates from the measured data significantly above 100 GeV due to the strong radiative cooling. This suggests that, although hadronic interactions can explain the antiproton data, the corresponding secondary positron flux is still not enough to account for the AMS data. Hence contribution from some primary positron sources, such as pulsars or dark matter, is non-negligible.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.12728  [pdf] - 2084228
Concept of the Solar Ring Mission: Overview
Comments: To be published in Science China Technological Sciences, 20 pages, 9 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2020-03-28
The concept of the Solar Ring mission was gradually formed from L5/L4 mission concept, and the proposal of its pre-phase study was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China in November 2018 and then by the Strategic Priority Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences in space sciences in May 2019. Solar Ring mission will be the first attempt to routinely monitor and study the Sun and inner heliosphere from a full 360-degree perspective in the ecliptic plane. The current preliminary design of the Solar Ring mission is to deploy six spacecraft, grouped in three pairs, on a sub-AU orbit around the Sun. The two spacecraft in each group are separated by about 30 degrees and every two groups by about 120 degrees. This configuration with necessary science payloads will allow us to establish three unprecedented capabilities: (1) determine the photospheric vector magnetic field with unambiguity, (2) provide 360-degree maps of the Sun and the inner heliosphere routinely, and (3) resolve the solar wind structures at multiple scales and multiple longitudes. With these capabilities, the Solar Ring mission aims to address the origin of solar cycle, the origin of solar eruptions, the origin of solar wind structures and the origin of severe space weather events. The successful accomplishment of the mission will advance our understanding of the star and the space environment that hold our life and enhance our capability of expanding the next new territory of human.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:2003.12646  [pdf] - 2071919
Planck intermediate results. LVI. Detection of the CMB dipole through modulation of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect: Eppur si muove II
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Casaponsa, B.; Chiang, H. C.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sullivan, R. M.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2020-03-27
The largest temperature anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is the dipole, which has been measured with increasing accuracy for more than three decades, particularly with the Planck satellite. The simplest interpretation of the dipole is that it is due to our motion with respect to the rest frame of the CMB. Since current CMB experiments infer temperature anisotropies from angular intensity variations, the dipole modulates the temperature anisotropies with the same frequency dependence as the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect. We present the first (and significant) detection of this signal in the tSZ maps, and find that it is consistent with direct measurements of the CMB dipole, as expected. The signal contributes power in the tSZ maps, modulated in a quadrupolar pattern, and we estimate its contribution to the tSZ bispectrum, noting that it contributes negligible noise to the bispectrum at relevant scales.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.06926  [pdf] - 2074453
Supernova Magnitude Evolution and PAge Approximation
Comments: ApJL accepted
Submitted: 2020-01-19, last modified: 2020-03-19
The evidence of environmental dependence of Type Ia supernova luminosity has inspired recent discussion about whether the late-universe cosmic acceleration is still supported by supernova data. We adopt the $\Delta\mathrm{HR}/\Delta\mathrm{age}$ parameter, which describes the dependence of supernova absolute magnitude on the age of supernova progenitor, as an additional nuisance parameter. Using the Pantheon supernova data, a lower bound $\ge 12\,\mathrm{Gyr}$ on the cosmic age, and a Gaussian prior $H_0 = 70\pm 2\,\mathrm{km\,s^{-1}Mpc^{-1}}$ on the Hubble constant, we reconstruct the cosmic expansion history. Within the flat $\Lambda$ cold dark matter ($\Lambda$CDM) framework, we still find a $5.6\sigma$ detection of cosmic acceleration. This is because a matter dominated decelerating universe would be too young to accommodate observed old stars with age $\gtrsim 12\,\mathrm{Gyr}$. A decelerating but non-flat universe is marginally consistent with the data, however, only in the presence of a negative spatial curvature $\sim$ two orders of magnitude beyond the current constraint from cosmic microwave background data. Finally, we propose a more general Parameterization based on the cosmic Age (PAge), which is {\it not} directly tied to the dark energy concept and hence is ideal for a null test of the cosmic acceleration. We find that, for a magnitude evolution rate $\Delta\mathrm{HR}/\Delta\mathrm{age} \lesssim 0.3\,\mathrm{mag}/5.3\,\mathrm{Gyr}$ (Kang et al. 2020), a spatially flat and decelerating PAge universe is fully consistent with the supernova data and the cosmic age bound, and has no tension with the geometric constraint from the observed CMB acoustic angular scales.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.01590  [pdf] - 2023730
On The Photodesorption of CO$_2$ Ice Analogues: The Formation of Atomic C in The Ice and the Effect of The VUV Emission Spectrume
Comments: 11 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2020-01-06
CO$_2$ ice has a phase transition at 35 K when its structure changes from amorphous to crystalline. Using Reflection absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (RAIRS), \"Oberg et al. observed that the photodesorption yield of CO$_2$ ice deposited at 60 K and irradiated at 18 K is 40% lower than that of CO$_2$ ice deposited and irradiated at 18 K. In this work, CO$_2$ ices were deposited at 16-60 K and UV-irradiated at 16 K to rule out the temperature effect and figure out the relationship between photodesorption yield and ice structure. IR spectroscopy is a common method used for measurement of the photodesorption yield in ices. We found that undetectable C atoms produced in irradiated CO$_2$ ice can account for 33% of the amount of depleted CO$_2$ molecules in the ice. A quantitative calibration of QMS was therefore performed to convert the measured ion current into photodesorption yield. During various irradiation periods, the dominant photodesorbing species were CO, O$_2$, and CO$_2$, and their photodesorption yields in CO$_2$ ices deposited at different temperature configurations were almost the same, indicating that ice morphology has no effect on the photodesorption yield of CO$_2$ ice. In addition, we found that the lower desorption yield reported by Mart\'in-Dom\'enech et al. is due to a linear relationship between the photodesorption yield and the combination of energy distribution of Microwave-Discharge Hydrogen-flow Lamp (MDHL) and UV absorption cross section of ices.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.10404  [pdf] - 2020662
Formation and Eruption of a Mini-sigmoid Originating in Coronal Hole
Comments: 19 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2019-12-22
In this paper, we study in detail the evolution of a mini-sigmiod originating in a cross-equatorial coronal hole, where the magnetic field is mostly open and seriously distinct from the closed background field above active-region sigmoids. The source region first appeared as a bipole, which subsequently experienced a rapid emergence followed by a long-term decay. Correspondingly, the coronal structure initially appeared as arc-like loops, then gradually sheared and transformed into continuously sigmoidal loops, mainly owing to flux cancellation near the polarity inversion line. The temperature of J-shaped and sigmoidal loops is estimated to be about $2.0\times10^{6}$ K, greater than that of the background coronal hole. Using the flux-rope insertion method, we further reconstruct the nonlinear force-free fields that well reproduces the transformation of the potential field into a sigmoidal field. The fact that the sheared and sigmoidal loops are mainly concentrated at around the high-Q region implies that the reconnection most likely takes place there to form the sigmoidal field and heat the plasma. Moreover, the twist of sigmoidal field lines is estimated to be around 0.8, less than the values derived for the sigmoids from active regions. However, the sigmoidal flux may quickly enter an unstable regime at the very low corona ($<10\ Mm$) due to the open background field. The results suggest that the mini-sigmoid, at least the one in our study, has the same formation and eruption process as the large-scale one, but is significantly influenced by the overlying flux.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06205  [pdf] - 2009439
Planck 2018 results. I. Overview and the cosmological legacy of Planck
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Casaponsa, B.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leahy, J. P.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meerburg, P. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shiraishi, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 61 pages, 40 figures, matches version accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2019-12-03
The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, which was dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched on 14 May 2009. It scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12 August 2009 and 23 October 2013, producing deep, high-resolution, all-sky maps in nine frequency bands from 30 to 857GHz. This paper presents the cosmological legacy of Planck, which currently provides our strongest constraints on the parameters of the standard cosmological model and some of the tightest limits available on deviations from that model. The 6-parameter LCDM model continues to provide an excellent fit to the cosmic microwave background data at high and low redshift, describing the cosmological information in over a billion map pixels with just six parameters. With 18 peaks in the temperature and polarization angular power spectra constrained well, Planck measures five of the six parameters to better than 1% (simultaneously), with the best-determined parameter (theta_*) now known to 0.03%. We describe the multi-component sky as seen by Planck, the success of the LCDM model, and the connection to lower-redshift probes of structure formation. We also give a comprehensive summary of the major changes introduced in this 2018 release. The Planck data, alone and in combination with other probes, provide stringent constraints on our models of the early Universe and the large-scale structure within which all astrophysical objects form and evolve. We discuss some lessons learned from the Planck mission, and highlight areas ripe for further experimental advances.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.00190  [pdf] - 2092274
Can Non-standard Recombination Resolve the Hubble Tension?
Comments: 8 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2019-11-30
The inconsistent Hubble constant values derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and from local distance-ladder measurements may suggest new physics beyond the standard $\Lambda$CDM paradigm. It has been found in earlier works that, at least phenomenologically, non-standard recombination histories can reduce the $\gtrsim 4\sigma$ Hubble tension to $\sim 2\sigma$. Following this path, we vary physical and phenomenological parameters in RECFAST, the standard code to compute ionization history of the universe, to explore possible physics beyond standard recombination. We find that the CMB constraint on the Hubble constant is sensitive to the Hydrogen ionization energy and $2s \rightarrow 1s$ two-photon decay rate, both of which are atomic constants, and is insensitive to other details of recombination. Thus, the Hubble tension is very robust against perturbations of recombination history, unless exotic physics modifies the atomic constants during the recombination epoch.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.08660  [pdf] - 2001484
Coupled MHD -- Hybrid Simulations of Space Plasmas
Comments: 13 pages, 3 figures, ASTRONUM 2019 refereed proceedings paper (in press)
Submitted: 2019-11-19
Heliospheric plasmas require multi-scale and multi-physics considerations. On one hand, MHD codes are widely used for global simulations of the solar-terrestrial environments, but do not provide the most elaborate physical description of space plasmas. Hybrid codes, on the other hand, capture important physical processes, such as electric currents and effects of finite Larmor radius, but they can be used locally only, since the limitations in available computational resources do not allow for their use throughout a global computational domain. In the present work, we present a new coupled scheme which allows to switch blocks in the block-adaptive grids from fluid MHD to hybrid simulations, without modifying the self-consistent computation of the electromagnetic fields acting on fluids (in MHD simulation) or charged ion macroparticles (in hybrid simulation). In this way, the hybrid scheme can refine the description in specified regions of interest without compromising the efficiency of the global MHD code.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.02199  [pdf] - 2026256
Transition region loops in the very late phase of flux-emergence in IRIS sit-and-stare observations
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figs, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-11-05
Loops are one of the fundamental structures that trace the geometry of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere. Their evolution and dynamics provide a crucial proxy for studying how the magnetized structures are formed and heated in the solar atmosphere. Here, we report on spectroscopic observations of a set of transition region loops taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) at Si IV 1394 \AA\ with a sit-and-stare mode. The loops are corresponding to the flux emergence at its very late phase when the emerged magentic features in the photosphere have fully developed. We find the transition region loops are still expanding and moving upward with a velocity of a few kilometers per second ($\lesssim$10 km/s) at this stage. The expansion of the loops leads to interactions between themselves and the ambient field, which can drive magnetic reconnection evidenced by multiple intense brightenings, including transition region explosive events and IRIS bombs in the footpoint region associated with the moving polarity. A set of quasi-periodic brightenings with a period of about 130 s is found at the loop apex, from which the Si IV 1394 \AA\ profiles are significantly non-Gaussian with enhancements at both blue and red wings at Doppler velocities of about 50 km/s. We suggest that the transition region loops in the very late phase of flux emergence can be powered by heating events generated by the interactions between the expanding loops and the ambient fields and also by (quasi-)periodic processes, such as oscillation-modulated braiding reconnection.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.12636  [pdf] - 1986935
Integral Relations and Control Volume Method for Kinetic Equation with Poisson Brackets
Comments: 30 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2019-10-25
Simulation of plasmas in the electromagnetic fields requires to solve numerically a kinetic equation, describing the time evolution of the particle distribution function. Here, we propose a finite volume scheme based on the integral relation for the Poisson bracket to solve the most fundamental kinetic equation, namely, the Liouville equation. The proposed scheme conserves the number of particles, maintains the total-variation-diminishing (TVD) property, and provides high-quality numerical results. Some other types of kinetic equations may be also formulated in terms of the Poisson brackets and solved with the proposed method. Among them is the focused transport equation describing the acceleration and propagation of the Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), which is of practical importance, since the high energy SEPs produce radiation hazards. The newly proposed scheme is demonstrated to be accurate and efficient, which makes it applicable to global simulation systems analysing the space weather. We also discuss a role of focused transport and the accuracy of the diffusive approximation, in application to the SEPs
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.05670  [pdf] - 1978903
The Hubble Tension Persists Beyond Slow-roll Inflation
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2019-10-12
For a standard $\Lambda$CDM universe with a power-law primordial power spectrum, the discrepancy between early- and late-universe measurements of the Hubble constant continued to grow, and recently reached $5.3\sigma$. During inflation, events beyond slow-roll often lead to features in the primordial power spectrum, hence breaking the power-law assumption in the derivation of the Hubble tension. We investigate, in a very model-independent way, whether such inflationary ``glitches'' can ease the Hubble tension. The recently released Planck temperature and polarization data and the 2019 SH0ES+H0LiCOW joint constraint on the Hubble constant are combined to drive a blind Daubechies wavelet signal search in the primordial power spectrum, up to a resolution $\Delta \ln k\sim 0.1$. We find no significant detection of any features beyond power-law. With 64 more degrees of freedom injected in the primordial power spectrum, the Hubble tension persists at a $4.9\sigma$ level.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06209  [pdf] - 1965163
Planck 2018 results. VI. Cosmological parameters
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Farhang, M.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Lemos, P.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 72 pages; some updated external data including BK15, Planck-only results unchanged. Parameter tables and chains available at https://wiki.cosmos.esa.int/planck-legacy-archive/index.php/Cosmological_Parameters
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2019-09-20
We present cosmological parameter results from the final full-mission Planck measurements of the CMB anisotropies. We find good consistency with the standard spatially-flat 6-parameter $\Lambda$CDM cosmology having a power-law spectrum of adiabatic scalar perturbations (denoted "base $\Lambda$CDM" in this paper), from polarization, temperature, and lensing, separately and in combination. A combined analysis gives dark matter density $\Omega_c h^2 = 0.120\pm 0.001$, baryon density $\Omega_b h^2 = 0.0224\pm 0.0001$, scalar spectral index $n_s = 0.965\pm 0.004$, and optical depth $\tau = 0.054\pm 0.007$ (in this abstract we quote $68\,\%$ confidence regions on measured parameters and $95\,\%$ on upper limits). The angular acoustic scale is measured to $0.03\,\%$ precision, with $100\theta_*=1.0411\pm 0.0003$. These results are only weakly dependent on the cosmological model and remain stable, with somewhat increased errors, in many commonly considered extensions. Assuming the base-$\Lambda$CDM cosmology, the inferred late-Universe parameters are: Hubble constant $H_0 = (67.4\pm 0.5)$km/s/Mpc; matter density parameter $\Omega_m = 0.315\pm 0.007$; and matter fluctuation amplitude $\sigma_8 = 0.811\pm 0.006$. We find no compelling evidence for extensions to the base-$\Lambda$CDM model. Combining with BAO we constrain the effective extra relativistic degrees of freedom to be $N_{\rm eff} = 2.99\pm 0.17$, and the neutrino mass is tightly constrained to $\sum m_\nu< 0.12$eV. The CMB spectra continue to prefer higher lensing amplitudes than predicted in base -$\Lambda$CDM at over $2\,\sigma$, which pulls some parameters that affect the lensing amplitude away from the base-$\Lambda$CDM model; however, this is not supported by the lensing reconstruction or (in models that also change the background geometry) BAO data. (Abridged)
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.02082  [pdf] - 1956001
The Surface Distributions of the Production of the Major Volatile Species, H2O, CO2, CO and O2, from the Nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko throughout the Rosetta Mission as Measured by the ROSINA Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer
Comments: 144 pages, 9 figures, 8 tables, 1 supplemental table
Submitted: 2019-09-04
The Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) suite of instruments operated throughout the over two years of the Rosetta mission operations in the vicinity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It measured gas densities and composition throughout the comet's atmosphere, or coma. Here we present two-years' worth of measurements of the relative densities of the four major volatile species in the coma of the comet, H2O. CO2, CO and O2, by one of the ROSINA sub-systems called the Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS). The absolute total gas densities were provided by the Comet Pressure Sensor (COPS), another ROSINA sub-system. DFMS is a very high mass resolution and high sensitivity mass spectrometer able to resolve at a tiny fraction of an atomic mass unit. We have analyzed the combined DFMS and COPS measurements using an inversion scheme based on spherical harmonics that solves for the distribution of potential surface activity of each species as the comet rotates, changing solar illumination, over short intervals and as the comet changes distance from the sun and orientation of its spin axis over long time intervals. We also use the surface boundary conditions derived from the inversion scheme to simulate the whole coma with our fully kinetic Direct Simulation Monte Carlo model and calculate the production rates of the four major species throughout the mission. We compare the derived production rates with revised remote sensing observations by the Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) as well as with published observations from the Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO). Finally we use the variation of the surface production of the major species to calculate the total mass loss over the mission and, for different estimates of the dust/gas ratio, calculate the variation of surface loss over the nucleus.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.01753  [pdf] - 1953464
Forecasting Cosmological Bias due to Local Gravitational Redshift
Comments: 6 pages; 2 figures
Submitted: 2019-04-02, last modified: 2019-09-02
When photons from distant galaxies and stars pass through our neighboring environment, the wavelengths of the photons would be shifted by our local gravitational potential. This local gravitational redshift effect can potentially have an impact on the measurement of cosmological distance-redshift relation. Using available supernovae data, Wojtak et al [1] found seemingly large biases of cosmological parameters for some extended models (non-flat $\Lambda$CDM, $w$CDM, etc.). Huang [2] pointed out that, however, the biases can be reduced to a negligible level if cosmic microwave background (CMB) data are added to break the strong degeneracy between parameters in the extended models. In this article we forecast the cosmological bias due to local gravitational redshifts for a future WFIRST-like supernovae survey. We find that the local gravitational redshift effect remains negligible, provided that CMB data or some future redshift survey data are added to break the degeneracy between parameters.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.07131  [pdf] - 1975399
Synthetic Extreme-ultraviolet Emissions Modulated by Leaky Fast Sausage Modes in Solar Active Region Loops
Comments: 16 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-08-19
We study the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) emissions modulated by leaky fast sausage modes (FSMs) in solar active region loops and examine their observational signatures via spectrometers like EIS. After computing fluid variables of leaky FSMs with MHD simulations, we forward-model the intensity and spectral properties of the Fe X 185~\AA~and Fe XII 195~\AA~lines by incorporating non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) in the computations of the relevant ionic fractions. The damping times derived from the intensity variations are then compared with the wave values, namely the damping times directly found from our MHD simulations. Our results show that in the equilibrium ionization cases, the density variations and the intensity variations can be either in phase or in anti-phase, depending on the loop temperature. NEI considerably impacts the intensity variations but has only marginal effects on the derived Doppler velocity or Doppler width. We find that the damping time derived from the intensity can largely reflect the wave damping time if the loop temperature is not drastically different from the nominal formation temperature of the corresponding emission line. These results are helpful for understanding the modulations to the EUV emissions by leaky FSMs and hence helpful for identifying FSMs in solar active region loops.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06211  [pdf] - 1927941
Planck 2018 results. X. Constraints on inflation
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Hooper, D. C.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; Lpez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meerburg, P. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Münchmeyer, M.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shiraishi, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, S. D. M.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments: References added and minor improvements. BICEP2/Keck Array BK15 is used in the place of BICEP2/Keck Array BK14
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2019-08-02
We report on the implications for cosmic inflation of the 2018 Release of the Planck CMB anisotropy measurements. The results are fully consistent with the two previous Planck cosmological releases, but have smaller uncertainties thanks to improvements in the characterization of polarization at low and high multipoles. Planck temperature, polarization, and lensing data determine the spectral index of scalar perturbations to be $n_\mathrm{s}=0.9649\pm 0.0042$ at 68% CL and show no evidence for a scale dependence of $n_\mathrm{s}.$ Spatial flatness is confirmed at a precision of 0.4% at 95% CL with the combination with BAO data. The Planck 95% CL upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r_{0.002}<0.10$, is further tightened by combining with the BICEP2/Keck Array BK15 data to obtain $r_{0.002}<0.056$. In the framework of single-field inflationary models with Einstein gravity, these results imply that: (a) slow-roll models with a concave potential, $V" (\phi) < 0,$ are increasingly favoured by the data; and (b) two different methods for reconstructing the inflaton potential find no evidence for dynamics beyond slow roll. Non-parametric reconstructions of the primordial power spectrum consistently confirm a pure power law. A complementary analysis also finds no evidence for theoretically motivated parameterized features in the Planck power spectrum, a result further strengthened for certain oscillatory models by a new combined analysis that includes Planck bispectrum data. The new Planck polarization data provide a stringent test of the adiabaticity of the initial conditions. The polarization data also provide improved constraints on inflationary models that predict a small statistically anisotropic quadrupolar modulation of the primordial fluctuations. However, the polarization data do not confirm physical models for a scale-dependent dipolar modulation.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.07459  [pdf] - 2011202
Role of planetary obliquity in regulating atmospheric escape: G-dwarf vs. M-dwarf Earth-like exoplanets
Comments: ApJ Letters, in press, 10 pages, 3 figures and 2 tables
Submitted: 2019-07-17, last modified: 2019-07-31
We present a three-species (H$^+$, O$^+$ and e$^-$) multi-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, endowed with the requisite upper atmospheric chemistry, that is capable of accurately quantifying the magnitude of oxygen ion losses from "Earth-like" exoplanets in habitable zones, whose magnetic and rotational axes are roughly coincidental with one another. We apply this model to investigate the role of planetary obliquity in regulating atmospheric losses from a magnetic perspective. For Earth-like exoplanets orbiting solar-type stars, we demonstrate that the dependence of the total atmospheric ion loss rate on the planetary (magnetic) obliquity is relatively weak; the escape rates are found to vary between $2.19 \times 10^{26}$ s$^{-1}$ to $2.37 \times 10^{26}$ s$^{-1}$. In contrast, the obliquity can influence the atmospheric escape rate ($\sim$ $10^{28}$ s$^{-1}$) by more than a factor of $2$ (or $200\%$) in the case of Earth-like exoplanets orbiting late-type M-dwarfs. Thus, our simulations indicate that planetary obliquity may play a weak-to-moderate role insofar as the retention of an atmosphere (necessary for surface habitability) is concerned.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.12875  [pdf] - 1925231
Planck 2018 results. V. CMB power spectra and likelihoods
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Casaponsa, B.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Code and data products are available on the Planck Legacy Archive (https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/planck/pla)
Submitted: 2019-07-30
This paper describes the 2018 Planck CMB likelihoods, following a hybrid approach similar to the 2015 one, with different approximations at low and high multipoles, and implementing several methodological and analysis refinements. With more realistic simulations, and better correction and modelling of systematics, we can now make full use of the High Frequency Instrument polarization data. The low-multipole 100x143 GHz EE cross-spectrum constrains the reionization optical-depth parameter $\tau$ to better than 15% (in combination with with the other low- and high-$\ell$ likelihoods). We also update the 2015 baseline low-$\ell$ joint TEB likelihood based on the Low Frequency Instrument data, which provides a weaker $\tau$ constraint. At high multipoles, a better model of the temperature-to-polarization leakage and corrections for the effective calibrations of the polarization channels (polarization efficiency or PE) allow us to fully use the polarization spectra, improving the constraints on the $\Lambda$CDM parameters by 20 to 30% compared to TT-only constraints. Tests on the modelling of the polarization demonstrate good consistency, with some residual modelling uncertainties, the accuracy of the PE modelling being the main limitation. Using our various tests, simulations, and comparison between different high-$\ell$ implementations, we estimate the consistency of the results to be better than the 0.5$\sigma$ level. Minor curiosities already present before (differences between $\ell$<800 and $\ell$>800 parameters or the preference for more smoothing of the $C_\ell$ peaks) are shown to be driven by the TT power spectrum and are not significantly modified by the inclusion of polarization. Overall, the legacy Planck CMB likelihoods provide a robust tool for constraining the cosmological model and represent a reference for future CMB observations. (Abridged)
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06210  [pdf] - 1924023
Planck 2018 results. VIII. Gravitational lensing
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Abstract abridged for arxiv submission. Lensing data products available at https://wiki.cosmos.esa.int/planck-legacy-archive/index.php/Lensing. Matches version accepted by A&A, with minor updates from v1
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2019-07-29
We present measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing potential using the final $\textit{Planck}$ 2018 temperature and polarization data. We increase the significance of the detection of lensing in the polarization maps from $5\,\sigma$ to $9\,\sigma$. Combined with temperature, lensing is detected at $40\,\sigma$. We present an extensive set of tests of the robustness of the lensing-potential power spectrum, and construct a minimum-variance estimator likelihood over lensing multipoles $8 \le L \le 400$. We find good consistency between lensing constraints and the results from the $\textit{Planck}$ CMB power spectra within the $\rm{\Lambda CDM}$ model. Combined with baryon density and other weak priors, the lensing analysis alone constrains $\sigma_8 \Omega_{\rm m}^{0.25}=0.589\pm 0.020$ ($1\,\sigma$ errors). Also combining with baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data, we find tight individual parameter constraints, $\sigma_8=0.811\pm0.019$, $H_0=67.9_{-1.3}^{+1.2}\,\text{km}\,\text{s}^{-1}\,\rm{Mpc}^{-1}$, and $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.303^{+0.016}_{-0.018}$. Combining with $\textit{Planck}$ CMB power spectrum data, we measure $\sigma_8$ to better than $1\,\%$ precision, finding $\sigma_8=0.811\pm 0.006$. We find consistency with the lensing results from the Dark Energy Survey, and give combined lensing-only parameter constraints that are tighter than joint results using galaxy clustering. Using $\textit{Planck}$ cosmic infrared background (CIB) maps we make a combined estimate of the lensing potential over $60\,\%$ of the sky with considerably more small-scale signal. We demonstrate delensing of the $\textit{Planck}$ power spectra, detecting a maximum removal of $40\,\%$ of the lensing-induced power in all spectra. The improvement in the sharpening of the acoustic peaks by including both CIB and the quadratic lensing reconstruction is detected at high significance (abridged).
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.08284  [pdf] - 1976842
The Simons Observatory: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Adachi, Shunsuke; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Atkins, Zachary; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Lizancos, Anton Baleato; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bhandarkar, Tanay; Bhimani, Sanah; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bolliet, Boris; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Carl, Fred. M; Cayuso, Juan; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Clark, Susan; Clarke, Philip; Contaldi, Carlo; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Coulton, Will; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Bouhargani, Hamza El; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Fergusson, James; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Halpern, Mark; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Harrington, Kathleen; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hensley, Brandon; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hoang, Thuong D.; Hoh, Jonathan; Hotinli, Selim C.; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Johnson, Matthew; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Kofman, Anna; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kusaka, Akito; LaPlante, Phil; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Liu, Jia; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McCarrick, Heather; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Mertens, James; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Moore, Jenna; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Murata, Masaaki; Naess, Sigurd; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Nicola, Andrina; Niemack, Mike; Nishino, Haruki; Nishinomiya, Yume; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Pagano, Luca; Partridge, Bruce; Perrotta, Francesca; Phakathi, Phumlani; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pierpaoli, Elena; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Rotti, Aditya; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Saunders, Lauren; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Shellard, Paul; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sifon, Cristobal; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Smith, Kendrick; Sohn, Wuhyun; Sonka, Rita; Spergel, David; Spisak, Jacob; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Treu, Jesse; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Wang, Yuhan; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Yasini, Siavash; Young, Edward; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zannoni, Mario; Zhang, Hezi; Zheng, Kaiwen; Zhu, Ningfeng; Zonca, Andrea
Comments: Astro2020 Decadal Project Whitepaper. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1808.07445
Submitted: 2019-07-16
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment sited on Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert in Chile that promises to provide breakthrough discoveries in fundamental physics, cosmology, and astrophysics. Supported by the Simons Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and with contributions from collaborating institutions, SO will see first light in 2021 and start a five year survey in 2022. SO has 287 collaborators from 12 countries and 53 institutions, including 85 students and 90 postdocs. The SO experiment in its currently funded form ('SO-Nominal') consists of three 0.4 m Small Aperture Telescopes (SATs) and one 6 m Large Aperture Telescope (LAT). Optimized for minimizing systematic errors in polarization measurements at large angular scales, the SATs will perform a deep, degree-scale survey of 10% of the sky to search for the signature of primordial gravitational waves. The LAT will survey 40% of the sky with arc-minute resolution. These observations will measure (or limit) the sum of neutrino masses, search for light relics, measure the early behavior of Dark Energy, and refine our understanding of the intergalactic medium, clusters and the role of feedback in galaxy formation. With up to ten times the sensitivity and five times the angular resolution of the Planck satellite, and roughly an order of magnitude increase in mapping speed over currently operating ("Stage 3") experiments, SO will measure the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations to exquisite precision in six frequency bands from 27 to 280 GHz. SO will rapidly advance CMB science while informing the design of future observatories such as CMB-S4.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.02441  [pdf] - 1912830
Revisiting Ryskin's Model of Cosmic Acceleration
Comments: 7 pages; 2 figures; submitted to Astroparticle Physics
Submitted: 2019-05-07, last modified: 2019-07-09
Cosmic backreaction as an additional source of the expansion of the universe has been a debate topic since the discovery of cosmic acceleration. The major concern is whether the self interaction of small-scale nonlinear structures would source gravity on very large scales. Gregory Ryskin argued against the additional inclusion of gravitational interaction energy of astronomical objects, whose masses are mostly inferred from gravitational effects and hence should already contain all sources with long-range gravity forces. Ryskin proposed that the backreaction contribution to the energy momentum tensor is instead from the rest of the universe beyond the observable patch. Ryskin's model elegantly solves the fine-tuning problem and is in good agreement with the Hubble diagram of Type Ia supernovae. In this article we revisit Ryskin's model and show that it is {\it inconsistent} with at least one of the following statements: (i) the universe is matter-dominated at low redshift ($z\lesssim 2$); (ii) the universe is radiation-dominated at sufficiently high redshift; (iii) matter density fluctuations are tiny ($\lesssim 10^{-4}$) at the recombination epoch.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.10353  [pdf] - 1920998
On the relation between transition region network jets and coronal plumes
Comments: The preprint of an article accepted for publication in Solar Physics
Submitted: 2019-06-25
Both coronal plumes and network jets are rooted in network lanes. The relationship between the two, however, has yet to be addressed. For this purpose, we perform an observational analysis using images acquired with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 171{\AA} passband to follow the evolution of coronal plumes, the observations taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) slit-jaw 1330{\AA} to study the network jets, and the line-of-sight magnetograms taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) to overview the the photospheric magnetic features in the regions. Four regions in the network lanes are identified, and labeled ``R1--R4''. We find that coronal plumes are clearly seen only in ``R1''&''R2'' but not in ``R3''&``R4'', even though network jets abound in all these regions. Furthermore, while magnetic features in all these regions are dominated by positive polarity, they are more compact (suggesting stronger convergence) in ``R1''&``R2'' than that in ``R3''&``R4''. We develop an automated method to identify and track the network jets in the regions. We find that the network jets rooted in ``R1''&``R2'' are higher and faster than that in ``R3''&``R4'',indicating that network regions producing stronger coronal plumes also tend to produce more dynamic network jets. We suggest that the stronger convergence in ``R1''&``R2'' might provide a condition for faster shocks and/or more small-scale magnetic reconnection events that power more dynamic network jets and coronal plumes.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1906.02552  [pdf] - 1896098
Planck 2018 results. VII. Isotropy and Statistics of the CMB
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Casaponsa, B.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Sirignano, C.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Paper VII of the Planck 2018 release. 67 pages. Accepted for publication in section 3. Cosmology (including clusters of galaxies) of Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2019-06-06
Analysis of the Planck 2018 data set indicates that the statistical properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies are in excellent agreement with previous studies using the 2013 and 2015 data releases. In particular, they are consistent with the Gaussian predictions of the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model, yet also confirm the presence of several so-called "anomalies" on large angular scales. The novelty of the current study, however, lies in being a first attempt at a comprehensive analysis of the statistics of the polarization signal over all angular scales, using either maps of the Stokes parameters, $Q$ and $U$, or the $E$-mode signal derived from these using a new methodology (which we describe in an appendix). Although remarkable progress has been made in reducing the systematic effects that contaminated the 2015 polarization maps on large angular scales, it is still the case that residual systematics (and our ability to simulate them) can limit some tests of non-Gaussianity and isotropy. However, a detailed set of null tests applied to the maps indicates that these issues do not dominate the analysis on intermediate and large angular scales (i.e., $\ell \lesssim 400$). In this regime, no unambiguous detections of cosmological non-Gaussianity, or of anomalies corresponding to those seen in temperature, are claimed. Notably, the stacking of CMB polarization signals centred on the positions of temperature hot and cold spots exhibits excellent agreement with the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model, and also gives a clear indication of how Planck provides state-of-the-art measurements of CMB temperature and polarization on degree scales.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.05697  [pdf] - 1882757
Planck 2018 results. IX. Constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Casaponsa, B.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Jung, G.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meerburg, P. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Münchmeyer, M.; Natoli, P.; Oppizzi, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shiraishi, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Smith, K.; Spencer, L. D.; Stanco, L.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 50 pages, 20 figures
Submitted: 2019-05-14
We analyse the Planck full-mission cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and E-mode polarization maps to obtain constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (NG). We compare estimates obtained from separable template-fitting, binned, and modal bispectrum estimators, finding consistent values for the local, equilateral, and orthogonal bispectrum amplitudes. Our combined temperature and polarization analysis produces the following results: f_NL^local = -0.9 +\- 5.1; f_NL^equil = -26 +\- 47; and f_NL^ortho = - 38 +\- 24 (68%CL, statistical). These results include the low-multipole (4 <= l < 40) polarization data, not included in our previous analysis, pass an extensive battery of tests, and are stable with respect to our 2015 measurements. Polarization bispectra display a significant improvement in robustness; they can now be used independently to set NG constraints. We consider a large number of additional cases, e.g. scale-dependent feature and resonance bispectra, isocurvature primordial NG, and parity-breaking models, where we also place tight constraints but do not detect any signal. The non-primordial lensing bispectrum is detected with an improved significance compared to 2015, excluding the null hypothesis at 3.5 sigma. We present model-independent reconstructions and analyses of the CMB bispectrum. Our final constraint on the local trispectrum shape is g_NLl^local = (-5.8 +\-6.5) x 10^4 (68%CL, statistical), while constraints for other trispectra are also determined. We constrain the parameter space of different early-Universe scenarios, including general single-field models of inflation, multi-field and axion field parity-breaking models. Our results provide a high-precision test for structure-formation scenarios, in complete agreement with the basic picture of the LambdaCDM cosmology regarding the statistics of the initial conditions (abridged).
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.10928  [pdf] - 1905629
GeV observations of the extended pulsar wind nebulae constrain the pulsar interpretations of the cosmic-ray positron excess
Comments: 26 pages, 11 figures, significantly expanded, to appear in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-10-25, last modified: 2019-05-09
It has long been suggested that nearby pulsars within $\sim 1 \,{\rm kpc}$ are the leading candidate of the 10-500 GeV cosmic-ray positron excess measured by PAMELA and other experiments. The recent measurement of surface brightness profile of TeV nebulae surrounding Geminga and PSR~B0656+14 by the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) suggests inefficient diffusion of particles from the sources, giving rise to a debate on the pulsar interpretation of the cosmic-ray positron excess. Here we argue that GeV observations provide more direct constraints on the positron density in the TeV nebulae in the energy range of 10-500 GeV and hence on the origin of the observed positron excess. Motivated by this, we search for GeV emission from the TeV nebulae with the \textsl{Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT). No spatially-extended GeV emission is detected from these two TeV nebulae in the framework of two-zone diffusion spatial templates, suggesting a relatively low density of GeV electrons/positrons in the TeV nebulae. A joint modelling of the data from HAWC and \textsl{Fermi}-LAT disfavors Geminga and PSR~B0656+14 as the dominant source of the positron excess at $\sim 50-500$ GeV for the usual Kolmogorov-type diffusion, while for an energy-independent diffusion, a dominant part of the positron excess contributed by them cannot be ruled out by the current data.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.10096  [pdf] - 1894236
High-redshift Mini-haloes from Modulated Preheating
Comments: PRD accepted version
Submitted: 2019-02-26, last modified: 2019-05-09
Intermittent type of primordial non-Gaussian fluctuations from modulated preheating can produce an overabundance of $\sim 10^8M_\odot$ mini-haloes at high redshift $z\gtrsim 20$. This may have a significant impact on the formation of high-redshift supermassive black holes.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.06688  [pdf] - 1867295
Observations of small-scale energetic events in the solar transition region: explosive events, UV bursts and network jets
Comments: review paper to be published in Journal Solar-Terrestrial Physics
Submitted: 2019-04-14
In this paper, we review observational aspects of three common small-scale energetic events in the solar transition region (TR), namely: TR explosive events, ultraviolet bursts and jets. These events are defined in either (both) spectral or (and) imaging data. The development of multiple instruments capable of observing the TR has allowed researchers to gain numerous insights into these phenomena in recent years. These events have provided a proxy to study how mass and energy are transported between the solar chromosphere and the corona. As the physical mechanisms responsible for these small-scale events might be similar to the mechanisms responsible for large-scale phenomena, such as flares and coronal mass ejections, analysis of these events could also help our understanding of the solar atmosphere from small to large scales. The observations of these small-scale energetic events demonstrate that the TR is extremely dynamic and is a crucial layer in the solar atmosphere between the chromosphere and the corona.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.11558  [pdf] - 1858882
Equipartition Dark Energy
Comments: 3 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2018-03-31, last modified: 2019-03-30
We explain dark energy with equipartition theorem in string landscape.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06212  [pdf] - 1844974
Planck 2018 results. XII. Galactic astrophysics using polarized dust emission
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M. I. R.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Green, G.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2019-03-07
We present 353 GHz full-sky maps of the polarization fraction $p$, angle $\psi$, and dispersion of angles $S$ of Galactic dust thermal emission produced from the 2018 release of Planck data. We confirm that the mean and maximum of $p$ decrease with increasing $N_H$. The uncertainty on the maximum polarization fraction, $p_\mathrm{max}=22.0$% at 80 arcmin resolution, is dominated by the uncertainty on the zero level in total intensity. The observed inverse behaviour between $p$ and $S$ is interpreted with models of the polarized sky that include effects from only the topology of the turbulent Galactic magnetic field. Thus, the statistical properties of $p$, $\psi$, and $S$ mostly reflect the structure of the magnetic field. Nevertheless, we search for potential signatures of varying grain alignment and dust properties. First, we analyse the product map $S \times p$, looking for residual trends. While $p$ decreases by a factor of 3--4 between $N_H=10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $N_H=2\times 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$, $S \times p$ decreases by only about 25%, a systematic trend observed in both the diffuse ISM and molecular clouds. Second, we find no systematic trend of $S \times p$ with the dust temperature, even though in the diffuse ISM lines of sight with high $p$ and low $S$ tend to have colder dust. We also compare Planck data with starlight polarization in the visible at high latitudes. The agreement in polarization angles is remarkable. Two polarization emission-to-extinction ratios that characterize dust optical properties depend only weakly on $N_H$ and converge towards the values previously determined for translucent lines of sight. We determine an upper limit for the polarization fraction in extinction of 13%, compatible with the $p_\mathrm{max}$ observed in emission. These results provide strong constraints for models of Galactic dust in diffuse gas.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1808.07445  [pdf] - 1841339
The Simons Observatory: Science goals and forecasts
The Simons Observatory Collaboration; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Aiola, Simone; Ali, Aamir; Alonso, David; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Arnold, Kam; Ashton, Peter; Austermann, Jason; Awan, Humna; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Baildon, Taylor; Barron, Darcy; Battaglia, Nick; Battye, Richard; Baxter, Eric; Bazarko, Andrew; Beall, James A.; Bean, Rachel; Beck, Dominic; Beckman, Shawn; Beringue, Benjamin; Bianchini, Federico; Boada, Steven; Boettger, David; Bond, J. Richard; Borrill, Julian; Brown, Michael L.; Bruno, Sarah Marie; Bryan, Sean; Calabrese, Erminia; Calafut, Victoria; Calisse, Paolo; Carron, Julien; Challinor, Anthony; Chesmore, Grace; Chinone, Yuji; Chluba, Jens; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Choi, Steve; Coppi, Gabriele; Cothard, Nicholas F.; Coughlin, Kevin; Crichton, Devin; Crowley, Kevin D.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Cukierman, Ari; D'Ewart, John M.; Dünner, Rolando; de Haan, Tijmen; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Dober, Bradley; Duell, Cody J.; Duff, Shannon; Duivenvoorden, Adri; Dunkley, Jo; Dusatko, John; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Ferraro, Simone; Fluxà, Pedro; Freese, Katherine; Frisch, Josef C.; Frolov, Andrei; Fuller, George; Fuzia, Brittany; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Ghersi, Jose Tomas Galvez; Gao, Jiansong; Gawiser, Eric; Gerbino, Martina; Gluscevic, Vera; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Golec, Joseph; Gordon, Sam; Gralla, Megan; Green, Daniel; Grigorian, Arpi; Groh, John; Groppi, Chris; Guan, Yilun; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Han, Dongwon; Hargrave, Peter; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hattori, Makoto; Haynes, Victor; Hazumi, Masashi; He, Yizhou; Healy, Erin; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hervias-Caimapo, Carlos; Hill, Charles A.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Gene; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Hložek, Renée; Ho, Shirley; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Howe, Logan; Huang, Zhiqi; Hubmayr, Johannes; Huffenberger, Kevin; Hughes, John P.; Ijjas, Anna; Ikape, Margaret; Irwin, Kent; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jeong, Oliver; Kaneko, Daisuke; Karpel, Ethan D.; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Kernasovskiy, Sarah S.; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kiuchi, Kenji; Klein, Jeff; Knowles, Kenda; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Krachmalnicoff, Nicoletta; Kuenstner, Stephen E.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Kusaka, Akito; Lashner, Jacob; Lee, Adrian; Lee, Eunseong; Leon, David; Leung, Jason S. -Y.; Lewis, Antony; Li, Yaqiong; Li, Zack; Limon, Michele; Linder, Eric; Lopez-Caraballo, Carlos; Louis, Thibaut; Lowry, Lindsay; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Mak, Daisy; Maldonado, Felipe; Mani, Hamdi; Mates, Ben; Matsuda, Frederick; Maurin, Loïc; Mauskopf, Phil; May, Andrew; McCallum, Nialh; McKenney, Chris; McMahon, Jeff; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Miller, Amber; Mirmelstein, Mark; Moodley, Kavilan; Munchmeyer, Moritz; Munson, Charles; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Navaroli, Martin; Newburgh, Laura; Nguyen, Ho Nam; Niemack, Michael; Nishino, Haruki; Orlowski-Scherer, John; Page, Lyman; Partridge, Bruce; Peloton, Julien; Perrotta, Francesca; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Poletti, Davide; Puddu, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Chris; Reichardt, Christian L.; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Rephaeli, Yoel; Riechers, Dominik; Rojas, Felipe; Roy, Anirban; Sadeh, Sharon; Sakurai, Yuki; Salatino, Maria; Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Schaan, Emmanuel; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sehgal, Neelima; Seibert, Joseph; Seljak, Uros; Sherwin, Blake; Shimon, Meir; Sierra, Carlos; Sievers, Jonathan; Sikhosana, Precious; Silva-Feaver, Maximiliano; Simon, Sara M.; Sinclair, Adrian; Siritanasak, Praween; Smith, Kendrick; Smith, Stephen R.; Spergel, David; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stein, George; Stevens, Jason R.; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Teply, Grant; Thomas, Daniel B.; Thorne, Ben; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Tsai, Calvin; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel; Vagnozzi, Sunny; van Engelen, Alexander; Van Lanen, Jeff; Van Winkle, Daniel D.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Vergès, Clara; Vissers, Michael; Wagoner, Kasey; Walker, Samantha; Ward, Jon; Westbrook, Ben; Whitehorn, Nathan; Williams, Jason; Williams, Joel; Wollack, Edward J.; Xu, Zhilei; Yu, Byeonghee; Yu, Cyndia; Zago, Fernando; Zhang, Hezi; Zhu, Ningfeng
Comments: This paper presents an overview of the Simons Observatory science goals, details about the instrument will be presented in a companion paper. The author contribution to this paper is available at https://simonsobservatory.org/publications.php (Abstract abridged) -- matching version published in JCAP
Submitted: 2018-08-22, last modified: 2019-03-01
The Simons Observatory (SO) is a new cosmic microwave background experiment being built on Cerro Toco in Chile, due to begin observations in the early 2020s. We describe the scientific goals of the experiment, motivate the design, and forecast its performance. SO will measure the temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background in six frequency bands: 27, 39, 93, 145, 225 and 280 GHz. The initial configuration of SO will have three small-aperture 0.5-m telescopes (SATs) and one large-aperture 6-m telescope (LAT), with a total of 60,000 cryogenic bolometers. Our key science goals are to characterize the primordial perturbations, measure the number of relativistic species and the mass of neutrinos, test for deviations from a cosmological constant, improve our understanding of galaxy evolution, and constrain the duration of reionization. The SATs will target the largest angular scales observable from Chile, mapping ~10% of the sky to a white noise level of 2 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, to measure the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, at a target level of $\sigma(r)=0.003$. The LAT will map ~40% of the sky at arcminute angular resolution to an expected white noise level of 6 $\mu$K-arcmin in combined 93 and 145 GHz bands, overlapping with the majority of the LSST sky region and partially with DESI. With up to an order of magnitude lower polarization noise than maps from the Planck satellite, the high-resolution sky maps will constrain cosmological parameters derived from the damping tail, gravitational lensing of the microwave background, the primordial bispectrum, and the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects, and will aid in delensing the large-angle polarization signal to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio. The survey will also provide a legacy catalog of 16,000 galaxy clusters and more than 20,000 extragalactic sources.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1902.06087  [pdf] - 1860023
Synthetic Emissions of the Fe XXI 1354 \AA\ Line from Flare Loops Experiencing Fundamental Fast Sausage Oscillations
Comments: accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-02-16
Inspired by recent IRIS observations, we forward model the response of the Fe XXI 1354 \AA\ line to fundamental, standing, linear fast sausage modes (FSMs) in flare loops. Starting with the fluid parameters for an FSM in a straight tube with equilibrium parameters largely compatible with the IRIS measurements, we synthesize the line profiles by incorporating the non-Equilibrium Ionization (NEI) effect in the computation of the contribution function. We find that both the intensity and Doppler shift oscillate at the wave period ($P$). The phase difference between the two differs from the expected value ($90^\circ$) only slightly because NEI plays only a marginal role in determining the ionic fraction of Fe XXI in the examined dense loop. The Doppler width modulations, however, posses an asymmetry in the first and second halves of a wave period, leading to a secondary periodicity at $P/2$ in addition to the primary one at $P$. This behavior results from the competition between the broadening due to bulk flow and that due to temperature variations, with the latter being stronger but not overwhelmingly so. These expected signatures, with the exception of the Doppler width, are largely consistent with the IRIS measurements, thereby corroborating the reported detection of a fundamental FSM. The forward modeled signatures are useful for identifying fundamental FSMs in flare loops from measurements of the Fe \MyRoman{21} 1354 \AA\ line with instruments similar to IRIS, even though a much higher cadence is required for the expected behavior in the Doppler widths to be detected.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1901.11215  [pdf] - 1846901
Investigating the Transition Region Explosive Events and Their Relationship to Network Jets
Comments: 9 figures; to appear in ApJ
Submitted: 2019-01-31
Recent imaging observations with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograp (IRIS) have revealed prevalent intermittent jets with apparent speeds of 80--250 km~s$^{-1}$ from the network lanes in the solar transition region (TR). On the other hand, spectroscopic observations of the TR lines have revealed the frequent presence of highly non-Gaussian line profiles with enhanced emission at the line wings, often referred as explosive events (EEs). Using simultaneous imaging and spectroscopic observations from IRIS, we investigate the relationship between EEs and network jets. We first identify EEs from the Si~{\sc{iv}}~1393.755 {\AA} line profiles in our observations, then examine related features in the 1330 {\AA} slit-jaw images. Our analysis suggests that EEs with double peaks or enhancements in both wings appear to be located at either the footpoints of network jets, or transient compact brightenings. These EEs are most likely produced by magnetic reconnection. We also find that EEs with enhancements only at the blue wing are mainly located on network jets, away from the footpoints. These EEs clearly result from the superposition of the high-speed network jets on the TR background. In addition, EEs showing enhancement only at the red wing of the line are often located around the jet footpoints, possibly caused by the superposition of reconnection downflows on the background emission. Moreover, we find some network jets that are not associated with any detectable EEs. Our analysis suggests that some EEs are related to the birth or propagation of network jets, and that others are not connected to network jets.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1812.09100  [pdf] - 1894195
Flatness without CMB - the Entanglement of Spatial Curvature and Dark Energy Equation of State
Comments: 7 pages, 2 figures;
Submitted: 2018-12-21
The cosmic spatial curvature parameter $\Omega_k$ is constrained, primarily by cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, to be very small. Observations of the cosmic distance ladder and the large scale structure can provide independent checks of the cosmic flatness. Such late-universe constraints on $\Omega_k$, however, are sensitive to the assumptions of the nature of dark energy. For minimally coupled scalar-field models of dark energy, the equation of state $w$ has nontrivial dependence on the cosmic spatial curvature $\Omega_k$ (Miao and Huang, 2018). Such dependence has not been taken into account in previous studies of future observational projects. In this paper we use the $w$ parameterization proposed by Miao and Huang, where the dependence of $w$ on $\Omega_k$ is encoded, and perform Fisher forecast on mock data of three benchmark projects: a WFIRST-like Type Ia supernovae survey, an EUCLID-like spectroscopic redshift survey, and an LSST-like photometric redshift survey. We find that the correlation between $\Omega_k$ and $w$ is primarily determined by the data rather than by the theoretical prior. We thus validate the standard approaches of treating $\Omega_k$ and $w$ as independent quantities.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.11403  [pdf] - 1882467
One large glitch in PSR B1737-30 detected with the TMRT
Comments: 12 papges, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-11-28
One large glitch was detected in PSR B1737$-$30 using data spanning from MJD 57999 to 58406 obtained with the newly built Shanghai Tian Ma Radio Telescope (TMRT). The glitch took place at the time around MJD 58232.4 when the pulsar underwent an increase in the rotation frequency of $\Delta \nu$ about 1.38$\times 10^{-6}$ Hz, corresponding to a fractional step change of $\Delta \nu / \nu$ $\thicksim$ 8.39$\times 10^{-7}$. Post$\textrm{-}$glitch $\nu$ gradually decreased to the pre$\textrm{-}$glitch value. The frequency derivative was observed to undergo a step change of about $-$9$\times 10^{-16}$ s$^{-2}$. Since July 1987, there are 36 glitches already reported in PSR B1737$-$30 including this one. According to our analysis, the glitch size distribution is well described by the power law with index of 1.13. The distribution of the interval between two adjacent glitches (waiting time $\Delta T$) follows a Poissonian probability density function. For PSR B1737$-$30, the interval is prone to be long after a large glitch. But no correlation is found between glitch size and the interval since previous glitch.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.08571  [pdf] - 1818766
Non-equilibrium Ionization Effects on Extreme-Ultraviolet Emissions Modulated by Standing Sausage Modes in Coronal Loops
Comments: 4 figures, accepted for publication in the ApJ
Submitted: 2018-11-20
Forward-modeling the emission properties in various passbands is important for confidently identifying magnetohydrodynamic waves in the structured solar corona. We examine how Non-equilibrium Ionization (NEI) affects the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions modulated by standing fast sausage modes (FSMs) in coronal loops, taking the Fe IX 171 \AA\ and Fe XII 193 \AA\ emission lines as examples. Starting with the expressions for linear FSMs in straight cylinders, we synthesize the specific intensities and spectral profiles for the two spectral lines by incorporating the self-consistently derived ionic fractions in the relevant contribution functions. We find that relative to the case where Equilibrium Ionization (EI) is assumed, NEI considerably impacts the intensity modulations, but shows essentially no effect on the Doppler velocities or widths. Furthermore, NEI may affect the phase difference between intensity variations and those in Doppler widths for Fe XII 193 \AA\ when the line-of-sight is oblique to the loop axis. While this difference is $180^\circ$ when EI is assumed, it is $\sim 90^\circ$ when NEI is incorporated for the parameters we choose. We conclude that in addition to viewing angles and instrumental resolutions, NEI further complicates the detection of FSMs in spectroscopic measurements of coronal loops in the EUV passband.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.04945  [pdf] - 1782697
Planck 2018 results. XI. Polarized dust foregrounds
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Final version to appear in A&A
Submitted: 2018-01-15, last modified: 2018-11-12
The study of polarized dust emission has become entwined with the analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. We use new Planck maps to characterize Galactic dust emission as a foreground to the CMB polarization. We present Planck EE, BB, and TE power spectra of dust polarization at 353 GHz for six nested sky regions covering from 24 to 71 % of the sky. We present power-law fits to the angular power spectra, yielding evidence for statistically significant variations of the exponents over sky regions and a difference between the values for the EE and BB spectra. The TE correlation and E/B power asymmetry extend to low multipoles that were not included in earlier Planck polarization papers. We also report evidence for a positive TB dust signal. Combining data from Planck and WMAP, we determine the amplitudes and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of polarized foregrounds, including the correlation between dust and synchrotron polarized emission, for the six sky regions as a function of multipole. This quantifies the challenge of the component separation procedure required for detecting the reionization and recombination peaks of primordial CMB B modes. The SED of polarized dust emission is fit well by a single-temperature modified blackbody emission law from 353 GHz to below 70 GHz. For a dust temperature of 19.6 K, the mean spectral index for dust polarization is $\beta_{\rm d}^{P} = 1.53\pm0.02 $. By fitting multi-frequency cross-spectra, we examine the correlation of the dust polarization maps across frequency. We find no evidence for decorrelation. If the Planck limit for the largest sky region applies to the smaller sky regions observed by sub-orbital experiments, then decorrelation might not be a problem for CMB experiments aiming at a primordial B-mode detection limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r\simeq0.01$ at the recombination peak.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.03219  [pdf] - 1811187
Magnetic loops above a small flux-emerging region observed by IRIS, Hinode and SDO
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-11-07
I report on observations of a set of magnetic loops above a region with late-phase flux emergence taken by IRIS, Hinode and SDO. The loop system consists of many transition region loop threads with size of 5--12\arcsec\ in length and $\sim0.5$\arcsec in width and coronal loops with similar length and $\sim2$\arcsec width. Although the loop system consists of threads with different temperatures, most individual loop thread have temperature in a narrow range. In the middle of the loop system, it shows clear systematic blue-shifts of about 10\,\kms\ in the transition region that is consistent with a flux emerging picture, while red-shifts of about 10\,\kms\ in the corona is observed. The nonthermal velocity of the loop system are smaller than the surrounding region in the transition region but are comparable in the corona. The electron densities of the coronal counterpart of the loop system range from $1\times10^9$\,cm$^{-3}$ to $4\times10^9$\,cm$^{-3}$. Electron density of a transition region loop is also measured and found to be about $5\times10^{10}$\,cm$^{-3}$, a magnitude larger than that in the coronal loops. In agreement with imaging data, the temperature profiles derived from the differential emission measurement technique confirms that some of the loops have been heated to corona. Our observations indicate that the flux emergence in its late phase is much different from that at the early stage. While the observed transition region is dominated by emerging flux, these emerging loops could be heated to corona and the heatings (if via nonthermal processes) most likely take place only after they reaching the transition region or lower corona.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1810.11996  [pdf] - 1806152
Monitoring AGNs with H\beta\ Asymmetry. I. First Results: Velocity-resolved Reverberation Mapping
Comments: 19 pages, 6 figures, 7 tables, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2018-10-29
We have started a long-term reverberation mapping project using the Wyoming Infrared Observatory 2.3 meter telescope titled "Monitoring AGNs with H\beta\ Asymmetry" (MAHA). The motivations of the project are to explore the geometry and kinematics of the gas responsible for complex H\beta\ emission-line profiles, ideally leading to an understanding of the structures and origins of the broad-line region (BLR). Furthermore, such a project provides the opportunity to search for evidence of close binary supermassive black holes. We describe MAHA and report initial results from our first campaign, from December 2016 to May 2017, highlighting velocity-resolved time lags for four AGNs with asymmetric H\beta\ lines. We find that 3C 120, Ark 120, and Mrk 6 display complex features different from the simple signatures expected for pure outflow, inflow, or a Keplerian disk. While three of the objects have been previously reverberation mapped, including velocity-resolved time lags in the cases of 3C 120 and Mrk 6, we report a time lag and corresponding black hole mass measurement for SBS 1518+593 for the first time. Furthermore, SBS 1518+593, the least asymmetric of the four, does show velocity-resolved time lags characteristic of a Keplerian disk or virialized motion more generally. Also, the velocity-resolved time lags of 3C 120 have significantly changed since previously observed, indicating an evolution of its BLR structure. Future analyses of the data for these objects and others in MAHA will explore the full diversity of H\beta\ lines and the physics of AGN BLRs.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.05850  [pdf] - 1783765
Solar ultraviolet bursts
Comments: Review article accepted for publication in Space Science Reviews
Submitted: 2018-05-15, last modified: 2018-10-03
The term "ultraviolet (UV) burst" is introduced to describe small, intense, transient brightenings in ultraviolet images of solar active regions. We inventorize their properties and provide a definition based on image sequences in transition-region lines. Coronal signatures are rare, and most bursts are associated with small-scale, canceling opposite-polarity fields in the photosphere that occur in emerging flux regions, moving magnetic features in sunspot moats, and sunspot light bridges. We also compare UV bursts with similar transition-region phenomena found previously in solar ultraviolet spectrometry and with similar phenomena at optical wavelengths, in particular Ellerman bombs. Akin to the latter, UV bursts are probably small-scale magnetic reconnection events occurring in the low atmosphere, at photospheric and/or chromospheric heights. Their intense emission in lines with optically thin formation gives unique diagnostic opportunities for studying the physics of magnetic reconnection in the low solar atmosphere. This paper is a review report from an International Space Science Institute team that met in 2016-2017.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.07320  [pdf] - 1785788
The $H_0$ Tension in Non-flat QCDM Cosmology
Comments: 8 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2018-03-20, last modified: 2018-09-20
The recent local measurement of Hubble constant leads to a more than $3\sigma$ tension with Planck + $\Lambda$CDM (Riess {\it et al} 2018). In this article we study the $H_0$ tension in non-flat QCDM cosmology, where Q stands for a minimally coupled and slowly-or-moderately rolling quintessence field $\phi$ with a smooth potential $V(\phi)$. By generalizing the QCDM one-parameter and three-parameter parametrizations in Huang {\it et al} 2011 to non-flat universe and using the latest cosmological data, we find that the $H_0$ tension remains above $3.2\sigma$ level for this class of model.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06206  [pdf] - 1747982
Planck 2018 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Argüeso, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Molinari, D.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Peel, M.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seljebotn, D. S.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-07-17, last modified: 2018-09-11
We present a final description of the data-processing pipeline for the Planck, Low Frequency Instrument (LFI), implemented for the 2018 data release. Several improvements have been made with respect to the previous release, especially in the calibration process and in the correction of instrumental features such as the effects of nonlinearity in the response of the analogue-to-digital converters. We provide a brief pedagogical introduction to the complete pipeline, as well as a detailed description of the important changes implemented. Self-consistency of the pipeline is demonstrated using dedicated simulations and null tests. We present the final version of the LFI full sky maps at 30, 44, and 70 GHz, both in temperature and polarization, together with a refined estimate of the Solar dipole and a final assessment of the main LFI instrumental parameters.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.08649  [pdf] - 1783719
Planck intermediate results. LIV. The Planck Multi-frequency Catalogue of Non-thermal Sources
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Argüeso, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 24 pages, 15 figures. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2018-02-23, last modified: 2018-09-11
This paper presents the Planck Multi-frequency Catalogue of Non-thermal (i.e. synchrotron-dominated) Sources (PCNT) observed between 30 and 857 GHz by the ESA Planck mission. This catalogue was constructed by selecting objects detected in the full mission all-sky temperature maps at 30 and 143 GHz, with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N)>3 in at least one of the two channels after filtering with a particular Mexican hat wavelet. As a result, 29400 source candidates were selected. Then, a multi-frequency analysis was performed using the Matrix Filters methodology at the position of these objects, and flux densities and errors were calculated for all of them in the nine Planck channels. The present catalogue is the first unbiased, full-sky catalogue of synchrotron-dominated sources published at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths and constitutes a powerful database for statistical studies of non-thermal extragalactic sources, whose emission is dominated by the central active galactic nucleus. Together with the full multi-frequency catalogue, we also define the Bright Planck Multi-frequency Catalogue of Non-thermal Sources PCNTb, where only those objects with a S/N>4 at both 30 and 143 GHz were selected. In this catalogue 1146 compact sources are detected outside the adopted Planck GAL070 mask; thus, these sources constitute a highly reliable sample of extragalactic radio sources. We also flag the high-significance subsample PCNThs, a subset of 151 sources that are detected with S/N>4 in all nine Planck channels, 75 of which are found outside the Planck mask adopted here. The remaining 76 sources inside the Galactic mask are very likely Galactic objects.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:1809.03087  [pdf] - 1775682
Kilonova emission from black hole-neutron star mergers: observational signatures of anisotropic mass ejection
Comments: Accepted by ApJ, 7 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2018-09-09
The gravitational wave event GW170817 associated with the short gamma-ray burst (GRB) 170817A confirms that binary neutron star (BNS) mergers are one of the origins of short GRBs. The associated kilonova emission, radioactively powered by nucleosynthesized heavy elements, was also detected. Black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) mergers have been argued to be another promising origin candidate of short GRBs and kilonovae. Numerical simulations show that the ejecta in BH-NS mergers is geometrically much more anisotropic than the BNS merger case. In this paper, we investigate observational signatures of kilonova emission from the anisotropic ejecta in BH-NS mergers. We find that a bump appears on the bolometric luminosity light curve due to the inhomogeneous mass distribution in the latitudinal direction. The decay slope of the single-band light curve becomes flatter and the spectrum also deviates from a single-temperature blackbody radiation spectrum due to the gradient in the velocity distribution of the ejecta. Future detection or non-detection of such signatures would be useful to test the mass ejection geometry in BH-NS mergers.
[47]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.04182  [pdf] - 1775593
Inefficient cosmic ray diffusion around Vela X : constraints from H.E.S.S. observations of very high-energy electrons
Comments: Accepted by ApJ, more discussions added, conclusions unchanged, 9 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2018-07-11, last modified: 2018-09-05
Vela X is a nearby pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by a $\sim 10^4$ year old pulsar. Modeling of the spectral energy distribution of the Vela X PWN has shown that accelerated electrons have largely escaped from the confinement, which is likely due to the disruption of the initially confined PWN by the SNR reverse shock. The escaped electrons propagate to the earth and contribute to the measured local cosmic-ray (CR) electron spectrum. We find that the escaped CR electrons from Vela X would hugely exceed the measured flux by HESS at $\sim 10$ TeV if the standard diffusion coefficient for the interstellar medium is used. We propose that the diffusion may be highly inefficient around Vela X and find that a spatially-dependent diffusion can lead to CR flux consistent with the HESS measurement. Using a two-zone model for the diffusion around Vela X, we find that the diffusion coefficient in the inner region of a few tens of parsecs should be $<10^{28}{\rm cm^2 s^{-1}}$ for $\sim10$ TeV CR electrons, which is about two orders of magnitude lower than the standard value for ISM. Such inefficient diffusion around PWN resembles the case of the Geminga and Monogem PWNe, suggesting that inefficient diffusion may be common in the vicinity of PWNe spanning a wide range of ages.
[48]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.00132  [pdf] - 1755826
Planck intermediate results. LIII. Detection of velocity dispersion from the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gerbino, M.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Stanco, L.; Sunyaev, R.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 20 pages, 12 figures and 8 tables, A&A in press
Submitted: 2017-07-01, last modified: 2018-08-23
Using the ${\it Planck}$ full-mission data, we present a detection of the temperature (and therefore velocity) dispersion due to the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect from clusters of galaxies. To suppress the primary CMB and instrumental noise we derive a matched filter and then convolve it with the ${\it Planck}$ foreground-cleaned `${\tt 2D-ILC\,}$' maps. By using the Meta Catalogue of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC), we determine the normalized ${\it rms}$ dispersion of the temperature fluctuations at the positions of clusters, finding that this shows excess variance compared with the noise expectation. We then build an unbiased statistical estimator of the signal, determining that the normalized mean temperature dispersion of $1526$ clusters is $\langle \left(\Delta T/T \right)^{2} \rangle = (1.64 \pm 0.48) \times 10^{-11}$. However, comparison with analytic calculations and simulations suggest that around $0.7\,\sigma$ of this result is due to cluster lensing rather than the kSZ effect. By correcting this, the temperature dispersion is measured to be $\langle \left(\Delta T/T \right)^{2} \rangle = (1.35 \pm 0.48) \times 10^{-11}$, which gives a detection at the $2.8\,\sigma$ level. We further convert uniform-weight temperature dispersion into a measurement of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion, by using estimates of the optical depth of each cluster (which introduces additional uncertainty into the estimate). We find that the velocity dispersion is $\langle v^{2} \rangle =(123\,000 \pm 71\,000)\,({\rm km}\,{\rm s}^{-1})^{2}$, which is consistent with findings from other large-scale structure studies, and provides direct evidence of statistical homogeneity on scales of $600\,h^{-1}{\rm Mpc}$. Our study shows the promise of using cross-correlations of the kSZ effect with large-scale structure in order to constrain the growth of structure.
[49]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06208  [pdf] - 1717311
Planck 2018 results. IV. Diffuse component separation
Planck Collaboration; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Casaponsa, B.; Challinor, A.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Herranz, D.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Natoli, P.; Oppizzi, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Peel, M.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seljebotn, D. S.; Sirignano, C.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Thommesen, H.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 74 pages, submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2018-07-17
We present full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and polarized synchrotron and thermal dust emission, derived from the third set of Planck frequency maps. These products have significantly lower contamination from instrumental systematic effects than previous versions. The methodologies used to derive these maps follow closely those described in earlier papers, adopting four methods (Commander, NILC, SEVEM, and SMICA) to extract the CMB component, as well as three methods (Commander, GNILC, and SMICA) to extract astrophysical components. Our revised CMB temperature maps agree with corresponding products in the Planck 2015 delivery, whereas the polarization maps exhibit significantly lower large-scale power, reflecting the improved data processing described in companion papers; however, the noise properties of the resulting data products are complicated, and the best available end-to-end simulations exhibit relative biases with respect to the data at the few percent level. Using these maps, we are for the first time able to fit the spectral index of thermal dust independently over 3 degree regions. We derive a conservative estimate of the mean spectral index of polarized thermal dust emission of beta_d = 1.55 +/- 0.05, where the uncertainty marginalizes both over all known systematic uncertainties and different estimation techniques. For polarized synchrotron emission, we find a mean spectral index of beta_s = -3.1 +/- 0.1, consistent with previously reported measurements. We note that the current data processing does not allow for construction of unbiased single-bolometer maps, and this limits our ability to extract CO emission and correlated components. The foreground results for intensity derived in this paper therefore do not supersede corresponding Planck 2015 products. For polarization the new results supersede the corresponding 2015 products in all respects.
[50]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.06207  [pdf] - 1717310
Planck 2018 results. III. High Frequency Instrument data processing and frequency maps
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Accepted for publication on A&A (AA/2018/32909)
Submitted: 2018-07-17
This paper presents the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) data processing procedures for the Planck 2018 release. Major improvements in mapmaking have been achieved since the previous 2015 release. They enabled the first significant measurement of the reionization optical depth parameter using HFI data. This paper presents an extensive analysis of systematic effects, including the use of simulations to facilitate their removal and characterize the residuals. The polarized data, which presented a number of known problems in the 2015 Planck release, are very significantly improved. Calibration, based on the CMB dipole, is now extremely accurate and in the frequency range 100 to 353 GHz reduces intensity-to-polarization leakage caused by calibration mismatch. The Solar dipole direction has been determined in the three lowest HFI frequency channels to within one arc minute, and its amplitude has an absolute uncertainty smaller than $0.35\mu$K, an accuracy of order $10^{-4}$. This is a major legacy from the HFI for future CMB experiments. The removal of bandpass leakage has been improved by extracting the bandpass-mismatch coefficients for each detector as part of the mapmaking process; these values in turn improve the intensity maps. This is a major change in the philosophy of "frequency maps", which are now computed from single detector data, all adjusted to the same average bandpass response for the main foregrounds. Simulations reproduce very well the relative gain calibration of detectors, as well as drifts within a frequency induced by the residuals of the main systematic effect. Using these simulations, we measure and correct the small frequency calibration bias induced by this systematic effect at the $10^{-4}$ level. There is no detectable sign of a residual calibration bias between the first and second acoustic peaks in the CMB channels, at the $10^{-3}$ level.
[51]  oai:arXiv.org:1806.00957  [pdf] - 1721157
Two-sided-loop jets associated with magnetic reconnection between emerging loops and twisted filament threads
Comments: 9 figures
Submitted: 2018-06-04
Coronal jets are always produced by magnetic reconnection between emerging flux and pre-existing overlying magnetic fields. When the overlying field is vertical/obilique or horizontal, the coronal jet will appear as anemone type or two-sided-loop type. Most of observational jets are of the anemone type, and only a few of two-sided-loop jets have been reported. Using the high-quality data from New Vacuum Solar Telescope, Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, and Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an example of two-sided-loop jets simultaneously observed in the chromosphere, transition region, and corona. The continuous emergence of magnetic flux brought in successively emerging of coronal loops and the slowly rising of an overlying horizontal filament threads. Sequentially, there appeared the deformation of the loops, the plasmoids ejection from the loop top, and pairs of loop brightenings and jet moving along the untwisting filament threads. All the observational results indicate there exist magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and overlying horizontal filament threads, and it is the first example of two-sided-loop jets associated with ejected plasmoids and twisted overlying fields.
[52]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.02880  [pdf] - 1686896
Helium abundance and speed difference between helium ions and protons in the solar wind from coronal holes, active regions, and quiet Sun
Comments: 19 pages, 5 figures, in press in MNRS
Submitted: 2018-05-08
Two main models have been developed to explain the mechanisms of release, heating and acceleration of the nascent solar wind, the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) models and reconnection-loop-opening (RLO) models, in which the plasma release processes are fundamentally different. Given that the statistical observational properties of helium ions produced in magnetically diverse solar regions could provide valuable information for the solar wind modelling, we examine the statistical properties of the helium abundance (A_He) and the speed difference between helium ions and protons (v_alpha,p) for coronal holes (CHs), active regions (ARs) and the quiet Sun (QS). We find bimodal distributions in the space of A_He and v_alpha,p/v_A (where v_A is the local Alfven speed)for the solar wind as a whole. The CH wind measurements are concentrated at higher A_He and v_alpha,p/v_A values with a smaller A_He distribution range, while the AR and QS wind is associated with lower A_He and v_alpha,p/v_A, and a larger A_He distribution range. The magnetic diversity of the source regions and the physical processes related to it are possibly responsible for the different properties of A_He and v_alpha,p/v_A. The statistical results suggest that the two solar wind generation mechanisms, WTD and RLO, work in parallel in all solar wind source regions. In CH regions WTD plays a major role, whereas the RLO mechanism is more important in AR and QS.
[53]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.08294  [pdf] - 1654547
Transition region bright dots in active regions observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures, publication in AIP Conference Proceedings
Submitted: 2018-03-22
The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveals numerous small-scale (sub-arcsecond) brightenings that appear as bright dots sparkling the solar transition region in active regions. Here, we report a statistical study on these transition region bright dots. We use an automatic approach to identify 2742 dots in a Si IV raster image. We find that the average spatial size of the dots is 0.8 arcsec$^2$ and most of them are located in the faculae area. Their Doppler velocities obtained from the Si IV 1394 {\AA} line range from -20 to 20 km/s. Among these 2742 dots, 1224 are predominantly blue-shifted and 1518 are red-shifted. Their nonthermal velocities range from 4 to 50 km/s with an average of 24 km/s. We speculate that the bright dots studied here are small-scale impulsive energetic events that can heat the active region corona.
[54]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.07515  [pdf] - 1652431
Observations of upward propagating waves in the transition region and corona above Sunspots
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-01-23
We present observations of persistent oscillations of some bright features in the upper-chromosphere/transition-region above sunspots taken by IRIS SJ 1400 {\AA} and upward propagating quasi-periodic disturbances along coronal loops rooted in the same region taken by AIA 171 {\AA} passband. The oscillations of the features are cyclic oscillatory motions without any obvious damping. The amplitudes of the spatial displacements of the oscillations are about 1 $^{"}$. The apparent velocities of the oscillations are comparable to the sound speed in the chromosphere, but the upward motions are slightly larger than that of the downward. The intensity variations can take 24-53% of the background, suggesting nonlinearity of the oscillations. The FFT power spectra of the oscillations show dominant peak at a period of about 3 minutes, in consistent with the omnipresent 3 minute oscillations in sunspots. The amplitudes of the intensity variations of the upward propagating coronal disturbances are 10-15% of the background. The coronal disturbances have a period of about 3 minutes, and propagate upward along the coronal loops with apparent velocities in a range of 30-80 km/s. We propose a scenario that the observed transition region oscillations are powered continuously by upward propagating shocks, and the upward propagating coronal disturbances can be the recurrent plasma flows driven by shocks or responses of degenerated shocks that become slow magnetic-acoustic waves after heating the plasma in the coronal loops at their transition-region bases.
[55]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.05967  [pdf] - 1641438
Magnetic braids in eruptions of a spiral structure in the solar atmosphere
Comments: 11 figs, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2018-01-18
We report on high-resolution imaging and spectral observations of eruptions of a spiral structure in the transition region, which were taken with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS), the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The eruption coincided with the appearance of two series of jets, with velocities comparable to the Alfv\'en speeds in their footpoints. Several pieces of evidence of magnetic braiding in the eruption are revealed, including localized bright knots, multiple well-separated jet threads, transition region explosive events and the fact that all these three are falling into the same locations within the eruptive structures. Through analysis of the extrapolated three-dimensional magnetic field in the region, we found that the eruptive spiral structure corresponded well to locations of twisted magnetic flux tubes with varying curl values along their lengths. The eruption occurred where strong parallel currents, high squashing factors, and large twist numbers were obtained. The electron number density of the eruptive structure is found to be $\sim3\times10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$, indicating that significant amount of mass could be pumped into the corona by the jets. Following the eruption, the extrapolations revealed a set of seemingly relaxed loops, which were visible in the AIA 94 \AA\ channel indicating temperatures of around 6.3 MK. With these observations, we suggest that magnetic braiding could be part of the mechanisms explaining the formation of solar eruption and the mass and energy supplement to the corona.
[56]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.05983  [pdf] - 1634329
A magnetic reconnection event in the solar atmosphere driven by relaxation of a twisted arch filament system
Comments: 5 figs, accepted for publication in ApJL
Submitted: 2018-01-18
We present high-resolution observations of a magnetic reconnection event in the solar atmosphere taken with the New Vacuum Solar Telescope, AIA and HMI. The reconnection event occurred between the threads of a twisted arch filament system (AFS) and coronal loops. Our observations reveal that the relaxation of the twisted AFS drives some of its threads to encounter the coronal loops, providing inflows of the reconnection. The reconnection is evidenced by flared X-shape features in the AIA images, a current-sheet-like feature apparently connecting post-reconnection loops in the \halpha$+$1 \AA\ images, small-scale magnetic cancellation in the HMI magnetograms and flows with speeds of 40--80 km/s along the coronal loops. The post-reconnection coronal loops seen in AIA 94 \AA\ passband appear to remain bright for a relatively long time, suggesting that they have been heated and/or filled up by dense plasmas previously stored in the AFS threads. Our observations suggest that the twisted magnetic system could release its free magnetic energy into the upper solar atmosphere through reconnection processes. While the plasma pressure in the reconnecting flux tubes are significantly different, the reconfiguration of field lines could result in transferring of mass among them and induce heating therein.
[57]  oai:arXiv.org:1801.03991  [pdf] - 1617216
Hall Effect in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
Comments: 23 pages, 6 figurs
Submitted: 2018-01-11
Magnetohydrodynamics simulations have been carried out in studying the solar wind and cometary plasma interactions for decades. Various plasma boundaries have been simulated and compared well with observations for comet 1P/Halley. The Rosetta mission, which studies comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, challenges our understanding of the solar wind and comet interactions. The Rosetta Plasma Consortium observed regions of very weak magnetic field outside the predicted diamagnetic cavity. In this paper, we simulate the inner coma with the Hall magnetohydrodynamics equations and show that the Hall effect is important in the inner coma environment. The magnetic field topology becomes complex and magnetic reconnection occurs on the dayside when the Hall effect is taken into account. The magnetic reconnection on the dayside can generate weak magnetic filed regions outside the global diamagnetic cavity, which may explain the Rosetta Plasma Consortium observations. We conclude that the substantial change in the inner coma environment is due to the fact that the ion inertial length (or gyro radius) is not much smaller than the size of the diamagnetic cavity.
[58]  oai:arXiv.org:1712.03845  [pdf] - 1630286
Early soft X-ray to UV emission from double neutron star mergers: implications from the long-term radio and X-ray emissions of GW 170817
Comments: 5 pages, 2 figures, ApJL in press, discussions on the reverse shock emission in the refreshed shock scenario for the long-term radio and X-ray emissions are added
Submitted: 2017-12-11, last modified: 2018-01-08
Recent long-term radio follow-up observations of GW 170817 reveals a simple power-law rising light curve, with a slope of $t^{0.78}$, up to 93 days after the merger. The latest X-ray detection at 109 days is also consistent with such a temporal slope. Such a shallow rise behavior requires a mildly relativistic outflow with a steep velocity gradient profile, so that slower material with larger energy catches up with the decelerating ejecta and re-energizes it. It has been suggested that this mildly relativistic outflow may represent a cocoon of material. We suggest that the velocity gradient profile may form during the stage that the cocoon is breaking out of the merger ejecta, resulted from shock propagation down a density gradient. The cooling of the hot relativistic cocoon material immediately after it breaks out should have produced soft X-ray to UV radiation at tens of seconds to hours after the merger. The soft X-ray emission has a luminosity of $L_{\rm X}\sim 10^{45}{\rm erg s^{-1}}$ over a period of tens of seconds for a merger event like GW 170817. The UV emission shows a rise initially and peaks at about a few hours with a luminosity of $L_{\rm UV}\sim 10^{42} {\rm erg s^{-1}}$. The soft X-ray transients could be detected by future wide-angle X-ray detectors, such as the Chinese mission Einstein Probe. This soft X-ray/UV emission would serve as one of the earliest electromagnetic counterparts of gravitation waves from double neutron star mergers and could provide the earliest localization of the sources.
[59]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.09135  [pdf] - 1626318
A comparison of Einstein-Boltzmann solvers for testing General Relativity
Comments: 23 pages; 11 figures. Matches version accepted in PRD
Submitted: 2017-09-26, last modified: 2017-12-14
We compare Einstein-Boltzmann solvers that include modifications to General Relativity and find that, for a wide range of models and parameters, they agree to a high level of precision. We look at three general purpose codes that primarily model general scalar-tensor theories, three codes that model Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) gravity, a code that models f(R) gravity, a code that models covariant Galileons, a code that models Ho\v{r}ava-Lifschitz gravity and two codes that model non-local models of gravity. Comparing predictions of the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and the power spectrum of dark matter for a suite of different models, we find agreement at the sub-percent level. This means that this suite of Einstein-Boltzmann solvers is now sufficiently accurate for precision constraints on cosmological and gravitational parameters.
[60]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.10596  [pdf] - 1783704
SPIDER: CMB polarimetry from the edge of space
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, LTD17 Conference
Submitted: 2017-11-28
SPIDER is a balloon-borne instrument designed to map the polarization of the millimeter-wave sky at large angular scales. SPIDER targets the B-mode signature of primordial gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), with a focus on mapping a large sky area with high fidelity at multiple frequencies. SPIDER's first longduration balloon (LDB) flight in January 2015 deployed a total of 2400 antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) at 90 GHz and 150 GHz. In this work we review the design and in-flight performance of the SPIDER instrument, with a particular focus on the measured performance of the detectors and instrument in a space-like loading and radiation environment. SPIDER's second flight in December 2018 will incorporate payload upgrades and new receivers to map the sky at 285 GHz, providing valuable information for cleaning polarized dust emission from CMB maps.
[61]  oai:arXiv.org:1711.04169  [pdf] - 1755845
280 GHz Focal Plane Unit Design and Characterization for the SPIDER-2 Suborbital Polarimeter
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-11-11, last modified: 2017-11-22
We describe the construction and characterization of the 280 GHz bolometric focal plane units (FPUs) to be deployed on the second flight of the balloon-borne SPIDER instrument. These FPUs are vital to SPIDER's primary science goal of detecting or placing an upper limit on the amplitude of the primordial gravitational wave signature in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by constraining the B-mode contamination in the CMB from Galactic dust emission. Each 280 GHz focal plane contains a 16 x 16 grid of corrugated silicon feedhorns coupled to an array of aluminum-manganese transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers fabricated on 150 mm diameter substrates. In total, the three 280 GHz FPUs contain 1,530 polarization sensitive bolometers (765 spatial pixels) optimized for the low loading environment in flight and read out by time-division SQUID multiplexing. In this paper we describe the mechanical, thermal, and magnetic shielding architecture of the focal planes and present cryogenic measurements which characterize yield and the uniformity of several bolometer parameters. The assembled FPUs have high yields, with one array as high as 95% including defects from wiring and readout. We demonstrate high uniformity in device parameters, finding the median saturation power for each TES array to be ~3 pW at 300 mK with a less than 6% variation across each array at one standard deviation. These focal planes will be deployed alongside the 95 and 150 GHz telescopes in the SPIDER-2 instrument, slated to fly from McMurdo Station in Antarctica in December 2018.
[62]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.06917  [pdf] - 1587379
Dark Matter Results From 54-Ton-Day Exposure of PandaX-II Experiment
Comments: Supplementary materials at https://pandax.sjtu.edu.cn/articles/2nd/supplemental.pdf version 2 as accepted by PRL
Submitted: 2017-08-23, last modified: 2017-09-21
We report a new search of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) using the combined low background data sets in 2016 and 2017 from the PandaX-II experiment in China. The latest data set contains a new exposure of 77.1 live day, with the background reduced to a level of 0.8$\times10^{-3}$ evt/kg/day, improved by a factor of 2.5 in comparison to the previous run in 2016. No excess events were found above the expected background. With a total exposure of 5.4$\times10^4$ kg day, the most stringent upper limit on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section was set for a WIMP with mass larger than 100 GeV/c$^2$, with the lowest exclusion at 8.6$\times10^{-47}$ cm$^2$ at 40 GeV/c$^2$.
[63]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.02114  [pdf] - 1579600
Planck 2015 results. XX. Constraints on inflation
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Desert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shiraishi, M.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 68 pages, 59 figures, 18 tables; updates to match the published version
Submitted: 2015-02-07, last modified: 2017-09-14
We present the implications for cosmic inflation of the Planck measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies in both temperature and polarization based on the full Planck survey. The Planck full mission temperature data and a first release of polarization data on large angular scales measure the spectral index of curvature perturbations to be $n_\mathrm{s} = 0.968 \pm 0.006$ and tightly constrain its scale dependence to $d n_s/d \ln k =-0.003 \pm 0.007$ when combined with the Planck lensing likelihood. When the high-$\ell$ polarization data is included, the results are consistent and uncertainties are reduced. The upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio is $r_{0.002} < 0.11$ (95% CL), consistent with the B-mode polarization constraint $r< 0.12$ (95% CL) obtained from a joint BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck analysis. These results imply that $V(\phi) \propto \phi^2$ and natural inflation are now disfavoured compared to models predicting a smaller tensor-to-scalar ratio, such as $R^2$ inflation. Three independent methods reconstructing the primordial power spectrum are investigated. The Planck data are consistent with adiabatic primordial perturbations. We investigate inflationary models producing an anisotropic modulation of the primordial curvature power spectrum as well as generalized models of inflation not governed by a scalar field with a canonical kinetic term. The 2015 results are consistent with the 2013 analysis based on the nominal mission data.
[64]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.01219  [pdf] - 1587916
The dehydration of water worlds via atmospheric losses
Comments: ApJ Letters, in press, 8 pages, 2 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2017-09-04
We present a three-species multi-fluid MHD model (H$^+$, H$_2$O$^+$ and e$^-$), endowed with the requisite atmospheric chemistry, that is capable of accurately quantifying the magnitude of water ion losses from exoplanets. We apply this model to a water world with Earth-like parameters orbiting a Sun-like star for three cases: (i) current normal solar wind conditions, (ii) ancient normal solar wind conditions, and (iii) one extreme "Carrington-type" space weather event. We demonstrate that the ion escape rate for (ii), with a value of 6.0$\times$10$^{26}$ s$^{-1}$, is about an order of magnitude higher than the corresponding value of 6.7$\times$10$^{25}$ s$^{-1}$ for (i). Studies of ion losses induced by space weather events, where the ion escape rates can reach $\sim$ 10$^{28}$ s$^{-1}$, are crucial for understanding how an active, early solar-type star (e.g., with frequent coronal mass ejections) could have accelerated the depletion of the exoplanet's atmosphere. We briefly explore the ramifications arising from the loss of water ions, especially for planets orbiting M-dwarfs where such effects are likely to be significant.
[65]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.00215  [pdf] - 1582291
A New Limit on CMB Circular Polarization from SPIDER
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures, 5 tables - Updated to version accepted for publication in ApJ, modified acknowledgements
Submitted: 2017-04-01, last modified: 2017-08-11
We present a new upper limit on CMB circular polarization from the 2015 flight of SPIDER, a balloon-borne telescope designed to search for $B$-mode linear polarization from cosmic inflation. Although the level of circular polarization in the CMB is predicted to be very small, experimental limits provide a valuable test of the underlying models. By exploiting the non-zero circular-to-linear polarization coupling of the HWP polarization modulators, data from SPIDER's 2015 Antarctic flight provide a constraint on Stokes $V$ at 95 and 150 GHz from $33<\ell<307$. No other limits exist over this full range of angular scales, and SPIDER improves upon the previous limit by several orders of magnitude, providing 95% C.L. constraints on $\ell (\ell+1)C_{\ell}^{VV}/(2\pi)$ ranging from 141 $\mu K ^2$ to 255 $\mu K ^2$ at 150 GHz for a thermal CMB spectrum. As linear CMB polarization experiments become increasingly sensitive, the techniques described in this paper can be applied to obtain even stronger constraints on circular polarization.
[66]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.04174  [pdf] - 1585901
Magnetic topological analysis of coronal bright points
Comments: 14 pages, 9 figures, 10 movies located at http://comp.astro.ku.dk/kg/BP/movies/, Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-07-13
{We report on the first of a series of studies on coronal bright points investigating the physical mechanism that generates these phenomena.} {The aim of this paper is to understand the magnetic-field structure that hosts the bright points.} {We use longitudinal magnetograms taken by the Solar Optical Telescope with the Narrowband Filter Imager. For a single case, magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager were added to the analysis. The longitudinal magnetic field component is used to derive the potential magnetic fields of the large regions around the bright points. A magneto-static field extrapolation method is tested to verify the accuracy of the potential field modelling. The three dimensional magnetic fields are investigated for the presence of magnetic null points and their influence on the local magnetic domain.} {In 9 out of 10 cases the bright point resides in areas where the coronal magnetic field contains an opposite polarity intrusion defining a magnetic null point above it. It is found that X-ray bright points reside, in these 9 cases, in a limited part of the projected fan dome area, either fully inside the dome or expanding over a limited area below which typically a dominant flux concentration resides. The 10th bright point is located in a bipolar loop system without an overlying null point.} {All bright points in coronal holes and two out of tree bright points in quiet Sun regions are seen to reside in regions containing a magnetic null point. An yet unidentified process(es) generates the BPs in specific regions of the fan-dome structure. }
[67]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.02564  [pdf] - 1583186
Plasma parameters and geometry of cool and warm active region loops
Comments: ApJ, accepted for publication
Submitted: 2017-05-07, last modified: 2017-05-24
How the solar corona is heated to high temperatures remains an unsolved mystery in solar physics. In the present study we analyse observations of 50 whole active-region loops taken with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode satellite. Eleven loops were classified as cool (<1 MK) and 39 as warm (1-2 MK) loops. We study their plasma parameters such as densities, temperatures, filling factors, non-thermal velocities and Doppler velocities. We combine spectroscopic analysis with linear force-free magnetic-field extrapolation to derive the three-dimensional structure and positioning of the loops, their lengths and heights as well as the magnetic field strength along the loops. We use density-sensitive line pairs from Fe XII, Fe XIII, Si X and Mg VII ions to obtain electron densities by taking special care of intensity background-subtraction. The emission-measure loci method is used to obtain the loop temperatures. We find that the loops are nearly isothermal along the line-of-sight. Their filling factors are between 8% and 89%. We also compare the observed parameters with the theoretical RTV scaling law. We find that most of the loops are in an overpressure state relative to the RTV predictions. In a followup study, we will report a heating model of a parallel-cascade-based mechanism and will compare the model parameters with the loop plasma and structural parameters derived here.
[68]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.02991  [pdf] - 1581832
The third data release of the Kilo-Degree Survey and associated data products
Comments: small modifications; 27 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2017-03-08, last modified: 2017-05-21
The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is an ongoing optical wide-field imaging survey with the OmegaCAM camera at the VLT Survey Telescope. It aims to image 1500 square degrees in four filters (ugri). The core science driver is mapping the large-scale matter distribution in the Universe, using weak lensing shear and photometric redshift measurements. Further science cases include galaxy evolution, Milky Way structure, detection of high-redshift clusters, and finding rare sources such as strong lenses and quasars. Here we present the third public data release (DR3) and several associated data products, adding further area, homogenized photometric calibration, photometric redshifts and weak lensing shear measurements to the first two releases. A dedicated pipeline embedded in the Astro-WISE information system is used for the production of the main release. Modifications with respect to earlier releases are described in detail. Photometric redshifts have been derived using both Bayesian template fitting, and machine-learning techniques. For the weak lensing measurements, optimized procedures based on the THELI data reduction and lensfit shear measurement packages are used. In DR3 stacked ugri images, weight maps, masks, and source lists for 292 new survey tiles (~300 sq.deg) are made available. The multi-band catalogue, including homogenized photometry and photometric redshifts, covers the combined DR1, DR2 and DR3 footprint of 440 survey tiles (447 sq.deg). Limiting magnitudes are typically 24.3, 25.1, 24.9, 23.8 (5 sigma in a 2 arcsec aperture) in ugri, respectively, and the typical r-band PSF size is less than 0.7 arcsec. The photometric homogenization scheme ensures accurate colors and an absolute calibration stable to ~2% for gri and ~3% in u. Separately released are a weak lensing shear catalogue and photometric redshifts based on two different machine-learning techniques.
[69]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.02487  [pdf] - 1580129
Planck intermediate results. LI. Features in the cosmic microwave background temperature power spectrum and shifts in cosmological parameters
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Narimani, A.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Stanco, L.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 22 pages, 17 figures, abstract abridged for Arxiv submission
Submitted: 2016-08-08, last modified: 2017-04-21
The six parameters of the standard $\Lambda$CDM model have best-fit values derived from the Planck temperature power spectrum that are shifted somewhat from the best-fit values derived from WMAP data. These shifts are driven by features in the Planck temperature power spectrum at angular scales that had never before been measured to cosmic-variance level precision. We investigate these shifts to determine whether they are within the range of expectation and to understand their origin in the data. Taking our parameter set to be the optical depth of the reionized intergalactic medium $\tau$, the baryon density $\omega_{\rm b}$, the matter density $\omega_{\rm m}$, the angular size of the sound horizon $\theta_*$, the spectral index of the primordial power spectrum, $n_{\rm s}$, and $A_{\rm s}e^{-2\tau}$ (where $A_{\rm s}$ is the amplitude of the primordial power spectrum), we examine the change in best-fit values between a WMAP-like large angular-scale data set (with multipole moment $\ell<800$ in the Planck temperature power spectrum) and an all angular-scale data set ($\ell<2500$ Planck temperature power spectrum), each with a prior on $\tau$ of $0.07\pm0.02$. We find that the shifts, in units of the 1$\sigma$ expected dispersion for each parameter, are $\{\Delta \tau, \Delta A_{\rm s} e^{-2\tau}, \Delta n_{\rm s}, \Delta \omega_{\rm m}, \Delta \omega_{\rm b}, \Delta \theta_*\} = \{-1.7, -2.2, 1.2, -2.0, 1.1, 0.9\}$, with a $\chi^2$ value of 8.0. We find that this $\chi^2$ value is exceeded in 15% of our simulated data sets, and that a parameter deviates by more than 2.2$\sigma$ in 9% of simulated data sets, meaning that the shifts are not unusually large. Comparing $\ell<800$ instead to $\ell>800$, or splitting at a different multipole, yields similar results. We examine the $\ell<800$ model residuals in the $\ell>800$ power spectrum data and find that the features there... [abridged]
[70]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.07610  [pdf] - 1535054
Charge States and FIP Bias of the Solar Wind from Coronal Holes, Active Regions, and Quiet Sun
Comments: accepted for publication in ApJ, 11 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2017-01-26, last modified: 2017-01-27
Connecting in-situ measured solar-wind plasma properties with typical regions on the Sun can provide an effective constraint and test to various solar wind models. We examine the statistical characteristics of the solar wind with an origin in different types of source regions. We find that the speed distribution of coronal hole (CH) wind is bimodal with the slow wind peaking at ~400 km/s and a fast at ~600 km/s. An anti-correlation between the solar wind speeds and the O7+/O6+ ion ratio remains valid in all three types of solar wind as well during the three studied solar cycle activity phases, i.e. solar maximum, decline and minimum. The N_Fe/N_O range and its average values all decrease with the increasing solar wind speed in different types of solar wind. The N_Fe/N_O range (0.06-0.40, FIP bias range 1-7) for AR wind is wider than for CH wind (0.06-0.20, FIP bias range 1-3) while the minimum value of N_Fe/N_O (0.06) does not change with the variation of speed, and it is similar for all sourceregions. The two-peak distribution of CH wind and the anti-correlation between the speed and O7+/O6+ in all three types of solar wind can be explained qualitatively by both the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) and reconnection-loop-opening (RLO) models, whereas the distribution features of N_Fe/N_O in different source regions of solar wind can be explained more reasonably by the RLO models.
[71]  oai:arXiv.org:1701.02954  [pdf] - 1534418
Searching for galaxy clusters in the Kilo-Degree Survey
Comments: 13 pages, 15 figures. Accepted for publication on Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2017-01-11
In this paper, we present the tools used to search for galaxy clusters in the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), and our first results. The cluster detection is based on an implementation of the optimal filtering technique that enables us to identify clusters as over-densities in the distribution of galaxies using their positions on the sky, magnitudes, and photometric redshifts. The contamination and completeness of the cluster catalog are derived using mock catalogs based on the data themselves. The optimal signal to noise threshold for the cluster detection is obtained by randomizing the galaxy positions and selecting the value that produces a contamination of less than 20%. Starting from a subset of clusters detected with high significance at low redshifts, we shift them to higher redshifts to estimate the completeness as a function of redshift: the average completeness is ~ 85%. An estimate of the mass of the clusters is derived using the richness as a proxy. We obtained 1858 candidate clusters with redshift 0 < z_c < 0.7 and mass 13.5 < log(M500/Msun) < 15 in an area of 114 sq. degrees (KiDS ESO-DR2). A comparison with publicly available Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-based cluster catalogs shows that we match more than 50% of the clusters (77% in the case of the redMaPPer catalog). We also cross-matched our cluster catalog with the Abell clusters, and clusters found by XMM and in the Planck-SZ survey; however, only a small number of them lie inside the KiDS area currently available.
[72]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.09365  [pdf] - 1513542
The Future of Primordial Features with Large-Scale Structure Surveys
Comments: 33 pages, minor revisions, published version
Submitted: 2016-05-30, last modified: 2016-11-07
Primordial features are one of the most important extensions of the Standard Model of cosmology, providing a wealth of information on the primordial universe, ranging from discrimination between inflation and alternative scenarios, new particle detection, to fine structures in the inflationary potential. We study the prospects of future large-scale structure (LSS) surveys on the detection and constraints of these features. We classify primordial feature models into several classes, and for each class we present a simple template of power spectrum that encodes the essential physics. We study how well the most ambitious LSS surveys proposed to date, including both spectroscopic and photometric surveys, will be able to improve the constraints with respect to the current Planck data. We find that these LSS surveys will significantly improve the experimental sensitivity on features signals that are oscillatory in scales, due to the 3D information. For a broad range of models, these surveys will be able to reduce the errors of the amplitudes of the features by a factor of 5 or more, including several interesting candidates identified in the recent Planck data. Therefore, LSS surveys offer an impressive opportunity for primordial feature discovery in the next decade or two. We also compare the advantages of both types of surveys.
[73]  oai:arXiv.org:1610.02360  [pdf] - 1580356
The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Two-Season ACTPol Spectra and Parameters
Comments: 23 pages, 25 figures
Submitted: 2016-10-07
We present the temperature and polarization angular power spectra measured by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol). We analyze night-time data collected during 2013-14 using two detector arrays at 149 GHz, from 548 deg$^2$ of sky on the celestial equator. We use these spectra, and the spectra measured with the MBAC camera on ACT from 2008-10, in combination with Planck and WMAP data to estimate cosmological parameters from the temperature, polarization, and temperature-polarization cross-correlations. We find the new ACTPol data to be consistent with the LCDM model. The ACTPol temperature-polarization cross-spectrum now provides stronger constraints on multiple parameters than the ACTPol temperature spectrum, including the baryon density, the acoustic peak angular scale, and the derived Hubble constant. Adding the new data to planck temperature data tightens the limits on damping tail parameters, for example reducing the joint uncertainty on the number of neutrino species and the primordial helium fraction by 20%.
[74]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.07698  [pdf] - 1513708
Explosive events in active region observed by IRIS and SST/CRISP
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figs, accepted by MNRAS
Submitted: 2016-09-25
Transition-region explosive events (EEs) are characterized by non-Gaussian line profiles with enhanced wings at Doppler velocities of 50-150 km/s. They are believed to be the signature of solar phenomena that are one of the main contributors to coronal heating. The aim of this study is to investigate the link of EEs to dynamic phenomena in the transition region and chromosphere in an active region. We analyze observations simultaneously taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in the Si IV 1394\AA\ line and the slit-jaw (SJ) 1400\AA\ images, and the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) in the H$\alpha$ line. In total 24 events were found. They are associated with small-scale loop brightenings in SJ 1400\AA\ images. Only four events show a counterpart in the H$\alpha$-35 km/s and H$\alpha$+35 km/s images. Two of them represent brightenings in the conjunction region of several loops that are also related to a bright region (granular lane) in the H$\alpha$-35km/s and H$\alpha$+35 km/s images. Sixteen are general loop brightenings that do not show any discernible response in the H$\alpha$ images. Six EEs appear as propagating loop brightenings, from which two are associated with dark jet-like features clearly seen in the H$\alpha$-35 km/s images. We found that chromospheric events with jet-like appearance seen in the wings of the H$\alpha$ line can trigger EEs in the transition region and in this case the IRIS Si IV 1394\AA\ line profiles are seeded with absorption components resulting from Fe II and Ni II. Our study indicates that EEs occurring in active regions have mostly upper-chromosphere/transition-region origin. We suggest that magnetic reconnection resulting from the braidings of small-scale transition region loops is one of the possible mechanisms of energy release that are responsible for the EEs reported in this paper.
[75]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.03507  [pdf] - 1530686
Planck intermediate results. XLVII. Planck constraints on reionization history
Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Ili_, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirri, G.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 19 pages, 18 figures. accepted in A&A
Submitted: 2016-05-11, last modified: 2016-09-05
We investigate constraints on cosmic reionization extracted from the Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We combine the Planck CMB anisotropy data in temperature with the low-multipole polarization data to fit LCDM models with various parameterizations of the reionization history. We obtain a Thomson optical depth tau=0.058 +/- 0.012 for the commonly adopted instantaneous reionization model. This confirms, with only data from CMB anisotropies, the low value suggested by combining Planck 2015 results with other data sets and also reduces the uncertainties. We reconstruct the history of the ionization fraction using either a symmetric or an asymmetric model for the transition between the neutral and ionized phases. To determine better constraints on the duration of the reionization process, we also make use of measurements of the amplitude of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect using additional information from the high resolution Atacama Cosmology Telescope and South Pole Telescope experiments. The average redshift at which reionization occurs is found to lie between z=7.8 and 8.8, depending on the model of reionization adopted. Using kSZ constraints and a redshift-symmetric reionization model, we find an upper limit to the width of the reionization period of Dz < 2.8. In all cases, we find that the Universe is ionized at less than the 10% level at redshifts above z~10. This suggests that an early onset of reionization is strongly disfavoured by the Planck data. We show that this result also reduces the tension between CMB-based analyses and constraints from other astrophysical sources.
[76]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.01272  [pdf] - 1531468
Weakening Gravity on Redshift-Survey Scales with Kinetic Matter Mixing
Comments: 39 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2016-09-05
We explore general scalar-tensor models in the presence of a kinetic mixing between matter and the scalar field, which we call Kinetic Matter Mixing. In the frame where gravity is de-mixed from the scalar this is due to disformal couplings of matter species to the gravitational sector, with disformal coefficients that depend on the gradient of the scalar field. In the frame where matter is minimally coupled, it originates from the so-called beyond Horndeski quadratic Lagrangian. We extend the Effective Theory of Interacting Dark Energy by allowing disformal coupling coefficients to depend on the gradient of the scalar field as well. In this very general approach, we derive the conditions to avoid ghost and gradient instabilities and we define Kinetic Matter Mixing independently of the frame metric used to described the action. We study its phenomenological consequences for a $\Lambda$CDM background evolution, first analytically on small scales. Then, we compute the matter power spectrum and the angular spectra of the CMB anisotropies and the CMB lensing potential, on all scales. We employ the public version of COOP, a numerical Einstein-Boltzmann solver that implements very general scalar-tensor modifications of gravity. Rather uniquely, Kinetic Matter Mixing weakens gravity on short scales, predicting a lower $\sigma_8$ with respect to the $\Lambda$CDM case. We propose this as a possible solution to the tension between the CMB best-fit model and low-redshift observables.
[77]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.04892  [pdf] - 1490846
Narrow-line-width UV bursts in the transition region above Sunspots observed by IRIS
Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures and 1 table, accepted for publication in ApJL
Submitted: 2016-08-17
Various small-scale structures abound in the solar atmosphere above active regions, playing an important role in the dynamics and evolution therein. We report on a new class of small-scale transition region structures in active regions, characterized by strong emissions but extremely narrow Si IV line profiles as found in observations taken with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Tentatively named as Narrow-line-width UV bursts (NUBs), these structures are located above sunspots and comprise of one or multiple compact bright cores at sub-arcsecond scales. We found six NUBs in two datasets (a raster and a sit-and-stare dataset). Among these, four events are short-living with a duration of $\sim$10 mins while two last for more than 36 mins. All NUBs have Doppler shifts of 15--18 km/s, while the NUB found in sit-and-stare data possesses an additional component at $\sim$50 km/s found only in the C II and Mg II lines. Given that these events are found to play a role in the local dynamics, it is important to further investigate the physical mechanisms that generate these phenomena and their role in the mass transport in sunspots.
[78]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.09387  [pdf] - 1530762
Planck intermediate results. XLVIII. Disentangling Galactic dust emission and cosmic infrared background anisotropies
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 26 pages, 25 figures (reduced in quality for arXiv), 1 table. Updated to match version accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2016-05-30, last modified: 2016-08-09
Using the Planck 2015 data release (PR2) temperature maps, we separate Galactic thermal dust emission from cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies. For this purpose, we implement a specifically tailored component-separation method, the so-called generalized needlet internal linear combination (GNILC) method, which uses spatial information (the angular power spectra) to disentangle the Galactic dust emission and CIB anisotropies. We produce significantly improved all-sky maps of Planck thermal dust emission, with reduced CIB contamination, at 353, 545, and 857 GHz. By reducing the CIB contamination of the thermal dust maps, we provide more accurate estimates of the local dust temperature and dust spectral index over the sky with reduced dispersion, especially at high Galactic latitudes above $b = \pm 20{\deg}$. We find that the dust temperature is $T = (19.4 \pm 1.3)$ K and the dust spectral index is $\beta = 1.6 \pm 0.1$ averaged over the whole sky, while $T = (19.4 \pm 1.5)$ K and $\beta = 1.6 \pm 0.2$ on 21 % of the sky at high latitudes. Moreover, subtracting the new CIB-removed thermal dust maps from the CMB-removed Planck maps gives access to the CIB anisotropies over 60 % of the sky at Galactic latitudes $|b| > 20{\deg}$. Because they are a significant improvement over previous Planck products, the GNILC maps are recommended for thermal dust science. The new CIB maps can be regarded as indirect tracers of the dark matter and they are recommended for exploring cross-correlations with lensing and large-scale structure optical surveys. The reconstructed GNILC thermal dust and CIB maps are delivered as Planck products.
[79]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.08633  [pdf] - 1530749
Planck intermediate results. XLIX. Parity-violation constraints from polarization data
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures. Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-05-27, last modified: 2016-08-05
Parity violating extensions of the standard electromagnetic theory cause in vacuo rotation of the plane of polarization of propagating photons. This effect, also known as cosmic birefringence, impacts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy angular power spectra, producing non-vanishing $T$--$B$ and $E$--$B$ correlations that are otherwise null when parity is a symmetry. Here we present new constraints on an isotropic rotation, parametrized by the angle $\alpha$, derived from Planck 2015 CMB polarization data. To increase the robustness of our analyses, we employ two complementary approaches, in harmonic space and in map space, the latter based on a peak stacking technique. The two approaches provide estimates for $\alpha$ that are in agreement within statistical uncertainties and very stable against several consistency tests. Considering the $T$--$B$ and $E$--$B$ information jointly, we find $\alpha = 0.31^{\circ} \pm 0.05^{\circ} \, ({\rm stat.})\, \pm 0.28^{\circ} \, ({\rm syst.})$ from the harmonic analysis and $\alpha = 0.35^{\circ} \pm 0.05^{\circ} \, ({\rm stat.})\, \pm 0.28^{\circ} \, ({\rm syst.})$ from the stacking approach. These constraints are compatible with no parity violation and are dominated by the systematic uncertainty in the orientation of Planck's polarization-sensitive bolometers.
[80]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01592  [pdf] - 1442574
Planck 2015 results. XVII. Constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Münchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shiraishi, M.; Smith, K.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Troja, A.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 68 pages, 32 figures, 31 tables. Subsection 6.3 on "Primordial curvature reconstruction" added; analysis in subsection 8.3 extended (paragraph "High frequency resonance model estimator" added); introduction to Section 10 and Appendix B added. This paper is one of a set associated with the 2015 data release from Planck. Matches version accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2015-02-05, last modified: 2016-07-19
The Planck full mission cosmic microwave background(CMB) temperature and E-mode polarization maps are analysed to obtain constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity(NG). Using three classes of optimal bispectrum estimators - separable template-fitting (KSW), binned, and modal - we obtain consistent values for the local, equilateral, and orthogonal bispectrum amplitudes, quoting as our final result from temperature alone fNL^local=2.5+\-5.7, fNL^equil=-16+\-70 and fNL^ortho=-34+\-33(68%CL). Combining temperature and polarization data we obtain fNL^local=0.8+\-5.0, fNL^equil=-4+\-43 and fNL^ortho=-26+\-21 (68%CL). The results are based on cross-validation of these estimators on simulations, are stable across component separation techniques, pass an extensive suite of tests, and are consistent with Minkowski functionals based measurements. The effect of time-domain de-glitching systematics on the bispectrum is negligible. In spite of these test outcomes we conservatively label the results including polarization data as preliminary, owing to a known mismatch of the noise model in simulations and the data. Beyond fNL estimates, we present model-independent reconstructions of the CMB bispectrum and derive constraints on early universe scenarios that generate NG, including general single-field and axion inflation, initial state modifications, parity-violating tensor bispectra, and directionally dependent vector models. We also present a wide survey of scale-dependent oscillatory bispectra, and we look for isocurvature NG. Our constraint on the local primordial trispectrum amplitude is gNL^local=(-9.0+\-7.7)x10^4 (68%CL), and we perform an analysis of additional trispectrum shapes. The global picture is one of consistency with the premises of the LambdaCDM cosmology, namely that the structure we observe today was sourced by adiabatic, passive, Gaussian, and primordial seed perturbations.[abridged]
[81]  oai:arXiv.org:1606.07335  [pdf] - 1538905
Planck intermediate results. L. Evidence for spatial variation of the polarized thermal dust spectral energy distribution and implications for CMB $B$-mode analysis
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Stanco, L.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-06-23
The characterization of the Galactic foregrounds has been shown to be the main obstacle in the challenging quest to detect primordial B-modes in the polarized microwave sky. We make use of the Planck-HFI 2015 data release at high frequencies to place new constraints on the properties of the polarized thermal dust emission at high Galactic latitudes. Here, we specifically study the spatial variability of the dust polarized spectral energy distribution, and its potential impact on the determination of the tensor-to-scalar ratio. We use the correlation ratio of the $C_\ell^{BB}$ angular power spectra between the 217- and 353-GHz channels as a tracer of these potential variations, computed on different high Galactic latitude regions, ranging from 80% to 20% of the sky. The new insight from Planck data is a departure of the correlation ratio from unity that cannot be attributed to a spurious decorrelation due to the cosmic microwave background, instrumental noise, or instrumental systematics. The effect is marginally detected on each region, but the statistical combination of all the regions gives more than 99% confidence for this variation in polarized dust properties. In addition, we show that the decorrelation increases when there is a decrease in the mean column density of the region of the sky being considered, and we propose a simple power-law empirical model for this dependence, which matches what is seen in the Planck data. We explore the effect that this measured decorrelation has on simulations of the BICEP2-Keck Array/Planck analysis and show that the 2015 constraints from those data still allow a decorrelation between the dust at 150 and 353GHz of the order of the one we measure. Finally we show that either spatial variation of the dust SED or of the dust polarization angle could produce decorrelations between 217- and 353-GHz data similar to those we observe in the data.
[82]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01589  [pdf] - 1483195
Planck 2015 results. XIII. Cosmological parameters
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Desert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Farhang, M.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Turler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Abstract severely abridged. Revised to match version accepted by Astronomy & Astrophysics. Many minor changes, but basic results remain unchanged
Submitted: 2015-02-05, last modified: 2016-06-17
We present results based on full-mission Planck observations of temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB. These data are consistent with the six-parameter inflationary LCDM cosmology. From the Planck temperature and lensing data, for this cosmology we find a Hubble constant, H0= (67.8 +/- 0.9) km/s/Mpc, a matter density parameter Omega_m = 0.308 +/- 0.012 and a scalar spectral index with n_s = 0.968 +/- 0.006. (We quote 68% errors on measured parameters and 95% limits on other parameters.) Combined with Planck temperature and lensing data, Planck LFI polarization measurements lead to a reionization optical depth of tau = 0.066 +/- 0.016. Combining Planck with other astrophysical data we find N_ eff = 3.15 +/- 0.23 for the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom and the sum of neutrino masses is constrained to < 0.23 eV. Spatial curvature is found to be |Omega_K| < 0.005. For LCDM we find a limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r <0.11 consistent with the B-mode constraints from an analysis of BICEP2, Keck Array, and Planck (BKP) data. Adding the BKP data leads to a tighter constraint of r < 0.09. We find no evidence for isocurvature perturbations or cosmic defects. The equation of state of dark energy is constrained to w = -1.006 +/- 0.045. Standard big bang nucleosynthesis predictions for the Planck LCDM cosmology are in excellent agreement with observations. We investigate annihilating dark matter and deviations from standard recombination, finding no evidence for new physics. The Planck results for base LCDM are in agreement with BAO data and with the JLA SNe sample. However the amplitude of the fluctuations is found to be higher than inferred from rich cluster counts and weak gravitational lensing. Apart from these tensions, the base LCDM cosmology provides an excellent description of the Planck CMB observations and many other astrophysical data sets.
[83]  oai:arXiv.org:1605.02985  [pdf] - 1530681
Planck intermediate results. XLVI. Reduction of large-scale systematic effects in HFI polarization maps and estimation of the reionization optical depth
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Ilic, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirri, G.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 53 pages, corresponding author: J.-L. Puget, submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-05-10, last modified: 2016-05-26
This paper describes the identification, modelling, and removal of previously unexplained systematic effects in the polarization data of the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) on large angular scales, including new mapmaking and calibration procedures, new and more complete end-to-end simulations, and a set of robust internal consistency checks on the resulting maps. These maps, at 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz, are early versions of those that will be released in final form later in 2016. The improvements allow us to determine the cosmic reionization optical depth $\tau$ using, for the first time, the low-multipole $EE$ data from HFI, reducing significantly the central value and uncertainty, and hence the upper limit. Two different likelihood procedures are used to constrain $\tau$ from two estimators of the CMB $E$- and $B$-mode angular power spectra at 100 and 143 GHz, after debiasing the spectra from a small remaining systematic contamination. These all give fully consistent results. A further consistency test is performed using cross-correlations derived from the Low Frequency Instrument maps of the Planck 2015 data release and the new HFI data. For this purpose, end-to-end analyses of systematic effects from the two instruments are used to demonstrate the near independence of their dominant systematic error residuals. The tightest result comes from the HFI-based $\tau$ posterior distribution using the maximum likelihood power spectrum estimator from $EE$ data only, giving a value $0.055\pm 0.009$. In a companion paper these results are discussed in the context of the best-fit Planck $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model and recent models of reionization.
[84]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01590  [pdf] - 1486777
Planck 2015 results. XIV. Dark energy and modified gravity
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salvatelli, V.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 33 pages, 22 figures. Minor changes after journal acceptance
Submitted: 2015-02-05, last modified: 2016-05-03
We study the implications of Planck data for models of dark energy (DE) and modified gravity (MG), beyond the cosmological constant scenario. We start with cases where the DE only directly affects the background evolution, considering Taylor expansions of the equation of state, principal component analysis and parameterizations related to the potential of a minimally coupled DE scalar field. When estimating the density of DE at early times, we significantly improve present constraints. We then move to general parameterizations of the DE or MG perturbations that encompass both effective field theories and the phenomenology of gravitational potentials in MG models. Lastly, we test a range of specific models, such as k-essence, f(R) theories and coupled DE. In addition to the latest Planck data, for our main analyses we use baryonic acoustic oscillations, type-Ia supernovae and local measurements of the Hubble constant. We further show the impact of measurements of the cosmological perturbations, such as redshift-space distortions and weak gravitational lensing. These additional probes are important tools for testing MG models and for breaking degeneracies that are still present in the combination of Planck and background data sets. All results that include only background parameterizations are in agreement with LCDM. When testing models that also change perturbations (even when the background is fixed to LCDM), some tensions appear in a few scenarios: the maximum one found is \sim 2 sigma for Planck TT+lowP when parameterizing observables related to the gravitational potentials with a chosen time dependence; the tension increases to at most 3 sigma when external data sets are included. It however disappears when including CMB lensing.
[85]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.07330  [pdf] - 1530632
Marginalized Fisher Forecast for Horndeski Dark Energy Models
Comments: 5 pages, 1 figure
Submitted: 2016-04-25, last modified: 2016-04-26
We use effective field theory (EFT) formalism to forecast the constraint on Horndeski class of dark energy models with future supernova and galaxy surveys. Previously (Gleyzes {\it et al.}) computed unmarginalized constraints (68\% CL error $\sim 10^{-3}$--$10^{-2}$) on EFT dark energy parameters by fixing all other parameters. We extend the previous work by allowing all cosmological parameters and nuisance parameters to vary and marginalizing over them. We find that (i) the constraints on EFT dark energy parameters are typically worsen by a factor of few after marginalization, and (ii) the constraint on the dark energy equation of state $w$ is not significantly affected by the inclusion of EFT dark energy parameters.
[86]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.01029  [pdf] - 1530576
Planck intermediate results. XLIV. The structure of the Galactic magnetic field from dust polarization maps of the southern Galactic cap
Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arzoumanian, D.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Jeune, M. Le; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Neveu, J.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Soler, J. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-04-04
We study the statistical properties of interstellar dust polarization at high Galactic latitude, using the Stokes parameter Planck maps at 353 GHz. Our aim is to advance the understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM), and to provide a model of the polarized dust foreground for cosmic microwave background component-separation procedures. Focusing on the southern Galactic cap, we examine the statistical distributions of the polarization fraction ($p$) and angle ($\psi$) to characterize the ordered and turbulent components of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) in the solar neighbourhood. We relate patterns at large angular scales in polarization to the orientation of the mean (ordered) GMF towards Galactic coordinates $(l_0,b_0)=(70^\circ \pm 5^\circ,24^\circ \pm 5^\circ)$. The histogram of $p$ shows a wide dispersion up to 25 %. The histogram of $\psi$ has a standard deviation of $12^\circ$ about the regular pattern expected from the ordered GMF. We use these histograms to build a phenomenological model of the turbulent component of the GMF, assuming a uniform effective polarization fraction ($p_0$) of dust emission. To model the Stokes parameters, we approximate the integration along the line of sight (LOS) as a sum over a set of $N$ independent polarization layers, in each of which the turbulent component of the GMF is obtained from Gaussian realizations of a power-law power spectrum. We are able to reproduce the observed $p$ and $\psi$ distributions using: a $p_0$ value of (26 $\pm$ 3)%; a ratio of 0.9 $\pm$ 0.1 between the strengths of the turbulent and mean components of the GMF; and a small value of $N$. We relate the polarization layers to the density structure and to the correlation length of the GMF along the LOS.
[87]  oai:arXiv.org:1602.04883  [pdf] - 1418783
Damping and power spectra of quasi-periodic intensity disturbances above a solar polar coronal hole
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2016-02-15
We study intensity disturbances above a solar polar coronal hole seen in the AIA 171 \AA\ and 193 \AA\ passbands, aiming to provide more insights into their physical nature. The damping and power spectra of the intensity disturbances with frequencies from 0.07 mHz to 10.5 mHz are investigated. The damping of the intensity disturbances tends to be stronger at lower frequencies, and their damping behavior below 980" (for comparison, the limb is at 945") is different from what happens above. No significant difference is found between the damping of the intensity disturbances in the AIA 171 \AA\ and that in the AIA 193 \AA. The indices of the power spectra of the intensity disturbances are found to be slightly smaller in the AIA 171 \AA\ than in the AIA 193 \AA, but the difference is within one sigma deviation. An additional enhanced component is present in the power spectra in a period range of 8--40 minutes at lower heights. While the power spectra of spicule is highly correlated with its associated intensity disturbance, it suggests that the power spectra of the intensity disturbances might be a mixture of spicules and wave activities. We suggest that each intensity disturbance in the polar coronal hole is possibly a series of independent slow magnetoacoustic waves triggered by spicular activities.
[88]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.02808  [pdf] - 1366267
Observational effects of a running Planck mass
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, accepted by PRD
Submitted: 2015-11-09, last modified: 2016-02-10
We consider observational effects of a running effective Planck mass in the scalar-tensor gravity theory. At the background level, an increasing effective Planck mass allows a larger Hubble constant $H_0$, which is more compatible with the local direct measurements. At the perturbative level, for cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies, an increasing effective Planck mass ($i$) suppresses the unlensed CMB power at $\ell \lesssim 30$ via the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect and ($ii$) enhances CMB lensing power. Both effects slightly relax the tension between the current CMB data from the Planck satellite and the standard $\Lambda$CDM model predictions. However, those impacts on the CMB secondary anisotropies are subdominant, and the overall constraints are driven by the background measurements. Combining CMB data from the Planck satellite and an $H_0$ prior from Riess $et$ $al$, we find a $\sim 2\sigma$ hint of a positive running of effective Planck mass. However, the hint goes away when we add other low-redshift observational data including type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations and an Universe age estimation using the oldest stars.
[89]  oai:arXiv.org:1506.07135  [pdf] - 1483209
Planck 2015 results. XVI. Isotropy and statistics of the CMB
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Aluri, P. K.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Casaponsa, B.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Pant, N.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments: Paper XVI of the Planck 2015 release. This is the version accepted by A&A. An additional section discussing the sensitivity of various anomalies to sky coverage has been included
Submitted: 2015-06-23, last modified: 2016-01-22
We test the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies using observations made by the Planck satellite. Our results are based mainly on the full Planck mission for temperature, but also include some polarization measurements. In particular, we consider the CMB anisotropy maps derived from the multi-frequency Planck data by several component-separation methods. For the temperature anisotropies, we find excellent agreement between results based on these sky maps over both a very large fraction of the sky and a broad range of angular scales, establishing that potential foreground residuals do not affect our studies. Tests of skewness, kurtosis, multi-normality, N-point functions, and Minkowski functionals indicate consistency with Gaussianity, while a power deficit at large angular scales is manifested in several ways, for example low map variance. The results of a peak statistics analysis are consistent with the expectations of a Gaussian random field. The "Cold Spot" is detected with several methods, including map kurtosis, peak statistics, and mean temperature profile. We thoroughly probe the large-scale dipolar power asymmetry, detecting it with several independent tests, and address the subject of a posteriori correction. Tests of directionality suggest the presence of angular clustering from large to small scales, but at a significance that is dependent on the details of the approach. We perform the first examination of polarization data, finding the morphology of stacked peaks to be consistent with the expectations of statistically isotropic simulations. Where they overlap, these results are consistent with the Planck 2013 analysis based on the nominal mission data and provide our most thorough view of the statistics of the CMB fluctuations to date.
[90]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.09215  [pdf] - 1359006
Magnetic flux supplement to coronal bright points
Comments: 20 pages, 16 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-11-30
Coronal bright points (BPs) are associated with magnetic bipolar features (MBFs) and magnetic cancellation. Here, we investigate how BP-associated MBFs form and how the consequent magnetic cancellation occurs. We analyse longitudinal magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to investigate the photospheric magnetic flux evolution of 70 BPs. From images taken in the 193 A passband of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) we dermine that the BPs' lifetimes vary from 2.7 to 58.8 hours. The formation of the BP MBFs is found to involve three processes, namely emergence, convergence and local coalescence of the magnetic fluxes. The formation of a MBF can involve more than one of these processes. Out of the 70 cases, flux emergence is the main process of a MBF buildup of 52 BPs, mainly convergence is seen in 28, and 14 cases are associated with local coalescence. For MBFs formed by bipolar emergence, the time difference between the flux emergence and the BP appearance in the AIA 193 \AA\ passband varies from 0.1 to 3.2 hours with an average of 1.3 hours. While magnetic cancellation is found in all 70 BPs, it can occur in three different ways: (I) between a MBF and small weak magnetic features (in 33 BPs); (II) within a MBF with the two polarities moving towards each other from a large distance (34 BPs); (III) within a MBF whose two main polarities emerge in the same place simultaneously (3 BPs). While a MBF builds up the skeleton of a BP, we find that the magnetic activities responsible for the BP heating may involve small weak fields.
[91]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.02779  [pdf] - 1354790
Planck intermediate results. XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium
Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 18 pages, 15 figures. A&A accepted. Corresponding author: T. Ghosh
Submitted: 2015-05-11, last modified: 2015-10-05
The quest for a B-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. We present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the 353 GHz Planck Stokes maps at high Galactic latitude, relevant to the study of dust emission as a polarized foreground to the CMB. We filter the intensity and polarization maps to isolate filaments in the range of angular scales where the power asymmetry between E-modes and B-modes is observed. Using the Smoothed Hessian Major Axis Filament Finder, we identify 259 filaments at high Galactic latitude, with lengths larger or equal to 2\deg\ (corresponding to 3.5 pc in length for a typical distance of 100 pc). These filaments show a preferred orientation parallel to the magnetic field projected onto the plane of the sky, derived from their polarization angles. We present mean maps of the filaments in Stokes I, Q, U, E, and B, computed by stacking individual images rotated to align the orientations of the filaments. Combining the stacked images and the histogram of relative orientations, we estimate the mean polarization fraction of the filaments to be 11 %. Furthermore, we show that the correlation between the filaments and the magnetic field orientations may account for the E and B asymmetry and the $C_{\ell}^{TE}/C_{\ell}^{EE}$ ratio, reported in the power spectra analysis of the Planck 353 GHz polarization maps. Future models of the dust foreground for CMB polarization studies will need to take into account the observed correlation between the dust polarization and the structure of interstellar matter.
[92]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.05639  [pdf] - 1279385
Active region upflows: 2. Data driven MHD modeling
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ. Multi-instrument observations from where data for the current modelling is taken is presented in Vanninathan et al. 2015 (also accepted for publication in A&A and on arxiv)
Submitted: 2015-09-18
Context. Observations of many active regions show a slow systematic outflow/upflow from their edges lasting from hours to days. At present no physical explanation has been proven, while several suggestions have been put forward. Aims. This paper investigates one possible method for maintaining these upflows assuming that convective motions drive the magnetic field to initiate them through magnetic reconnection. Methods. We use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data to provide an initial potential three dimensional magnetic field of the active region NOAA 11123 on 2010 November 13 where the characteristic upflow velocities are observed. A simple one-dimensional hydrostatic atmospheric model covering the region from the photosphere to the corona is derived. Local Correlation Tracking of the magnetic features in the HMI data is used to derive a proxy for the time dependent velocity field. The time dependent evolution of the system is solved using a resistive three-dimensional MagnetoHydro-Dynamic code. Results. The magnetic field contains several null points located well above the photosphere, with their fan planes dividing the magnetic field into independent open and closed flux domains. The stressing of the interfaces between the different flux domains is expected to provide locations where magnetic reconnection can take place and drive systematic flows. In this case, the region between the closed and open flux is identified as the region where observations find the systematic upflows. Conclusions. In the present experiment, the driving only initiates magneto-acoustic waves, without driving any systematic upflows at any of the flux interfaces.
[93]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.05624  [pdf] - 1312024
Active region upflows: 1. Multi-instrument observations
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. Data driven modelling using observations from this paper is presented in Galsgaard et al. 2015 (also accepted for publication in A&A and on arxiv)
Submitted: 2015-09-18
Upflows at the edges of active regions (ARs) are studied by spatially and temporally combining multi-instrument observations obtained with EIS/Hinode, AIA and HMI/SDO and IBIS/NSO, to derive their plasma parameters. This information is used for benchmarking data-driven modelling of the upflows (Galsgaard et al., 2015). The studied AR upflow displays blueshifted emission of 5-20 km/s in Fe XII and Fe XIII and its average electron density is 1.8x10^9 cm^3 at 1 MK. The time variation of the density shows no significant change (in a 3sigma error). The plasma density along a single loop drops by 50% over a distance of 20000 km. We find a second velocity component in the blue wing of the Fe XII and Fe XIII lines at 105 km/s. This component is persistent during the whole observing period of 3.5 hours with variations of only 15 km/s. We also study the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field and find that magnetic flux diffusion is responsible for the formation of the upflow region. High cadence Halpha observations of the chromosphere at the footpoints of the upflow region show no significant jet-like (spicule/rapid blue excursion) activity to account for several hours/days of plasma upflow. Using an image enhancement technique, we show that the coronal structures seen in the AIA 193A channel is comparable to the EIS Fe XII images, while images in the AIA 171A channel reveals additional loops that are a result of contribution from cooler emission to this channel. Our results suggest that at chromospheric heights there are no signatures that support the possible contribution of spicules to AR upflows. We suggest that magnetic flux diffusion is responsible for the formation of the coronal upflows. The existence of two velocity components possibly indicate the presence of two different flows which are produced by two different physical mechanisms, e.g. magnetic reconnection and pressure-driven.
[94]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.00742  [pdf] - 1292226
The first and second data releases of the Kilo-Degree Survey
Comments: 26 pages, 26 figures, 2 appendices; two new figures, several textual clarifications, updated references; accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2015-07-02, last modified: 2015-08-19
The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the VLT Survey Telescope and the OmegaCAM camera. KiDS will image 1500 square degrees in four filters (ugri), and together with its near-infrared counterpart VIKING will produce deep photometry in nine bands. Designed for weak lensing shape and photometric redshift measurements, the core science driver of the survey is mapping the large-scale matter distribution in the Universe back to a redshift of ~0.5. Secondary science cases are manifold, covering topics such as galaxy evolution, Milky Way structure, and the detection of high-redshift clusters and quasars. KiDS is an ESO Public Survey and dedicated to serving the astronomical community with high-quality data products derived from the survey data, as well as with calibration data. Public data releases will be made on a yearly basis, the first two of which are presented here. For a total of 148 survey tiles (~160 sq.deg.) astrometrically and photometrically calibrated, coadded ugri images have been released, accompanied by weight maps, masks, source lists, and a multi-band source catalog. A dedicated pipeline and data management system based on the Astro-WISE software system, combined with newly developed masking and source classification software, is used for the data production of the data products described here. The achieved data quality and early science projects based on the data products in the first two data releases are reviewed in order to validate the survey data. Early scientific results include the detection of nine high-z QSOs, fifteen candidate strong gravitational lenses, high-quality photometric redshifts and galaxy structural parameters for hundreds of thousands of galaxies. (Abridged)
[95]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01582  [pdf] - 1486774
Planck 2015 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results
Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Farhang, M.; Feeney, S.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Florido, E.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jin, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leahy, J. P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Müenchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Oppermann, N.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Pelkonen, V. -M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B. Rouillé; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Sanghera, H. S.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Shiraishi, M.; Smith, K.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tristram, M.; Troja, A.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vidal, M.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.
Comments: 40 pages, 24 figures
Submitted: 2015-02-05, last modified: 2015-08-09
The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14~May 2009 and scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12~August 2009 and 23~October 2013. In February~2015, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based on data from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data and the data products in the release, as well as the associated cosmological and astrophysical science results and papers. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and diffuse foregrounds in temperature and polarization, catalogues of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic cold clumps), and extensive simulations of signals and noise used in assessing the performance of the analysis methods and assessment of uncertainties. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data are described, as well as a CMB lensing likelihood. Scientific results include cosmological parameters deriving from CMB power spectra, gravitational lensing, and cluster counts, as well as constraints on inflation, non-Gaussianity, primordial magnetic fields, dark energy, and modified gravity.
[96]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.08440  [pdf] - 1264187
Sources of quasi-periodic propagating disturbances above a solar polar coronal hole
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJL
Submitted: 2015-07-30
Quasi-periodic propagating disturbances (PDs) are ubiquitous in polar coronal holes on the Sun. It remains unclear as to what generates PDs. In this work, we investigate how the PDs are generated in the solar atmosphere by analyzing a fourhour dataset taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We find convincing evidence that spicular activities in the solar transition region as seen in the AIA 304 {\AA} passband are responsible for PDs in the corona as revealed in the AIA 171 {\AA} images. We conclude that spicules are an important source that triggers coronal PDs.
[97]  oai:arXiv.org:1507.07594  [pdf] - 1273260
Cool transition region loops observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2015-07-27
We report on the first Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) study of cool transition region loops. This class of loops has received little attention in the literature. A cluster of such loops was observed on the solar disk in active region NOAA11934, in the Si IV 1402.8 \AA\ spectral raster and 1400 \AA\ slit-jaw (SJ) images. We divide the loops into three groups and study their dynamics and interaction. The first group comprises relatively stable loops, with 382--626\,km cross-sections. Observed Doppler velocities are suggestive of siphon flows, gradually changing from -10 km/s at one end to 20 km/s at the other end of the loops. Nonthermal velocities from 15 to 25 km/s were determined. These physical properties suggest that these loops are impulsively heated by magnetic reconnection occurring at the blue-shifted footpoints where magnetic cancellation with a rate of $10^{15}$ Mx/s is found. The released magnetic energy is redistributed by the siphon flows. The second group corresponds to two footpoints rooted in mixed-magnetic-polarity regions, where magnetic cancellation occurred at a rate of $10^{15}$ Mx/s and line profiles with enhanced wings of up to 200 km/s were observed. These are suggestive of explosive-like events. The Doppler velocities combined with the SJ images suggest possible anti-parallel flows in finer loop strands. In the third group, interaction between two cool loop systems is observed. Evidence for magnetic reconnection between the two loop systems is reflected in the line profiles of explosive events, and a magnetic cancellation rate of $3\times10^{15}$ Mx/s observed in the corresponding area. The IRIS observations have thus opened a new window of opportunity for in-depth investigations of cool transition region loops. Further numerical experiments are crucial for understanding their physics and their role in the coronal heating processes.
[98]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.06600  [pdf] - 1129116
Revisiting the cosmological bias due to local gravitational redshifts
Comments: 3 pages; 4 figures; accepted by PRD
Submitted: 2015-04-24, last modified: 2015-05-22
A recent article by Wojtak {\it et al} (arXiv:1504.00718) pointed out that the local gravitational redshift, despite its smallness ($\sim 10^{-5}$), can have a noticeable ($\sim 1\%$) systematic effect on our cosmological parameter measurements. The authors studied a few extended cosmological models (nonflat $\Lambda$CDM, $w$CDM, and $w_0$-$w_a$CDM) with a mock supernova data set. We repeat this calculation and find that the $\sim 1\%$ biases are due to strong degeneracy between cosmological parameters. When cosmic microwave background (CMB) data are added to break the degeneracy, the biases due to local gravitational redshift are negligible ($\lesssim 0.1 \sigma$).
[99]  oai:arXiv.org:1505.00407  [pdf] - 987916
Coronal sources and in situ properties of the solar winds sampled by ACE during 1999-2008
Comments: 24 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in Solar Physics
Submitted: 2015-05-03
We identify the coronal sources of the solar winds sampled by the ACE spacecraft during 1999-2008, and examine the in situ solar wind properties as a function of wind sources. The standard two-step mapping technique is adopted to establish the photospheric footpoints of the magnetic flux tubes along which the ACE winds flow. The footpoints are then placed in the context of EIT 284~\AA\ images and photospheric magnetograms, allowing us to categorize the sources into four groups: coronal holes (CHs), active regions (ARs), the quiet Sun (QS), and "Undefined". This practice also enables us to establish the response to solar activity of the fractions occupied by each kind of solar winds, and of their speeds and O$^{7+}$/O$^{6+}$ ratios measured in situ. We find that during the maximum phase, the majority of ACE winds originate from ARs. During the declining phase, CHs and ARs are equally important contributors to the ACE solar winds. The QS contribution increases with decreasing solar activity, and maximizes in the minimum phase when QS appear to be the primary supplier of the ACE winds. With decreasing activity, the winds from all sources tend to become cooler, as represented by the increasingly low O$^{7+}$/O$^{6+}$ ratios. On the other hand, during each activity phase, the AR winds tend to be the slowest and associated with the highest O$^{7+}$/O$^{6+}$ ratios, and the CH winds correspond to the other extreme, with the QS winds lying in between. Applying the same analysis method to the slow winds only, here defined as the winds with speeds lower than 500 km s$^{-1}$, we find basically the same overall behavior, as far as the contributions of individual groups of sources are concerned. This statistical study indicates that QS regions are an important source of the solar wind during the minimum phase.
[100]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.06501  [pdf] - 938769
Knowledge Discovery Framework for the Virtual Observatory
Comments: ADASS XVI ASP Conference Series, Vol. 376, proceedings of the conference held 15-18 October 2006 in Tucson, Arizona, USA. Edited by Richard A. Shaw, Frank Hill and David J. Bell., p.563
Submitted: 2015-02-23
We describe a framework that allows a scientist-user to easily query for information across all Virtual Observatory (VO) repositories and pull it back for analysis. This framework hides the gory details of meta-data remediation and data formatting from the user, allowing them to get on with search, retrieval and analysis of VO data as if they were drawn from a single source using a science based terminology rather than a data-centric one.
[101]  oai:arXiv.org:1412.4671  [pdf] - 908115
Testing Inflation with Large Scale Structure: Connecting Hopes with Reality
Comments: 27 pages + references
Submitted: 2014-12-15
The statistics of primordial curvature fluctuations are our window into the period of inflation, where these fluctuations were generated. To date, the cosmic microwave background has been the dominant source of information about these perturbations. Large scale structure is however from where drastic improvements should originate. In this paper, we explain the theoretical motivations for pursuing such measurements and the challenges that lie ahead. In particular, we discuss and identify theoretical targets regarding the measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity. We argue that when quantified in terms of the local (equilateral) template amplitude $f_{\rm NL}^{\rm loc}$ ($f_{\rm NL}^{\rm eq}$), natural target levels of sensitivity are $\Delta f_{\rm NL}^{\rm loc, eq.} \simeq 1$. We highlight that such levels are within reach of future surveys by measuring 2-, 3- and 4-point statistics of the galaxy spatial distribution. This paper summarizes a workshop held at CITA (University of Toronto) on October 23-24, 2014.
[102]  oai:arXiv.org:1409.6425  [pdf] - 1222184
Explosive events on sub-arcsecond scale in IRIS observations: a case study
Comments: 16 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2014-09-23
We present study of a typical explosive event (EE) at sub-arcsecond scale witnessed by strong non-Gaussian profiles with blue- and red-shifted emission of up to 150 km/s seen in the transition-region Si IV 1402.8 \AA, and the chromospheric Mg II k 2796.4 \AA\ and C II 1334.5 \AA\ observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph at unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution. For the first time a EE is found to be associated with very small-scale ($\sim$120 km wide) plasma ejection followed by retraction in the chromosphere. These small-scale jets originate from a compact bright-point-like structure of $\sim$1.5" size as seen in the IRIS 1330 \AA\ images. SDO/AIA and SDO/HMI co-observations show that the EE lies in the footpoint of a complex loop-like brightening system. The EE is detected in the higher temperature channels of AIA 171 \AA, 193 \AA\ and 131 \AA\ suggesting that it reaches a higher temperature of log T$=5.36\pm0.06$ (K). Brightenings observed in the AIA channels with durations 90--120 seconds are probably caused by the plasma ejections seen in the chromosphere. The wings of the C II line behave in a similar manner as the Si IV's indicating close formation temperatures, while the Mg II k wings show additional Doppler-shifted emission. Magnetic convergence or emergence followed by cancellation at a rate of $5\times10^{14}$ Mx s$^{-1}$ is associated with the EE region. The combined changes of the locations and the flux of different magnetic patches suggest that magnetic reconnection must have taken place. Our results challenge several theories put forward in the past to explain non-Gaussian line profiles, i.e. EEs. Our case study on its own, however, cannot reject these theories, thus further in-depth studies on the phenomena producing EEs are required.
[103]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.5473  [pdf] - 1216482
Measurements of Outflow Velocities in On-Disk Plumes from EIS Hinode Observations
Comments: accepted for publication in ApJ, 13 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2014-08-23
The contribution of plumes to the solar wind has been subject to hot debate in the past decades. The EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode provides a unique means to deduce outflow velocities at coronal heights via direct Doppler shift measurements of coronal emission lines. Such direct Doppler shift measurements were not possible with previous spectrometers. We measure the outflow velocity at coronal heights in several on-disk long-duration plumes, which are located in coronal holes and show significant blue shifts throughout the entire observational period. In one case, a plume is measured 4 hours apart. The deduced outflow velocities are consistent, suggesting that the flows are quasi-steady. Furthermore, we provide an outflow velocity profile along the plumes, finding that the velocity corrected for the line-of-sight effect can reach 10 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.02 $R_{\odot}$, 15 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.03 $R_{\odot}$, and 25 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.05 $R_{\odot}$. This clear signature of steady acceleration, combined with the fact that there is no significant blue shift at the base of plumes, provides an important constraint on plume models. At the height of 1.03 $R_{\odot}$, EIS also deduced a density of 1.3$\times10^{8}$ cm$^{-3}$, resulting in a proton flux of about 4.2$\times10^9$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ scaled to 1AU, which is an order of magnitude higher than the proton input to a typical solar wind if a radial expansion is assumed. This suggests that, coronal hole plumes may be an important source of the solar wind.
[104]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.1544  [pdf] - 1215432
Oscillations in a sunspot with light bridges
Comments: 11 pages, 7 figures
Submitted: 2014-07-06
Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode observed a sunspot (AR 11836) with two light bridges (LBs) on 31 Aug 2013. We analysed a 2-hour \ion{Ca}{2} H emission intensity data set and detected strong 5-min oscillation power on both LBs and in the inner penumbra. The time-distance plot reveals that 5-min oscillation phase does not vary significantly along the thin bridge, indicating that the oscillations are likely to originate from the underneath. The slit taken along the central axis of the wide light bridge exhibits a standing wave feature. However, at the centre of the wide bridge, the 5-min oscillation power is found to be stronger than at its sides. Moreover, the time-distance plot across the wide bridge exhibits a herringbone pattern that indicates a counter-stream of two running waves originated at the bridge sides. Thus, the 5-min oscillations on the wide bridge also resemble the properties of running penumbral waves. The 5-min oscillations are suppressed in the umbra, while the 3-min oscillations occupy all three cores of the sunspot's umbra, separated by the LBs. The 3-min oscillations were found to be in phase at both sides of the LBs. It may indicate that either LBs do not affect umbral oscillations, or umbral oscillations at different umbral cores share the same source. Also, it indicates that LBs are rather shallow objects situated in the upper part of the umbra. We found that umbral flashes follow the life cycles of umbral oscillations with much larger amplitudes. They cannot propagate across LBs. Umbral flashes dominate the 3-min oscillation power within each core, however, they do not disrupt the phase of umbral oscillation.
[105]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.5149  [pdf] - 1180066
Chameleons in the Early Universe: Kicks, Rebounds, and Particle Production
Comments: 28 pages, 17 figures; minor changes made to match published version; companion to arXiv:1304.0009
Submitted: 2013-10-18, last modified: 2014-06-02
Chameleon gravity is a scalar-tensor theory that includes a non-minimal coupling between the scalar field and the matter fields and yet mimics general relativity in the Solar System. The scalar degree of freedom is hidden in high-density environments because the effective mass of the chameleon scalar depends on the trace of the stress-energy tensor. In the early Universe, when the trace of the matter stress-energy tensor is nearly zero, the chameleon is very light, and Hubble friction prevents it from reaching the minimum of its effective potential. Whenever a particle species becomes non-relativistic, however, the trace of the stress-energy tensor is temporarily nonzero, and the chameleon begins to roll. We show that these "kicks" to the chameleon field have catastrophic consequences for chameleon gravity. The velocity imparted to the chameleon by the kick is sufficiently large that the chameleon's mass changes rapidly as it slides past its potential minimum. This nonadiabatic evolution shatters the chameleon field by generating extremely high-energy perturbations through quantum particle production. If the chameleon's coupling to matter is slightly stronger than gravitational, the excited modes have trans-Planckian momenta. The production of modes with momenta exceeding 1e7 GeV can only be avoided for small couplings and finely tuned initial conditions. These quantum effects also significantly alter the background evolution of the chameleon field, and we develop new analytic and numerical techniques to treat quantum particle production in the regime of strong dissipation. This analysis demonstrates that chameleon gravity cannot be treated as a classical field theory at the time of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and casts doubt on chameleon gravity's viability as an alternative to general relativity.
[106]  oai:arXiv.org:1405.2194  [pdf] - 844889
H\alpha\ spectroscopy and multiwavelength imaging of a solar flare caused by filament eruption
Comments: Accepted by A&A, 18 pages, 16 figures
Submitted: 2014-05-09, last modified: 2014-05-15
We study a sequence of eruptive events including filament eruption, a GOES C4.3 flare and a coronal mass ejection. We aim to identify the possible trigger(s) and precursor(s) of the filament destabilisation; investigate flare kernel characteristics; flare ribbons/kernels formation and evolution; study the interrelation of the filament-eruption/flare/coronal-mass-ejection phenomena as part of the integral active-region magnetic field configuration; determine H\alpha\ line profile evolution during the eruptive phenomena. Multi-instrument observations are analysed including H\alpha\ line profiles, speckle images at H\alpha-0.8 \AA\ and H\alpha+0.8 \AA\ from IBIS at DST/NSO, EUV images and magnetograms from the SDO, coronagraph images from STEREO and the X-ray flux observations from FERMI and GOES. We establish that the filament destabilisation and eruption are the main trigger for the flaring activity. A surge-like event with a circular ribbon in one of the filament footpoints is determined as the possible trigger of the filament destabilisation. Plasma draining in this footpoint is identified as the precursor for the filament eruption. A magnetic flux emergence prior to the filament destabilisation followed by a high rate of flux cancelation of 1.34$\times10^{16}$ Mx s$^{-1}$ is found during the flare activity. The flare X-ray lightcurves reveal three phases that are found to be associated with three different ribbons occurring consecutively. A kernel from each ribbon is selected and analysed. The kernel lightcurves and H alpha line profiles reveal that the emission increase in the line centre is stronger than that in the line wings. A delay of around 5-6 mins is found between the increase in the line centre and the occurrence of red asymmetry. Only red asymmetry is observed in the ribbons during the impulsive phases. Blue asymmetry is only associated with the dynamic filament.
[107]  oai:arXiv.org:1311.6105  [pdf] - 773440
The full CMB temperature bispectrum from single-field inflation
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures
Submitted: 2013-11-24
We compute the full cosmic microwave background temperature bispectrum generated by nonlinearities after single-field inflation. By integrating the photon temperature at second order along a perturbed geodesic in Newtonian gauge, we derive an expression for the observed temperature fluctuations that, for the first time, clarifies the separation of the gravitational lensing and time-delay effects from the purely second-order contributions. We then use the second-order Boltzmann code CosmoLib$2^{\rm nd}$ to calculate these contributions and their bispectrum. Including the perturbations in the photon path, the numerically computed bispectrum exactly matches the expected squeezed limit. Moreover, the analytic squeezed-limit formula reproduces well the signal-to-noise and shape of the full bispectrum, potentially facilitating the subtraction of the bias induced by second-order effects. For a cosmic-variance limited experiment with $l_{\rm max} = 2000$, the bias on a local signal is $f_{\rm NL}^{\rm loc} =0.73$ negligible for equilateral and orthogonal signals. The signal-to-noise ratio is unity at $l_{\rm max} \sim 3000$, suggesting that second-order effects may hopefully be measured in the future.
[108]  oai:arXiv.org:1307.4857  [pdf] - 791690
The power spectrum of systematics in cosmic shear tomography and the bias on cosmological parameters
Comments: 19 pages, 5 tables, 4 figures
Submitted: 2013-07-18
Cosmic shear tomography has emerged as one of the most promising tools to both investigate the nature of dark energy and discriminate between General Relativity and modified gravity theories. In order to successfully achieve these goals, systematics in shear measurements have to be taken into account; their impact on the weak lensing power spectrum has to be carefully investigated in order to estimate the bias induced on the inferred cosmological parameters. To this end, we develop here an efficient tool to compute the power spectrum of systematics by propagating, in a realistic way, shear measurement, source properties and survey setup uncertainties. Starting from analytical results for unweighted moments and general assumptions on the relation between measured and actual shear, we derive analytical expressions for the multiplicative and additive bias, showing how these terms depend not only on the shape measurement errors, but also on the properties of the source galaxies (namely, size, magnitude and spectral energy distribution). We are then able to compute the amplitude of the systematics power spectrum and its scaling with redshift, while we propose a multigaussian expansion to model in a non-parametric way its angular scale dependence. Our method allows to self-consistently propagate the systematics uncertainties to the finally observed shear power spectrum, thus allowing us to quantify the departures from the actual spectrum. We show that even a modest level of systematics can induce non-negligible deviations, thus leading to a significant bias on the recovered cosmological parameters.
[109]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.0009  [pdf] - 1165624
Catastrophic Consequences of Kicking the Chameleon
Comments: 5 pages, 5 figures; accepted for publication in PRL
Submitted: 2013-03-29
The physics of the "dark energy" that drives the current cosmological acceleration remains mysterious, and the dark sector may involve new light dynamical fields. If these light scalars couple to matter, a screening mechanism must prevent them from mediating an unacceptably strong fifth force locally. Here we consider a concrete example: the chameleon mechanism. We show that the same coupling between the chameleon field and matter employed by the screening mechanism also has catastrophic consequences for the chameleon during the Universe's first minutes. The chameleon couples to the trace of the stress-energy tensor, which is temporarily non-zero in a radiation-dominated universe whenever a particle species becomes non-relativistic. These "kicks" impart a significant velocity to the chameleon field, causing its effective mass to vary non-adiabatically and resulting in the copious production of quantum fluctuations. Dissipative effects strongly modify the background evolution of the chameleon field, invalidating all previous classical treatments of chameleon cosmology. Moreover, the resulting fluctuations have extremely high characteristic energies, which casts serious doubt on the validity of the effective theory. Our results demonstrate that quantum particle production can profoundly affect scalar-tensor gravity, a possibility not previously considered. Working in this new context, we also develop the theory and numerics of particle production in the regime of strong dissipation.
[110]  oai:arXiv.org:1301.1351  [pdf] - 611357
Statistical Analysis of Small Ellerman Bomb Events
Comments: 19 pages. 7 Figures
Submitted: 2013-01-07
The properties of Ellerman bombs (EBs), small-scale brightenings in the H-alpha line wings, have proved difficult to establish due to their size being close to the spatial resolution of even the most advanced telescopes. Here, we aim to infer the size and lifetime of EBs using high-resolution data of an emerging active region collected using the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) and Rapid Oscillations of the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instruments as well as the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We develop an algorithm to track EBs through their evolution, finding that EBs can often be much smaller (around 0.3") and shorter lived (less than 1 minute) than previous estimates. A correlation between G-band magnetic bright points and EBs is also found. Combining SDO/HMI and G-band data gives a good proxy of the polarity for the vertical magnetic field. It is found that EBs often occur both over regions of opposite polarity flux and strong unipolar fields, possibly hinting at magnetic reconnection as a driver of these events.The energetics of EB events is found to follow a power-law distribution in the range of "nano-flare" (10^{22-25} ergs).
[111]  oai:arXiv.org:1212.3573  [pdf] - 975575
The CMB bispectrum from recombination
Comments: 5 pages; CosmoLib; CMB
Submitted: 2012-12-14
We compute the cosmic microwave background temperature bispectrum generated by nonlinearities at recombination on all scales. We use CosmoLib$2^{\rm nd}$, a numerical Boltzmann code at second-order to compute CMB bispectra on the full sky. We consistently include all effects except gravitational lensing, which can be added to our result using standard methods. The bispectrum is peaked on squeezed triangles and agrees with the analytic approximation in the squeezed limit at the few per cent level for all the scales where this is applicable. On smaller scales, we recover previous results on perturbed recombination. For cosmic-variance limited data to $l_{\rm max} =2000$, its signal-to-noise is $S/N=0.47$ and will bias a local signal by $f_{\rm NL}^{\rm loc}\simeq 0.82$.
[112]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.5025  [pdf] - 1157961
On the shear estimation bias induced by the spatial variation of colour across galaxy profiles
Comments: MNRAS submitted, 18 pages, 13 Figures
Submitted: 2012-11-21
The spatial variation of the colour of a galaxy may introduce a bias in the measurement of its shape if the PSF profile depends on wavelength. We study how this bias depends on the properties of the PSF and the galaxies themselves. The bias depends on the scales used to estimate the shape, which may be used to optimise methods to reduce the bias. Here we develop a general approach to quantify the bias. Although applicable to any weak lensing survey, we focus on the implications for the ESA Euclid mission. Based on our study of synthetic galaxies we find that the bias is a few times 10^-3 for a typical galaxy observed by Euclid. Consequently, it cannot be neglected and needs to be accounted for. We demonstrate how one can do so using spatially resolved observations of galaxies in two filters. We show that HST observations in the F606W and F814W filters allow us to model and reduce the bias by an order of magnitude, sufficient to meet Euclid's scientific requirements. The precision of the correction is ultimately determined by the number of galaxies for which spatially-resolved observations in at least two filters are available. We use results from the Millennium Simulation to demonstrate that archival HST data will be sufficient for the tomographic cosmic shear analysis with the Euclid dataset.
[113]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.2009  [pdf] - 824078
Coronal hole boundaries at small scales: IV. SOT view Magnetic field properties of small-scale transient brightenings in coronal holes
Comments: 19 pages, 18 figures, A&A in press
Submitted: 2012-10-06
We study the magnetic properties of small-scale transients in coronal hole. We found all brightening events are associated with bipolar regions and caused by magnetic flux emergence followed by cancellation with the pre-existing and newly emerging magnetic flux. In the coronal hole, 19 of 22 events have a single stable polarity which does not change its position in time. In eleven cases this is the dominant polarity. The dominant flux of the coronal hole form the largest concentration of magnetic flux in terms of size while the opposite polarity is distributed in small concentrations. In the coronal hole the number of magnetic elements of the dominant polarity is four times higher than the non-dominant one. The supergranulation configuration appears to preserve its general shape during approximately nine hours of observations although the large concentrations in the network did evolve and were slightly displaced, and their strength either increased or decreased. The emission fluctuations seen in the X-ray bright points are associated with reoccurring magnetic cancellation in the footpoints. Unique observations of an X-ray jet reveal similar magnetic behaviour in the footpoints, i.e. cancellation of the opposite polarity magnetic flux. We found that the magnetic flux cancellation rate during the jet is much higher than in bright points. Not all magnetic cancellations result in an X-ray enhancement, suggesting that there is a threshold of the amount of magnetic flux involved in a cancellation above which brightening would occur at X-ray temperatures. Our study demonstrates that the magnetic flux in coronal holes is continuously recycled through magnetic reconnection which is responsible for the formation of numerous small-scale transient events. The open magnetic flux forming the coronal-hole phenomenon is largely involved in these transient features.
[114]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.6661  [pdf] - 1125155
Newly Discovered Global Temperature Structures in the Quiet Sun at Solar Minimum
Comments: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal, waiting for the full biblio info
Submitted: 2012-07-27
Magnetic loops are building blocks of the closed-field corona. While active region loops are readily seen in images taken at EUV and X-ray wavelengths, quiet Sun loops are seldom identifiable and therefore difficult to study on an individual basis. The first analysis of solar minimum (Carrington Rotation 2077) quiet Sun (QS) coronal loops utilizing a novel technique called the Michigan Loop Diagnostic Technique (MLDT) is presented. This technique combines Differential Emission Measure Tomography (DEMT) and a potential field source surface (PFSS) model, and consists of tracing PFSS field lines through the tomographic grid on which the Local Differential Emission Measure (LDEM) is determined. As a result, the electron temperature Te and density Ne at each point along each individual field line can be obtained. Using data from STEREO/EUVI and SOHO/MDI, the MLDT identifies two types of QS loops in the corona: so-called "up" loops in which the temperature increases with height, and so-called "down" loops in which the temperature decreases with height. Up loops are expected, however, down loops are a surprise, and furthermore, they are ubiquitous in the low-latitude corona. Up loops dominate the QS at higher latitudes. The MLDT allows independent determination of the empirical pressure and density scale heights, and the differences between the two remain to be explained. The down loops appear to be a newly discovered property of the solar minimum corona that may shed light on the physics of coronal heating. The results are shown to be robust to the calibration uncertainties of the EUVI instrument.
[115]  oai:arXiv.org:1205.0608  [pdf] - 1123131
Analysis on a General Class of Holographic Type Dark Energy Models
Comments: 20 pages, 5 figures, minor typos corrected, reference added, published version in JCAP
Submitted: 2012-05-02, last modified: 2012-07-16
We present a detail analysis on a general class of holographic type dark energy models characterized by the length scale $L=\frac1{a^n(t)}\int_0^t dt' a^m(t')$. We show that $n \geq 0$ is required by the recent cosmic accelerated expansion of universe. In the early universe dominated by the constituent with constant equation of state $w_m$, we have $w_{de}\simeq -1-\frac{2n}{3}$ for $n \geq 0$ and $m<0$, and $w_{de}\simeq-\frac23(n-m)+w_m$ for $n > m \geq 0$. The models with $n > m \geq 0$ become single-parameter models like the $\Lambda$CDM model due to the analytic feature $\Omega_{de}\simeq \frac{d^2}4(2m+3w_m+3)^2a^{2(n-m)}$ at radiation- and matter-dominated epoch. Whereas the cases $n=m\geq 0$ should be abandoned as the dark energy cannot dominate the universe forever and there might be too large fraction of dark energy in early universe, and the cases $m> n \geq 0$ are forbidden by the self-consistent requirement $\Omega_{de}\ll1 $ in the early universe. Thus a detailed study on the single-parameter models corresponding to cases $n >m \geq 0$ is carried out by using recent observations. The best-fit analysis indicates that the conformal-age-like models with $n=m+1$, i.e. $L\propto\frac1{Ha}$ in early universe, are more favored and also the models with smaller $n$ for the given $n-m$ are found to fit the observations better. The equation of state of the dark energy in models with $n=m+1 >0$ transits from $w_{de}<-1$ during inflation to $w_{de}>-1$ in radiation- and matter-dominated epoch, and then back to $w_{de}<-1$ eventually. The best-fit result of the case $(n=0, m=-1)$ which is so-called $\eta$HDE model proposed in \cite{Huang:2012xm} is the most favorable model and compatible with the $\Lambda$CDM model.
[116]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.1281  [pdf] - 1124615
Coronal hole boundaries at small scales: III. EIS and SUMER views
Comments: 16 pages, accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2012-07-05
We report on the plasma properties of small-scale transient events identified in the quiet Sun, coronal holes and their boundaries. We use spectroscopic co-observations from SUMER/SoHO and EIS/Hinode combined with high cadence imaging data from XRT/Hinode. We measure Doppler shifts using single and multiple Gauss fits of transition region and coronal lines as well as electron densities and temperatures. We combine co-temporal imaging and spectroscopy to separate brightening expansions from plasma flows. The transient brightening events in coronal holes and their boundaries were found to be very dynamical producing high density outflows at large speeds. Most of these events represent X-ray jets from pre-existing or newly emerging coronal bright points at X-ray temperatures. The average electron density of the jets is logNe ~ 8.76 cm^-3 while in the flaring site it is logNe ~ 9.51 cm^-3. The jet temperatures reach a maximum of 2.5 MK but in the majority of the cases the temperatures do not exceed 1.6 MK. The footpoints of jets have temperatures of a maximum of 2.5 MK though in a single event scanned a minute after the flaring the measured temperature was 12 MK. The jets are produced by multiple microflaring in the transition region and corona. Chromospheric emission was only detected in their footpoints and was only associated with downflows. The Doppler shift measurements in the quiet Sun transient brightenings confirmed that these events do not produce jet-like phenomena. The plasma flows in these phenomena remain trapped in closed loops.
[117]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.5961  [pdf] - 523036
A Cosmology Forecast Toolkit -- CosmoLib
Comments: published in JCAP; added WMAP+ACT constraint on axion monodromy model
Submitted: 2012-01-28, last modified: 2012-06-11
The package CosmoLib is a combination of a cosmological Boltzmann code and a simulation toolkit to forecast the constraints on cosmological parameters from future observations. In this paper we describe the released linear-order part of the package. We discuss the stability and performance of the Boltzmann code. This is written in Newtonian gauge and including dark energy perturbations. In CosmoLib the integrator that computes the CMB angular power spectrum is optimized for a $\ell$-by-$\ell$ brute-force integration, which is useful for studying inflationary models predicting sharp features in the primordial power spectrum of metric fluctuations. The numerical code and its documentation are available at http://www.cita.utoronto.ca/~zqhuang/CosmoLib.
[118]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.4228  [pdf] - 1116741
Holographic Dark Energy Characterized by the Total Comoving Horizon and Insights to Cosmological Constant and Coincidence Problem
Comments: 17 pages, 4 figures, two eqs. (26)(27) added for the consistent approximate solution of dark energy in early universe, references added, published version in PRD
Submitted: 2012-02-20, last modified: 2012-05-02
The observed acceleration of the present universe is shown to be well explained by the holographic dark energy characterized by the total comoving horizon of the universe ($\eta$HDE). It is of interest to notice that the very large primordial part of the comoving horizon generated by the inflation of early universe makes the $\eta$HDE behave like a cosmological constant. As a consequence, both the fine-tuning problem and the coincidence problem can reasonably be understood with the inflationary universe and holographical principle. We present a systematic analysis and obtain a consistent cosmological constraint on the $\eta$HDE model based on the recent cosmological observations. It is found that the $\eta$HDE model gives the best-fit result $\Omega_{m0}=0.270$ ($\Omega_{de0}=0.730$) and the minimal $\chi^2_{min}=542.915$ which is compatible with $\chi^2_{\Lambda {\rm CDM}}=542.919$ for the $\Lambda$CDM model.
[119]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.3517  [pdf] - 1116683
Cosmological Constraint and Analysis on Holographic Dark Energy Model Characterized by the Conformal-age-like Length
Comments: 17 pages, 5 figures, minor changes for the fitting data, references added
Submitted: 2012-02-16, last modified: 2012-04-27
We present a best-fit analysis on the single-parameter holographic dark energy model characterized by the conformal-age-like length, $L=\frac{1}{a^4(t)}\int_0^tdt' a^3(t') $. Based on the Union2 compilation of 557 supernova Ia data, the baryon acoustic oscillation results from the SDSS DR7 and the cosmic microwave background radiation data from the WMAP7, we show that the model gives the minimal $\chi^2_{min}=546.273$, which is comparable to $\chi^2_{\Lambda{\rm CDM}}=544.616$ for the $\Lambda$CDM model. The single parameter $d$ concerned in the model is found to be $d=0.232\pm 0.006\pm 0.009$. Since the fractional density of dark energy $\Omega_{de}\sim d^2a^2$ at $a \ll 1$, the fraction of dark energy is naturally negligible in the early universe, $\Omega_{de} \ll 1$ at $a \ll 1$. The resulting constraints on the present fractional energy density of matter and the equation of state are $\Omega_{m0}=0.286^{+0.019}_{-0.018}^{+0.032}_{-0.028}$ and $w_{de0}=-1.240^{+0.027}_{-0.027}^{+0.045}_{-0.044}$ respectively. The model leads to a slightly larger fraction of matter comparing to the $\Lambda$CDM model. We also provide a systematic analysis on the cosmic evolutions of the fractional energy density of dark energy, the equation of state of dark energy, the deceleration parameter and the statefinder. It is noticed that the equation of state crosses from $w_{de}>-1$ to $w_{de}<-1$, the universe transits from decelerated expansion ($q>0$) to accelerated expansion ($q<0$) recently, and the statefinder may serve as a sensitive diagnostic to distinguish the CHDE model with the $\Lambda$CDM model.
[120]  oai:arXiv.org:1202.2590  [pdf] - 1116578
Holographic Dark Energy Model Characterized by the Conformal-age-like Length
Comments: 9 pages, typos corrected, published version
Submitted: 2012-02-12, last modified: 2012-04-26
A holographic dark energy model characterized by the conformal-age-like length scale $L= \frac{1}{a^4(t)}\int_0^tdt' a^3(t') $ is motivated from the four dimensional spacetime volume at cosmic time $t$ in the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. It is shown that when the background constituent with constant equation of state $w_m$ dominates the universe in the early time, the fractional energy density of the dark energy scales as $\Omega_{de}\simeq \frac94(3+w_m)^2d^2a^2$ with the equation of state given by $w_{de}\simeq-\frac23 +w_m$. The value of $w_m$ is taken to be $w_m\simeq-1$ during inflation, $w_m=\frac13$ in radiation-dominated epoch and $w_m=0$ in matter-dominated epoch respectively. When the model parameter $d$ takes the normal value at order one, the fractional density of dark energy is naturally negligible in the early universe, $\Omega_{de} \ll 1$ at $a \ll 1$. With such an analytic feature, the model can be regarded as a single-parameter model like the $\Lambda$CDM model, so that the present fractional energy density $\Omega_{de}(a=1)$ can solely be determined by solving the differential equation of $\Omega_{de}$ once $d$ is given. We further extend the model to the general case in which both matter and radiation are present. The scenario involving possible interaction between the dark energy and the background constituent is also discussed.
[121]  oai:arXiv.org:1201.5955  [pdf] - 968248
Constraining inflation with future galaxy redshift surveys
Comments: a few reference changed in v2
Submitted: 2012-01-28, last modified: 2012-04-05
With future galaxy surveys, a huge number of Fourier modes of the distribution of the large scale structures in the Universe will become available. These modes are complementary to those of the CMB and can be used to set constraints on models of the early universe, such as inflation. Using a MCMC analysis, we compare the power of the CMB with that of the combination of CMB and galaxy survey data, to constrain the power spectrum of primordial fluctuations generated during inflation. We base our analysis on the Planck satellite and a spectroscopic redshift survey with configuration parameters close to those of the Euclid mission as examples. We first consider models of slow-roll inflation, and show that the inclusion of large scale structure data improves the constraints by nearly halving the error bars on the scalar spectral index and its running. If we attempt to reconstruct the inflationary single-field potential, a similar conclusion can be reached on the parameters characterizing the potential. We then study models with features in the power spectrum. In particular, we consider ringing features produced by a break in the potential and oscillations such as in axion monodromy. Adding large scale structures improves the constraints on features by more than a factor of two. In axion monodromy we show that there are oscillations with small amplitude and frequency in momentum space that are undetected by CMB alone but can be measured by including galaxy surveys in the analysis.
[122]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.3193  [pdf] - 429544
Euclid Definition Study Report
Laureijs, R.; Amiaux, J.; Arduini, S.; Auguères, J. -L.; Brinchmann, J.; Cole, R.; Cropper, M.; Dabin, C.; Duvet, L.; Ealet, A.; Garilli, B.; Gondoin, P.; Guzzo, L.; Hoar, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Holmes, R.; Kitching, T.; Maciaszek, T.; Mellier, Y.; Pasian, F.; Percival, W.; Rhodes, J.; Criado, G. Saavedra; Sauvage, M.; Scaramella, R.; Valenziano, L.; Warren, S.; Bender, R.; Castander, F.; Cimatti, A.; Fèvre, O. Le; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Levi, M.; Lilje, P.; Meylan, G.; Nichol, R.; Pedersen, K.; Popa, V.; Lopez, R. Rebolo; Rix, H. -W.; Rottgering, H.; Zeilinger, W.; Grupp, F.; Hudelot, P.; Massey, R.; Meneghetti, M.; Miller, L.; Paltani, S.; Paulin-Henriksson, S.; Pires, S.; Saxton, C.; Schrabback, T.; Seidel, G.; Walsh, J.; Aghanim, N.; Amendola, L.; Bartlett, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Benabed, K.; Cuby, J. -G.; Elbaz, D.; Fosalba, P.; Gavazzi, G.; Helmi, A.; Hook, I.; Irwin, M.; Kneib, J. -P.; Kunz, M.; Mannucci, F.; Moscardini, L.; Tao, C.; Teyssier, R.; Weller, J.; Zamorani, G.; Osorio, M. R. Zapatero; Boulade, O.; Foumond, J. J.; Di Giorgio, A.; Guttridge, P.; James, A.; Kemp, M.; Martignac, J.; Spencer, A.; Walton, D.; Blümchen, T.; Bonoli, C.; Bortoletto, F.; Cerna, C.; Corcione, L.; Fabron, C.; Jahnke, K.; Ligori, S.; Madrid, F.; Martin, L.; Morgante, G.; Pamplona, T.; Prieto, E.; Riva, M.; Toledo, R.; Trifoglio, M.; Zerbi, F.; Abdalla, F.; Douspis, M.; Grenet, C.; Borgani, S.; Bouwens, R.; Courbin, F.; Delouis, J. -M.; Dubath, P.; Fontana, A.; Frailis, M.; Grazian, A.; Koppenhöfer, J.; Mansutti, O.; Melchior, M.; Mignoli, M.; Mohr, J.; Neissner, C.; Noddle, K.; Poncet, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Serrano, S.; Shane, N.; Starck, J. -L.; Surace, C.; Taylor, A.; Verdoes-Kleijn, G.; Vuerli, C.; Williams, O. R.; Zacchei, A.; Altieri, B.; Sanz, I. Escudero; Kohley, R.; Oosterbroek, T.; Astier, P.; Bacon, D.; Bardelli, S.; Baugh, C.; Bellagamba, F.; Benoist, C.; Bianchi, D.; Biviano, A.; Branchini, E.; Carbone, C.; Cardone, V.; Clements, D.; Colombi, S.; Conselice, C.; Cresci, G.; Deacon, N.; Dunlop, J.; Fedeli, C.; Fontanot, F.; Franzetti, P.; Giocoli, C.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gow, J.; Heavens, A.; Hewett, P.; Heymans, C.; Holland, A.; Huang, Z.; Ilbert, O.; Joachimi, B.; Jennins, E.; Kerins, E.; Kiessling, A.; Kirk, D.; Kotak, R.; Krause, O.; Lahav, O.; van Leeuwen, F.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lombardi, M.; Magliocchetti, M.; Maguire, K.; Majerotto, E.; Maoli, R.; Marulli, F.; Maurogordato, S.; McCracken, H.; McLure, R.; Melchiorri, A.; Merson, A.; Moresco, M.; Nonino, M.; Norberg, P.; Peacock, J.; Pello, R.; Penny, M.; Pettorino, V.; Di Porto, C.; Pozzetti, L.; Quercellini, C.; Radovich, M.; Rassat, A.; Roche, N.; Ronayette, S.; Rossetti, E.; Sartoris, B.; Schneider, P.; Semboloni, E.; Serjeant, S.; Simpson, F.; Skordis, C.; Smadja, G.; Smartt, S.; Spano, P.; Spiro, S.; Sullivan, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trotta, R.; Verde, L.; Wang, Y.; Williger, G.; Zhao, G.; Zoubian, J.; Zucca, E.
Comments: 116 pages, with executive summary and table of contents
Submitted: 2011-10-14
Euclid is a space-based survey mission from the European Space Agency designed to understand the origin of the Universe's accelerating expansion. It will use cosmological probes to investigate the nature of dark energy, dark matter and gravity by tracking their observational signatures on the geometry of the universe and on the cosmic history of structure formation. The mission is optimised for two independent primary cosmological probes: Weak gravitational Lensing (WL) and Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). The Euclid payload consists of a 1.2 m Korsch telescope designed to provide a large field of view. It carries two instruments with a common field-of-view of ~0.54 deg2: the visual imager (VIS) and the near infrared instrument (NISP) which contains a slitless spectrometer and a three bands photometer. The Euclid wide survey will cover 15,000 deg2 of the extragalactic sky and is complemented by two 20 deg2 deep fields. For WL, Euclid measures the shapes of 30-40 resolved galaxies per arcmin2 in one broad visible R+I+Z band (550-920 nm). The photometric redshifts for these galaxies reach a precision of dz/(1+z) < 0.05. They are derived from three additional Euclid NIR bands (Y, J, H in the range 0.92-2.0 micron), complemented by ground based photometry in visible bands derived from public data or through engaged collaborations. The BAO are determined from a spectroscopic survey with a redshift accuracy dz/(1+z) =0.001. The slitless spectrometer, with spectral resolution ~250, predominantly detects Ha emission line galaxies. Euclid is a Medium Class mission of the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme, with a foreseen launch date in 2019. This report (also known as the Euclid Red Book) describes the outcome of the Phase A study.
[123]  oai:arXiv.org:1109.5606  [pdf] - 1084386
Magnetic Reconnection resulting from Flux Emergence: Implications for Jet Formation in the lower solar atmosphere?
Comments: 11 pages, 13 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2011-09-26
We aim at investigating the formation of jet-like features in the lower solar atmosphere, e.g. chromosphere and transition region, as a result of magnetic reconnection. Magnetic reconnection as occurring at chromospheric and transition regions densities and triggered by magnetic flux emergence is studied using a 2.5D MHD code. The initial atmosphere is static and isothermal, with a temperature of 20,000 K. The initial magnetic field is uniform and vertical. Two physical environments with different magnetic field strength (25 G and 50 G) are presented. In each case, two sub-cases are discussed, where the environments have different initial mass density. In the case where we have a weaker magnetic field (25 G) and higher plasma density ($N_e=2\times 10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$), valid for the typical quiet Sun chromosphere, a plasma jet would be observed with a temperature of 2--3 $\times 10^4$ K and a velocity as high as 40 km/s. The opposite case of a medium with a lower electron density ($N_e=2\times 10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$), i.e. more typical for the transition region, and a stronger magnetic field of 50 G, up-flows with line-of-sight velocities as high as 90 km/s and temperatures of 6 $\times$ 10$^5$ K, i.e. upper transition region -- low coronal temperatures, are produced. Only in the latter case, the low corona Fe IX 171 \AA\ shows a response in the jet which is comparable to the O V increase. The results show that magnetic reconnection can be an efficient mechanism to drive plasma outflows in the chromosphere and transition region. The model can reproduce characteristics, such as temperature and velocity for a range of jet features like a fibril, a spicule, an hot X-ray jet or a transition region jet by changing either the magnetic field strength or the electron density, i.e. where in the atmosphere the reconnection occurs.
[124]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.0227  [pdf] - 376761
The Art of Lattice and Gravity Waves from Preheating
Comments: 17 pages, 13 figures, HLattice release, HLattice Version 2.0
Submitted: 2011-02-01, last modified: 2011-06-07
The nonlinear dynamics of preheating after early-Universe inflation is often studied with lattice simulations. In this work I present a new lattice code HLATTICE. It differs from previous public available codes in the following three aspects: (i) A much higher accuracy is achieved with a modified sixth-order symplectic integrator; (ii) scalar, vector, and tensor metric perturbations in synchronous gauge and their feedback to the dynamics of scalar fields are all included; (iii) the code uses a projector that completely removes the scalar and vector components defined by the discrete spatial derivatives. Such a generic code can have wide range of applications. As an example, gravity waves from preheating after inflation are calculated with a better accuracy.
[125]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.5672  [pdf] - 350708
Obtaining Potential Field Solution with Spherical Harmonics and Finite Differences
Comments: This paper describes the publicly available Finite Difference Iterative Potential field Solver (FDIPS). The code can be obtained from http://csem.engin.umich.edu/FDIPS
Submitted: 2011-04-29
Potential magnetic field solutions can be obtained based on the synoptic magnetograms of the Sun. Traditionally, a spherical harmonics decomposition of the magnetogram is used to construct the current and divergence free magnetic field solution. This method works reasonably well when the order of spherical harmonics is limited to be small relative to the resolution of the magnetogram, although some artifacts, such as ringing, can arise around sharp features. When the number of spherical harmonics is increased, however, using the raw magnetogram data given on a grid that is uniform in the sine of the latitude coordinate can result in inaccurate and unreliable results, especially in the polar regions close to the Sun. We discuss here two approaches that can mitigate or completely avoid these problems: i) Remeshing the magnetogram onto a grid with uniform resolution in latitude, and limiting the highest order of the spherical harmonics to the anti-alias limit; ii) Using an iterative finite difference algorithm to solve for the potential field. The naive and the improved numerical solutions are compared for actual magnetograms, and the differences are found to be rather dramatic. We made our new Finite Difference Iterative Potential-field Solver (FDIPS) a publically available code, so that other researchers can also use it as an alternative to the spherical harmonics approach.
[126]  oai:arXiv.org:1102.1837  [pdf] - 1051995
A weak lensing analysis of the Abell 383 cluster
Comments: 11 pages, 12 figures. Accepted for publication on Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2011-02-09
In this paper we use deep CFHT and SUBARU $uBVRIz$ archival images of the Abell 383 cluster (z=0.187) to estimate its mass by weak lensing. To this end, we first use simulated images to check the accuracy provided by our KSB pipeline. Such simulations include both the STEP 1 and 2 simulations, and more realistic simulations of the distortion of galaxy shapes by a cluster with a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. From such simulations we estimate the effect of noise on shear measurement and derive the correction terms. The R-band image is used to derive the mass by fitting the observed tangential shear profile with a NFW mass profile. Photometric redshifts are computed from the uBVRIz catalogs. Different methods for the foreground/background galaxy selection are implemented, namely selection by magnitude, color and photometric redshifts, and results are compared. In particular, we developed a semi-automatic algorithm to select the foreground galaxies in the color-color diagram, based on observed colors. Using color selection or photometric redshifts improves the correction of dilution from foreground galaxies: this leads to higher signals in the inner parts of the cluster. We obtain a cluster mass that is ~ 20% higher than previous estimates, and is more consistent the mass expected from X--ray data. The R-band luminosity function of the cluster is finally computed.
[127]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.5953  [pdf] - 1042804
The WHI Corona from Differential Emission Measure Tomography
Comments: 13 Figures
Submitted: 2010-12-29
A three dimensional (3D) tomographic reconstruction of the local differential emission measure (LDEM) of the global solar corona during the whole heliosphere interval (WHI, Carrington rotation CR-2068) is presented, based on STEREO/EUVI images. We determine the 3D distribution of the electron density, mean temperature, and temperature spread, in the range of heliocentric heights 1.03 to 1.23 Rsun. The reconstruction is complemented with a potential field source surface (PFSS) magnetic-field model. The streamer core, streamer legs, and subpolar regions are analyzed and compared to a similar analysis previously performed for CR-2077, very near the absolute minimum of the Solar Cycle 23. In each region, the typical values of density and temperature are similar in both periods. The WHI corona exhibits a streamer structure of relatively smaller volume and latitudinal extension than during CR-2077, with a global closed-to-open density contrast about 6% lower, and a somewhat more complex morphology. The average basal electron density is found to be about 2.23 and 1.08 x 10^8 cm^-3, in the streamer core and subpolar regions, respectively. The electron temperature is quite uniform over the analyzed height range, with average values of about 1.13 and 0.93 MK, in the streamer core and subpolar regions, respectively. Within the streamer closed region, both periods show higher temperatures at mid-latitudes and lower temperatures near the equator. Both periods show beta>1 in the streamer core and beta<1 in the surrounding open regions, with CR-2077 exhibiting a stronger contrast. Hydrostatic fits to the electron density are performed, and the scale height is compared to the LDEM mean electron temperature. Within the streamer core, the results are consistent with an isothermal hydrostatic plasma regime, with the temperatures of ions and electrons differing by up to about 10% .. (continues)..
[128]  oai:arXiv.org:1007.5297  [pdf] - 296825
Parameterizing and Measuring Dark Energy Trajectories from Late-Inflatons
Comments:
Submitted: 2010-07-29
Bulk dark energy properties are determined by the redshift evolution of its pressure-to-density ratio, $w_{de}(z)$. An experimental goal is to decide if the dark energy is dynamical, as in the quintessence (and phantom) models treated here. We show that a three-parameter approximation $w_{de}(z; \epsilon_s, \epsilon_{\phi\infty}, \zeta_s)$ fits well the ensemble of trajectories for a wide class of late-inflaton potentials $V(\phi)$. Markov Chain Monte Carlo probability calculations are used to confront our $w_{de}(z)$ trajectories with current observational information on Type Ia supernova, Cosmic Microwave Background, galaxy power spectra, weak lensing and the Lyman-${\alpha}$ forest. We find the best constrained parameter is a low redshift slope parameter, $\epsilon_s \propto (\partial \ln V / \partial \phi)^2$ when the dark energy and matter have equal energy densities. A tracking parameter $\epsilon_{\phi\infty}$ defining the high-redshift attractor of $1+w_{de}$ is marginally constrained. Poorly determined is $\zeta_s$, characterizing the evolution of $\epsilon_s$, and a measure of $\partial^2 \ln V / \partial \phi^2$ . The constraints we find already rule out some popular quintessence and phantom models, or restrict their potential parameters. We also forecast how the next generation of cosmological observations improve the constraints: by a factor of about five on $\epsilon_s$ and $\epsilon_{\phi\infty}$, but with $\zeta_s$ remaining unconstrained (unless the true model significantly deviates from $\Lambda$CDM). Thus potential reconstruction beyond an overall height and a gradient is not feasible for the large space of late-inflaton models considered here.
[129]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.0433  [pdf] - 291042
$Om$ Diagnostic for Dilaton Dark Energy
Comments: 6 pages and 6 figures.
Submitted: 2010-05-04
$Om$ diagnostic can differentiate between different models of dark energy without the accurate current value of matter density. We apply this geometric diagnostic to dilaton dark energy(DDE) model and differentiate DDE model from LCDM. We also investigate the influence of coupled parameter $\alpha$ on the evolutive behavior of $Om$ with respect to redshift $z$. According to the numerical result of $Om$, we get the current value of equation of state $\omega_{\sigma0}$=-0.952 which fits the WMAP5+BAO+SN very well.
[130]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.0503  [pdf] - 27916
Preheating After Modular Inflation
Comments: 34 pages, 10 figures. Accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2009-09-02, last modified: 2009-12-13
We study (p)reheating in modular (closed string) inflationary scenarios, with a special emphasis on Kahler moduli/Roulette models. It is usually assumed that reheating in such models occurs through perturbative decays. However, we find that there are very strong non-perturbative preheating decay channels related to the particular shape of the inflaton potential (which is highly nonlinear and has a very steep minimum). Preheating after modular inflation, proceeding through a combination of tachyonic instability and broad-band parametric resonance, is perhaps the most violent example of preheating after inflation known in the literature. Further, we consider the subsequent transfer of energy to the standard model sector in scenarios where the standard model particles are confined to a D7-brane wrapping the inflationary blow-up cycle of the compactification manifold or, more interestingly, a non-inflationary blow up cycle. We explicitly identify the decay channels of the inflaton in these two scenarios. We also consider the case where the inflationary cycle shrinks to the string scale at the end of inflation; here a field theoretical treatment of reheating is insufficient and one must turn instead to a stringy description. We estimate the decay rate of the inflaton and the reheat temperature for various scenarios.
[131]  oai:arXiv.org:0909.0751  [pdf] - 27979
Particle Production During Inflation: Observational Constraints and Signatures
Comments: 13 pages, 6 figures. Added references and typos corrected. Accepted for publication in PRD
Submitted: 2009-09-03, last modified: 2009-12-13
In a variety of inflation models the motion of the inflaton may trigger the production of some non-inflaton particles during inflation, for example via parametric resonance or a phase transition. Particle production during inflation leads to observables in the cosmological fluctuations, such as features in the primordial power spectrum and also nongaussianities. Here we focus on a prototype scenario with inflaton, \phi, and iso-inflaton, \chi, fields interacting during inflation via the coupling g^2 (\phi-\phi_0)^2\chi^2. Since several previous investigations have hinted at the presence of localized "glitches" in the observed primordial power spectrum, which are inconsistent with the simplest power-law model, it is interesting to determine the extent to which such anomalies can be explained by this simple and well-motivated model. Our prototype scenario predicts a bump-like feature in the primordial power spectrum, rather than an oscillatory "ringing" pattern as has previously been assumed. We discuss the observational constraints on such features. We find that bumps with amplitude as large as 10% of the usual scale invariant fluctuations from inflation are allowed on scales relevant for Cosmic Microwave Background experiments. Our results imply an upper limit on the coupling g^2 which is crucial for assessing the detectability of the nongaussianity produced by inflationary particle production. We also discuss more complicated features that result from superposing multiple instances of particle production. Finally, we point to a number of microscopic realizations of this scenario in string theory and supersymmetry and discuss the implications of our constraints for the popular brane/axion monodromy inflation models.
[132]  oai:arXiv.org:0902.0615  [pdf] - 20999
Cosmological Fluctuations from Infra-Red Cascading During Inflation
Comments: 13 pages, 9 figures. Accepted for publication in Phys. Rev. D
Submitted: 2009-02-04, last modified: 2009-07-20
We propose a qualitatively new mechanism for generating cosmological fluctuations from inflation. The non-equilibrium excitation of interacting scalar fields often evolves into infra-red (IR) and ultra-violet (UV) cascading, resulting in an intermediate scaling regime. We observe elements of this phenomenon in a simple model with inflaton \phi and iso-inflaton \chi fields interacting during inflation via the coupling g^2 (\phi-\phi_0)^2 \chi^2. Iso-inflaton particles are created during inflation when they become instantaneously massless at \phi=\phi_0, with occupation numbers not exceeding unity. We point out that very quickly the produced \chi particles become heavy and their multiple re-scatterings off the homogeneous condensate \phi(t) generates bremschtrahlung radiation of light inflaton IR fluctuations with high occupation numbers. The subsequent evolution of these IR fluctuations is qualitatively similar to that of the usual inflationary fluctuations, but their initial amplitude is different. The IR cascading generates a bump-shaped contribution to the cosmological curvature fluctuations, which can even dominate over the usual fluctuations for g^2>0.06. The IR cascading curvature fluctuations are significantly non-gaussian and the strength and location of the bump are model-dependent, through g^2 and \phi_0. The effect from IR cascading fluctuations is significantly larger than that from the momentary slowing-down of \phi(t). With a sequence of such bursts of particle production, the superposition of the bumps can lead to a new broad band non-gaussian component of cosmological fluctuations added to the usual fluctuations. Such a sequence of particle creation events can, but need not, lead to trapped inflation.
[133]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.3407  [pdf] - 22548
Non-Gaussian Spikes from Chaotic Billiards in Inflation Preheating
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2009-03-20
A new class of non-Gaussian curvature fluctuations \zeta_{pr} (\bx) \equiv \delta N(\chi_i) arises from the post-inflation preheating behaviour of a non-inflaton field \chi_i. Its billiard-like chaotic dynamics imprints regular log-spaced narrow spikes in the number of preheating e-folds N(\chi_i). We perform highly accurate lattice simulations of SUSY-inspired quartic inflaton and coupling potentials in a separate-universe approximation to compute N(\chi_i) as a function of the (nearly homogeneous) initial condition \chi_i. The super-horizon modes of \chi_i(\bx) result in positive spiky excursions in \zeta_{pr} and hence negative gravitational potential fluctuations added to the usual sign-independent inflaton-induced perturbations, observably manifested in large cosmic structures and as (polarized) temperature CMB cold spots.
[134]  oai:arXiv.org:0812.4016  [pdf] - 900543
Cosmological Constraints on Decaying Dark Matter
Comments: 29 pages, 6 figures. Added references and corrected typos as well as grammatical oversights
Submitted: 2008-12-22, last modified: 2009-01-30
We present a complete analysis of the cosmological constraints on decaying dark matter. Previous analyses have used the cosmic microwave background and Type Ia supernova. We have updated them with the latest data as well as extended the analysis with the inclusion of Lyman-$\alpha$ forest, large scale structure and weak lensing observations. Astrophysical constraints are not considered in the present paper. The bounds on the lifetime of decaying dark matter are dominated by either the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect for the scenario with weak reionization, or CMB polarization observations when there is significant reionization. For the respective scenarios, the lifetimes for decaying dark matter are $\Gamma^{-1} \gtrsim 100$ Gyr and $ (f \Gamma) ^{-1} \gtrsim 5.3 \times 10^8$ Gyr (at 95.4% confidence level), where the phenomenological parameter $f$ is the fraction of the decay energy deposited in baryonic gas. This allows us to constrain particle physics models with dark matter candidates through investigation of dark matter decays into Standard Model particles via effective operators. For decaying dark matter of $\sim 100$ GeV mass, we found that the size of the coupling constant in the effective dimension-4 operators responsible for dark matter decay has to generically be $ \lesssim 10^{-22}$. We have also explored the implications of our analysis for representative models in theories of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking, minimal supergravity and little Higgs.
[135]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-th/0606032  [pdf] - 117857
Exponential Potentials and Attractor Solution of Dilatonic Cosmology
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, add some references, revised version for Int.J.Theor.Phys. appeared in Int.J.Theor.Phys
Submitted: 2006-06-05, last modified: 2007-04-30
We present the scalar-tensor gravitational theory with an exponential potential in which pauli metric is regarded as the physical space-time metric. We show that it is essentially equivalent to coupled quintessence(CQ) model. However for baryotropic fluid being radiation there are in fact no coupling between dilatonic scalar field and radiation. We present the critical points for baryotropic fluid and investigate the properties of critical points when the baryotropic matter is specified to ordinary matter. It is possible for all the critical points to be attractors as long as the parameters $\lambda$ and $\beta$ satisfy certain conditions. To demonstrate the attractor behaviors of these critical points, We numerically plot the phase plane for each critical point. Finally with the bound on $\beta$ from the observation and the fact that our universe is undergoing an accelerating expansion, we conclude that present accelerating expansion is not the eventual stage of universe. Moreover, we numerically describe the evolution of the density parameters $\Omega$ and the decelerating factor $q$, and computer the present values of some cosmological parameters, which are consistent with current observational data.
[136]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-th/0606033  [pdf] - 117858
Cosmology in Nonlinear Born-Infeld Scalar Field Theory With Negative Potentials
Comments: 18 pages, 18 figures, some references added, revised version for Int.J.Mod.Phys.A, appeared in Int.J.Mod.Phys.A
Submitted: 2006-06-05, last modified: 2007-04-30
The cosmological evolution in Nonlinear Born-Infeld(hereafter NLBI) scalar field theory with negative potentials was investigated. The cosmological solutions in some important evolutive epoches were obtained. The different evolutional behaviors between NLBI and linear(canonical) scalar field theory have been presented. A notable characteristic is that NLBI scalar field behaves as ordinary matter nearly the singularity while the linear scalar field behaves as "stiff" matter. We find that in order to accommodate current observational accelerating expanding universe the value of potential parameters $|m|$ and $|V_0|$ must have an {\it upper bound}. We compare different cosmological evolutions for different potential parameters $m, V_0$.
[137]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-th/0610188  [pdf] - 247977
Cosmologies with General Non-Canonical Scalar Field
Comments: 13 pages, one figure, typo corrected, references added, the contents and results enhanced, but previous results remains no change,changed the title "Cosmologies with General Non-Linear Scalar Field" as "Cosmologies with General Non-Canonical Scalar Field"
Submitted: 2006-10-17, last modified: 2007-01-19
We generally investigate the scalar field model with the lagrangian $L=F(X)-V(\phi)$, which we call it {\it General Non-Canonical Scalar Field Model}. We find that it is a special square potential(with a negative minimum) that drives the linear field solution($\phi=\phi_0t$) while in K-essence model(with the lagrangian $L=-V(\phi)F(X)$) the potential should be taken as an inverse square form. Hence their cosmological evolution are totally different. We further find that this linear field solutions are highly degenerate, and their cosmological evolutions are actually equivalent to the divergent model where its sound speed diverges. We also study the stability of the linear field solution. With a simple form of $F(X)=1-\sqrt{1-2X}$ we indicate that our model may be considered as a unified model of dark matter and dark energy. Finally we study the case when the baryotropic index $\gamma$ is constant. It shows that, unlike the K-essence, the detailed form of F(X) depends on the potential $V(\phi)$. We analyze the stability of this constant $\gamma_0$ solution and find that they are stable for $\gamma_0\leq1$. Finally we simply consider the constant c_s^2 case and get an exact solution for F(X)
[138]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-th/0610019  [pdf] - 117941
Born-Infeld Type Phantom Model in the $\omega-\omega'$ Plane
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, some references added
Submitted: 2006-10-01, last modified: 2006-11-09
In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of Born-Infeld(B-I) phantom model in the $\omega-\omega'$ plane, which is defined by the equation of state parameter for the dark energy and its derivative with respect to $N$(the logarithm of the scale factor $a$). We find the scalar field equation of motion in $\omega-\omega'$ plane, and show mathematically the property of attractor solutions which correspond to $\omega_\phi\sim-1$, $\Omega_\phi=1$, which avoid the "Big rip" problem and meets the current observations well.
[139]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-th/0610018  [pdf] - 117940
Dilaton Coupled Quintessence Model in the $\omega-\omega'$ Plane
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, some references added
Submitted: 2006-10-01, last modified: 2006-11-09
In this paper, we regard dilaton in Weyl-scaled induced gravitational theory as a coupled quintessence. Based on this consideration, we investigate the dilaton coupled quintessence(DCQ) model in $\omega-\omega'$ plane, which is defined by the equation of state parameter for the dark energy and its derivative with respect to $N$(the logarithm of the scale factor $a$). We find the scalar field equation of motion in $\omega-\omega'$ plane, and show mathematically the property of attractor solutions which correspond to $\omega_\sigma\sim-1$, $\Omega_\sigma=1$. Finally, we find that our model is a tracking one which belongs to "freezing" type model classified in $\omega-\omega'$ plane.
[140]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-th/0604160  [pdf] - 117819
Coupled Quintessence and Phantom Based On a Dilaton
Comments: 9 pages, 11 figures, some references and Journal-ref added
Submitted: 2006-04-23, last modified: 2006-10-08
Based on dilatonic dark energy model, we consider two cases: dilaton field with positive kinetic energy(coupled quintessence) and with negative kinetic energy(phantom). In the two cases, we investigate the existence of attractor solutions which correspond to an equation of state parameter $\omega=-1$ and a cosmic density parameter $\Omega_\sigma=1$. We find that the coupled term between matter and dilaton can't affect the existence of attractor solutions. In the Mexican hat potential, the attractor behaviors, the evolution of state parameter $\omega$ and cosmic density parameter $\Omega$, are shown mathematically. Finally, we show the effect of coupling term on the evolution of $X(\frac{\sigma}{\sigma_0})$ and $Y(\frac{\dot{\sigma}}{\sigma^2_0})$ with respect to $N(lna)$ numerically.
[141]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0605392  [pdf] - 82080
Uncertainty on determining the dark energy equation of state due to the spatial curvature
Comments: 18 pages, 15 figures
Submitted: 2006-05-16
We have studied the uncertainty on the determination of the dark energy equation of state due to a non-vanishing spatial curvature by considering some fundamental observables. We discussed the sensitivity of these observables to the value and redshift history of the equation of state and the spatial curvature and investigated whether these different observables are complementary and can help to reduce the cosmic confusion.
[142]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-th/0501059  [pdf] - 117517
Holographic explanation of wide-angle power correlation suppression in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation
Comments: 12 pages, 5 figures, revised version, accepted for publication in JCAP
Submitted: 2005-01-09, last modified: 2006-04-20
We investigate the question of the suppression of the CMB power spectrum for the lowest multipoles in closed Universes. The intrinsic reason for a lowest cutoff in closed Universes, connected with the discrete spectrum of the wavelength, is shown not to be enough to explain observations. We thus extend the holographic cosmic duality to closed universes by relating the dark energy equation of state and the power spectrum, showing a suppression behavior which describes the low l features extremely well. We also explore the possibility to disclose the nature of the dark energy from the observed small l CMB spectrum by employing the holographic idea.
[143]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0511745  [pdf] - 78103
Dark Energy: relating the evolution of the universe from the past to the future
Comments: 9 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2005-11-26
Using the evolution history of the universe, one can make constraint on the parameter space of dynamic dark energy models. We discuss two different parameterized dark energy models. Our results further restrict the combined constraints obtained from supernova and WMAP observations. From the allowed parameter space, it is found that our universe will experience an eternal acceleration. We also estimate the bound on the physically relevant regions both in the re-inflationary and inflationary phases.
[144]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-th/0409080  [pdf] - 117429
The Evolution of Universe with th B-I Type Phantom Scalar Field
Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures,typos corrected, references added,figures added and enriched, title changed, main result remained
Submitted: 2004-09-07, last modified: 2005-07-14
We considered the phantom cosmology with a lagrangian $\displaystyle L=\frac{1}{\eta}[1-\sqrt{1+\eta g^{\mu\nu}\phi_{, \mu}\phi_{, \nu}}]-u(\phi)$, which is original from the nonlinear Born-Infeld type scalar field with the lagrangian $\displaystyle L=\frac{1}{\eta}[1-\sqrt{1-\eta g^{\mu\nu}\phi_{, \mu}\phi_{, \nu}}]-u(\phi)$. This cosmological model can explain the accelerated expansion of the universe with the equation of state parameter $w\leq-1$. We get a sufficient condition for a arbitrary potential to admit a late time attractor solution: the value of potential $u(X_c)$ at the critical point $(X_c,0)$ should be maximum and large than zero. We study a specific potential with the form of $u(\phi)=V_0(1+\frac{\phi}{\phi_0})e^{(-\frac{\phi}{\phi_0})}$ via phase plane analysis and compute the cosmological evolution by numerical analysis in detail. The result shows that the phantom field survive till today (to account for the observed late time accelerated expansion) without interfering with the nucleosynthesis of the standard model(the density parameter $\Omega_{\phi}\simeq10^{-12}$ at the equipartition epoch), and also avoid the future collapse of the universe.
[145]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9710213  [pdf] - 98972
A High Resolution ROSAT X-Ray Study of Abell 4059
Comments: 11 Pages, AASTeX, including 8 postscript figures
Submitted: 1997-10-20
We have analyzed the ROSAT HRI image and PSPC spectra of Abell~4059. The most striking feature of the X-ray image is the two X-ray holes and an orthogonal X-ray bar in the center of the cluster. It is likely that the radio plasma from the cD galaxy may have displaced the X-ray gas and created the X-ray holes, or we may be seeing a rotationally supported disk of the X-ray emitting gas. There may also be a moderate cooling flow in the center of the cluster, Mdot=184^{+22}_{-25} Msolar/yr, as suggested by the X-ray surface brightness profile. However, such a cooling flow is not needed in the spectral fitting of the PSPC data. It may be that the cooling flow has just begun in the center of the cluster. In addition, very little intrinsic absorption was found in the center of the cluster.
[146]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/9601087  [pdf] - 93942
Phase Randomization and Doppler Peaks in the CMB Angular Power Spectrum
Comments: 11 Pages in RevTeX
Submitted: 1996-01-16
Using the Boltzmann equation with a Langevin-like term describing the stochastic force in a baryon-photon plasma, we investigate the influence of the incoherent electron-photon scattering on the subhorizon evolution of the cosmic microwave radiation. The stochastic fluctuation caused by each collision on average is found to be small. Nevertheless, it leads to a significant Brownian drifting of the phase in the acoustic oscillation, and the coherent oscillations cannot be maintained during their dynamical evolution. As a consequence, the proposed Doppler peaks probably do not exist.