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Huang, Dongqing

Normalized to: Huang, D.

46 article(s) in total. 1354 co-authors, from 1 to 19 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 33,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.04356  [pdf] - 2049211
Constraining the Local Burst Rate Density of Primordial Black Holes with HAWC
Comments: Corresponding authors: K.L. Engel & A. Peisker. 13 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2019-11-11, last modified: 2020-02-17
Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) may have been created by density fluctuations in the early Universe and could be as massive as $> 10^9$ solar masses or as small as the Planck mass. It has been postulated that a black hole has a temperature inversely-proportional to its mass and will thermally emit all species of fundamental particles via Hawking Radiation. PBHs with initial masses of $\sim 5 \times 10^{14}$ g (approximately one gigaton) should be expiring today with bursts of high-energy gamma radiation in the GeV--TeV energy range. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays with energies of $\sim$300 GeV to past 100 TeV, which corresponds to the high end of the PBH burst spectrum. With its large instantaneous field-of-view of $\sim 2$ sr and a duty cycle over 95%, the HAWC Observatory is well suited to perform an all-sky search for PBH bursts. We conducted a search using 959 days of HAWC data and exclude the local PBH burst rate density above $3400~\mathrm{pc^{-3}~yr^{-1}}$ at 99% confidence, the strongest limit on the local PBH burst rate density from any existing electromagnetic measurement.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2001.04065  [pdf] - 2029845
Constraints on the Emission of Gamma Rays from M31 with HAWC
Comments:
Submitted: 2020-01-13
Cosmic rays, along with stellar radiation and magnetic fields, are known to make up a significant fraction of the energy density of galaxies such as the Milky Way. When cosmic rays interact in the interstellar medium, they produce gamma-ray emission which provides an important indication of how the cosmic rays propagate. Gamma rays from the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), located 785 kpc away, provide a unique opportunity to study cosmic-ray acceleration and diffusion in a galaxy with a structure and evolution very similar to the Milky Way. Using 33 months of data from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, we search for TeV gamma rays from the galactic plane of M31. We also investigate past and present evidence of galactic activity in M31 by searching for Fermi Bubble-like structures above and below the galactic nucleus. No significant gamma-ray emission is observed, so we use the null result to compute upper limits on the energy density of cosmic rays $>10$ TeV in M31. The computed upper limits are approximately ten times higher than expected from the extrapolation of the Fermi LAT results.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.08609  [pdf] - 2031954
Multiple Galactic Sources with Emission Above 56 TeV Detected by HAWC
HAWC Collaboration; Abeysekara, A. U.; Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Camacho, J. R. Angeles; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Arunbabu, K. P.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Baghmanyan, V.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de León, S. Coutiño; De la Fuente, E.; de León, C.; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engel, K.; Espinoza, C.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; Galván-Gámez, A.; Garcia, D.; García-González, J. A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hinton, J.; Hona, B.; Huang, D.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Kieda, D.; Lara, A.; Lee, W. H.; Vargas, H. León; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Luis-Raya, G.; Lundeen, J.; López-Coto, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Morales-Soto, J. A.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Peisker, A.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Greus, F. Salesa; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Tabachnick, E.; Tanner, M.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Torres-Escobedo, R.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, H.
Comments: Accepted by Physical Review Letters
Submitted: 2019-09-18, last modified: 2020-01-09
We present the first catalog of gamma-ray sources emitting above 56 and 100 TeV with data from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory, a wide field-of-view observatory capable of detecting gamma rays up to a few hundred TeV. Nine sources are observed above 56 TeV, all of which are likely Galactic in origin. Three sources continue emitting past 100 TeV, making this the highest-energy gamma-ray source catalog to date. We report the integral flux of each of these objects. We also report spectra for three highest-energy sources and discuss the possibility that they are PeVatrons.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.06272  [pdf] - 2050176
Extending light WIMP searches to single scintillation photons in LUX
Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Baxter, A.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Boxer, B.; Brás, P.; Burdin, S.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; de Viveiros, L.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fallon, S. R.; Fan, A.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Genovesi, J.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, K. R.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Grace, E.; Gwilliam, C.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Jahangir, O.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazka, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kravitz, S.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Larsen, N. A.; Leason, E.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Levy, C.; Liao, J.; Lin, J.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; López-Paredes, B.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marangou, N.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D. M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Naylor, A.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; Nilima, A.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Reichhart, L.; Riffard, Q.; Rischbieter, G. R. C.; Rossiter, P.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Utku, U.; Uvarov, S.; Vacheret, A.; Velan, V.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Woodward, D.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-07-14, last modified: 2019-12-27
We present a novel analysis technique for liquid xenon time projection chambers that allows for a lower threshold by relying on events with a prompt scintillation signal consisting of single detected photons. The energy threshold of the LUX dark matter experiment is primarily determined by the smallest scintillation response detectable, which previously required a 2-fold coincidence signal in its photomultiplier arrays, enforced in data analysis. The technique presented here exploits the double photoelectron emission effect observed in some photomultiplier models at vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths. We demonstrate this analysis using an electron recoil calibration dataset and place new constraints on the spin-independent scattering cross section of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) down to 2.5 GeV/c$^2$ WIMP mass using the 2013 LUX dataset. This new technique is promising to enhance light WIMP and astrophysical neutrino searches in next-generation liquid xenon experiments.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1802.06039  [pdf] - 2007874
Projected WIMP sensitivity of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) dark matter experiment
Akerib, D. S.; Akerlof, C. W.; Alsum, S. K.; Araújo, H. M.; Arthurs, M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Balashov, S.; Bauer, D.; Belle, J.; Beltrame, P.; Benson, T.; Bernard, E. P.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boast, K. E.; Boxer, B.; Brás, P.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. V.; Burdin, S.; Busenitz, J. K.; Carels, C.; Carlsmith, D. L.; Carlson, B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Cole, A.; Cottle, A.; Craddock, W. W.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Dahl, C. E.; de Viveiros, L.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edberg, T. K.; Edwards, W. R.; Fan, A.; Fayer, S.; Fiorucci, S.; Fruth, T.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Genovesi, J.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; van der Grinten, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hans, S.; Hanzel, K.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hillbrand, S.; Hjemfelt, C.; Hoff, M. D.; Hor, J. Y-K.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Ji, W.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kamdin, K.; Keefner, J.; Khaitan, D.; Khazov, A.; Kim, Y. D.; Kocher, C. D.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kraus, H.; Krebs, H. J.; Kreczko, L.; Krikler, B.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Kyre, S.; Lee, J.; Lenardo, B. G.; Leonard, D. S.; Lesko, K. T.; Levy, C.; Li, J.; Liao, J.; Liao, F. -T.; Lin, J.; Lindote, A.; Linehan, R.; Lippincott, W. H.; Liu, X.; Lopes, M. I.; Paredes, B. López; Lorenzon, W.; Luitz, S.; Lyle, J. M.; Majewski, P.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Maupin, C.; McKinsey, D. N.; Meng, Y.; Miller, E. H.; Mock, J.; Monzani, M. E.; Morad, J. A.; Morrison, E.; Mount, B. J.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; Nikoleyczik, J.; O'Sullivan, K.; Olcina, I.; Olevitch, M. A.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Patton, S. J.; Pease, E. K.; Penning, B.; Piepke, A.; Powell, S.; Preece, R. M.; Pushkin, K.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reichenbacher, J.; Rhyne, C. A.; Richards, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rosero, R.; Rossiter, P.; Saba, J. S.; Sarychev, M.; Schnee, R. W.; Schubnell, M.; Scovell, P. R.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silk, J. J.; Silva, C.; Skarpaas, K.; Skulski, W.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stancu, I.; Stark, M. R.; Stiegler, T. M.; Stifter, K.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, W. C.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, D. J.; Temples, D.; Terman, P. A.; Thomas, K. J.; Timalsina, M.; To, W. H.; Tomás, A.; Tope, T. E.; Tripathi, M.; Tull, C. E.; Tvrznikova, L.; Utku, U.; Va'vra, J.; Vacheret, A.; Verbus, J. R.; Voirin, E.; Waldron, W. L.; Watson, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, D. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Woodward, D.; Worm, S. D.; Yeh, M.; Yin, J.; Young, I.
Comments: 14 pages, 11 figures
Submitted: 2018-02-16, last modified: 2019-12-02
LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) is a next generation dark matter direct detection experiment that will operate 4850 feet underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota, USA. Using a two-phase xenon detector with an active mass of 7 tonnes, LZ will search primarily for low-energy interactions with Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), which are hypothesized to make up the dark matter in our galactic halo. In this paper, the projected WIMP sensitivity of LZ is presented based on the latest background estimates and simulations of the detector. For a 1000 live day run using a 5.6 tonne fiducial mass, LZ is projected to exclude at 90% confidence level spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections above $1.6 \times 10^{-48}$ cm$^{2}$ for a 40 $\mathrm{GeV}/c^{2}$ mass WIMP. Additionally, a $5\sigma$ discovery potential is projected reaching cross sections below the existing and projected exclusion limits of similar experiments that are currently operating. For spin-dependent WIMP-neutron(-proton) scattering, a sensitivity of $2.7 \times 10^{-43}$ cm$^{2}$ ($8.1 \times 10^{-42}$ cm$^{2}$) for a 40 $\mathrm{GeV}/c^{2}$ mass WIMP is expected. With underground installation well underway, LZ is on track for commissioning at SURF in 2020.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.08070  [pdf] - 2000346
Constraints on Lorentz invariance violation from HAWC observations of gamma rays above 100 TeV
Comments: 9 pages, 3 figures. Submitted to journal
Submitted: 2019-11-18
Due to the high energies and long distances to the sources, astrophysical observations provide a unique opportunity to test possible signatures of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). Superluminal LIV enables the decay of photons at high energy. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is among the most sensitive gamma-ray instruments currently operating above 10 TeV. HAWC finds evidence of 100 TeV photon emission from at least four astrophysical sources. These observations exclude, for the strongest of the limits set, the LIV energy scale to $2.2\times10^{31}$ eV, over 1800 times the Planck energy and an improvement of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude over previous limits.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.09124  [pdf] - 1990394
The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) Experiment
The LZ Collaboration; Akerib, D. S.; Akerlof, C. W.; Akimov, D. Yu.; Alquahtani, A.; Alsum, S. K.; Anderson, T. J.; Angelides, N.; Araújo, H. M.; Arbuckle, A.; Armstrong, J. E.; Arthurs, M.; Auyeung, H.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Balashov, S.; Bang, J.; Barry, M. J.; Barthel, J.; Bauer, D.; Bauer, P.; Baxter, A.; Belle, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bensinger, J.; Benson, T.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Bhatti, A.; Biekert, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Birrittella, B.; Boast, K. E.; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Boulton, E. M.; Boxer, B.; Bramante, R.; Branson, S.; Brás, P.; Breidenbach, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. V.; Bunker, R.; Burdin, S.; Busenitz, J. K.; Campbell, J. S.; Carels, C.; Carlsmith, D. L.; Carlson, B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Cascella, M.; Chan, C.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Chott, N. I.; Cole, A.; Coleman, J.; Colling, D.; Conley, R. A.; Cottle, A.; Coughlen, R.; Craddock, W. W.; Curran, D.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; da Cunha, J. P.; Dahl, C. E.; Dardin, S.; Dasu, S.; Davis, J.; Davison, T. J. R.; de Viveiros, L.; Decheine, N.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Dushkin, A.; Edberg, T. K.; Edwards, W. R.; Edwards, B. N.; Edwards, J.; Elnimr, M. M.; Emmet, W. T.; Eriksen, S. R.; Faham, C. H.; Fan, A.; Fayer, S.; Fiorucci, S.; Flaecher, H.; Florang, I. M. Fogarty; Ford, P.; Francis, V. B.; Froborg, F.; Fruth, T.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gantos, N. J.; Garcia, D.; Geffre, A.; Gehman, V. M.; Gelfand, R.; Genovesi, J.; Gerhard, R. M.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, E.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Gokhale, S.; Gomber, B.; Gonda, T. G.; Greenall, A.; Greenwood, S.; Gregerson, G.; van der Grinten, M. G. D.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Hall, C. R.; Hamilton, D.; Hans, S.; Hanzel, K.; Harrington, T.; Harrison, A.; Hasselkus, C.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hemer, D.; Hertel, S. A.; Heise, J.; Hillbrand, S.; Hitchcock, O.; Hjemfelt, C.; Hoff, M. D.; Holbrook, B.; Holtom, E.; Hor, J. Y-K.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Hurteau, T. W.; Ignarra, C. M.; Irving, M. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Jahangir, O.; Jeffery, S. N.; Ji, W.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, J.; Johnson, P.; Jones, W. G.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kamaha, A.; Kamdin, K.; Kasey, V.; Kazkaz, K.; Keefner, J.; Khaitan, D.; Khaleeq, M.; Khazov, A.; Khromov, A. V.; Khurana, I.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, W. T.; Kocher, C. D.; Konovalov, A. M.; Korley, L.; Korolkova, E. V.; Koyuncu, M.; Kras, J.; Kraus, H.; Kravitz, S. W.; Krebs, H. J.; Kreczko, L.; Krikler, B.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Kumpan, A. V.; Kyre, S.; Lambert, A. R.; Landerud, B.; Larsen, N. A.; Laundrie, A.; Leason, E. A.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Leonard, D. S.; Leonard, R.; Lesko, K. T.; Levy, C.; Li, J.; Liu, Y.; Liao, J.; Liao, F. -T.; Lin, J.; Lindote, A.; Linehan, R.; Lippincott, W. H.; Liu, R.; Liu, X.; Loniewski, C.; Lopes, M. I.; Paredes, B. López; Lorenzon, W.; Lucero, D.; Luitz, S.; Lyle, J. M.; Lynch, C.; Majewski, P. A.; Makkinje, J.; Malling, D. C.; Manalaysay, A.; Manenti, L.; Mannino, R. L.; Marangou, N.; Markley, D. J.; MarrLaundrie, P.; Martin, T. J.; Marzioni, M. F.; Maupin, C.; McConnell, C. T.; McKinsey, D. N.; McLaughlin, J.; Mei, D. -M.; Meng, Y.; Miller, E. H.; Minaker, Z. J.; Mizrachi, E.; Mock, J.; Molash, D.; Monte, A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morad, J. A.; Morrison, E.; Mount, B. J.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Naim, D.; Naylor, A.; Nedlik, C.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Nesbit, J.; Neves, F.; Nikkel, J. A.; Nikoleyczik, J. A.; Nilima, A.; O'Dell, J.; Oh, H.; O'Neill, F. G.; O'Sullivan, K.; Olcina, I.; Olevitch, M. A.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Oxborough, L.; Pagac, A.; Pagenkopf, D.; Pal, S.; Palladino, K. J.; Palmaccio, V. M.; Palmer, J.; Pangilinan, M.; Patton, S. J.; Pease, E. K.; Penning, B. P.; Pereira, G.; Pereira, C.; Peterson, I. B.; Piepke, A.; Pierson, S.; Powell, S.; Preece, R. M.; Pushkin, K.; Qie, Y.; Racine, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C. A.; Richards, A.; Riffard, Q.; Rischbieter, G. R. C.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rose, H. J.; Rosero, R.; Rossiter, P.; Rucinski, R.; Rutherford, G.; Rynders, D.; Saba, J. S.; Sabarots, L.; Santone, D.; Sarychev, M.; Sazzad, A. B. M. R.; Schnee, R. W.; Schubnell, M.; Scovell, P. R.; Severson, M.; Seymour, D.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, G. W.; Shutt, T. A.; Silk, J. J.; Silva, C.; Skarpaas, K.; Skulski, W.; Smith, A. R.; Smith, R. J.; Smith, R. E.; So, J.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Stancu, I.; Stark, M. R.; Stephenson, S.; Stern, N.; Stevens, A.; Stiegler, T. M.; Stifter, K.; Studley, R.; Sumner, T. J.; Sundarnath, K.; Sutcliffe, P.; Swanson, N.; Szydagis, M.; Tan, M.; Taylor, W. C.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, D. J.; Temples, D.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Thomas, K. J.; Thomson, J. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; Timalsina, M.; To, W. H.; Tomás, A.; Tope, T. E.; Tripathi, M.; Tronstad, D. R.; Tull, C. E.; Turner, W.; Tvrznikova, L.; Utes, M.; Utku, U.; Uvarov, S.; Va'vra, J.; Vacheret, A.; Vaitkus, A.; Verbus, J. R.; Vietanen, T.; Voirin, E.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Walcott, S.; Waldron, W. L.; Walker, K.; Wang, J. J.; Wang, R.; Wang, L.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J. R.; Migneault, J.; Weatherly, S.; Webb, R. C.; Wei, W. -Z.; While, M.; White, R. G.; White, J. T.; White, D. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wilson, K.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wolfs, J. D.; Woodward, D.; Worm, S. D.; Xiang, X.; Xiao, Q.; Xu, J.; Yeh, M.; Yin, J.; Young, I.; Zhang, C.
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-10-20, last modified: 2019-11-03
We describe the design and assembly of the LUX-ZEPLIN experiment, a direct detection search for cosmic WIMP dark matter particles. The centerpiece of the experiment is a large liquid xenon time projection chamber sensitive to low energy nuclear recoils. Rejection of backgrounds is enhanced by a Xe skin veto detector and by a liquid scintillator Outer Detector loaded with gadolinium for efficient neutron capture and tagging. LZ is located in the Davis Cavern at the 4850' level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, USA. We describe the major subsystems of the experiment and its key design features and requirements.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.11241  [pdf] - 1981692
Results of a Search for Sub-GeV Dark Matter Using 2013 LUX Data
Comments:
Submitted: 2018-11-27, last modified: 2019-10-16
The scattering of dark matter (DM) particles with sub-GeV masses off nuclei is difficult to detect using liquid xenon-based DM search instruments because the energy transfer during nuclear recoils is smaller than the typical detector threshold. However, the tree-level DM-nucleus scattering diagram can be accompanied by simultaneous emission of a Bremsstrahlung photon or a so-called "Migdal" electron. These provide an electron recoil component to the experimental signature at higher energies than the corresponding nuclear recoil. The presence of this signature allows liquid xenon detectors to use both the scintillation and the ionization signals in the analysis where the nuclear recoil signal would not be otherwise visible. We report constraints on spin-independent DM-nucleon scattering for DM particles with masses of 0.4-5 GeV/c$^2$ using 1.4$\times10^4$ kg$\cdot$day of search exposure from the 2013 data from the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment for four different classes of mediators. This analysis extends the reach of liquid xenon-based DM search instruments to lower DM masses than has been achieved previously.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.01238  [pdf] - 1976874
Strong Dark Matter Self-Interaction from a Stable Scalar Mediator
Comments: 24 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2019-10-02, last modified: 2019-10-08
In face of the small-scale structure problems of the collisionless cold dark matter (DM) paradigm, a popular remedy is to introduce a strong DM self-interaction which can be generated nonperturbatively by a MeV-scale light mediator. However, if such the mediator is unstable and decays into SM particles, the model is severely constrained by the DM direct and indirect detection experiments. In the present paper, we study a model of a self-interacting fermionic DM, endowed with a light stable scalar mediator. In this model, the DM relic abundance is dominated by the fermionic DM particle which is generated mainly via the freeze-out of its annihilations to the stable mediator. Since this channel is invisible, the DM indirect detection constraints should be greatly relaxed. Furthermore, the direct detection signals are suppressed to an unobservable level since fermionic DM scatterings with a nucleon appear at one-loop level. By further studying the bounds from the CMB and BBN on the visible channels involving the dark sector, we show that there is a large parameter space which can generate appropriate DM self-interactions at dwarf galaxy scales, while remaining compatible with other experimental constraints.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1909.01808  [pdf] - 1955448
HAWC Contributions to the 36th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC2019)
Abeysekara, A. U.; Albert, A.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Camacho, J. R. Angeles; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Arunbabu, K. P.; Rojas, D. Avila; Solares, H. A. Ayala; Baghmanyan, V.; Barber, A. S.; Gonzalez, J. Becerra; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Braun, J.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Cotti12, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de León, S. Coutiño; De la Fuente, E.; de León, C.; Hernandez, R. Diaz; Diaz-Cruz, L.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engel, K.; Enríquez-Rivera, O.; Espinoza, C.; Alonso, M. Fernández; Fick, B.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; Galván-Gámez, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garcia-Luna, J. L.; Garfias, F.; Giacinti, G.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hinton, J.; Hona, B.; Huang, D.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kieda, D.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; Vargas, H. León; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; López-Coto, R.; Luis-Raya, G.; Lundeen, J.; Malone, K.; Marandon, V.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A. J.; McEnery, J.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Morales-Soto, J. A.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nayerhoda, A.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Peisker, A.; Araujo, Y. Pérez; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Greus, F. Salesa; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Arroyo, M. Seglar; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Tabachnick, E.; Taboada, I.; Tanner, M.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Torres-Escobedo, R.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Vianello, G.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.
Comments: List of proceedings from the HAWC Collaboration presented at ICRC2019. Corrected typos in the index of the previous version. Follow the "HTML" link to access the list
Submitted: 2019-09-04
List of proceedings from the HAWC Collaboration presented at the 36th International Cosmic Ray Conference, 24 July - 1 August 2019, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1908.11456  [pdf] - 1951599
Studies of the Time Structure of Extended Air Showers for Direction Reconstruction with the HAWC Outrigger Array
Comments: Presented at the 36th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC 2019)
Submitted: 2019-08-29
The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) gamma-ray observatory is a ground-based air shower array designed to detect Cherenkov light produced in water by secondary particles from atmospheric air showers. In order to improve the sensitivity at the highest energies, especially for the shower cores falling outside the main array, 345 smaller Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCDs) were installed around the main array, the outrigger array. This extension increased the instrumented area of HAWC by a factor of four. With the increased size of the array, and the ability to detect shower particles further away from the core, understanding of the time structure of the shower front is crucial for accurate direction reconstruction and mandates proper modeling. In this contribution, we present a model of the shower front as expected to be observed by the outriggers obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations. Applying this model to shower reconstruction, the improvements on air shower parameter are studied.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.06842  [pdf] - 1945858
GRID: a Student Project to Monitor the Transient Gamma-Ray Sky in the Multi-Messenger Astronomy Era
Wen, Jiaxing; Long, Xiangyun; Zheng, Xutao; An, Yu; Cai, Zhengyang; Cang, Jirong; Che, Yuepeng; Chen, Changyu; Chen, Liangjun; Chen, Qianjun; Chen, Ziyun; Cheng, Yingjie; Deng, Litao; Deng, Wei; Ding, Wenqing; Du, Hangci; Duan, Lian; Gan, Quan; Gao, Tai; Gao, Zhiying; Han, Wenbin; Han, Yiying; He, Xinbo; He, Xinhao; Hou, Long; Hu, Fan; Hu, Junling; Huang, Bo; Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Xuefeng; Jia, Shihai; Jiang, Yuchen; Jin, Yifei; Li, Ke; Li, Siyao; Li, Yurong; Liang, Jianwei; Liang, Yuanyuan; Lin, Wei; Liu, Chang; Liu, Gang; Liu, Mengyuan; Liu, Rui; Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Wanqiang; Lu, Di'an; Lu, Peiyibin; Lu, Zhiyong; Luo, Xiyu; Ma, Sizheng; Ma, Yuanhang; Mao, Xiaoqing; Mo, Yanshan; Nie, Qiyuan; Qu, Shuiyin; Shan, Xiaolong; Shi, Gengyuan; Song, Weiming; Sun, Zhigang; Tan, Xuelin; Tang, Songsong; Tao, Mingrui; Wang, Boqin; Wang, Yue; Wang, Zhiang; Wu, Qiaoya; Wu, Xuanyi; Xia, Yuehan; Xiao, Hengyuan; Xie, Wenjin; Xu, Dacheng; Xu, Rui; Xu, Weili; Yan, Longbiao; Yan, Shengyu; Yang, Dongxin; Yang, Hang; Yang, Haoguang; Yang, Yi-Si; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Lei; Yu, Huan; Yu, Yangyi; Zhang, Aiqiang; Zhang, Bingtao; Zhang, Lixuan; Zhang, Maoxing; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Tianliang; Zhang, Yuchong; Zhao, Qianru; Zhao, Ruining; Zheng, Shiyu; Zhou, Xiaolong; Zhu, Runyu; Zou, Yu; An, Peng; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Hongbing; Dai, Zigao; Fan, Yizhong; Feng, Changqing; Feng, Hua; Gao, He; Huang, Liang; Kang, Mingming; Li, Lixin; Li, Zhuo; Liang, Enwei; Lin, Lin; Lin, Qianqian; Liu, Congzhan; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Xuewen; Liu, Yinong; Lu, Xiang; Mao, Shude; Shen, Rongfeng; Shu, Jing; Su, Meng; Sun, Hui; Tam, Pak-Hin; Tang, Chi-Pui; Tian, Yang; Wang, Fayin; Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zhonghai; Wu, Jianfeng; Wu, Xuefeng; Xiong, Shaolin; Xu, Can; Yu, Jiandong; Yu, Wenfei; Yu, Yunwei; Zeng, Ming; Zeng, Zhi; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Bing; Zhao, Zongqing; Zhou, Rong; Zhu, Zonghong
Comments: accepted for publication in Experimental Astronomy
Submitted: 2019-07-16
The Gamma-Ray Integrated Detectors (GRID) is a space mission concept dedicated to monitoring the transient gamma-ray sky in the energy range from 10 keV to 2 MeV using scintillation detectors onboard CubeSats in low Earth orbits. The primary targets of GRID are the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the local universe. The scientific goal of GRID is, in synergy with ground-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, to accumulate a sample of GRBs associated with the merger of two compact stars and study jets and related physics of those objects. It also involves observing and studying other gamma-ray transients such as long GRBs, soft gamma-ray repeaters, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, and solar flares. With multiple CubeSats in various orbits, GRID is unaffected by the Earth occultation and serves as a full-time and all-sky monitor. Assuming a horizon of 200 Mpc for ground-based GW detectors, we expect to see a few associated GW-GRB events per year. With about 10 CubeSats in operation, GRID is capable of localizing a faint GRB like 170817A with a 90% error radius of about 10 degrees, through triangulation and flux modulation. GRID is proposed and developed by students, with considerable contribution from undergraduate students, and will remain operated as a student project in the future. The current GRID collaboration involves more than 20 institutes and keeps growing. On August 29th, the first GRID detector onboard a CubeSat was launched into a Sun-synchronous orbit and is currently under test.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1903.12372  [pdf] - 1916847
Improved Measurements of the \b{eta}-Decay Response of Liquid Xenon with the LUX Detector
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-03-29, last modified: 2019-06-07
We report results from an extensive set of measurements of the \b{eta}-decay response in liquid xenon.These measurements are derived from high-statistics calibration data from injected sources of both $^{3}$H and $^{14}$C in the LUX detector. The mean light-to-charge ratio is reported for 13 electric field values ranging from 43 to 491 V/cm, and for energies ranging from 1.5 to 145 keV.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.10136  [pdf] - 1888935
Multicomponent Dark Matter in the Light of CALET and DAMPE
Comments: 21 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2019-05-24
In the light of latest measurements of the total $e^+ + e^-$ flux by CALET and DAMPE experiments, we revisit the multicomponent leptonically decaying dark matter (DM) explanations to the cosmic-ray electron/positron excesses observed previously. Especially, we use the single and double-component DM models to explore the compatibility of the AMS-02 positron fraction with the new CALET or DAMPE data. It turns out that neither single nor double-component DM models are able to fit the AMS-02 positron fraction and DAMPE total $e^+ + e^-$ flux data simultaneously. On the other hand, for the combined AMS-02 and CALET dataset, both the single and double-component DM models can provide reasonable fits. If we further take into the diffuse $\gamma$-ray constraints from Fermi-LAT, only the double-component DM models are allowed.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.08510  [pdf] - 1953525
Stochastic Gravitational Waves from Inflaton Decays
Comments: 15 pages, 4 figures
Submitted: 2019-05-21
Due to the universality of gravitational interactions, it is generally expected that a stochastic gravitational wave (GW) background could form during the reheating period when the inflaton perturbatively decays with the emission of gravitons. Previously, only models in which the inflaton dominantly decays into a pair of light scalar and/or fermion particles were considered in the literature. In the present paper, we focus on the cases with a vector particle pair in the final decay product. The differential decay rates for the three-body gravitational inflaton decays are presented for two typical couplings between the inflaton and vector fields, from which we predict their respective GW frequency spectra. It turns out that, similar to the scalar and fermion cases, the obtained GW spectra is too high in frequency to be observed by the current and near-future GW detection experiments and calls for a new design of high-frequency GW detectors.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.02773  [pdf] - 1931449
The Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) Science White Paper
Comments: This document is a collaborative effort, 185 pages, 110 figures
Submitted: 2019-05-07
The Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project is a new generation multi-component instrument, to be built at 4410 meters of altitude in the Sichuan province of China, with the aim to study with unprecedented sensitivity the spec trum, the composition and the anisotropy of cosmic rays in the energy range between 10$^{12}$ and 10$^{18}$ eV, as well as to act simultaneously as a wide aperture (one stereoradiant), continuously-operated gamma ray telescope in the energy range between 10$^{11}$ and $10^{15}$ eV. The experiment will be able of continuously surveying the TeV sky for steady and transient sources from 100 GeV to 1 PeV, t hus opening for the first time the 100-1000 TeV range to the direct observations of the high energy cosmic ray sources. In addition, the different observables (electronic, muonic and Cherenkov/fluorescence components) that will be measured in LHAASO will allow to investigate origin, acceleration and propagation of the radiation through a measurement of energy spec trum, elemental composition and anisotropy with unprecedented resolution. The remarkable sensitivity of LHAASO in cosmic rays physics and gamma astronomy would play a key-role in the comprehensive general program to explore the High Energy Universe. LHAASO will allow important studies of fundamental physics (such as indirect dark matter search, Lorentz invariance violation, quantum gravity) and solar and heliospheric physics. In this document we introduce the concept of LHAASO and the main science goals, providing an overview of the project.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.07113  [pdf] - 1758152
Search for annual and diurnal rate modulations in the LUX experiment
Comments: 12 pages, 9 figures
Submitted: 2018-07-18, last modified: 2018-09-27
Various dark matter models predict annual and diurnal modulations of dark matter interaction rates in Earth-based experiments as a result of the Earth's motion in the halo. Observation of such features can provide generic evidence for detection of dark matter interactions. This paper reports a search for both annual and diurnal rate modulations in the LUX dark matter experiment using over 20 calendar months of data acquired between 2013 and 2016. This search focuses on electron recoil events at low energies, where leptophilic dark matter interactions are expected to occur and where the DAMA experiment has observed a strong rate modulation for over two decades. By using the innermost volume of the LUX detector and developing robust cuts and corrections, we obtained a stable event rate of 2.3$\pm$0.2~cpd/keV$_{\text{ee}}$/tonne, which is among the lowest in all dark matter experiments. No statistically significant annual modulation was observed in energy windows up to 26~keV$_{\text{ee}}$. Between 2 and 6~keV$_{\text{ee}}$, this analysis demonstrates the most sensitive annual modulation search up to date, with 9.2$\sigma$ tension with the DAMA/LIBRA result. We also report no observation of diurnal modulations above 0.2~cpd/keV$_{\text{ee}}$/tonne amplitude between 2 and 6~keV$_{\text{ee}}$.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:0805.2366  [pdf] - 1934226
LSST: from Science Drivers to Reference Design and Anticipated Data Products
Ivezić, Željko; Kahn, Steven M.; Tyson, J. Anthony; Abel, Bob; Acosta, Emily; Allsman, Robyn; Alonso, David; AlSayyad, Yusra; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrew, John; Angel, James Roger P.; Angeli, George Z.; Ansari, Reza; Antilogus, Pierre; Araujo, Constanza; Armstrong, Robert; Arndt, Kirk T.; Astier, Pierre; Aubourg, Éric; Auza, Nicole; Axelrod, Tim S.; Bard, Deborah J.; Barr, Jeff D.; Barrau, Aurelian; Bartlett, James G.; Bauer, Amanda E.; Bauman, Brian J.; Baumont, Sylvain; Becker, Andrew C.; Becla, Jacek; Beldica, Cristina; Bellavia, Steve; Bianco, Federica B.; Biswas, Rahul; Blanc, Guillaume; Blazek, Jonathan; Blandford, Roger D.; Bloom, Josh S.; Bogart, Joanne; Bond, Tim W.; Borgland, Anders W.; Borne, Kirk; Bosch, James F.; Boutigny, Dominique; Brackett, Craig A.; Bradshaw, Andrew; Brandt, William Nielsen; Brown, Michael E.; Bullock, James S.; Burchat, Patricia; Burke, David L.; Cagnoli, Gianpietro; Calabrese, Daniel; Callahan, Shawn; Callen, Alice L.; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Charles-Emerson, Glenaver; Chesley, Steve; Cheu, Elliott C.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Chiang, James; Chirino, Carol; Chow, Derek; Ciardi, David R.; Claver, Charles F.; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Cockrum, Joseph J.; Coles, Rebecca; Connolly, Andrew J.; Cook, Kem H.; Cooray, Asantha; Covey, Kevin R.; Cribbs, Chris; Cui, Wei; Cutri, Roc; Daly, Philip N.; Daniel, Scott F.; Daruich, Felipe; Daubard, Guillaume; Daues, Greg; Dawson, William; Delgado, Francisco; Dellapenna, Alfred; de Peyster, Robert; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Digel, Seth W.; Doherty, Peter; Dubois, Richard; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory P.; Durech, Josef; Economou, Frossie; Eracleous, Michael; Ferguson, Henry; Figueroa, Enrique; Fisher-Levine, Merlin; Focke, Warren; Foss, Michael D.; Frank, James; Freemon, Michael D.; Gangler, Emmanuel; Gawiser, Eric; Geary, John C.; Gee, Perry; Geha, Marla; Gessner, Charles J. B.; Gibson, Robert R.; Gilmore, D. Kirk; Glanzman, Thomas; Glick, William; Goldina, Tatiana; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Goodenow, Iain; Graham, Melissa L.; Gressler, William J.; Gris, Philippe; Guy, Leanne P.; Guyonnet, Augustin; Haller, Gunther; Harris, Ron; Hascall, Patrick A.; Haupt, Justine; Hernandez, Fabio; Herrmann, Sven; Hileman, Edward; Hoblitt, Joshua; Hodgson, John A.; Hogan, Craig; Huang, Dajun; Huffer, Michael E.; Ingraham, Patrick; Innes, Walter R.; Jacoby, Suzanne H.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jammes, Fabrice; Jee, James; Jenness, Tim; Jernigan, Garrett; Jevremović, Darko; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Anthony S.; Johnson, Margaret W. G.; Jones, R. Lynne; Juramy-Gilles, Claire; Jurić, Mario; Kalirai, Jason S.; Kallivayalil, Nitya J.; Kalmbach, Bryce; Kantor, Jeffrey P.; Karst, Pierre; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kelly, Heather; Kessler, Richard; Kinnison, Veronica; Kirkby, David; Knox, Lloyd; Kotov, Ivan V.; Krabbendam, Victor L.; Krughoff, K. Simon; Kubánek, Petr; Kuczewski, John; Kulkarni, Shri; Ku, John; Kurita, Nadine R.; Lage, Craig S.; Lambert, Ron; Lange, Travis; Langton, J. Brian; Guillou, Laurent Le; Levine, Deborah; Liang, Ming; Lim, Kian-Tat; Lintott, Chris J.; Long, Kevin E.; Lopez, Margaux; Lotz, Paul J.; Lupton, Robert H.; Lust, Nate B.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Mahabal, Ashish; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Marsh, Darren S.; Marshall, Philip J.; Marshall, Stuart; May, Morgan; McKercher, Robert; McQueen, Michelle; Meyers, Joshua; Migliore, Myriam; Miller, Michelle; Mills, David J.; Miraval, Connor; Moeyens, Joachim; Monet, David G.; Moniez, Marc; Monkewitz, Serge; Montgomery, Christopher; Mueller, Fritz; Muller, Gary P.; Arancibia, Freddy Muñoz; Neill, Douglas R.; Newbry, Scott P.; Nief, Jean-Yves; Nomerotski, Andrei; Nordby, Martin; O'Connor, Paul; Oliver, John; Olivier, Scot S.; Olsen, Knut; O'Mullane, William; Ortiz, Sandra; Osier, Shawn; Owen, Russell E.; Pain, Reynald; Palecek, Paul E.; Parejko, John K.; Parsons, James B.; Pease, Nathan M.; Peterson, J. Matt; Peterson, John R.; Petravick, Donald L.; Petrick, M. E. Libby; Petry, Cathy E.; Pierfederici, Francesco; Pietrowicz, Stephen; Pike, Rob; Pinto, Philip A.; Plante, Raymond; Plate, Stephen; Price, Paul A.; Prouza, Michael; Radeka, Veljko; Rajagopal, Jayadev; Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Regnault, Nicolas; Reil, Kevin A.; Reiss, David J.; Reuter, Michael A.; Ridgway, Stephen T.; Riot, Vincent J.; Ritz, Steve; Robinson, Sean; Roby, William; Roodman, Aaron; Rosing, Wayne; Roucelle, Cecille; Rumore, Matthew R.; Russo, Stefano; Saha, Abhijit; Sassolas, Benoit; Schalk, Terry L.; Schellart, Pim; Schindler, Rafe H.; Schmidt, Samuel; Schneider, Donald P.; Schneider, Michael D.; Schoening, William; Schumacher, German; Schwamb, Megan E.; Sebag, Jacques; Selvy, Brian; Sembroski, Glenn H.; Seppala, Lynn G.; Serio, Andrew; Serrano, Eduardo; Shaw, Richard A.; Shipsey, Ian; Sick, Jonathan; Silvestri, Nicole; Slater, Colin T.; Smith, J. Allyn; Smith, R. Chris; Sobhani, Shahram; Soldahl, Christine; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa; Stover, Edward; Strauss, Michael A.; Street, Rachel A.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Sullivan, Ian S.; Sweeney, Donald; Swinbank, John D.; Szalay, Alexander; Takacs, Peter; Tether, Stephen A.; Thaler, Jon J.; Thayer, John Gregg; Thomas, Sandrine; Thukral, Vaikunth; Tice, Jeffrey; Trilling, David E.; Turri, Max; Van Berg, Richard; Berk, Daniel Vanden; Vetter, Kurt; Virieux, Francoise; Vucina, Tomislav; Wahl, William; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Walsh, Brian; Walter, Christopher W.; Wang, Daniel L.; Wang, Shin-Yawn; Warner, Michael; Wiecha, Oliver; Willman, Beth; Winters, Scott E.; Wittman, David; Wolff, Sidney C.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Wu, Xiuqin; Xin, Bo; Yoachim, Peter; Zhan, Hu
Comments: 57 pages, 32 color figures, version with high-resolution figures available from https://www.lsst.org/overview
Submitted: 2008-05-15, last modified: 2018-05-23
(Abridged) We describe here the most ambitious survey currently planned in the optical, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). A vast array of science will be enabled by a single wide-deep-fast sky survey, and LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: probing dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. LSST will be a wide-field ground-based system sited at Cerro Pach\'{o}n in northern Chile. The telescope will have an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg$^2$ field of view, and a 3.2 Gigapixel camera. The standard observing sequence will consist of pairs of 15-second exposures in a given field, with two such visits in each pointing in a given night. With these repeats, the LSST system is capable of imaging about 10,000 square degrees of sky in a single filter in three nights. The typical 5$\sigma$ point-source depth in a single visit in $r$ will be $\sim 24.5$ (AB). The project is in the construction phase and will begin regular survey operations by 2022. The survey area will be contained within 30,000 deg$^2$ with $\delta<+34.5^\circ$, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, $ugrizy$, covering the wavelength range 320--1050 nm. About 90\% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will uniformly observe a 18,000 deg$^2$ region about 800 times (summed over all six bands) during the anticipated 10 years of operations, and yield a coadded map to $r\sim27.5$. The remaining 10\% of the observing time will be allocated to projects such as a Very Deep and Fast time domain survey. The goal is to make LSST data products, including a relational database of about 32 trillion observations of 40 billion objects, available to the public and scientists around the world.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1803.11397  [pdf] - 1658322
Damping of gravitational waves in a viscous Universe and its implication for dark matter self-interactions
Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2018-03-30
It is well known that a gravitational wave (GW) experiences the damping effect when it propagates in a fluid with nonzero shear viscosity. In this paper, we propose a new method to constrain the GW damping rate and thus the fluid shear viscosity. By defining the effective distance which incorporates damping effects, we can transform the GW strain expression in a viscous Universe into the same form as that in a perfect fluid. Therefore, the constraints of the luminosity distances from the observed GW events by LIGO and Virgo can be directly applied to the effective distances in our formalism. We exploit the lognormal likelihoods for the available GW effective distances and a Gaussian likelihood for the luminosity distance inferred from the electromagnetic radiation observation of the binary neutron star merger event GW170817. Our fittings show no obvious damping effects in the current GW data, and the upper limit on the damping rate with the combined data is $6.75 \times 10^{-4}\,{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ at 95\% confidence level. By assuming that the dark matter self-scatterings are efficient enough for the hydrodynamic description to be valid, we find that a GW event from its source at a luminosity distance $D\gtrsim 10^4\;\rm Mpc$ can be used to put a constraint on the dark matter self-interactions.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.00320  [pdf] - 1634152
Strongly self-interacting vector dark matter via freeze-in
Comments: 29 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2017-10-01, last modified: 2017-11-17
We study a vector dark matter (VDM) model in which the dark sector couples to the Standard Model sector via a Higgs portal. If the portal coupling is small enough the VDM can be produced via the freeze-in mechanism. It turns out that the electroweak phase transition have a substantial impact on the prediction of the VDM relic density. We further assume that the dark Higgs boson which gives the VDM mass is so light that it can induce strong VDM self-interactions and solve the small-scale structure problems of the Universe. As illustrated by the latest LUX data, the extreme smallness of the Higgs portal coupling required by the freeze-in mechanism implies that the dark matter direct detection bounds are easily satisfied. However, the model is well constrained by the indirect detections of VDM from BBN, CMB, AMS-02, and diffuse $\gamma$/X-rays. Consequently, only when the dark Higgs boson mass is at most of ${\cal O}({\rm keV})$ does there exist a parameter region which leads to a right amount of VDM relic abundance and an appropriate VDM self-scattering while satisfying all other constraints simultaneously.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1710.00945  [pdf] - 1589178
Study on 2015 June 22 Forbush decrease with the muon telescope in Antarctic
Comments: 10 pages,6 figures
Submitted: 2017-10-02
By the end of 2014, a cosmic ray muon telescope was installed at Zhongshan Station in Antarctic and has been continuously collecting data since then. It is the first surface muon telescope to be built in Antarctic. In June 2015, five CMEs were ejected towards the Earth initiating a big large Forbush decrease (FD) event. We conduct a comprehensive study of the galactic cosmic ray intensity fluctuations during the FD using the data from cosmic ray detectors of multiple stations (Zhongshan, McMurdo, South Polar and Nagoya) and he solar wind measurements from ACE and WIND. A pre-increase before the shock arrival was observed. Distinct differences exist in the timelines of the galactic cosmic ray recorded by the neutron monitors and the muon telescopes. FD onset for Zhongshan muon telescope is delayed (2.5h) with respect to SSC onset. This FD had a profile of four-step decrease. The traditional one- or two-step classification of FDs was inadequate to explain this FD.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1708.06917  [pdf] - 1587379
Dark Matter Results From 54-Ton-Day Exposure of PandaX-II Experiment
Comments: Supplementary materials at https://pandax.sjtu.edu.cn/articles/2nd/supplemental.pdf version 2 as accepted by PRL
Submitted: 2017-08-23, last modified: 2017-09-21
We report a new search of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) using the combined low background data sets in 2016 and 2017 from the PandaX-II experiment in China. The latest data set contains a new exposure of 77.1 live day, with the background reduced to a level of 0.8$\times10^{-3}$ evt/kg/day, improved by a factor of 2.5 in comparison to the previous run in 2016. No excess events were found above the expected background. With a total exposure of 5.4$\times10^4$ kg day, the most stringent upper limit on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section was set for a WIMP with mass larger than 100 GeV/c$^2$, with the lowest exclusion at 8.6$\times10^{-47}$ cm$^2$ at 40 GeV/c$^2$.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1709.00800  [pdf] - 1611913
Ultra-Low Energy Calibration of LUX Detector using $^{127}$Xe Electron Capture
Comments: 10 pages, 10 figures, 2 tables
Submitted: 2017-09-03
We report an absolute calibration of the ionization yields($\textit{Q$_y$})$ and fluctuations for electronic recoil events in liquid xenon at discrete energies between 186 eV and 33.2 keV. The average electric field applied across the liquid xenon target is 180 V/cm. The data are obtained using low energy $^{127}$Xe electron capture decay events from the 95.0-day first run from LUX (WS2013) in search of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The sequence of gamma-ray and X-ray cascades associated with $^{127}$I de-excitations produces clearly identified 2-vertex events in the LUX detector. We observe the K- (binding energy, 33.2 keV), L- (5.2 keV), M- (1.1 keV), and N- (186 eV) shell cascade events and verify that the relative ratio of observed events for each shell agrees with calculations. The N-shell cascade analysis includes single extracted electron (SE) events and represents the lowest-energy electronic recoil $\textit{in situ}$ measurements that have been explored in liquid xenon.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.02297  [pdf] - 1582421
First Searches for Axions and Axion-Like Particles with the LUX Experiment
Comments:
Submitted: 2017-04-07, last modified: 2017-06-30
The first searches for axions and axion-like particles with the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment are presented. Under the assumption of an axio-electric interaction in xenon, the coupling constant between axions and electrons, gAe is tested, using data collected in 2013 with an exposure totalling 95 live-days $\times$ 118 kg. A double-sided, profile likelihood ratio statistic test excludes gAe larger than 3.5 $\times$ 10$^{-12}$ (90% C.L.) for solar axions. Assuming the DFSZ theoretical description, the upper limit in coupling corresponds to an upper limit on axion mass of 0.12 eV/c$^{2}$, while for the KSVZ description masses above 36.6 eV/c$^{2}$ are excluded. For galactic axion-like particles, values of gAe larger than 4.2 $\times$ 10$^{-13}$ are excluded for particle masses in the range 1-16 keV/c$^{2}$. These are the most stringent constraints to date for these interactions.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.03380  [pdf] - 1583256
Limits on spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon cross section obtained from the complete LUX exposure
Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures, version accepted by PRL
Submitted: 2017-05-09, last modified: 2017-06-23
We present experimental constraints on the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon elastic cross sections from the total 129.5 kg-year exposure acquired by the Large Underground Xenon experiment (LUX), operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota (USA). A profile likelihood ratio analysis allows 90% CL upper limits to be set on the WIMP-neutron (WIMP-proton) cross section of $\sigma_n$ = 1.6$\times 10^{-41}$ cm$^{2}$ ($\sigma_p$ = 5$\times 10^{-40}$ cm$^{2}$) at 35 GeV$c^{-2}$, almost a sixfold improvement over the previous LUX spin-dependent results. The spin-dependent WIMP-neutron limit is the most sensitive constraint to date.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.09144  [pdf] - 1554108
LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) Technical Design Report
Mount, B. J.; Hans, S.; Rosero, R.; Yeh, M.; Chan, C.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Huang, D. Q.; Makkinje, J.; Malling, D. C.; Pangilinan, M.; Rhyne, C. A.; Taylor, W. C.; Verbus, J. R.; Kim, Y. D.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J.; Leonard, D. S.; Li, J.; Belle, J.; Cottle, A.; Lippincott, W. H.; Markley, D. J.; Martin, T. J.; Sarychev, M.; Tope, T. E.; Utes, M.; Wang, R.; Young, I.; Araújo, H. M.; Bailey, A. J.; Bauer, D.; Colling, D.; Currie, A.; Fayer, S.; Froborg, F.; Greenwood, S.; Jones, W. G.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Olcina, I.; Paredes, B. López; Richards, A.; Sumner, T. J.; Tomás, A.; Vacheret, A.; Brás, P.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Neves, F.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Silva, C.; Solovov, V. N.; Barry, M. J.; Cole, A.; Dobi, A.; Edwards, W. R.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Gantos, N. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hanzel, K.; Hoff, M. D.; Kamdin, K.; Lesko, K. T.; McConnell, C. T.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Patton, S. J.; Saba, J. S.; Sorensen, P.; Thomas, K. J.; Tull, C. E.; Waldron, W. L.; Witherell, M. S.; Bernstein, A.; Kazkaz, K.; Xu, J.; Akimov, D. Yu.; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Khromov, A. V.; Konovalov, A. M.; Kumpan, A. V.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Dahl, C. E.; Temples, D.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; de Viveiros, L.; Akerib, D. S.; Auyeung, H.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Breidenbach, M.; Bramante, R.; Conley, R.; Craddock, W. W.; Fan, A.; Hau, A.; Ignarra, C. M.; Ji, W.; Krebs, H. J.; Linehan, R.; Lee, C.; Luitz, S.; Mizrachi, E.; Monzani, M. E.; O'Neill, F. G.; Pierson, S.; Racine, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Shutt, G. W.; Shutt, T. A.; Skarpaas, K.; Stifter, K.; To, W. H.; Va'vra, J.; Whitis, T. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Bai, X.; Bunker, R.; Coughlen, R.; Hjemfelt, C.; Leonard, R.; Miller, E. H.; Morrison, E.; Reichenbacher, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Stark, M. R.; Sundarnath, K.; Tiedt, D. R.; Timalsina, M.; Bauer, P.; Carlson, B.; Horn, M.; Johnson, M.; Keefner, J.; Maupin, C.; Taylor, D. J.; Balashov, S.; Ford, P.; Francis, V.; Holtom, E.; Khazov, A.; Kaboth, A.; Majewski, P.; Nikkel, J. A.; O'Dell, J.; Preece, R. M.; van der Grinten, M. G. D.; Worm, S. D.; Mannino, R. L.; Stiegler, T. M.; Terman, P. A.; Webb, R. C.; Levy, C.; Mock, J.; Szydagis, M.; Busenitz, J. K.; Elnimr, M.; Hor, J. Y-K.; Meng, Y.; Piepke, A.; Stancu, I.; Kreczko, L.; Krikler, B.; Penning, B.; Bernard, E. P.; Jacobsen, R. G.; McKinsey, D. N.; Watson, R.; Cutter, J. E.; El-Jurf, S.; Gerhard, R. M.; Hemer, D.; Hillbrand, S.; Holbrook, B.; Lenardo, B. G.; Manalaysay, A. G.; Morad, J. A.; Stephenson, S.; Thomson, J. A.; Tripathi, M.; Uvarov, S.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Kyre, S.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Solmaz, M.; White, D. T.; Cascella, M.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Ghag, C.; Liu, X.; Manenti, L.; Reichhart, L.; Shaw, S.; Utku, U.; Beltrame, P.; Davison, T. J. R.; Marzioni, M. F.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nilima, A.; Boxer, B.; Burdin, S.; Greenall, A.; Powell, S.; Rose, H. J.; Sutcliffe, P.; Balajthy, J.; Edberg, T. K.; Hall, C. R.; Silk, J. S.; Hertel, S.; Akerlof, C. W.; Arthurs, M.; Lorenzon, W.; Pushkin, K.; Schubnell, M.; Boast, K. E.; Carels, C.; Fruth, T.; Kraus, H.; Liao, F. -T.; Lin, J.; Scovell, P. R.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Khaitan, D.; Koyuncu, M.; Skulski, W.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Yin, J.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Rossiter, P.; Woodward, D.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Mei, D. -M.; Wang, L.; Wei, W. -Z.; While, M.; Zhang, C.; Alsum, S. K.; Benson, T.; Carlsmith, D. L.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Dasu, S.; Gregerson, G.; Gomber, B.; Pagac, A.; Palladino, K. J.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Xiao, Q.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. V.; Olevitch, M. A.; Boulton, E. M.; Emmet, W. T.; Hurteau, T. W.; Larsen, N. A.; Pease, E. K.; Tennyson, B. P.; Tvrznikova, L.
Comments: 392 pages. Submitted to the Department of Energy as part of the documentation for the Critical Decision Numbers Two and Three (CD-2 and CD-3) management processes. Report also available by chapter at <a href="http://hep.ucsb.edu/LZ/TDR/">this URL</a>
Submitted: 2017-03-27
In this Technical Design Report (TDR) we describe the LZ detector to be built at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The LZ dark matter experiment is designed to achieve sensitivity to a WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of three times ten to the negative forty-eighth square centimeters.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.07648  [pdf] - 1531370
Results from a search for dark matter in the complete LUX exposure
Comments: This version includes a combined analysis with previously published LUX results, and matches the version published in PRL
Submitted: 2016-08-26, last modified: 2017-01-13
We report constraints on spin-independent weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-nucleon scattering using a 3.35e4 kg-day exposure of the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment. A dual-phase xenon time projection chamber with 250 kg of active mass is operated at the Sanford Underground Research Facility under Lead, South Dakota (USA). With roughly fourfold improvement in sensitivity for high WIMP masses relative to our previous results, this search yields no evidence of WIMP nuclear recoils. At a WIMP mass of 50 GeV/c^2, WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross sections above 2.2e-46 cm^2 are excluded at the 90% confidence level. When combined with the previously reported LUX exposure, this exclusion strengthens to 1.1e-46 cm^2 at 50 GeV/c^2.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.05381  [pdf] - 1503451
Low-energy (0.7-74 keV) nuclear recoil calibration of the LUX dark matter experiment using D-D neutron scattering kinematics
LUX Collaboration; Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Bradley, A.; Bramante, R.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chapman, J. J.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; de Viveiros, L.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, K. R.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Ihm, M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Malling, D. C.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D. M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pangilinan, M.; Pease, E. K.; Phelps, P.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C. A.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.
Comments: 24 pages, 15 figures, 6 tables
Submitted: 2016-08-18, last modified: 2016-10-26
The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is a dual-phase liquid xenon time projection chamber (TPC) operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. A calibration of nuclear recoils in liquid xenon was performed $\textit{in situ}$ in the LUX detector using a collimated beam of mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced by a deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion source. The nuclear recoil energy from the first neutron scatter in the TPC was reconstructed using the measured scattering angle defined by double-scatter neutron events within the active xenon volume. We measured the absolute charge ($Q_{y}$) and light ($L_{y}$) yields at an average electric field of 180 V/cm for nuclear recoil energies spanning 0.7 to 74 keV and 1.1 to 74 keV, respectively. This calibration of the nuclear recoil signal yields will permit the further refinement of liquid xenon nuclear recoil signal models and, importantly for dark matter searches, clearly demonstrates measured ionization and scintillation signals in this medium at recoil energies down to $\mathcal{O}$(1 keV).
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.05309  [pdf] - 1531303
Proposed low-energy absolute calibration of nuclear recoils in a dual-phase noble element TPC using D-D neutron scattering kinematics
Comments: 21 pages, 18 figures, 6 tables
Submitted: 2016-08-18
We propose a new technique for the calibration of nuclear recoils in large noble element dual-phase time projection chambers used to search for WIMP dark matter in the local galactic halo. This technique provides an $\textit{in situ}$ measurement of the low-energy nuclear recoil response of the target media using the measured scattering angle between multiple neutron interactions within the detector volume. The low-energy reach and reduced systematics of this calibration have particular significance for the low-mass WIMP sensitivity of several leading dark matter experiments. Multiple strategies for improving this calibration technique are discussed, including the creation of a new type of quasi-monoenergetic 272 keV neutron source. We report results from a time-of-flight based measurement of the neutron energy spectrum produced by an Adelphi Technology, Inc. DD108 neutron generator, confirming its suitability for the proposed nuclear recoil calibration.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.03506  [pdf] - 1406496
Improved Limits on Scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles from Reanalysis of 2013 LUX data
Comments: Accepted by Phys. Rev. Lett
Submitted: 2015-12-10, last modified: 2016-05-16
We present constraints on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP)-nucleus scattering from the 2013 data of the Large Underground Xenon dark matter experiment, including $1.4\times10^{4}\;\mathrm{kg\; day}$ of search exposure. This new analysis incorporates several advances: single-photon calibration at the scintillation wavelength, improved event-reconstruction algorithms, a revised background model including events originating on the detector walls in an enlarged fiducial volume, and new calibrations from decays of an injected tritium $\beta$ source and from kinematically constrained nuclear recoils down to 1.1 keV. Sensitivity, especially to low-mass WIMPs, is enhanced compared to our previous results which modeled the signal only above a 3 keV minimum energy. Under standard dark matter halo assumptions and in the mass range above 4 $\mathrm{GeV}\,c^{-2}$, these new results give the most stringent direct limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section. The 90% C.L. upper limit has a minimum of 0.6 zb at 33 $\mathrm{GeV}\,c^{-2}$ WIMP mass.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.03133  [pdf] - 1402511
Tritium calibration of the LUX dark matter experiment
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-12-09, last modified: 2016-05-05
We present measurements of the electron-recoil (ER) response of the LUX dark matter detector based upon 170,000 highly pure and spatially-uniform tritium decays. We reconstruct the tritium energy spectrum using the combined energy model and find good agreement with expectations. We report the average charge and light yields of ER events in liquid xenon at 180 V/cm and 105 V/cm and compare the results to the NEST model. We also measure the mean charge recombination fraction and its fluctuations, and we investigate the location and width of the LUX ER band. These results provide input to a re-analysis of the LUX Run3 WIMP search.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1604.00128  [pdf] - 1551913
Effect of near-earth thunderstorms electric field on the intensity of ground cosmic ray positrons/electrons in Tibet
Comments: 17pages,15figures
Submitted: 2016-04-01
Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study the correlation between the ground cosmic ray intensity and near-earth thunderstorms electric field at YBJ (4300 m a.s.l., Tibet, China). The variations of the secondary cosmic ray intensity are found to be highly dependent on the strength and polarity of the electric field. In negative fields and in positive fields greater than 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons increases with increasing electric field strength. And these values increase more obviously when involving a shower with lower primary energy or a higher zenith angle. While in positive fields ranging from 0 to 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons declines and the amplitude is up to 3.1% for vertical showers. A decrease of intensity occurs for inclined showers in positive fields less than 500 V/cm, which is accompanied by smaller amplitudes. In this paper, the intensity changes are discussed, especially concerning the decreases in positive electric fields. Our simulation results are in good agreement with ground-based experimental results obtained from ARGO-YBJ and the Carpet air shower array. These results could be helpful in understanding the acceleration mechanisms of secondary charged particles caused by an atmospheric electric field.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1511.02693  [pdf] - 1381517
Sensitivity study of (10,100) GeV gamma-ray bursts with double shower front events from ARGO-YBJ
Comments:
Submitted: 2015-11-09, last modified: 2016-03-27
ARGO-YBJ, located at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory (4300 m a.s.l., Tibet, China), is a full coverage air shower array, with an energy threshold of 300 GeV for gamma-ray astronomy. Most of the recorded events are single front showers, satisfying the trigger requirement of at least 20 particles detected in a given time window. However, in 13% of the events, two randomly arriving showers may be recorded in the same time window, and the second one, in generally smaller, does not need to satisfy the trigger condition. These events are called double front shower events. By using these small showers, well under the trigger threshold, the detector primary energy threshold can be lowered to a few tens of GeV. In this paper, the angular resolution that can be achieved with these events is evaluated by a full Monte Carlo simulation. The ARGO-YBJ sensitivity in detecting gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by using double front shower events is also studied for various cutoff energies, time durations, and zenith angles of GRBs in the field view of ARGO.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1509.02910  [pdf] - 1286987
LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) Conceptual Design Report
The LZ Collaboration; Akerib, D. S.; Akerlof, C. W.; Akimov, D. Yu.; Alsum, S. K.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Balashov, S.; Barry, M. J.; Bauer, P.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boast, K. E.; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Boulton, E. M.; Bramante, R.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. V.; Bunker, R.; Burdin, S.; Busenitz, J. K.; Carels, C.; Carlsmith, D. L.; Carlson, B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Cascella, M.; Chan, C.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Craddock, W. W.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; da Cunha, J. P.; Dahl, C. E.; Dasu, S.; Davison, T. J. R.; de Viveiros, L.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edberg, T. K.; Edwards, B. N.; Edwards, W. R.; Elnimr, M. M.; Emmet, W. T.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Ford, P.; Francis, V. B.; Fu, C.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gantos, N. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Gerhard, R. M.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Gomber, B.; Hall, C. R.; Harris, A.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hoff, M. D.; Holbrook, B.; Holtom, E.; Huang, D. Q.; Hurteau, T. W.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Ji, X.; Johnson, M.; Ju, Y.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Khazov, A.; Khromov, A. V.; Konovalov, A. M.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kraus, H.; Krebs, H. J.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Kumpan, A. V.; Kyre, S.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Liao, F. -T.; Lin, J.; Lindote, A.; Lippincott, W. H.; Liu, J.; Liu, X.; Lopes, M. I.; Lorenzon, W.; Luitz, S.; Majewski, P.; Malling, D. C.; Manalaysay, A. G.; Manenti, L.; Mannino, R. L.; Markley, D. J.; Martin, T. J.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D. -M.; Meng, Y.; Miller, E. H.; Mock, J.; Monzani, M. E.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; Nikkel, J. A.; O'Neill, F. G.; O'Dell, J.; O'Sullivan, K.; Olevitch, M. A.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pangilinan, M.; Patton, S. J.; Pease, E. K.; Piepke, A.; Powell, S.; Preece, R. M.; Pushkin, K.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rose, H. J.; Rosero, R.; Saba, J. S.; Sarychev, M.; Schnee, R. W.; Schubnell, M. S. G.; Scovell, P. R.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Skarpaas, K.; Skulski, W.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Stancu, I.; Stark, M. R.; Stephenson, S.; Stiegler, T. M.; Sumner, T. J.; Sundarnath, K.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Thomas, K. J.; Thomson, J. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tomás, A.; Tripathi, M.; Tull, C. E.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Va'vra, J.; van der Grinten, M. G. D.; Verbus, J. R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Waldron, W. L.; Wang, L.; Webb, R. C.; Wei, W. -Z.; While, M.; White, D. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Woods, E.; Woodward, D.; Worm, S. D.; Yeh, M.; Yin, J.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.
Comments: 278 pages. Submitted to the Department of Energy as part of the documentation for the Critical Decision Number One (CD-1) management process. Report also available by chapter at http://hep.ucsb.edu/LZ/CDR. This version includes corrections of minor typographic errors
Submitted: 2015-09-09, last modified: 2015-09-23
The design and performance of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) detector is described as of March 2015 in this Conceptual Design Report. LZ is a second-generation dark-matter detector with the potential for unprecedented sensitivity to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) of masses from a few GeV/c2 to hundreds of TeV/c2. With total liquid xenon mass of about 10 tonnes, LZ will be the most sensitive experiment for WIMPs in this mass region by the end of the decade. This report describes in detail the design of the LZ technical systems. Expected backgrounds are quantified and the performance of the experiment is presented. The LZ detector will be located at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. The organization of the LZ Project and a summary of the expected cost and current schedule are given.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.4450  [pdf] - 988319
Revisiting Multi-Component Dark Matter with New AMS-02 Data
Comments: 18 pages, 2 figures, revised version accepted for publication in PRD
Submitted: 2014-11-17, last modified: 2015-04-21
We revisit the multi-component leptonically decaying dark matter (DM) scenario to explain the possible electron/positron excesses with the recently updated AMS-02 data. We find that both the single- and two-component DM models can fit the positron fraction and $e^+/e^-$ respective fluxes, in which the two-component ones provide better fits. However, for the single-component models, the recent AMS-02 data on the positron fraction limit the DM cutoff to be smaller than 1 TeV, which conflicts with the high-energy behavior of the AMS-02 total $e^++e^-$ flux spectrum, while the two-component DM models do not possess such a problem. We also discuss the constraints from the Fermi-LAT measurement of the diffuse $\gamma$-ray spectrum. We show that the two-component DM models are consistent with the current DM lifetime bounds. In contrast, the best-fit DM lifetimes in the single-component models are actually excluded.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.6481  [pdf] - 863010
X-ray Line from the Dark Transition Electric Dipole
Comments: 16 pages, 4 figures, revised version accepted for publication in JHEP
Submitted: 2014-06-25, last modified: 2014-07-27
We study a two-component dark matter (DM) model in which the two Majorana fermionic DM components with nearly degenerate masses are stabilized by an $Z_2$ symmetry and interact with the right-handed muon and tau only via real Yukawa couplings, together with an additional $Z_2$-odd singly-charged scalar. In this setup, the decay from the heavy DM to the lighter one via the transition electric dipole yields the 3.55 keV X-ray signal observed recently. The Yukawa couplings in the dark sector are assumed to be hierarchical, so that the observed DM relic abundance can be achieved with the leading s-wave amplitudes without a fine-tuning. We also consider the constraints from flavor physics, DM direct detections and collider searches, respectively.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1404.1334  [pdf] - 806396
The variability of crater identification among expert and community crater analysts
Comments: 72 pages, 11 figures, 5 tables. Robbins, S.J., et al. The variability of crater identification among expert and community crater analysts. Icarus (2014), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2014.02.022
Submitted: 2014-03-13
The identification of impact craters on planetary surfaces provides important information about their geological history. Most studies have relied on individual analysts who map and identify craters and interpret crater statistics. However, little work has been done to determine how the counts vary as a function of technique, terrain, or between researchers. Furthermore, several novel internet-based projects ask volunteers with little to no training to identify craters, and it was unclear how their results compare against the typical professional researcher. To better understand the variation among experts and to compare with volunteers, eight professional researchers have identified impact features in two separate regions of the moon. Small craters (diameters ranging from 10 m to 500 m) were measured on a lunar mare region and larger craters (100s m to a few km in diameter) were measured on both lunar highlands and maria. Volunteer data were collected for the small craters on the mare. Our comparison shows that the level of agreement among experts depends on crater diameter, number of craters per diameter bin, and terrain type, with differences of up to $\sim\pm45%$. We also found artifacts near the minimum crater diameter that was studied. These results indicate that caution must be used in most cases when interpreting small variations in crater size-frequency distributions and for craters $\le10$ pixels across. Because of the natural variability found, projects that emphasize many people identifying craters on the same area and using a consensus result are likely to yield the most consistent and robust information.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1403.1299  [pdf] - 862558
Radiogenic and Muon-Induced Backgrounds in the LUX Dark Matter Detector
Comments: 18 pages, 12 figures / 17 images, submitted to Astropart. Phys
Submitted: 2014-03-05
The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment aims to detect rare low-energy interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The radiogenic backgrounds in the LUX detector have been measured and compared with Monte Carlo simulation. Measurements of LUX high-energy data have provided direct constraints on all background sources contributing to the background model. The expected background rate from the background model for the 85.3 day WIMP search run is $(2.6\pm0.2_{\textrm{stat}}\pm0.4_{\textrm{sys}})\times10^{-3}$~events~keV$_{ee}^{-1}$~kg$^{-1}$~day$^{-1}$ in a 118~kg fiducial volume. The observed background rate is $(3.6\pm0.4_{\textrm{stat}})\times10^{-3}$~events~keV$_{ee}^{-1}$~kg$^{-1}$~day$^{-1}$, consistent with model projections. The expectation for the radiogenic background in a subsequent one-year run is presented.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1402.3731  [pdf] - 788195
A Detailed Look at the First Results from the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) Dark Matter Experiment
Comments: 16 pages, 3 figures, to appear in the proceedings of The 10th International Symposium on Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (CosPA2013); fixed author list and added info on new calibration
Submitted: 2014-02-15, last modified: 2014-02-25
LUX, the world's largest dual-phase xenon time-projection chamber, with a fiducial target mass of 118 kg and 10,091 kg-days of exposure thus far, is currently the most sensitive direct dark matter search experiment. The initial null-result limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross-section was released in October 2013, with a primary scintillation threshold of 2 phe, roughly 3 keVnr for LUX. The detector has been deployed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota, and is the first experiment to achieve a limit on the WIMP cross-section lower than $10^{-45}$ cm$^{2}$. Here we present a more in-depth discussion of the novel energy scale employed to better understand the nuclear recoil light and charge yields, and of the calibration sources, including the new internal tritium source. We found the LUX data to be in conflict with low-mass WIMP signal interpretations of other results.
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.0366  [pdf] - 804488
Imprint of Multi-component Dark Matter on AMS-02
Comments: 23 pages, 5 figures, revised version accepted for publication in Phys. Rev. D
Submitted: 2013-12-02, last modified: 2014-02-25
The multi-component decaying dark matter (DM) scenario is investigated to explain the possible excesses in the positron fraction by PAMELA and recently confirmed by AMS-02, and in the total $e^+ +e^-$ flux observed by Fermi-LAT. By performing the $\chi^2$ fits, we find that two DM components are already enough to give a reasonable fit of both AMS-02 and Fermi-LAT data. The best-fitted results show that the heavier DM component with its mass 1.5 TeV dominantly decays through the $\mu$-channel, while the lighter one of 100 GeV mainly through the $\tau$-channel. As a byproduct, the fine structure around 100 GeV observed by AMS-02 and Fermi-LAT can be naturally explained by the dropping due to the lighter DM component. With the obtained model parameters by the fitting, we calculate the diffuse $\gamma$-ray emission spectrum in this two-component DM scenario, and find that it is consistent with the data measured by Fermi-LAT. We also construct a microscopic particle DM model to naturally realize the two-component DM scenario, and point out an interesting neutrino signal which is possible to be measured in the near future by IceCube.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1310.8214  [pdf] - 795009
First results from the LUX dark matter experiment at the Sanford Underground Research Facility
Comments: Accepted by Phys. Rev. Lett. Appendix A included as supplementary material with PRL article
Submitted: 2013-10-30, last modified: 2014-02-05
The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment, a dual-phase xenon time-projection chamber operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (Lead, South Dakota), was cooled and filled in February 2013. We report results of the first WIMP search dataset, taken during the period April to August 2013, presenting the analysis of 85.3 live-days of data with a fiducial volume of 118 kg. A profile-likelihood analysis technique shows our data to be consistent with the background-only hypothesis, allowing 90% confidence limits to be set on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering with a minimum upper limit on the cross section of $7.6 \times 10^{-46}$ cm$^{2}$ at a WIMP mass of 33 GeV/c$^2$. We find that the LUX data are in strong disagreement with low-mass WIMP signal interpretations of the results from several recent direct detection experiments.
[42]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.2200  [pdf] - 554182
Spectral Energy Distribution of Markarian 501: Quiescent State vs. Extreme Outburst
The VERITAS Collaboration; Acciari, V. A.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Böttcher, M.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huang, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Madhavan, A. S; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.; Collaboration, The MAGIC; :; Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Tridon, D. Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; del Pozo, E. De Cea; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Mendez, C. Delgado; Ortega, A. Diago; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Errando, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Struebig, J. C.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Paneque, D.; Hayashida, M.
Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ, 25 pages, 6 figures, corresponding authors: Daniel Gall daniel-d-gall@uiowa.edu and Wei Cui cui@purdue.edu
Submitted: 2010-12-10
The very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) blazar Markarian 501 has a well-studied history of extreme spectral variability and is an excellent laboratory for studying the physical processes within the jets of active galactic nuclei. However, there are few detailed multiwavelength studies of Markarian 501 during its quiescent state, due to its low luminosity. A short-term multiwavelength study of Markarian 501 was coordinated in March 2009, focusing around a multi-day observation with the Suzaku X-ray satellite and including {\gamma}-ray data from VERITAS, MAGIC, and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope with the goal of providing a well-sampled multiwavelength baseline measurement of Markarian 501 in the quiescent state. The results of these quiescent-state observations are compared to the historically extreme outburst of April 16, 1997, with the goal of examining variability of the spectral energy distribution between the two states. The derived broadband spectral energy distribution shows the characteristic double-peaked profile. We find that the X-ray peak shifts by over two orders of magnitude in photon energy between the two flux states while the VHE peak varies little. The limited shift in the VHE peak can be explained by the transition to the Klein-Nishina regime. Synchrotron self-Compton models are matched to the data and the implied Klein-Nishina effects are explored.
[43]  oai:arXiv.org:1002.2974  [pdf] - 157896
Observations of the shell-type SNR Cassiopeia A at TeV energies with VERITAS
Comments: 27 pages, 2 figures; Accepted for publication in ApJ
Submitted: 2010-02-15
We report on observations of very high-energy gamma rays from the shell-type supernova remnant Cassiopeia A with the VERITAS stereoscopic array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in Arizona. The total exposure time for these observations is 22 hours, accumulated between September and November of 2007. The gamma-ray source associated with the SNR Cassiopeia A was detected above 200 GeV with a statistical significance of 8.3 s.d. The estimated integral flux for this gamma-ray source is about 3% of the Crab-Nebula flux. The photon spectrum is compatible with a power law dN/dE ~ E^(-Gamma) with an index Gamma = 2.61 +/- 0.24(stat) +/- 0.2(sys). The data are consistent with a point-like source. We provide a detailed description of the analysis results, and discuss physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed gamma-ray emission.
[44]  oai:arXiv.org:0912.3772  [pdf] - 1934486
VERITAS Observations of Mkn 501 in 2009
Comments: 2009 Fermi Symposium, eConf Proceedings C091122, 4 pages, 3 figures
Submitted: 2009-12-18, last modified: 2009-12-28
VERITAS is the high-sensitivity instrument of latest generation. It is often used for the short AGN monitoring exposures evenly distributed over entire observational season of a source of interest. Each of these exposures is long enough to detect the source at the flux level of about 1 Crab. During the 2009 observing season a number of exposures of Mkn 501 with VERITAS revealed variable TeV gamma-ray emission at the flux level eventually exceeding 2 Crab. The spectral and flux variability measurements in TeV gamma rays for the 2009 data sample of Mkn 501 are summarized in this paper.
[45]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0009003  [pdf] - 37845
Non-Thermal Production of WIMPs and the Sub-Galactic Structure of the Universe
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures; typo corrected; to appear in PRL
Submitted: 2000-09-01, last modified: 2000-11-30
There is increasing evidence that conventional cold dark matter (CDM) models lead to conflicts between observations and numerical simulations of dark matter halos on sub-galactic scales. Spergel and Steinhardt showed that if the CDM is strongly self-interacting, then the conflicts disappear. However, the assumption of strong self-interaction would rule out the favored candidates for CDM, namely weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), such as the neutralino. In this paper we propose a mechanism of non-thermal production of WIMPs and study its implications on the power spectrum. We find that the non-vanishing velocity of the WIMPs suppresses the power spectrum on small scales compared to what it obtained in the conventional CDM model. Our results show that, in this context, WIMPs as candidates for dark matter can work well both on large scales and on sub-galactic scales.
[46]  oai:arXiv.org:hep-ph/0007064  [pdf] - 113566
Remark on approximation in the calculation of the primordial spectrum generated during inflation
Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures, to appear in PRD
Submitted: 2000-07-06
We re-examine approximations in the analytical calculation of the primordial spectrum of cosmological perturbation produced during inflation. Taking two inflation models (chaotic inflation and natural inflation) as examples, we numerically verify the accuracy of these approximations.