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Hsu, Alexander D.

Normalized to: Hsu, A.

3 article(s) in total. 39 co-authors, from 1 to 2 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 9,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.08468  [pdf] - 1799995
Analysis of Neptune's 2017 Bright Equatorial Storm
Comments: 42 pages, 14 figures, 6 tables; Accepted to Icarus
Submitted: 2018-11-20
We report the discovery of a large ($\sim$8500 km diameter) infrared-bright storm at Neptune's equator in June 2017. We tracked the storm over a period of 7 months with high-cadence infrared snapshot imaging, carried out on 14 nights at the 10 meter Keck II telescope and 17 nights at the Shane 120 inch reflector at Lick Observatory. The cloud feature was larger and more persistent than any equatorial clouds seen before on Neptune, remaining intermittently active from at least 10 June to 31 December 2017. Our Keck and Lick observations were augmented by very high-cadence images from the amateur community, which permitted the determination of accurate drift rates for the cloud feature. Its zonal drift speed was variable from 10 June to at least 25 July, but remained a constant $237.4 \pm 0.2$ m s$^{-1}$ from 30 September until at least 15 November. The pressure of the cloud top was determined from radiative transfer calculations to be 0.3-0.6 bar; this value remained constant over the course of the observations. Multiple cloud break-up events, in which a bright cloud band wrapped around Neptune's equator, were observed over the course of our observations. No "dark spot" vortices were seen near the equator in HST imaging on 6 and 7 October. The size and pressure of the storm are consistent with moist convection or a planetary-scale wave as the energy source of convective upwelling, but more modeling is required to determine the driver of this equatorial disturbance as well as the triggers for and dynamics of the observed cloud break-up events.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1807.10692  [pdf] - 1729192
A New, Long-Lived, Jupiter Mesoscale Wave Observed at Visible Wavelengths
Comments: Astronomical Journal, accepted
Submitted: 2018-07-27
Small-scale waves were observed along the boundary between Jupiter's North Equatorial Belt and North Tropical Zone, ~16.5{\deg} N planetographic latitude in Hubble Space Telescope data in 2012 and throughout 2015 to 2018, observable at all wavelengths from the UV to the near IR. At peak visibility, the waves have sufficient contrast (~10%) to be observed from ground-based telescopes. They have a typical wavelength of about 1.2{\deg} (1400 km), variable-length wave trains, and westward phase speeds of a few m/s or less. New analysis of Voyager 2 data shows similar wave trains over at least 300 hours. Some waves appear curved when over cyclones and anticyclones, but most are straight, but tilted, shifting in latitude as they pass vortices. Based on their wavelengths, phase speeds, and faint appearance at high-altitude sensitive passbands, the observed NEB waves are consistent with inertia-gravity waves at the 500-mbar pressure level, though formation altitude is not well constrained. Preliminary General Circulation Model simulations generate inertia-gravity waves from vortices interacting with the environment and can reproduce the observed wavelengths and orientations. Several mechanisms can generate these waves, and all may contribute: geostrophic adjustment of cyclones; cyclone/anticyclone interactions; wind interactions with obstructions or heat pulses from convection; or changing vertical wind shear. However, observations also show that the presence of vortices and/or regions of convection are not sufficient by themselves for wave formation, implying that a change in vertical structure may affect their stability, or that changes in haze properties may affect their visibility.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1212.0544  [pdf] - 1158236
A Census of Broad-Line Active Galactic Nuclei in Nearby Galaxies: Coeval Star Formation and Rapid Black Hole Growth
Comments: 16 pages, 17 figures. ApJ accepted
Submitted: 2012-12-03
We present the first quantified, statistical map of broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) frequency with host galaxy color and stellar mass in nearby (0.01 < z < 0.11) galaxies. Aperture photometry and z-band concentration measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are used to dis- entangle AGN and galaxy emission, resulting in estimates of uncontaminated galaxy rest-frame color, luminosity, and stellar mass. Broad-line AGNs are distributed throughout the blue cloud and green valley at a given stellar mass, and are much rarer in quiescent (red sequence) galaxies. This is in contrast to the published host galaxy properties of weaker narrow-line AGNs, indicating that broad-line AGNs occur during a different phase in galaxy evolution. More luminous broad-line AGNs have bluer host galaxies, even at fixed mass, suggesting that the same processes that fuel nuclear activity also efficiently form stars. The data favor processes that simultaneously fuel both star formation activity and rapid supermassive black hole accretion. If AGNs cause feedback on their host galaxies in the nearby universe, the evidence of galaxy-wide quenching must be delayed until after the broad-line AGN phase.