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Holl, Berry

Normalized to: Holl, B.

41 article(s) in total. 888 co-authors, from 1 to 28 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 6,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:2006.09416  [pdf] - 2120079
Empirical completeness assessment of the Gaia DR2, Pan-STARRS 1 and ASAS-SN-II RR Lyrae catalogues
Comments: 15 pages, 14 figures, 4+10 tables. Accepted for publication at MNRAS. Completeness maps and Python utils to plot and/or recompute them, available at https://github.com/cmateu/rrl_completeness
Submitted: 2020-06-16
RR Lyrae stars are an important and widely used tracer of the most ancient populations of our Galaxy, mainly due to their standard candle nature. The availability of large scale surveys of variable stars is allowing us to trace the structure of our entire Galaxy, even in previously inaccessible areas like the Galactic disc. In this work we aim to provide an empirical assessment of the completeness of the three largest RR Lyrae catalogues available: Gaia DR2, PanSTARRS-1 and ASAS-SN-II. Using a joint probabilistic analysis of the three surveys we compute 2D and 3D completeness maps in each survey's full magnitude range. At the bright end (G<13) we find ASAS-SN-II and Gaia are near 100% complete in RRab at high latitude (|b|>20deg); ASAS-SN-II has the best completeness at low latitude for RRab and at all latitudes for RRc. At the faint end (G>13), Gaia DR2 is the most complete catalogue for both RR Lyrae types, at any latitude, with median completeness rates of 95% (RRab) and >85% (RRc) outside the ecliptic plane (|\beta|>25deg). We confirm a high and uniform completeness of PanSTARRS-1 RR Lyrae at 91% (RRab) and 82% (RRc) down to G~18, and provide the first estimate of its completeness at low galactic latitude (|b|<20deg) at an estimated median 65% (RRab) and 50-60% (RRc). Our results are publicly available as 2D and 3D completeness maps, and as functions to evaluate each survey's completeness versus distance or per line-of sight.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:2004.14433  [pdf] - 2086999
Completeness of the Gaia-verse I: when and where were Gaia's eyes on the sky during DR2?
Comments: 17 pages, submitted to MNRAS. The Completeness of the Gaia-verse project website can be found at http://www.gaiaverse.space . The Gaia DPAC has made an official list of gaps available at https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/dr2-data-gaps
Submitted: 2020-04-29
The Gaia space mission is crafting revolutionary astrometric, photometric and spectroscopic catalogues that will allow us to map our Galaxy, but only if we know the completeness of this Gaia-verse of catalogues: what stars does it contain and what stars is it missing? We argue that the completeness is driven by Gaia's spinning-and-precessing scanning law and will apply this principle to the Gaia-verse over this series. We take a first step by identifying the periods in time that did not contribute any measurements to Gaia DR2; these gaps create ribbons of incompleteness across the sky that will bias any study that ignores them, although some of these gaps may be filled in future data releases. Our first approach was to use the variable star photometry to identify the 94 gaps longer than 1% of a day. Our second approach was to predict the number of observations of every point on the sky, which in comparison to the reported number of detections revealed additional gaps in the astrometry and spectroscopy. Making these predictions required us to make the most precise, publicly-available determination of the Gaia scanning law. Using this scanning law, we further identified that most stars fainter than $G=22$ in DR2 have spurious magnitudes due to a miscalibration resulting from a thunderstorm over Madrid. Our list of gaps and precision scanning law will allow astronomers to know when Gaia's eye was truly on their binary star, exoplanet or microlensing event during the time period of the second data release.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09382  [pdf] - 2078647
Gaia Data Release 2: Variable stars in the colour-absolute magnitude diagram
Comments: 20 pages, 11 figures, published in Astronomy and Astrophysics (A&A 623, 110, 2019)
Submitted: 2018-04-25, last modified: 2020-04-16
The ESA Gaia mission provides a unique time-domain survey for more than 1.6 billion sources with G ~ 21 mag. We showcase stellar variability across the Galactic colour-absolute magnitude diagram (CaMD), focusing on pulsating, eruptive, and cataclysmic variables, as well as on stars exhibiting variability due to rotation and eclipses. We illustrate the locations of variable star classes, variable object fractions, and typical variability amplitudes throughout the CaMD and illustrate how variability-related changes in colour and brightness induce `motions' using 22 months worth of calibrated photometric, spectro-photometric, and astrometric Gaia data of stars with significant parallax. To ensure a large variety of variable star classes to populate the CaMD, we crossmatch Gaia sources with known variable stars. We also used the statistics and variability detection modules of the Gaia variability pipeline. Corrections for interstellar extinction are not implemented in this article. Gaia enables the first investigation of Galactic variable star populations across the CaMD on a similar, if not larger, scale than previously done in the Magellanic Clouds. Despite observed colours not being reddening corrected, we clearly see distinct regions where variable stars occur and determine variable star fractions to within Gaia's current detection thresholds. Finally, we show the most complete description of variability-induced motion within the CaMD to date. Gaia enables novel insights into variability phenomena for an unprecedented number of stars, which will benefit the understanding of stellar astrophysics. The CaMD of Galactic variable stars provides crucial information on physical origins of variability in a way previously accessible only for Galactic star clusters or external galaxies.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1912.07659  [pdf] - 2015879
Gaia's revolution in stellar variability
Comments: 7 pages, 4 figures, invited contribution at the conference "Stars and their variability observed from space - Celebrating the 5th anniversary of BRITE-Constellation", Vienna, Austria, August 19 - 23, 2019. Eds: C. Neiner, W. Weiss, D. Baade, E. Griffin, C. Lovekin, A. Moffat
Submitted: 2019-12-16
Stellar variability studies are now reaching a completely new level thanks to ESA's Gaia mission, which enables us to locate many variable stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and determine the various instability strips/bands. Furthermore, this mission also allows us to detect, characterise and classify many millions of new variable stars thanks to its very unique nearly simultaneous multi-epoch survey with different instruments (photometer, spectro-photometer, radial velocity spectrometer). An overview of what can be found in literature in terms of mostly data products by the Gaia consortium is given. This concerns the various catalogues of variable stars derived from the Gaia time series and also the location and motion of variable stars in the observational Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. In addition, we provide a list of a few thousands of variable white dwarf candidates derived from the DR2 published data, among them probably many hundreds of new pulsating white dwarfs. On a very different topic, we also show how Gaia allows us to reveal the 3D structures of and around the Milky Way thanks to the RR Lyrae stars.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1911.09114  [pdf] - 2001949
Multivariate Time-series Analysis of Variable Objects in the Gaia Mission
Comments: Published in PASP, 12 pages, 5 figures
Submitted: 2019-11-20
In astronomy, we are witnessing an enormous increase in the number of source detections, precision, and diversity of measurements. Additionally, multi-epoch data is becoming the norm, making time-series analyses an important aspect of current astronomy. The Gaia mission is an outstanding example of a multi-epoch survey that provides measurements in a large diversity of domains, with its broad-band photometry; spectrophotometry in blue and red (used to derive astrophysical parameters); spectroscopy (employed to infer radial velocities, v sin(i), and other astrophysical parameters); and its extremely precise astrometry. Most of all that information is provided for sources covering the entire sky. Here, we present several properties related to the Gaia time series, such as the time sampling; the different types of measurements; the Gaia G, G BP and G RP-band photometry; and Gaia-inspired studies using the CORrelation-RAdial-VELocities data to assess the potential of the information on the radial velocity, the FWHM, and the contrast of the cross-correlation function. We also present techniques (which are used or are under development) that optimize the extraction of astrophysical information from the different instruments of Gaia, such as the principal component analysis and the multi-response regression. The detailed understanding of the behavior of the observed phenomena in the various measurement domains can lead to richer and more precise characterization of the Gaia data, including the definition of more informative attributes that serve as input to (our) machine-learning algorithms.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1910.08028  [pdf] - 1981876
ESA Voyage 2050 white paper -- Faint objects in motion: the new frontier of high precision astrometry
Comments: White paper for the Voyage 2050 long-term plan in the ESA Science Programme. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1707.01348
Submitted: 2019-10-12
Sky survey telescopes and powerful targeted telescopes play complementary roles in astronomy. In order to investigate the nature and characteristics of the motions of very faint objects, a flexibly-pointed instrument capable of high astrometric accuracy is an ideal complement to current astrometric surveys and a unique tool for precision astrophysics. Such a space-based mission will push the frontier of precision astrometry from evidence of earth-massed habitable worlds around the nearest starts, and also into distant Milky way objects up to the Local Group of galaxies. As we enter the era of the James Webb Space Telescope and the new ground-based, adaptive-optics-enabled giant telescopes, by obtaining these high precision measurements on key objects that Gaia could not reach, a mission that focuses on high precision astrometry science can consolidate our theoretical understanding of the local universe, enable extrapolation of physical processes to remote redshifts, and derive a much more consistent picture of cosmological evolution and the likely fate of our cosmos. Already several missions have been proposed to address the science case of faint objects in motion using high precision astrometry ESA missions: NEAT for M3, micro-NEAT for S1 mission, and Theia for M4 and M5. Additional new mission configurations adapted with technological innovations could be envisioned to pursue accurate measurements of these extremely small motions. The goal of this white paper is to address the fundamental science questions that are at stake when we focus on the motions of faint sky objects and to briefly review quickly instrumentation and mission profiles.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1905.08542  [pdf] - 1901957
Triage of Astrometric Binaries - how to find triple systems and dormant black-hole secondaries in the Gaia orbits
Comments: Submitted to MNRAS
Submitted: 2019-05-21
Preparing for the expected wealth of Gaia detections, we consider here a simple algorithm for classifying unresolved astrometric binaries with main-sequence (MS) primary into three classes: binaries with a probable MS secondary, with two possible values for the mass ratio; probable hierarchical triple MS systems with an astrometric secondary as a close binary, with a limited range of mass-ratio values; and binaries with a compact-object secondary, with a minimal value of the mass ratio. This is done by defining a unit-less observational parameter 'Astrometric Mass-Ratio Function' (AMRF), $\mathcal{A}$, of a binary, based on primary-mass estimation, in addition to the astrometric parameters - the angular semi-major axis, the period and the parallax. We derive the $\mathcal{A}$ value that differentiates the three classes by forward modeling representative binaries of each class, assuming some mass-luminosity relation.To demonstrate the potential of the algorithm, we consider the orbits of 98 Hipparcos astrometric binaries with main-sequence primaries, using the Hipparcos parallaxes and the primary-mass estimates. For systems with known spectroscopic orbital solution, our results are consistent with the spectroscopic elements, validating the suggested approach. The algorithm will be able to identify hierarchical triple systems and dormant neutron-star and black-hole companions in the Gaia astrometric binaries.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1811.03919  [pdf] - 1885473
Gaia Data Release 2: All-sky classification of high-amplitude pulsating stars
Comments: 21 pages, 33 figures, with minor revisions, in press (Astronomy & Astrophysics)
Submitted: 2018-11-09, last modified: 2019-05-14
More than half a million of the 1.69 billion sources in Gaia Data Release 2 (DR2) are published with photometric time series that exhibit light variations during the 22 months of observation. An all-sky classification of common high-amplitude pulsators (Cepheids, long-period variables, Delta Scuti / SX Phoenicis, and RR Lyrae stars) is provided for stars with brightness variations greater than 0.1 mag in G band. A semi-supervised classification approach was employed, firstly training multi-stage random forest classifiers with sources of known types in the literature, followed by a preliminary classification of the Gaia data and a second training phase that included a selection of the first classification results to improve the representation of some classes, before the improved classifiers were applied to the Gaia data. Dedicated validation classifiers were used to reduce the level of contamination in the published results. A relevant fraction of objects were not yet sufficiently sampled for reliable Fourier series decomposition, consequently classifiers were based on features derived from statistics of photometric time series in the G, BP, and RP bands, as well as from some astrometric parameters. The published classification results include 195,780 RR Lyrae stars, 150,757 long-period variables, 8550 Cepheids, and 8882 Delta Scuti / SX Phoenicis stars. All of these results represent candidates whose completeness and contamination are described as a function of variability type and classification reliability. Results are expressed in terms of class labels and classification scores, which are available in the vari_classifier_result table of the Gaia archive.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.02079  [pdf] - 1911148
Gaia Data Release 2: Specific characterisation and validation of all-sky Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars
Comments: 46 pages, 46 figures, 5 tables. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2018-05-05, last modified: 2018-10-29
The Gaia second Data Release (DR2) presents a first mapping of full-sky RR Lyrae stars and Cepheids observed by the spacecraft during the initial 22 months of science operations. The Specific Object Study (SOS) pipeline, developed to validate and fully characterise Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars (SOS Cep&RRL) observed by Gaia, has been presented in the documentation and papers accompanying the Gaia first Data Release. Here we describe how the SOS pipeline was modified to allow for processing the Gaia multiband (G, G_BP and G_RP) time series photometry of all-sky candidate variables and produce specific results for confirmed RR Lyrae stars and Cepheids that are published in the DR2 catalogue. The SOS Cep&RRL processing uses tools such as the period-amplitude and the period-luminosity relations in the G band. For the analysis of the Gaia DR2 candidates we also used tools based on the G_BP and G_RP photometry, such as the period-Wesenheit relation in (G,G_RP). Multiband time series photometry and characterisation by the SOS Cep&RRL pipeline are published in Gaia DR2 for 150,359 such variables (9,575 classified as Cepheids and 140,784 as RR Lyrae stars) distributed all over the sky. The sample includes variables in 87 globular clusters and 14 dwarf galaxies. To the best of our knowledge, as of 25 April 2018, variability of 50,570 of these sources (350 Cepheids and 50,220 RR Lyrae stars) is not known in the literature, hence likely they are new discoveries by Gaia. An estimate of the interstellar absorption is published for 54,272 fundamental-mode RR Lyrae stars from a relation based on the G-band amplitude and the pulsation period. Metallicities derived from the Fourier parameters of the light curves are also released for 64,932 RR Lyrae stars and 3,738 fundamental-mode classical Cepheids with period shorter than 6.3 days.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.00747  [pdf] - 1799831
Gaia Data Release 2. Short-timescale variability processing and analysis
Comments: 18 pages, 19 figures, 2 tables, submitted to Astronomy & Astrophysics and accepted for publication
Submitted: 2018-05-02, last modified: 2018-08-27
The Gaia DR2 sample of short-timescale variable candidates results from the investigation of the first 22 months of Gaia photometry for a subsample of sources at the Gaia faint end. For this exercise, we limited ourselves to the case of suspected rapid periodic variability. Our study combines fast-variability detection through variogram analysis, high-frequency search by means of least-squares periodograms, and empirical selection based on the investigation of specific sources seen through the Gaia eyes (e.g. known variables or visually identified objects with peculiar features in their light curves). The progressive definition and validation of this selection criterion also benefited from supplementary ground-based photometric monitoring of a few preliminary candidates, performed at the Flemish Mercator telescope (Canary Islands, Spain) between August and November 2017. We publish a list of 3,018 short-timescale variable candidates, spread throughout the sky, with a false-positive rate up to 10-20% in the Magellanic Clouds, and a more significant but justifiable contamination from longer-period variables between 19% and 50%, depending on the area of the sky. Although its completeness is limited to about 0.05%, this first sample of Gaia short-timescale variables recovers some very interesting known short-period variables, such as post-common envelope binaries or cataclysmic variables, and brings to light some fascinating, newly discovered variable sources. In the perspective of future Gaia data releases, several improvements of the short-timescale variability processing are considered, by enhancing the existing variogram and period-search algorithms or by classifying the identified candidates. Nonetheless, the encouraging outcome of our Gaia DR2 analysis demonstrates the power of this mission for such fast-variability studies, and opens great perspectives for this domain of astrophysics.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09378  [pdf] - 1732652
Gaia Data Release 2: Observational Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams
Gaia Collaboration; Babusiaux, C.; van Leeuwen, F.; Barstow, M. A.; Jordi, C.; Vallenari, A.; Bossini, D.; Bressan, A.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; van Leeuwen, M.; Brown, A. G. A.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Walton, N. A.; Arenou, F.; Bastian, U.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Bakker, J.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; DeAngeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Holl, B.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Teyssier, D.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Audard, M.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Burgess, P.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Clotet, M.; Creevey, O.; Davidson, M.; DeRidder, J.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fouesneau, M.; Frémat, Y.; Galluccio, L.; García-Torres, M.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Gosset, E.; Guy, L. P.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández, J.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Jordan, S.; Korn, A. J.; Krone-Martins, A.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Lebzelter, T.; Löffler, W.; Manteiga, M.; Marrese, P. M.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Moitinho, A.; Mora, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Richards, P. J.; Rimoldini, L.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Sozzetti, A.; Süveges, M.; Torra, J.; vanReeven, W.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aerts, C.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alvarez, R.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Arcay, B.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Balm, P.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbato, D.; Barblan, F.; Barklem, P. S.; Barrado, D.; Barros, M.; Muñoz, S. Bartholomé; Bassilana, J. -L.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; Berihuete, A.; Bertone, S.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Boeche, C.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Bramante, L.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Brugaletta, E.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Butkevich, A. G.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cancelliere, R.; Cannizzaro, G.; Carballo, R.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Casamiquela, L.; Castellani, M.; Castro-Ginard, A.; Charlot, P.; Chemin, L.; Chiavassa, A.; Cocozza, G.; Costigan, G.; Cowell, S.; Crifo, F.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Cuypers, J.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; deLaverny, P.; DeLuise, F.; DeMarch, R.; deMartino, D.; deSouza, R.; deTorres, A.; Debosscher, J.; delPozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Diakite, S.; Diener, C.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Eriksson, K.; Esquej, P.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernique, P.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Frézouls, B.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavel, A.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Giacobbe, P.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Glass, F.; Gomes, M.; Granvik, M.; Gueguen, A.; Guerrier, A.; Guiraud, J.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Hauser, M.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Heu, J.; Hilger, T.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holland, G.; Huckle, H. E.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Janßen, K.; JevardatdeFombelle, G.; Jonker, P. G.; Juhász, Á. L.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kewley, A.; Klar, J.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, M.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Koubsky, P.; Lambert, S.; Lanza, A. F.; Lasne, Y.; Lavigne, J. -B.; LeFustec, Y.; LePoncin-Lafitte, C.; Lebreton, Y.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; López, M.; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martino, M.; Marton, G.; Mary, N.; Massari, D.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molnár, L.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; O'Mullane, W.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Panahi, A.; Pawlak, M.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poggio, E.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Racero, E.; Ragaini, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Riclet, F.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rivard, A.; Rixon, G.; Roegiers, T.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sanna, N.; Santana-Ros, T.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Ségransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Siltala, L.; Silva, A. F.; Smart, R. L.; Smith, K. W.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; SoriaNieto, S.; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Teyssandier, P.; Thuillot, W.; Titarenko, A.; TorraClotet, F.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Uzzi, S.; Vaillant, M.; Valentini, G.; Valette, V.; vanElteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; Vaschetto, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Viala, Y.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; vonEssen, C.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Wertz, O.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zorec, J.; Zschocke, S.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.
Comments: Published in the A&A Gaia Data Release 2 special issue. Tables 2 and A.4 corrected. Tables available at http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/616/A10
Submitted: 2018-04-25, last modified: 2018-08-13
We highlight the power of the Gaia DR2 in studying many fine structures of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD). Gaia allows us to present many different HRDs, depending in particular on stellar population selections. We do not aim here for completeness in terms of types of stars or stellar evolutionary aspects. Instead, we have chosen several illustrative examples. We describe some of the selections that can be made in Gaia DR2 to highlight the main structures of the Gaia HRDs. We select both field and cluster (open and globular) stars, compare the observations with previous classifications and with stellar evolutionary tracks, and we present variations of the Gaia HRD with age, metallicity, and kinematics. Late stages of stellar evolution such as hot subdwarfs, post-AGB stars, planetary nebulae, and white dwarfs are also analysed, as well as low-mass brown dwarf objects. The Gaia HRDs are unprecedented in both precision and coverage of the various Milky Way stellar populations and stellar evolutionary phases. Many fine structures of the HRDs are presented. The clear split of the white dwarf sequence into hydrogen and helium white dwarfs is presented for the first time in an HRD. The relation between kinematics and the HRD is nicely illustrated. Two different populations in a classical kinematic selection of the halo are unambiguously identified in the HRD. Membership and mean parameters for a selected list of open clusters are provided. They allow drawing very detailed cluster sequences, highlighting fine structures, and providing extremely precise empirical isochrones that will lead to more insight in stellar physics. Gaia DR2 demonstrates the potential of combining precise astrometry and photometry for large samples for studies in stellar evolution and stellar population and opens an entire new area for HRD-based studies.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.02035  [pdf] - 1767420
Gaia Data Release 2: The first Gaia catalogue of long-period variable candidates
Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. 29 pages, 52 figures
Submitted: 2018-05-05, last modified: 2018-07-27
Gaia DR2 provides a unique all-sky catalogue of 550'737 variable stars, of which 151'761 are long-period variable (LPV) candidates with G variability amplitudes larger than 0.2 mag (5-95% quantile range). About one-fifth of the LPV candidates are Mira candidates, the majority of the rest are semi-regular variable candidates. For each source, G, BP , and RP photometric time-series are published, together with some LPV-specific attributes for the subset of 89'617 candidates with periods in G longer than 60 days. We describe this first Gaia catalogue of LPV candidates, and present various validation checks. Various samples of LPVs were used to validate the catalogue: a sample of well-studied very bright LPVs with light curves from the AAVSO that are partly contemporaneous with Gaia light curves, a sample of Gaia LPV candidates with good parallaxes, the ASAS_SN catalogue of LPVs, and the OGLE catalogues of LPVs towards the Magellanic Clouds and the Galactic bulge. The analyses of these samples show a good agreement between Gaia DR2 and literature periods. The same is globally true for bolometric corrections of M-type stars. The main contaminant of our DR2 catalogue comes from young stellar objects (YSOs) in the solar vicinity (within ~1 kpc), although their number in the whole catalogue is only at the percent level. A cautionary note is provided about parallax-dependent LPV attributes published in the catalogue. This first Gaia catalogue of LPVs approximately doubles the number of known LPVs with amplitudes larger than 0.2 mag, despite the conservative candidate selection criteria that prioritise low contamination over high completeness, and despite the limited DR2 time coverage compared to the long periods characteristic of LPVs. It also contains a small set of YSO candidates, which offers the serendipitous opportunity to study these objects at an early stage of the Gaia data releases.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09373  [pdf] - 1767409
Gaia Data Release 2: Summary of the variability processing & analysis results
Comments: 21 pages, 10 figures, 5 tables, accepted by Astronomy & Astrophysics, added several language corrections, and expanded Gaia archive query examples
Submitted: 2018-04-25, last modified: 2018-07-06
The Gaia Data Release 2 (DR2): we summarise the processing and results of the identification of variable source candidates of RR Lyrae stars, Cepheids, long period variables (LPVs), rotation modulation (BY Dra-type) stars, delta Scuti & SX Phoenicis stars, and short-timescale variables. In this release we aim to provide useful but not necessarily complete samples of candidates. The processed Gaia data consist of the G, BP, and RP photometry during the first 22 months of operations as well as positions and parallaxes. Various methods from classical statistics, data mining and time series analysis were applied and tailored to the specific properties of Gaia data, as well as various visualisation tools. The DR2 variability release contains: 228'904 RR Lyrae stars, 11'438 Cepheids, 151'761 LPVs, 147'535 stars with rotation modulation, 8'882 delta Scuti & SX Phoenicis stars, and 3'018 short-timescale variables. These results are distributed over a classification and various Specific Object Studies (SOS) tables in the Gaia archive, along with the three-band time series and associated statistics for the underlying 550'737 unique sources. We estimate that about half of them are newly identified variables. The variability type completeness varies strongly as function of sky position due to the non-uniform sky coverage and intermediate calibration level of this data. The probabilistic and automated nature of this work implies certain completeness and contamination rates which are quantified so that users can anticipate their effects. This means that even well-known variable sources can be missed or misidentified in the published data. The DR2 variability release only represents a small subset of the processed data. Future releases will include more variable sources and data products; however, DR2 shows the (already) very high quality of the data and great promise for variability studies.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.00421  [pdf] - 1736369
Gaia Data Release 2: Rotational modulation in late-type dwarfs
Comments: 14 pages, 11 figures, accepted by A&A
Submitted: 2018-05-01, last modified: 2018-06-27
We present the methods devised to identify the BY Dra variables candidates in Gaia DR2 and infer their variability parameters. BY Dra candidates are pre-selected from their position in the HR diagram, built from Gaia parallaxes, $G$ magnitudes, and $(G_{BP} - G_{RP})$ colours. Since the time evolution of the stellar active region can disrupt the coherence of the signal, segments not much longer than their expected evolution timescale are extracted from the entire photometric time-series and period search algorithms are applied to each segment. For the Gaia DR2, we select sources having similar period in at least two segments as candidates BY Dra. Results are further filtered considering the time series phase coverage and the expected approximate light curve shape. Gaia DR2 includes rotational periods and modulation amplitudes of 147 535 BY Dra candidates. The data unveil the existence of two populations with distinctive period and amplitude distributions. The sample covers 38% of the whole sky when divided in bins (HEALPix) of $\approx$0.84 square degrees and we estimate that represents 0.7 -- 5 % of all BY Dra stars potentially detectable by Gaia. The preliminary data contained in Gaia DR2 illustrate the vast and unique information that the mission is going to provide on stellar rotation and magnetic activity. This information, complemented by Gaia exquisite parallaxes, proper motions, and astrophysical parameter, is opening new and unique perspectives for our understanding of the evolution of stellar angular momentum and dynamo action.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.09366  [pdf] - 1732648
Gaia Data Release 2: The astrometric solution
Comments: 25 pages, 29 figures. Special A&A issue on Gaia Data Release 2
Submitted: 2018-04-25
Gaia Data Release 2 (Gaia DR2) contains results for 1693 million sources in the magnitude range 3 to 21 based on observations collected by the European Space Agency Gaia satellite during the first 22 months of its operational phase. We describe the input data, models, and processing used for the astrometric content of Gaia DR2, and the validation of these results performed within the astrometry task. Some 320 billion centroid positions from the pre-processed astrometric CCD observations were used to estimate the five astrometric parameters (positions, parallaxes, and proper motions) for 1332 million sources, and approximate positions at the reference epoch J2015.5 for an additional 361 million mostly faint sources. Special validation solutions were used to characterise the random and systematic errors in parallax and proper motion. For the sources with five-parameter astrometric solutions, the median uncertainty in parallax and position at the reference epoch J2015.5 is about 0.04 mas for bright (G<14 mag) sources, 0.1 mas at G=17 mag, and 0.7 mas at G=20 mag. In the proper motion components the corresponding uncertainties are 0.05, 0.2, and 1.2 mas/yr, respectively. The optical reference frame defined by Gaia DR2 is aligned with ICRS and is non-rotating with respect to the quasars to within 0.15 mas/yr. From the quasars and validation solutions we estimate that systematics in the parallaxes depending on position, magnitude, and colour are generally below 0.1 mas, but the parallaxes are on the whole too small by about 0.03 mas. Significant spatial correlations of up to 0.04 mas in parallax and 0.07 mas/yr in proper motion are seen on small (<1 deg) and intermediate (20 deg) angular scales. Important statistics and information for the users of the Gaia DR2 astrometry are given in the appendices.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.04079  [pdf] - 1664617
All-sky RR Lyrae Stars in the Gaia Data
Comments: 5 pages, 1 figure, Proceedings of the RR Lyrae 2017 Conference (Revival of the Classical Pulsators: from Galactic Structure to Stellar Interior Diagnostics), to be published in the Proceedings of the Polish Astronomical Society
Submitted: 2018-04-11
The second Gaia data release is expected to contain data products from about 22 months of observation. Based on these data, we aim to provide an advance publication of a full-sky Gaia map of RR Lyrae stars. Although comprehensive, these data still contain a significant fraction of sources which are insufficiently sampled for Fourier series decomposition of the periodic light variations. The challenges in the identification of RR Lyrae candidates with (much) fewer than 20 field-of-view transits are described. General considerations of the results, their limitations, and interpretation are presented together with prospects for improvement in subsequent Gaia data releases.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.03778  [pdf] - 1584573
PLATO as it is: a legacy mission for Galactic archaeology
Comments: 17 pages, 9 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomical Notes
Submitted: 2017-06-12, last modified: 2017-07-07
Deciphering the assembly history of the Milky Way is a formidable task, which becomes possible only if one can produce high-resolution chrono-chemo-kinematical maps of the Galaxy. Data from large-scale astrometric and spectroscopic surveys will soon provide us with a well-defined view of the current chemo-kinematical structure of the Milky Way, but will only enable a blurred view on the temporal sequence that led to the present-day Galaxy. As demonstrated by the (ongoing) exploitation of data from the pioneering photometric missions CoRoT, Kepler, and K2, asteroseismology provides the way forward: solar-like oscillating giants are excellent evolutionary clocks thanks to the availability of seismic constraints on their mass and to the tight age-initial-mass relation they adhere to. In this paper we identify five key outstanding questions relating to the formation and evolution of the Milky Way that will need precise and accurate ages for large samples of stars to be addressed, and we identify the requirements in terms of number of targets and the precision on the stellar properties that are needed to tackle such questions. By quantifying the asteroseismic yields expected from PLATO for red-giant stars, we demonstrate that these requirements are within the capabilities of the current instrument design, provided that observations are sufficiently long to identify the evolutionary state and allow robust and precise determination of acoustic-mode frequencies. This will allow us to harvest data of sufficient quality to reach a 10% precision in age. This is a fundamental pre-requisite to then reach the more ambitious goal of a similar level of accuracy, which will only be possible if we have to hand a careful appraisal of systematic uncertainties on age deriving from our limited understanding of stellar physics, a goal which conveniently falls within the main aims of PLATO's core science.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.01348  [pdf] - 1585537
Theia: Faint objects in motion or the new astrometry frontier
The Theia Collaboration; Boehm, Celine; Krone-Martins, Alberto; Amorim, Antonio; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Brandeker, Alexis; Courbin, Frederic; Ensslin, Torsten; Falcao, Antonio; Freese, Katherine; Holl, Berry; Labadie, Lucas; Leger, Alain; Malbet, Fabien; Mamon, Gary; McArthur, Barbara; Mora, Alcione; Shao, Michael; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Spolyar, Douglas; Villaver, Eva; Albertus, Conrado; Bertone, Stefano; Bouy, Herve; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Brown, Anthony; Brown, Warren; Cardoso, Vitor; Chemin, Laurent; Claudi, Riccardo; Correia, Alexandre C. M.; Crosta, Mariateresa; Crouzier, Antoine; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Damasso, Mario; da Silva, Antonio; Davies, Melvyn; Das, Payel; Dayal, Pratika; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Erickcek, Adrienne; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Fortin, Morgane; Fridlund, Malcolm; Garcia, Paulo; Gnedin, Oleg; Goobar, Ariel; Gordo, Paulo; Goullioud, Renaud; Hambly, Nigel; Hara, Nathan; Hobbs, David; Hog, Erik; Holland, Andrew; Ibata, Rodrigo; Jordi, Carme; Klioner, Sergei; Kopeikin, Sergei; Lacroix, Thomas; Laskar, Jacques; Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe Le; Luri, Xavier; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Makarov, Valeri; Massey, Richard; Mennesson, Bertrand; Michalik, Daniel; de Almeida, Andre Moitinho; Mourao, Ana; Moustakas, Leonidas; Murray, Neil; Muterspaugh, Matthew; Oertel, Micaela; Ostorero, Luisa; Perez-Garcia, Angeles; Platais, Imants; de Mora, Jordi Portell i; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Randall, Lisa; Read, Justin; Regos, Eniko; Rory, Barnes; Rybicki, Krzysztof; Scott, Pat; Schneider, Jean; Scholtz, Jakub; Siebert, Arnaud; Tereno, Ismael; Tomsick, John; Traub, Wesley; Valluri, Monica; Walker, Matt; Walton, Nicholas; Watkins, Laura; White, Glenn; Evans, Dafydd Wyn; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Wyse, Rosemary
Comments: http://theia.phyip3.dur.ac.uk
Submitted: 2017-07-02
In the context of the ESA M5 (medium mission) call we proposed a new satellite mission, Theia, based on relative astrometry and extreme precision to study the motion of very faint objects in the Universe. Theia is primarily designed to study the local dark matter properties, the existence of Earth-like exoplanets in our nearest star systems and the physics of compact objects. Furthermore, about 15 $\%$ of the mission time was dedicated to an open observatory for the wider community to propose complementary science cases. With its unique metrology system and "point and stare" strategy, Theia's precision would have reached the sub micro-arcsecond level. This is about 1000 times better than ESA/Gaia's accuracy for the brightest objects and represents a factor 10-30 improvement for the faintest stars (depending on the exact observational program). In the version submitted to ESA, we proposed an optical (350-1000nm) on-axis TMA telescope. Due to ESA Technology readiness level, the camera's focal plane would have been made of CCD detectors but we anticipated an upgrade with CMOS detectors. Photometric measurements would have been performed during slew time and stabilisation phases needed for reaching the required astrometric precision.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00688  [pdf] - 1583007
Gaia Data Release 1. Testing the parallaxes with local Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars
Gaia Collaboration; Clementini, G.; Eyer, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Muraveva, T.; Garofalo, A.; Sarro, L. M.; Palmer, M.; Luri, X.; Molinaro, R.; Rimoldini, L.; Szabados, L.; Musella, I.; Anderson, R. I.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Azntoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernánde, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: 29 pages, 25 figures. Accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2017-05-01
Parallaxes for 331 classical Cepheids, 31 Type II Cepheids and 364 RR Lyrae stars in common between Gaia and the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1) as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). In order to test these first parallax measurements of the primary standard candles of the cosmological distance ladder, that involve astrometry collected by Gaia during the initial 14 months of science operation, we compared them with literature estimates and derived new period-luminosity ($PL$), period-Wesenheit ($PW$) relations for classical and Type II Cepheids and infrared $PL$, $PL$-metallicity ($PLZ$) and optical luminosity-metallicity ($M_V$-[Fe/H]) relations for the RR Lyrae stars, with zero points based on TGAS. The new relations were computed using multi-band ($V,I,J,K_{\mathrm{s}},W_{1}$) photometry and spectroscopic metal abundances available in the literature, and applying three alternative approaches: (i) by linear least squares fitting the absolute magnitudes inferred from direct transformation of the TGAS parallaxes, (ii) by adopting astrometric-based luminosities, and (iii) using a Bayesian fitting approach. TGAS parallaxes bring a significant added value to the previous Hipparcos estimates. The relations presented in this paper represent first Gaia-calibrated relations and form a "work-in-progress" milestone report in the wait for Gaia-only parallaxes of which a first solution will become available with Gaia's Data Release 2 (DR2) in 2018.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.01581  [pdf] - 1582372
Pulsating star research and the Gaia revolution
Comments: 12 pages, 4 figures, proceedings for the 22nd Los Alamos Stellar Pulsation Conference Series Meeting "Wide field variability surveys: a 21st-century perspective", held in San Pedro de Atacama, Chile, Nov. 28 - Dec. 2, 2016
Submitted: 2017-04-05
In this article we present an overview of the ESA Gaia mission and of the unprecedented impact that Gaia will have on the field of variable star research. We summarise the contents and impact of the first Gaia data release on the description of variability phenomena, with particular emphasis on pulsating star research. The Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution, although limited to 2.1 million stars, has been used in many studies related to pulsating stars. Furthermore a set of 3,194 Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars with their times series have been released. Finally we present the plans for the ongoing study of variable phenomena with Gaia and highlight some of the possible impacts of the second data release on variable, and specifically, pulsating stars.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.10597  [pdf] - 1582256
Gaia eclipsing binary and multiple systems. Two-Gaussian models applied to OGLE-III eclipsing binary light curves in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Comments: 20 pages, 29 figures. Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2017-03-30
The advent of large scale multi-epoch surveys raises the need for automated light curve (LC) processing. This is particularly true for eclipsing binaries (EBs), which form one of the most populated types of variable objects. The Gaia mission, launched at the end of 2013, is expected to detect of the order of few million EBs over a 5-year mission. We present an automated procedure to characterize EBs based on the geometric morphology of their LCs with two aims: first to study an ensemble of EBs on a statistical ground without the need to model the binary system, and second to enable the automated identification of EBs that display atypical LCs. We model the folded LC geometry of EBs using up to two Gaussian functions for the eclipses and a cosine function for any ellipsoidal-like variability that may be present between the eclipses. The procedure is applied to the OGLE-III data set of EBs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) as a proof of concept. The bayesian information criterion is used to select the best model among models containing various combinations of those components, as well as to estimate the significance of the components. Based on the two-Gaussian models, EBs with atypical LC geometries are successfully identified in two diagrams, using the Abbe values of the original and residual folded LCs, and the reduced $\chi^2$. Cleaning the data set from the atypical cases and further filtering out LCs that contain non-significant eclipse candidates, the ensemble of EBs can be studied on a statistical ground using the two-Gaussian model parameters. For illustration purposes, we present the distribution of projected eccentricities as a function of orbital period for the OGLE-III set of EBs in the LMC, as well as the distribution of their primary versus secondary eclipse widths.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.09362  [pdf] - 1582168
Gaia Eclipsing Binary and Multiple Systems. A study of detectability and classification of eclipsing binaries with Gaia
Comments: 9 pages, 18 figures, accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2017-03-27
In the new era of large-scale astronomical surveys, automated methods of analysis and classification of bulk data are a fundamental tool for fast and efficient production of deliverables. This becomes ever more imminent as we enter the Gaia era. We investigate the potential detectability of eclipsing binaries with Gaia using a data set of all Kepler eclipsing binaries sampled with Gaia cadence and folded with the Kepler period. The performance of fitting methods is evaluated with comparison to real Kepler data parameters and a classification scheme is proposed for the potentially detectable sources based on the geometry of the light curve fits. The polynomial chain (polyfit) and two-Gaussian models are used for light curve fitting of the data set. Classification is performed with a combination of the t-SNE (t-distrubuted Stochastic Neighbor Embedding) and DBSCAN (Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise) algorithms. We find that approximately 68% of Kepler Eclipsing Binary sources are potentially detectable by Gaia when folded with the Kepler period and propose a classification scheme of the detectable sources based on the morphological type indicative of the light curve, with subclasses that reflect the properties of the fitted model (presence and visibility of eclipses, their width, depth, etc.).
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.01131  [pdf] - 1567701
Gaia Data Release 1. Open cluster astrometry: performance, limitations, and future prospects
Gaia Collaboration; van Leeuwen, F.; Vallenari, A.; Jordi, C.; Lindegren, L.; Bastian, U.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Martino, D.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffer, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegrio, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Rimoldini, L.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingril, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernsteiny, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclarky, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardio, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Palmer, M.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poelsy, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: Accepted for publication by A&A. 21 pages main text plus 46 pages appendices. 34 figures main text, 38 figures appendices. 8 table in main text, 19 tables in appendices
Submitted: 2017-03-03
Context. The first Gaia Data Release contains the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). This is a subset of about 2 million stars for which, besides the position and photometry, the proper motion and parallax are calculated using Hipparcos and Tycho-2 positions in 1991.25 as prior information. Aims. We investigate the scientific potential and limitations of the TGAS component by means of the astrometric data for open clusters. Methods. Mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are derived taking into account the error correlations within the astrometric solutions for individual stars, an estimate of the internal velocity dispersion in the cluster, and, where relevant, the effects of the depth of the cluster along the line of sight. Internal consistency of the TGAS data is assessed. Results. Values given for standard uncertainties are still inaccurate and may lead to unrealistic unit-weight standard deviations of least squares solutions for cluster parameters. Reconstructed mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are generally in very good agreement with earlier Hipparcos-based determination, although the Gaia mean parallax for the Pleiades is a significant exception. We have no current explanation for that discrepancy. Most clusters are observed to extend to nearly 15 pc from the cluster centre, and it will be up to future Gaia releases to establish whether those potential cluster-member stars are still dynamically bound to the clusters. Conclusions. The Gaia DR1 provides the means to examine open clusters far beyond their more easily visible cores, and can provide membership assessments based on proper motions and parallaxes. A combined HR diagram shows the same features as observed before using the Hipparcos data, with clearly increased luminosities for older A and F dwarfs.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.06296  [pdf] - 1581568
Gaia eclipsing binary and multiple systems. Supervised classification and self-organizing maps
Comments: 20 pages, 22 figures. Accepted for publication in A&A
Submitted: 2017-02-21
Large surveys producing tera- and petabyte-scale databases require machine-learning and knowledge discovery methods to deal with the overwhelming quantity of data and the difficulties of extracting concise, meaningful information with reliable assessment of its uncertainty. This study investigates the potential of a few machine-learning methods for the automated analysis of eclipsing binaries in the data of such surveys. We aim to aid the extraction of samples of eclipsing binaries from such databases and to provide basic information about the objects. We estimate class labels according to two classification systems, one based on the light curve morphology (EA/EB/EW classes) and the other based on the physical characteristics of the binary system (system morphology classes; detached through overcontact systems). Furthermore, we explore low-dimensional surfaces along which the light curves of eclipsing binaries are concentrated, to use in the characterization of the binary systems and in the exploration of biases of the full unknown Gaia data with respect to the training sets. We explore the performance of principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), random forest classification and self-organizing maps (SOM). We pre-process the photometric time series by combining a double Gaussian profile fit and a smoothing spline, in order to de-noise and interpolate the observed light curves. We achieve further denoising, and selected the most important variability elements from the light curves using PCA. We perform supervised classification using random forest and LDA based on the PC decomposition, while SOM gives a continuous 2-dimensional manifold of the light curves arranged by a few important features. We estimate the uncertainty of the supervised methods due to the specific finite training set using ensembles of models constructed on randomized training sets.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.04165  [pdf] - 1535795
Crossmatching variable objects with the Gaia data
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure, in Astronomical Data Analysis Software and Systems XXVI, Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series
Submitted: 2017-02-14
Tens of millions of new variable objects are expected to be identified in over a billion time series from the Gaia mission. Crossmatching known variable sources with those from Gaia is crucial to incorporate current knowledge, understand how these objects appear in the Gaia data, train supervised classifiers to recognise known classes, and validate the results of the Variability Processing and Analysis Coordination Unit (CU7) within the Gaia Data Analysis and Processing Consortium (DPAC). The method employed by CU7 to crossmatch variables for the first Gaia data release includes a binary classifier to take into account positional uncertainties, proper motion, targeted variability signals, and artefacts present in the early calibration of the Gaia data. Crossmatching with a classifier makes it possible to automate all those decisions which are typically made during visual inspection. The classifier can be trained with objects characterized by a variety of attributes to ensure similarity in multiple dimensions (astrometry, photometry, time-series features), with no need for a-priori transformations to compare different photometric bands, or of predictive models of the motion of objects to compare positions. Other advantages as well as some disadvantages of the method are discussed. Implementation steps from the training to the assessment of the crossmatch classifier and selection of results are described.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1702.03295  [pdf] - 1535694
Gaia Data Release 1: The variability processing & analysis and its application to the south ecliptic pole region
Comments: 40 pages, 46 figures. Submitted to A&A
Submitted: 2017-02-10
The ESA Gaia mission provides a unique time-domain survey for more than one billion sources brighter than G=20.7 mag. Gaia offers the unprecedented opportunity to study variability phenomena in the Universe thanks to multi-epoch G-magnitude photometry in addition to astrometry, blue and red spectro-photometry, and spectroscopy. Within the Gaia Consortium, Coordination Unit 7 has the responsibility to detect variable objects, classify them, derive characteristic parameters for specific variability classes, and provide global descriptions of variable phenomena. We describe the variability processing and analysis that we plan to apply to the successive data releases, and we present its application to the G-band photometry results of the first 14 months of Gaia operations that comprises 28 days of Ecliptic Pole Scanning Law and 13 months of Nominal Scanning Law. Out of the 694 million, all-sky, sources that have calibrated G-band photometry in this first stage of the mission, about 2.3 million sources that have at least 20 observations are located within 38 degrees from the South Ecliptic Pole. We detect about 14% of them as variable candidates, among which the automated classification identified 9347 Cepheid and RR Lyrae candidates. Additional visual inspections and selection criteria led to the publication of 3194 Cepheid and RR Lyrae stars, described in Clementini et al. (2016). Under the restrictive conditions for DR1, the completenesses of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars are estimated at 67% and 58%, respectively, numbers that will significantly increase with subsequent Gaia data releases. Data processing within the Gaia Consortium is iterative, the quality of the data and the results being improved at each iteration. The results presented in this article show a glimpse of the exceptional harvest that is to be expected from the Gaia mission for variability phenomena. [abridged]
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.02952  [pdf] - 1538988
Gaia data release 1, the photometric data
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures, 1 table, Accepted for publication by A&A as part of the Gaia 1st data release issue
Submitted: 2016-12-09
Context. This paper presents an overview of the photometric data that are part of the first Gaia data release. Aims. The principles of the processing and the main characteristics of the Gaia photometric data are presented. Methods. The calibration strategy is outlined briefly and the main properties of the resulting photometry are presented. Results. Relations with other broadband photometric systems are provided. The overall precision for the Gaia photometry is shown to be at the milli-magnitude level and has a clear potential to improve further in future releases.
[28]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.04269  [pdf] - 1523839
Gaia Data Release 1 - The Cepheid & RR Lyrae star pipeline and its application to the south ecliptic pole region
Comments: 36 pages, 45 figures, 4 tables. Accepted for publication on A&A. A full version with higher resolution figures and the complete atlas of light curves can be found at this link: http://davide2.bo.astro.it/~felix/ The manuscript is part of the series of DPAC papers that accompany Gaia DR1
Submitted: 2016-09-14, last modified: 2016-10-14
We present an overview of the Specific Objects Study (SOS) pipeline developed within the Coordination Unit 7 (CU7) of the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC), the coordination unit charged with the processing and analysis of variable sources observed by Gaia, to validate and fully characterise Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars observed by the spacecraft. We describe how the SOS for Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars (SOS Cep&RRL) was specifically tailored to analyse Gaia's G-band photometric time-series with a South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) footprint, which covers an external region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). G-band time-series photometry and characterization by the SOS Cep&RRL pipeline (mean magnitude and pulsation characteristics) are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (Gaia DR1) for a total sample of 3,194 variable stars, 599 Cepheids and 2,595 RR Lyrae stars, of which 386 (43 Cepheids and 343 RR Lyrae stars) are new discoveries by Gaia. All 3,194 stars are distributed over an area extending 38 degrees on either side from a point offset from the centre of the LMC by about 3 degrees to the north and 4 degrees to the east. The vast majority, but not all, are located within the LMC. The published sample also includes a few bright RR Lyrae stars that trace the outer halo of the Milky Way in front of the LMC.
[29]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.07255  [pdf] - 1523853
Gaia Data Release 1: The reference frame and the optical properties of ICRF sources
Comments:
Submitted: 2016-09-23
As part of the data processing for Gaia Data Release~1 (Gaia DR1) a special astrometric solution was computed, the so-called auxiliary quasar solution. This gives positions for selected extragalactic objects, including radio sources in the second realisation of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2) that have optical counterparts bright enough to be observed with Gaia. A subset of these positions was used to align the positional reference frame of Gaia DR1 with the ICRF2. We describe the properties of the Gaia auxiliary quasar solution for a subset of sources matched to ICRF2, and compare their optical and radio positions at the sub-mas level. Their formal standard errors are better than 0.76~milliarcsec (mas) for 50% of the sources and better than 3.35~mas for 90%. Optical magnitudes are obtained in Gaia's unfiltered photometric G band. The comparison with the radio positions of the defining sources shows no systematic differences larger than a few tenths of a mas. The fraction of questionable solutions, not readily accounted for by the statistics, is less than 6%. Normalised differences have extended tails requiring case-by-case investigations for around 100 sources, but we have not seen any difference indisputably linked to an optical-radio offset in the sources.
[30]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.04303  [pdf] - 1523840
Gaia Data Release 1: Astrometry - one billion positions, two million proper motions and parallaxes
Comments: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2016-09-14
Gaia Data Release 1 (Gaia DR1) contains astrometric results for more than 1 billion stars brighter than magnitude 20.7 based on observations collected by the Gaia satellite during the first 14 months of its operational phase. We give a brief overview of the astrometric content of the data release and of the model assumptions, data processing, and validation of the results. For stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues, complete astrometric single-star solutions are obtained by incorporating positional information from the earlier catalogues. For other stars only their positions are obtained by neglecting their proper motions and parallaxes. The results are validated by an analysis of the residuals, through special validation runs, and by comparison with external data. Results. For about two million of the brighter stars (down to magnitude ~11.5) we obtain positions, parallaxes, and proper motions to Hipparcos-type precision or better. For these stars, systematic errors depending e.g. on position and colour are at a level of 0.3 milliarcsecond (mas). For the remaining stars we obtain positions at epoch J2015.0 accurate to ~10 mas. Positions and proper motions are given in a reference frame that is aligned with the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to better than 0.1 mas at epoch J2015.0, and non-rotating with respect to ICRF to within 0.03 mas/yr. The Hipparcos reference frame is found to rotate with respect to the Gaia DR1 frame at a rate of 0.24 mas/yr. Based on less than a quarter of the nominal mission length and on very provisional and incomplete calibrations, the quality and completeness of the astrometric data in Gaia DR1 are far from what is expected for the final mission products. The results nevertheless represent a huge improvement in the available fundamental stellar data and practical definition of the optical reference frame.
[31]  oai:arXiv.org:1608.00556  [pdf] - 1498385
Vetting Galactic Leavitt Law Calibrators using Radial Velocities: On the Variability, Binarity, and Possible Parallax Error of 19 Long-period Cepheids
Comments: 27 pages, 8 figures, 8 tables, ApJS in press
Submitted: 2016-08-01
We investigate the radial velocity (RV) variability and spectroscopic binarity of 19 Galactic long-period ($P_{\rm{puls}} \gtrsim 10$ d) classical Cepheid variable stars whose trigonometric parallaxes are being measured using the Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia. Our primary objective is to constrain possible parallax error due to undetected orbital motion. Using $>1600$ high-precision RVs measured between 2011 and 2016, we find no indication of orbital motion on $\lesssim 5$ yr timescales for 18 Cepheids and determine upper limits on allowed configurations for a range of input orbital periods. The results constrain the unsigned parallax error due to orbital motion to $< 2 \%$ for 16 stars, and $< 4 \%$ for 18. We improve the orbital solution of the known binary YZ Carinae and show that the astrometric model must take into account orbital motion to avoid significant error ($\sim \pm 100 \mu$arcsec). We further investigate long-timescale ($P_{\rm{orb}} > 10$ yr) variations in pulsation-averaged velocity $v_\gamma$ via a template fitting approach using both new and literature RVs. We discover the spectroscopic binarity of XZ Car and CD Cyg, find first tentative evidence for AQ Car, and reveal KN Cen's orbital signature. Further (mostly tentative) evidence of time-variable $v_\gamma$ is found for SS CMa, VY Car, SZ Cyg, and X Pup. We briefly discuss considerations regarding a vetting process of Galactic Leavitt law calibrators and show that light contributions by companions are insignificant for most distance scale applications.
[32]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.08614  [pdf] - 1378770
Revealing the Nature of Extreme Coronal-line Emitter SDSS J095209.56+214313.3
Comments: Submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2015-12-29
Extreme coronal-line emitter (ECLE) SDSSJ095209.56+214313.3, known by its strong, fading, high ionization lines, has been a long standing candidate for a tidal disruption event, however a supernova origin has not yet been ruled out. Here we add several new pieces of information to the puzzle of the nature of the transient that powered its variable coronal lines: 1) an optical light curve from the Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) survey that serendipitously catches the optical flare, and 2) late-time observations of the host galaxy with the Swift Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) and X-ray telescope (XRT) and the ground-based Mercator telescope. The well-sampled, $\sim10$-year long, unfiltered LINEAR light curve constrains the onset of the flare to a precision of $\pm5$ days and enables us to place a lower limit on the peak optical magnitude. Difference imaging allows us to estimate the location of the flare in proximity of the host galaxy core. Comparison of the \textsl{GALEX} data (early 2006) with the recently acquired Swift UVOT (June 2015) and Mercator observations (April 2015) demonstrate a decrease in the UV flux over a $\sim 10$ year period, confirming that the flare was UV-bright. The long-lived UV-bright emission, detected 1.8 rest-frame years after the start of the flare, strongly disfavors a SN origin. These new data allow us to conclude that the flare was indeed powered by the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole and that TDEs are in fact capable of powering the enigmatic class of ECLEs.
[33]  oai:arXiv.org:1504.00782  [pdf] - 1232162
A comparative study of four significance measures for periodicity detection in astronomical surveys
Comments: 16 pages, 14 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2015-04-03
We study the problem of periodicity detection in massive data sets of photometric or radial velocity time series, as presented by ESA's Gaia mission. Periodicity detection hinges on the estimation of the false alarm probability (FAP) of the extremum of the periodogram of the time series. We consider the problem of its estimation with two main issues in mind. First, for a given number of observations and signal-to-noise ratio, the rate of correct periodicity detections should be constant for all realized cadences of observations regardless of the observational time patterns, in order to avoid sky biases that are difficult to assess. Second, the computational loads should be kept feasible even for millions of time series. Using the Gaia case, we compare the $F^M$ method (Paltani 2004, Schwarzenberg-Czerny 2012), the Baluev method (Baluev 2008) and the GEV method (S\"uveges 2014), as well as a method for the direct estimation of a threshold. Three methods involve some unknown parameters, which are obtained by fitting a regression-type predictive model using easily obtainable covariates derived from observational time series. We conclude that the GEV and the Baluev methods both provide good solutions to the issues posed by a large-scale processing. The first of these yields the best scientific quality at the price of some moderately costly pre-processing. When this pre-processing is impossible for some reason (e.g. the computational costs are prohibitive or good regression models cannot be constructed), the Baluev method provides a computationally inexpensive alternative with slight biases in regions where time samplings exhibit strong aliases.
[34]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.04116  [pdf] - 1055849
Revealing {\delta} Cephei's Secret Companion and Intriguing Past
Comments: 31 pages (referee format), 10 figures, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Submitted: 2015-03-13
Classical Cepheid variable stars are crucial calibrators of the cosmic distance scale thanks to a relation between their pulsation periods and luminosities. Their archetype, {\delta} Cephei, is an important calibrator for this relation. In this paper, we show that {\delta} Cephei is a spectroscopic binary based on newly-obtained high-precision radial velocities. We combine these new data with literature data to determine the orbit, which has period 2201 days, semi-amplitude 1.5 km/s, and high eccentricity (e = 0.647). We re-analyze Hipparcos intermediate astrometric data to measure {\delta} Cephei's parallax ($\varpi = 4.09 \pm 0.16$ mas) and find tentative evidence for an orbital signature, although we cannot claim detection. We estimate that Gaia will fully determine the astrometric orbit. Using the available information from spectroscopy, velocimetry, astrometry, and Geneva stellar evolution models ($M_{\delta Cep} ~ 5.0 - 5.25 M_\odot$), we constrain the companion mass to within $0.2 < M_2 < 1.2 M_\odot$. We discuss the potential of ongoing and previous interactions between the companion and {\delta} Cephei near pericenter passage, informing reported observations of circumstellar material and bow-shock. The orbit may have undergone significant changes due to a Kozai-Lidov mechanism driven by the outer (visual and astrometric) companion HD 213307. Our discovery of {\delta} Cephei's nature as a spectroscopic binary exposes a hidden companion and reveals a rich and dynamical history of the archetype of classical Cepheid variables.
[35]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.03830  [pdf] - 935393
The variability processing and analysis of the Gaia mission
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure. To be published in the proceedings of the GREAT-ITN conference "The Milky Way Unravelled by Gaia: GREAT Science from the Gaia Data Releases", 1-5 December 2014, University of Barcelona, Spain, EAS Publications Series, eds Nicholas Walton, Francesca Figueras, and Caroline Soubiran
Submitted: 2015-02-12
We present the variability processing and analysis that is foreseen for the Gaia mission within Coordination Unit 7 (CU7) of the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC). A top level description of the tasks is given.
[36]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.03829  [pdf] - 935392
The Gaia Mission, Binary Stars and Exoplanets
Comments: 15 pages, 8 figures. LIVING TOGETHER PLANETS, HOST STARS and BINARIES, Proceedings of a Proceedings of a Conference held in held at Litomy\v{s}l, Czech Republic. Edited by Slavek M. Rucinski, Guillermo Torres and Miloslav Zejda. Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Conference Series, 2015
Submitted: 2015-02-12
On the 19th of December 2013, the Gaia spacecraft was successfully launched by a Soyuz rocket from French Guiana and started its amazing journey to map and characterise one billion celestial objects with its one billion pixel camera. In this presentation, we briefly review the general aims of the mission and describe what has happened since launch, including the Ecliptic Pole scanning mode. We also focus especially on binary stars, starting with some basic observational aspects, and then turning to the remarkable harvest that Gaia is expected to yield for these objects.
[37]  oai:arXiv.org:1502.01165  [pdf] - 931035
Automated eclipsing binary detection: applying the Gaia CU7 pipeline to Hipparcos
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure, to be published in conference proceedings: "The Milky Way Unravelled by Gaia" in "EAS Publications Series"
Submitted: 2015-02-04
We demonstrate the eclipsing binary detection performance of the Gaia variability analysis and processing pipeline using Hipparcos data. The automated pipeline classifies 1,067 (0.9%) of the 118,204 Hipparcos sources as eclipsing binary candidates. The detection rate amounts to 89% (732 sources) in a subset of 819 visually confirmed eclipsing binaries, with the period correctly identified for 80% of them, and double or half periods obtained in 6% of the cases.
[38]  oai:arXiv.org:1411.5943  [pdf] - 904189
Time series data mining for the Gaia variability analysis
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures. appears in the Proc. of the 2014 conference on Big Data from Space (BiDS14), European Commission, Joint Research Centre, P. Soille, P. G. Marchetti (eds)
Submitted: 2014-11-21
Gaia is an ESA cornerstone mission, which was successfully launched December 2013 and commenced operations in July 2014. Within the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis consortium, Coordination Unit 7 (CU7) is responsible for the variability analysis of over a billion celestial sources and nearly 4 billion associated time series (photometric, spectrophotometric, and spectroscopic), encoding information in over 800 billion observations during the 5 years of the mission, resulting in a petabyte scale analytical problem. In this article, we briefly describe the solutions we developed to address the challenges of time series variability analysis: from the structure for a distributed data-oriented scientific collaboration to architectural choices and specific components used. Our approach is based on Open Source components with a distributed, partitioned database as the core to handle incrementally: ingestion, distributed processing, analysis, results and export in a constrained time window.
[39]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.0303  [pdf] - 633740
The Gaia mission
Comments: 12 pages, 3 figures. Proceedings of the XIth Hvar Astrophysical Colloquium
Submitted: 2013-03-01
Gaia is a very ambitious mission of the European Space Agency. At the heart of Gaia lie the measurements of the positions, distances, space motions, brightnesses and astrophysical parameters of stars, which represent fundamental pillars of modern astronomical knowledge. We provide a brief description of the Gaia mission with an emphasis on binary stars. In particular, we summarize results of simulations, which estimate the number of binary stars to be processed to several tens of millions. We also report on the catalogue release scenarios. In the current proposal, the first results for binary stars will be available in 2017 (for a launch in 2013).
[40]  oai:arXiv.org:1112.4165  [pdf] - 453259
A conjugate gradient algorithm for the astrometric core solution of Gaia
Comments: 24 pages, 16 figures. Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2011-12-18
The ESA space astrometry mission Gaia, planned to be launched in 2013, has been designed to make angular measurements on a global scale with micro-arcsecond accuracy. A key component of the data processing for Gaia is the astrometric core solution, which must implement an efficient and accurate numerical algorithm to solve the resulting, extremely large least-squares problem. The Astrometric Global Iterative Solution (AGIS) is a framework that allows to implement a range of different iterative solution schemes suitable for a scanning astrometric satellite. In order to find a computationally efficient and numerically accurate iteration scheme for the astrometric solution, compatible with the AGIS framework, we study an adaptation of the classical conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm, and compare it to the so-called simple iteration (SI) scheme that was previously known to converge for this problem, although very slowly. The different schemes are implemented within a software test bed for AGIS known as AGISLab, which allows to define, simulate and study scaled astrometric core solutions. After successful testing in AGISLab, the CG scheme has been implemented also in AGIS. The two algorithms CG and SI eventually converge to identical solutions, to within the numerical noise (of the order of 0.00001 micro-arcsec). These solutions are independent of the starting values (initial star catalogue), and we conclude that they are equivalent to a rigorous least-squares estimation of the astrometric parameters. The CG scheme converges up to a factor four faster than SI in the tested cases, and in particular spatially correlated truncation errors are much more efficiently damped out with the CG scheme.
[41]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.1547  [pdf] - 1084711
The impact of CCD radiation damage on Gaia astrometry: I. Image location estimation in the presence of radiation damage
Comments: 23 figures, 6 tables, accepted for publication in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society the 4th of October 2011
Submitted: 2011-10-07
The Gaia mission has been designed to perform absolute astrometric measurements with unprecedented accuracy; the end-of-mission parallax standard error is required to be 30 micro-arcseconds for a G2V type star of magnitude 15. These requirements set a stringent constraint on the accuracy of the estimation of the location of the stellar image on the CCD for each observation: e.g., 0.3 milli-arseconds (mas) or 0.005 pixels for the same V=15 G2V star. However the Gaia CCDs will suffer from charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) caused by radiation damage that will degrade the stellar image quality and may degrade the astrometric performance of Gaia if not properly addressed. For the first time at this level of detail, the potential impact of radiation damage on the performance of Gaia is investigated. In this first paper we focus on the evaluation of the CTI impact on the image location accuracy. We show that CTI decreases the stellar image signal-to-noise ratio and irreversibly degrades the image location estimation precision. As a consequence the location estimation standard errors increase by up to 6% for a radiation damage level equivalent to the end-of-mission. In addition the CTI-induced image distortion introduces a systematic bias in the image location estimation (up to 0.05 pixels or 3 mas in the Gaia operating conditions). We present a novel approach to CTI mitigation that enables, without correction of the raw data, the unbiased estimation of the image location and flux from damaged observations. Its implementation reduces the maximum measured location bias for the faintest magnitude to 0.005 pixels (~4e-4 pixels at magnitude 15). In a second paper we will investigate how the CTI effects affect the final astrometric accuracy of Gaia by propagating residual errors through the astrometric solution.