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Harpsoe, K.

Normalized to: Harpsoe, K.

25 article(s) in total. 332 co-authors, from 1 to 25 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 26,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.03511  [pdf] - 1533244
Faint source star planetary microlensing: the discovery of the cold gas giant planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb
Comments: 10 pages, 5 figures, MNRAS accepted
Submitted: 2016-12-11
We report the discovery of a planet --- OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb --- via gravitational microlensing. Observations for the lensing event were made by the MOA, OGLE, Wise, RoboNET/LCOGT, MiNDSTEp and $\mu$FUN groups. All analyses of the light curve data favour a lens system comprising a planetary mass orbiting a host star. The most favoured binary lens model has a mass ratio between the two lens masses of $(4.78 \pm 0.13)\times 10^{-3}$. Subject to some important assumptions, a Bayesian probability density analysis suggests the lens system comprises a $3.09_{-1.12}^{+1.02}$ M_jup planet orbiting a $0.62_{-0.22}^{+0.20}$ M_sun host star at a deprojected orbital separation of $4.40_{-1.46}^{+2.16}$ AU. The distance to the lens system is $2.22_{-0.83}^{+0.96}$ kpc. Planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb provides additional data to the growing number of cool planets discovered using gravitational microlensing against which planetary formation theories may be tested. Most of the light in the baseline of this event is expected to come from the lens and thus high-resolution imaging observations could confirm our planetary model interpretation.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.02724  [pdf] - 1301609
Red noise versus planetary interpretations in the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-446
Comments: accepted ApJ 2015
Submitted: 2015-10-09, last modified: 2015-10-28
For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing datasets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (A_{max} \sim 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (\sim 3M_\oplus ) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favour the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1510.08099  [pdf] - 1319719
Rotation periods and astrometric motions of the Luhman 16AB brown dwarfs by high-resolution lucky-imaging monitoring
Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication by Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2015-10-27
Context. Photometric monitoring of the variability of brown dwarfs can provide useful information about the structure of clouds in their cold atmospheres. The brown-dwarf binary system Luhman 16AB is an interesting target for such a study, as its components stand at the L/T transition and show high levels of variability. Luhman 16AB is also the third closest system to the Solar system, allowing precise astrometric investigations with ground-based facilities. Aims. The aim of the work is to estimate the rotation period and study the astrometric motion of both components. Methods. We have monitored Luhman 16AB over a period of two years with the lucky-imaging camera mounted on the Danish 1.54m telescope at La Silla, through a special i+z long-pass filter, which allowed us to clearly resolve the two brown dwarfs into single objects. An intense monitoring of the target was also performed over 16 nights, in which we observed a peak-to-peak variability of 0.20 \pm 0.02 mag and 0.34 \pm 0.02 mag for Luhman 16A and 16B, respectively. Results. We used the 16-night time-series data to estimate the rotation period of the two components. We found that Luhman 16B rotates with a period of 5.1 \pm 0.1 hr, in very good agreement with previous measurements. For Luhman 16A, we report that it rotates slower than its companion and, even though we were not able to get a robust determination, our data indicate a rotation period of roughly 8 hr. This implies that the rotation axes of the two components are well aligned and suggests a scenario in which the two objects underwent the same accretion process. The 2-year complete dataset was used to study the astrometric motion of Luhman 16AB. We predict a motion of the system that is not consistent with a previous estimate based on two months of monitoring, but cannot confirm or refute the presence of additional planetary-mass bodies in the system.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1407.6253  [pdf] - 1215864
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. VI. WASP-24, WASP-25 and WASP-26
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 14 pages, 10 figures, 8 tables. Data and supplementary information are available on request
Submitted: 2014-07-23
We present time-series photometric observations of thirteen transits in the planetary systems WASP-24, WASP-25 and WASP-26. All three systems have orbital obliquity measurements, WASP-24 and WASP-26 have been observed with Spitzer, and WASP-25 was previously comparatively neglected. Our light curves were obtained using the telescope-defocussing method and have scatters of 0.5 to 1.2 mmag relative to their best-fitting geometric models. We used these data to measure the physical properties and orbital ephemerides of the systems to high precision, finding that our improved measurements are in good agreement with previous studies. High-resolution Lucky Imaging observations of all three targets show no evidence for faint stars close enough to contaminate our photometry. We confirm the eclipsing nature of the star closest to WASP-24 and present the detection of a detached eclipsing binary within 4.25 arcmin of WASP-26.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1406.7448  [pdf] - 863023
Physical properties of the WASP-67 planetary system from multi-colour photometry
Comments: 10 pages, 8 figures, 5 tables, to appear in Astronomy & Astrophysics
Submitted: 2014-06-28
The extrasolar planet WASP-67 b is the first hot Jupiter definitively known to undergo only partial eclipses. The lack of the second and third contact point in this planetary system makes it difficult to obtain accurate measurements of its physical parameters. Aims. By using new high-precision photometric data, we confirm that WASP-67 b shows grazing eclipses and compute accurate estimates of the physical properties of the planet and its parent star. Methods. We present high-quality, multi-colour, broad-band photometric observations comprising five light curves covering two transit events, obtained using two medium-class telescopes and the telescope-defocussing technique. One transit was observed through a Bessel-R filter and the other simultaneously through filters similar to Sloan griz. We modelled these data using jktebop. The physical parameters of the system were obtained from the analysis of these light curves and from published spectroscopic measurements. Results. All five of our light curves satisfy the criterion for being grazing eclipses. We revise the physical parameters of the whole WASP-67 system and, in particular, significantly improve the measurements of the planet's radius and density as compared to the values in the discovery paper. The transit ephemeris was also substantially refined. We investigated the variation of the planet's radius as a function of the wavelength, using the simultaneous multi-band data, finding that our measurements are consistent with a flat spectrum to within the experimental uncertainties.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1312.4982  [pdf] - 796520
Physical properties and transmission spectrum of the WASP-80 planetary system from multi-colour photometry
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures
Submitted: 2013-12-17, last modified: 2014-03-13
WASP-80 is one of only two systems known to contain a hot Jupiter which transits its M-dwarf host star. We present eight light curves of one transit event, obtained simultaneously using two defocussed telescopes. These data were taken through the Bessell I, Sloan griz and near-infrared JHK passbands. We use our data to search for opacity-induced changes in the planetary radius, but find that all values agree with each other. Our data are therefore consistent with a flat transmission spectrum to within the observational uncertainties. We also measure an activity index of the host star of log R'_HK=-4.495, meaning that WASP-80A shows strong chromospheric activity. The non-detection of starspots implies that, if they exist, they must be small and symmetrically distributed on the stellar surface. We model all available optical transit light curves to obtain improved physical properties and orbital ephemerides for the system.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.6384  [pdf] - 746524
Physical properties, transmission and emission spectra of the WASP-19 planetary system from multi-colour photometry
Comments: 18 pages, 12 figures, 11 tables
Submitted: 2013-06-26, last modified: 2013-11-14
We present new ground-based, multi-colour, broad-band photometric measurements of the physical parameters, transmission and emission spectra of the transiting extrasolar planet WASP-19b. The measurements are based on observations of 8 transits and four occultations using the 1.5m Danish Telescope, 14 transits at the PEST observatory, and 1 transit observed simultaneously through four optical and three near-infrared filters, using the GROND instrument on the ESO 2.2m telescope. We use these new data to measure refined physical parameters for the system. We find the planet to be more bloated and the system to be twice as old as initially thought. We also used published and archived datasets to study the transit timings, which do not depart from a linear ephemeris. We detected an anomaly in the GROND transit light curve which is compatible with a spot on the photosphere of the parent star. The starspot position, size, spot contrast and temperature were established. Using our new and published measurements, we assembled the planet's transmission spectrum over the 370-2350 nm wavelength range and its emission spectrum over the 750-8000 nm range. By comparing these data to theoretical models we investigated the theoretically-predicted variation of the apparent radius of WASP-19b as a function of wavelength and studied the composition and thermal structure of its atmosphere. We conclude that: there is no evidence for strong optical absorbers at low pressure, supporting the common idea that the planet's atmosphere lacks a dayside inversion; the temperature of the planet is not homogenized, because the high warming of its dayside causes the planet to be more efficient in re-radiating than redistributing energy to the night side; the planet seems to be outside of any current classification scheme.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.6041  [pdf] - 1152352
MOA-2010-BLG-311: A planetary candidate below the threshold of reliable detection
Yee, J. C.; Hung, L. -W.; Bond, I. A.; Allen, W.; Monard, L. A. G.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Dominik, M.; Tsapras, Y.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Zellem, R.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gorbikov, E.; Han, C.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Lee, C. -U.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Nola, M.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shporer, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Skowron, J.; Thornley, G.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beatty, T. G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Henderson, C. B.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J. W.; Shappee, B.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; van Saders, J.; Zub, M.; Street, R. A.; Horne, K.; Bramich, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Sahu, K. C.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsgans, J.
Comments: 29 pages, 6 Figures, 3 Tables. For a brief video presentation on this paper, please see http://www.youtube.com/user/OSUAstronomy 10/25/2012 - Updated author list. Replaced 10/10/13 to reflect the version published in ApJ
Submitted: 2012-10-22, last modified: 2013-10-10
We analyze MOA-2010-BLG-311, a high magnification (A_max>600) microlensing event with complete data coverage over the peak, making it very sensitive to planetary signals. We fit this event with both a point lens and a 2-body lens model and find that the 2-body lens model is a better fit but with only Delta chi^2~80. The preferred mass ratio between the lens star and its companion is $q=10^(-3.7+/-0.1), placing the candidate companion in the planetary regime. Despite the formal significance of the planet, we show that because of systematics in the data the evidence for a planetary companion to the lens is too tenuous to claim a secure detection. When combined with analyses of other high-magnification events, this event helps empirically define the threshold for reliable planet detection in high-magnification events, which remains an open question.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1309.7714  [pdf] - 1179574
MOA-2010-BLG-328Lb: a sub-Neptune orbiting very late M dwarf ?
Furusawa, K.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Gould, A.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Snodgrass, C.; Prester, D. Dominis; Albrow, M. D.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Choi, J. Y.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Hung, L. -W.; Jung, Y. -K.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Nola, M.; Ofek, E.; Park, B. G.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I. -G.; Skowron, J.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Street, R. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Horne, K.; Donatowicz, J.; Sahu, K. C.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beatty, T. G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, C. S.; Black, C.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Fouque, P.; Greenhill, J.; Henderson, C. B.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J. W.; Shappee, B.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; van Saders, J.; Zellem, R.; Zub, M.
Comments: 30 pages, 6 figures. accepted for publication in ApJ. Figure 1 and 2 are updated
Submitted: 2013-09-29, last modified: 2013-10-09
We analyze the planetary microlensing event MOA-2010-BLG-328. The best fit yields host and planetary masses of Mh = 0.11+/-0.01 M_{sun} and Mp = 9.2+/-2.2M_Earth, corresponding to a very late M dwarf and sub-Neptune-mass planet, respectively. The system lies at DL = 0.81 +/- 0.10 kpc with projected separation r = 0.92 +/- 0.16 AU. Because of the host's a-priori-unlikely close distance, as well as the unusual nature of the system, we consider the possibility that the microlens parallax signal, which determines the host mass and distance, is actually due to xallarap (source orbital motion) that is being misinterpreted as parallax. We show a result that favors the parallax solution, even given its close host distance. We show that future high-resolution astrometric measurements could decisively resolve the remaining ambiguity of these solutions.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1304.2243  [pdf] - 713744
EMCCD photometry reveals two new variable stars in the crowded central region of the globular cluster NGC 6981
Comments: 4 pages, 3 figures, Submitted to A&A, Version 3 contains the correct celestial coordinates in Table 1
Submitted: 2013-04-08, last modified: 2013-09-02
Two previously unknown variable stars in the crowded central region of the globular cluster NGC 6981 are presented. The observations were made using the Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera at the Danish 1.54m Telescope at La Silla, Chile.The two variables were not previously detected by conventional CCD imaging because of their proximity to a bright star. This discovery demonstrates that EMCCDs are a powerful tool for performing high-precision time-series photometry in crowded fields and near bright stars, especially when combined with difference image analysis (DIA).
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1306.3509  [pdf] - 1172053
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. V. WASP-15 and WASP-16
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS; 9 pages, 7 tables, 6 figures. The light curves are available from http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/jkt/data-teps.html and the results are included in TEPCat at http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/jkt/tepcat/
Submitted: 2013-06-14
We present new photometric observations of WASP-15 and WASP-16, two transiting extrasolar planetary systems with measured orbital obliquities but without photometric follow-up since their discovery papers. Our new data for WASP-15 comprise observations of one transit simultaneously in four optical passbands using GROND on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope, plus coverage of half a transit from DFOSC on the Danish 1.54m telescope, both at ESO La Silla. For WASP-16 we present observations of four complete transits, all from the Danish telescope. We use these new data to refine the measured physical properties and orbital ephemerides of the two systems. Whilst our results are close to the originally-determined values for WASP-15, we find that the star and planet in the WASP-16 system are both larger and less massive than previously thought.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1303.1184  [pdf] - 1165025
A Giant Planet beyond the Snow Line in Microlensing Event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251
Kains, N.; Street, R.; Choi, J. -Y.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Almeida, L. A.; Jablonski, F.; Tristram, P.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozlowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Skowron, J.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Fang, X. -S.; Grundahl, F.; Gu, C. -H.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M.; Lundkvist, M.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Sahu, K. C.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Wertz, O.; Bajek, D.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Ipatov, S.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, T.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Allen, W.; Batista, V.; Chung, S. -J.; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Henderson, C.; Jung, Y. -K.; Koo, J. -R.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I. -G.; Yee, J.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouque, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Meintjes, P.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Williams, A.; Wouters, D.; Zub, M.
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, 3 tables; A&A in press
Submitted: 2013-03-05
We present the analysis of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251. This anomalous event was observed by several survey and follow-up collaborations conducting microlensing observations towards the Galactic Bulge. Based on detailed modelling of the observed light curve, we find that the lens is composed of two masses with a mass ratio q=1.9 x 10^-3. Thanks to our detection of higher-order effects on the light curve due to the Earth's orbital motion and the finite size of source, we are able to measure the mass and distance to the lens unambiguously. We find that the lens is made up of a planet of mass 0.53 +- 0.21,M_Jup orbiting an M dwarf host star with a mass of 0.26 +- 0.11 M_Sun. The planetary system is located at a distance of 2.57 +- 0.61 kpc towards the Galactic Centre. The projected separation of the planet from its host star is d=1.408 +- 0.019, in units of the Einstein radius, which corresponds to 2.72 +- 0.75 AU in physical units. We also identified a competitive model with similar planet and host star masses, but with a smaller orbital radius of 1.50 +- 0.50 AU. The planet is therefore located beyond the snow line of its host star, which we estimate to be around 1-1.5 AU.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1211.3782  [pdf] - 1157842
MOA-2010-BLG-073L: An M-Dwarf with a Substellar Companion at the Planet/Brown Dwarf Boundary
Street, R. A.; Choi, J. -Y.; Tsapras, Y.; Han, C.; Furusawa, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Bond, I. A.; Wouters, D.; Zellem, R.; Udalski, A.; Snodgrass, C.; Horne, K.; Dominik, M.; Browne, P.; Kains, N.; Bramich, D. M.; Bajek, D.; Steele, I. A.; Ipatov, S.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagayama, T.; Nishimaya, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Yee, J.; Dong, S.; Shin, I. -G.; Lee, C. -U.; Skowron, J.; De Almeida, L. Andrade; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Hwang, K. -H.; Koo, J. -R.; Maoz, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishhook, D.; Shporer, A.; McCormick, J.; Christie, G.; Natusch, T.; Allen, B.; Drummond, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Thornley, G.; Knowler, M.; Bos, M.; Bolt, G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouque, P.; Bachelet, E.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F.; Hinse, T. C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.
Comments: 24 pages, 8 figures, best viewed in colour, accepted by ApJ
Submitted: 2012-11-15, last modified: 2012-12-11
We present an analysis of the anomalous microlensing event, MOA-2010-BLG-073, announced by the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics survey on 2010-03-18. This event was remarkable because the source was previously known to be photometrically variable. Analyzing the pre-event source lightcurve, we demonstrate that it is an irregular variable over time scales >200d. Its dereddened color, $(V-I)_{S,0}$, is 1.221$\pm$0.051mag and from our lens model we derive a source radius of 14.7$\pm$1.3 $R_{\odot}$, suggesting that it is a red giant star. We initially explored a number of purely microlensing models for the event but found a residual gradient in the data taken prior to and after the event. This is likely to be due to the variability of the source rather than part of the lensing event, so we incorporated a slope parameter in our model in order to derive the true parameters of the lensing system. We find that the lensing system has a mass ratio of q=0.0654$\pm$0.0006. The Einstein crossing time of the event, $T_{\rm{E}}=44.3$\pm$0.1d, was sufficiently long that the lightcurve exhibited parallax effects. In addition, the source trajectory relative to the large caustic structure allowed the orbital motion of the lens system to be detected. Combining the parallax with the Einstein radius, we were able to derive the distance to the lens, $D_L$=2.8$\pm$0.4kpc, and the masses of the lensing objects. The primary of the lens is an M-dwarf with $M_{L,p}$=0.16$\pm0.03M_{\odot}$ while the companion has $M_{L,s}$=11.0$\pm2.0M_{\rm{J}}$ putting it in the boundary zone between planets and brown dwarfs.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1210.6045  [pdf] - 1152354
MOA-2010-BLG-523: "Failed Planet" = RS CVn Star
Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Bond, I. A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Greenhill, J.; Tsapras, Y.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Bensby, T.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Hung, L. -W.; Jablonski, F.; Lee, C. -U.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Munoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nola, M.; Pogge, R. W.; Skowron, J.; Thornley, G.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Botzler, C. S.; Chote, P.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Harris, P.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Kubiak, M.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Browne, P.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Hardis, S.; Harpsoe, K.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Sahu, K. C.; Scarpetta, G.; Schafer, S.; Schonebeck, F.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Street, R. A.; Horne, K.; Bramich, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Beatty, T. G.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A. A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Fouque, P.; Henderson, C. B.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B; Martin, R.; Menzies, J. W.; Shappee, B.; Williams, A.; van Saders, J.; Zub, M.
Comments: 29 pp, 6 figs, submitted to ApJ
Submitted: 2012-10-22, last modified: 2012-10-26
The Galactic bulge source MOA-2010-BLG-523S exhibited short-term deviations from a standard microlensing lightcurve near the peak of an Amax ~ 265 high-magnification microlensing event. The deviations originally seemed consistent with expectations for a planetary companion to the principal lens. We combine long-term photometric monitoring with a previously published high-resolution spectrum taken near peak to demonstrate that this is an RS CVn variable, so that planetary microlensing is not required to explain the lightcurve deviations. This is the first spectroscopically confirmed RS CVn star discovered in the Galactic bulge.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1207.5797  [pdf] - 1125066
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. IV. Confirmation of the huge radius of WASP-17b
Comments: 11 pages, 7 tables, 7 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS
Submitted: 2012-07-24
We present photometric observations of four transits in the WASP-17 planetary system, obtained using telescope defocussing techniques and with scatters reaching 0.5 mmag per point. Our revised orbital period is 4.0 +/- 0.6 s longer than previous measurements, a difference of 6.6 sigma, and does not support the published detections of orbital eccentricity in this system. We model the light curves using the JKTEBOP code and calculate the physical properties of the system by recourse to five sets of theoretical stellar model predictions. The resulting planetary radius, Rb = 1.932 +/- 0.052 +/- 0.010 Rjup (statistical and systematic errors respectively), provides confirmation that WASP-17b is the largest planet currently known. All fourteen planets with radii measured to be greater than 1.6 Rjup are found around comparatively hot (Teff > 5900 K) and massive (MA > 1.15 Msun) stars. Chromospheric activity indicators are available for eight of these stars, and all imply a low activity level. The planets have small or zero orbital eccentricities, so tidal effects struggle to explain their large radii. The observed dearth of large planets around small stars may be natural but could also be due to observational biases against deep transits, if these are mistakenly labelled as false positives and so not followed up.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1009.0344  [pdf] - 1034636
OGLE-2005-BLG-153: Microlensing Discovery and Characterization of A Very Low Mass Binary
Comments: 6 pages, 3 figures, 1 table
Submitted: 2010-09-02, last modified: 2012-04-25
The mass function and statistics of binaries provide important diagnostics of the star formation process. Despite this importance, the mass function at low masses remains poorly known due to observational difficulties caused by the faintness of the objects. Here we report the microlensing discovery and characterization of a binary lens composed of very low-mass stars just above the hydrogen-burning limit. From the combined measurements of the Einstein radius and microlens parallax, we measure the masses of the binary components of $0.10\pm 0.01\ M_\odot$ and $0.09\pm 0.01\ M_\odot$. This discovery demonstrates that microlensing will provide a method to measure the mass function of all Galactic populations of very low mass binaries that is independent of the biases caused by the luminosity of the population.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1110.5912  [pdf] - 1085173
Qatar-2: A K dwarf orbited by a transiting hot Jupiter and a more massive companion in an outer orbit
Comments:
Submitted: 2011-10-26
We report the discovery and initial characterization of Qatar-2b, a hot Jupiter transiting a V = 13.3 mag K dwarf in a circular orbit with a short period, P_ b = 1.34 days. The mass and radius of Qatar-2b are M_p = 2.49 M_j and R_p = 1.14 R_j, respectively. Radial-velocity monitoring of Qatar-2 over a span of 153 days revealed the presence of a second companion in an outer orbit. The Systemic Console yielded plausible orbits for the outer companion, with periods on the order of a year and a companion mass of at least several M_j. Thus Qatar-2 joins the short but growing list of systems with a transiting hot Jupiter and an outer companion with a much longer period. This system architecture is in sharp contrast to that found by Kepler for multi-transiting systems, which are dominated by objects smaller than Neptune, usually with tightly spaced orbits that must be nearly coplanar.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1106.2160  [pdf] - 1077213
Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star
Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Suzuki, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Street, R.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kundurthy, P.; Skowron, J.; Becker, A. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Heyrovsky, D.; Barry, R. K.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Wellnitz, D. D.; Bond, I. A.; Sumi, T.; Dong, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Korpela, A. V.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Gorbikov, E.; Gould, A.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Mallia, F.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shporer, A.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; Allan, A.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Tsapras, Y.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, R.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Prester, D. Dominis; Donatowicz, J.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. -B.; Martin, R.; Menzies, J; Sahu, K. C.; Waldman, I.; Zub, A. Williams M.; Bourhrous, H.; Matsuoka, Y.; Nagayama, T.; Oi, N.; Randriamanakoto, Z.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Glitrup, M.; Harpsoe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Zimmer, F.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Ulaczyk, K.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.
Comments: 38 pages with 7 figures
Submitted: 2011-06-10
We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of m_p = 10.4 +- 1.7 Earth masses and orbits a star of mass M_* = 0.56 +- 0.09 Solar masses at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 (+1.9 -0.5) AU and an orbital period of P = 7.6 (+7.7 -1.5} yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are enabled by the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect, which is seen primarily in the light curve distortion due to the orbital motion of the Earth. But, the analysis also demonstrates the capability to measure microlensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a "failed" gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets.
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1012.5181  [pdf] - 1042746
A much lower density for the transiting extrasolar planet WASP-7
Comments: Accepted for publication as a Research Note in A&A. 5 pages, 4 tables, 3 figures
Submitted: 2010-12-23
We present the first high-precision photometry of the transiting extrasolar planetary system WASP-7, obtained using telescope defocussing techniques and reaching a scatter of 0.68 mmag per point. We find that the transit depth is greater and that the host star is more evolved than previously thought. The planet has a significantly larger radius (1.330 +/- 0.093 Rjup versus 0.915 +0.046 -0.040 Rjup) and much lower density (0.41 +/- 0.10 rhojup versus 1.26 +0.25 -0.21 rhojup) and surface gravity (13.4 +/- 2.6 m/s2 versus 26.4 +4.4 -4.0 m/s2) than previous measurements showed. Based on the revised properties it is no longer an outlier in planetary mass--radius and period--gravity diagrams. We also obtain a more precise transit ephemeris for the WASP-7 system.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1010.1809  [pdf] - 1041176
A sub-Saturn Mass Planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb
Miyake, N.; Sumi, T.; Dong, Subo; Street, R.; Mancini, L.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Tsapras, Y.; Yee, J. C.; Albrow, M. D.; Bond, I. A.; Fouque, P.; Browne, P.; Han, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Finet, F.; Furusawa, K.; Harpsoe, K.; Allen, W.; Hundertmark, M.; Freeman, M.; Suzuki, D.; Abe, F.; Botzler, C. S.; Douchin, D.; Fukui, A.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagayama, T.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Collaboration, The MOA; Bolt, G.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gorbikov, E.; Higgins, D.; Janczak, K. -H. Hwang J.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C. -U.; Koo, J. -R.; lowski, S. Koz; Lee, Y.; Mallia, F.; Maury, A.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Mu~noz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Ofek, E. O.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Santallo, R.; Shporer, A.; Spector, O.; Thornley, G.; Collaboration, The Micro FUN; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Steele, I.; Collaboration, The RoboNet; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Novati, S. Calchi; Dominik, M.; Dreizler, S.; Glitrup, M.; Hessman, F. V.; Hinse, T. C.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mathiasen, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Wambsganss, J.; Zimmer, F.; Consortium, The MiNDSTEp; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Greenhill, J.; Kubas, D.; Menzies, J.; Collaboration, The PLANET
Comments: accepted to ApJ, 28 pages, 6 figures, 3 tables
Submitted: 2010-10-09, last modified: 2010-12-10
We report the gravitational microlensing discovery of a sub-Saturn mass planet, MOA-2009-BLG-319Lb, orbiting a K or M-dwarf star in the inner Galactic disk or Galactic bulge. The high cadence observations of the MOA-II survey discovered this microlensing event and enabled its identification as a high magnification event approximately 24 hours prior to peak magnification. As a result, the planetary signal at the peak of this light curve was observed by 20 different telescopes, which is the largest number of telescopes to contribute to a planetary discovery to date. The microlensing model for this event indicates a planet-star mass ratio of q = (3.95 +/- 0.02) x 10^{-4} and a separation of d = 0.97537 +/- 0.00007 in units of the Einstein radius. A Bayesian analysis based on the measured Einstein radius crossing time, t_E, and angular Einstein radius, \theta_E, along with a standard Galactic model indicates a host star mass of M_L = 0.38^{+0.34}_{-0.18} M_{Sun} and a planet mass of M_p = 50^{+44}_{-24} M_{Earth}, which is half the mass of Saturn. This analysis also yields a planet-star three-dimensional separation of a = 2.4^{+1.2}_{-0.6} AU and a distance to the planetary system of D_L = 6.1^{+1.1}_{-1.2} kpc. This separation is ~ 2 times the distance of the snow line, a separation similar to most of the other planets discovered by microlensing.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1006.4464  [pdf] - 1033269
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. III. The transiting planetary system WASP-2
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 9 pages, 3 figures, 10 tables
Submitted: 2010-06-23
We present high-precision photometry of three transits of the extrasolar planetary system WASP-2, obtained by defocussing the telescope, and achieving point-to-point scatters of between 0.42 and 0.73 mmag. These data are modelled using the JKTEBOP code, and taking into account the light from the recently-discovered faint star close to the system. The physical properties of the WASP-2 system are derived using tabulated predictions from five different sets of stellar evolutionary models, allowing both statistical and systematic errorbars to be specified. We find the mass and radius of the planet to be M_b = 0.847 +/- 0.038 +/- 0.024 Mjup and R_b = 1.044 +/- 0.029 +/- 0.015 Rjup. It has a low equilibrium temperature of 1280 +/- 21 K, in agreement with a recent finding that it does not have an atmospheric temperature inversion. The first of our transit datasets has a scatter of only 0.42 mmag with respect to the best-fitting light curve model, which to our knowledge is a record for ground-based observations of a transiting extrasolar planet.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1005.0966  [pdf] - 1026693
OGLE 2008--BLG--290: An accurate measurement of the limb darkening of a Galactic Bulge K Giant spatially resolved by microlensing
Fouque, P.; Heyrovsky, D.; Dong, S.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Novati, S. Calchi; Cassan, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominik, M.; Prester, D. Dominis; Greenhill, J.; Horne, K.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Kozlowski, S.; Kubas, D.; Lee, C. -H.; Marquette, J. -B.; Mathiasen, M.; Menzies, J.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nishiyama, S.; Papadakis, I.; Street, R.; Sumi, T.; Williams, A.; Yee, J. C.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cole, A.; Cook, K. H.; Donatowicz, J.; Kains, N.; Kane, S. R.; Martin, R.; Pollard, K. R.; Sahu, K. C.; Tsapras, Y.; Wambsganss, J.; Zub, M.; DePoy, D. L.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Lee, C. -U.; Park, B. -G.; Pogge, R. W.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Soszynski, I.; Szewczyk, O.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Abe, F.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Gilmore, A. C.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Itow, Y.; ~Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Korpela, A. V.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Perrott, Y.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sako, T.; Sato, S.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D.; Sweatman, W.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.; Allan, A.; Bode, M. F.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Clay, N.; Fraser, S. N.; Hawkins, E.; Kerins, E.; Lister, T. A.; Mottram, C. J.; Saunders, E. S.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wheatley, P. J.; Anguita, T.; Bozza, V.; Harpsoe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Masi, G.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Thone, C. C.; Riffeser, A.; ~Seitz, S.; Bender, R.
Comments: Astronomy & Astrophysics in press
Submitted: 2010-05-06
Gravitational microlensing is not only a successful tool for discovering distant exoplanets, but it also enables characterization of the lens and source stars involved in the lensing event. In high magnification events, the lens caustic may cross over the source disk, which allows a determination of the angular size of the source and additionally a measurement of its limb darkening. When such extended-source effects appear close to maximum magnification, the resulting light curve differs from the characteristic Paczynski point-source curve. The exact shape of the light curve close to the peak depends on the limb darkening of the source. Dense photometric coverage permits measurement of the respective limb-darkening coefficients. In the case of microlensing event OGLE 2008-BLG-290, the K giant source star reached a peak magnification of about 100. Thirteen different telescopes have covered this event in eight different photometric bands. Subsequent light-curve analysis yielded measurements of linear limb-darkening coefficients of the source in six photometric bands. The best-measured coefficients lead to an estimate of the source effective temperature of about 4700 +100-200 K. However, the photometric estimate from colour-magnitude diagrams favours a cooler temperature of 4200 +-100 K. As the limb-darkening measurements, at least in the CTIO/SMARTS2 V and I bands, are among the most accurate obtained, the above disagreement needs to be understood. A solution is proposed, which may apply to previous events where such a discrepancy also appeared.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:0910.4875  [pdf] - 316002
Physical properties of the 0.94-day period transiting planetary system WASP-18
Comments: 6 pages, 2 figures, 4 tables. Accepted for publication in ApJ. Data can be obtained from http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/~jkt/
Submitted: 2009-10-26
We present high-precision photometry of five consecutive transits of WASP-18, an extrasolar planetary system with one of the shortest orbital periods known. Through the use of telescope defocussing we achieve a photometric precision of 0.47 to 0.83 mmag per observation over complete transit events. The data are analysed using the JKTEBOP code and three different sets of stellar evolutionary models. We find the mass and radius of the planet to be M_b = 10.43 +/- 0.30 +/- 0.24 Mjup R_b = 1.165 +/- 0.055 +/- 0.014 Rjup (statistical and systematic errors) respectively. The systematic errors in the orbital separation and the stellar and planetary masses, arising from the use of theoretical predictions, are of a similar size to the statistical errors and set a limit on our understanding of the WASP-18 system. We point out that seven of the nine known massive transiting planets (M_b > 3 Mjup) have eccentric orbits, whereas significant orbital eccentricity has been detected for only four of the 46 less massive planets. This may indicate that there are two different populations of transiting planets, but could also be explained by observational biases. Further radial velocity observations of low-mass planets will make it possible to choose between these two scenarios.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:0907.3356  [pdf] - 1002978
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. II. The transiting planetary system WASP-4
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 8 pages plus appendix, 4 figures, 8 tables
Submitted: 2009-07-20
We present and analyse light curves of four transits of the Southern hemisphere extrasolar planetary system WASP-4, obtained with a telescope defocussed so the radius of each point spread function was 17 arcsec (44 pixels). This approach minimises both random and systematic errors, allowing us to achieve scatters of between 0.60 and 0.88 mmag per observation over complete transit events. The light curves are augmented by published observations and analysed using the JKTEBOP code. The results of this process are combined with theoretical stellar model predictions to derive the physical properties of the WASP-4 system. We find that the mass and radius of the planet are M_b = 1.289 {+0.090 -0.090} {+0.039 -0.000} MJup and R_b = 1.371 {+0.032 -0.035} {+0.021 -0.000} RJup, respectively (statistical and systematic uncertainties). These quantities give a surface gravity and density of g_b = 17.03 +0.97 -0.54 m/s2 and rho_b = 0.500 {+0.032 -0.021} {+0.000 -0.008} rhoJup, and fit the trends for short-period extrasolar planets to have relatively high masses and surface gravities. WASP-4 is now one of the best-quantified transiting extrasolar planetary systems, and significant further progress requires improvements to our understanding of the physical properties of low-mass stars.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:0903.2139  [pdf] - 1001621
High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. I. The transiting planetary system WASP-5
Comments: Accepted for publication in MNRAS. 9 pages, 4 figures, quite a few tables
Submitted: 2009-03-12
We present high-precision photometry of two transit events of the extrasolar planetary system WASP-5, obtained with the Danish 1.54m telescope at ESO La Silla. In order to minimise both random and flat-fielding errors, we defocussed the telescope so its point spread function approximated an annulus of diameter 40 pixels (16 arcsec). Data reduction was undertaken using standard aperture photometry plus an algorithm for optimally combining the ensemble of comparison stars. The resulting light curves have point-to-point scatters of 0.50 mmag for the first transit and 0.59 mmag for the second. We construct detailed signal to noise calculations for defocussed photometry, and apply them to our observations. We model the light curves with the JKTEBOP code and combine the results with tabulated predictions from theoretical stellar evolutionary models to derive the physical properties of the WASP-5 system. We find that the planet has a mass of M_b = 1.637 +/- 0.075 +/- 0.033 Mjup, a radius of R_b = 1.171 +/- 0.056 +/- 0.012 Rjup, a large surface gravity of g_b = 29.6 +/- 2.8 m/s2 and a density of rho_b = 1.02 +/- 0.14 +/- 0.01 rhojup (statistical and systematic uncertainties). The planet's high equilibrium temperature of T_eq = 1732 +/- 80 K makes it a good candidate for detecting secondary eclipses.