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27 article(s) in total. 645 co-authors, from 1 to 6 common article(s). Median position in authors list is 1,0.

[1]  oai:arXiv.org:1609.07325  [pdf] - 2099691
GaiaNIR: Combining optical and Near-Infra-Red (NIR) capabilities with Time-Delay-Integration (TDI) sensors for a future Gaia-like mission
Comments: 27 Pages
Submitted: 2016-09-23, last modified: 2020-05-22
ESA recently called for new "Science Ideas" to be investigated in terms of feasibility and technological developments -- for technologies not yet sufficiently mature. These ideas may in the future become candidates for M or L class missions within the ESA Science Program. With the launch of Gaia in December 2013, Europe entered a new era of space astrometry following in the footsteps of the very successful Hipparcos mission from the early 1990s. Gaia is the successor to Hipparcos, both of which operated in optical wavelengths, and Gaia is two orders of magnitude more accurate in the five astrometric parameters and is surveying four orders of magnitude more stars in a vast volume of the Milky Way. The combination of the Hipparcos/Tycho-2 catalogues with the first early Gaia data release will give improved proper motions over a long ~25 year baseline. The final Gaia solution will also establish a new optical reference frame by means of quasars, by linking the optical counterparts of radio (VLBI) sources defining the orientation of the reference frame, and by using the zero proper motion of quasars to determine a non-rotating frame. A weakness of Gaia is that it only operates at optical wavelengths. However, much of the Galactic centre and the spiral arm regions, important for certain studies, are obscured by interstellar extinction and this makes it difficult for Gaia to deeply probe. Traditionally, this problem is overcome by switching to the infra-red but this was not possible with Gaia's CCDs. Additionally, to scan the entire sky and make global absolute parallax measurements the spacecraft must have a constant rotation and this requires that the CCDs operate in TDI mode, increasing their complexity.
[2]  oai:arXiv.org:1707.01020  [pdf] - 2065138
Astrometric accuracy during the past 2000 years
Comments: 4 pages, 2 figures, update of the report from 2017 in arxiv:1707.01020v1. arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1104.4554
Submitted: 2017-07-04, last modified: 2020-03-16
The great development of astrometric accuracy since the observations by Hipparchus about 150 BC was documented in 2008 in the first version of the present report. This report was updated in H{\o}g (2017d), e.g. with recent information on the catalogues before 1800 AD. The development has often been displayed in diagrams showing the accuracy versus time. A new simplified diagram is provided in the present report as Fig.2 and in a .png file and this information will presumably be the main interest for some readers.
[3]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.12535  [pdf] - 1924376
Voyage 2050 White Paper: All-Sky Visible and Near Infrared Space Astrometry
Comments: arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1609.07325
Submitted: 2019-07-26
A new all-sky visible and Near-InfraRed (NIR) space astrometry mission with a wavelength cutoff in the K-band is not just focused on a single or small number of key science cases. Instead, it is extremely broad, answering key science questions in nearly every branch of astronomy while also providing a dense and accurate visible-NIR reference frame needed for future astronomy facilities. For almost 2 billion common stars the combination of Gaia and a new all-sky NIR astrometry mission would provide much improved proper motions, answering key science questions -- from the solar system and stellar systems, including exoplanet systems, to compact galaxies, quasars, neutron stars, binaries and dark matter substructures. The addition of NIR will result in up to 8 billion newly measured stars in some of the most obscured parts of our Galaxy, and crucially reveal the very heart of the Galactic bulge region. In this white paper we argue that rather than improving on the accuracy, a greater overall science return can be achieved by going deeper than Gaia and by expanding the wavelength range to the NIR.
[4]  oai:arXiv.org:1907.05191  [pdf] - 1914761
Astro2020 Activity, Project of State of the Profession Consideration (APC) White Paper: All-Sky Near Infrared Space Astrometry. State of the Profession Considerations: Development of Scanning NIR Detectors for Astronomy
Comments:
Submitted: 2019-07-11
Gaia is a revolutionary space mission developed by ESA and is delivering 5 parameter astrometry, photometry and radial velocities over the whole sky with astrometric accuracies down to a few tens of micro-arcseconds. A weakness of Gaia is that it only operates at optical wavelengths. However, much of the Galactic centre and the spiral arm regions, important for certain studies, are obscured by interstellar extinction and this makes it difficult for Gaia to deeply probe. This problem can be overcome by switching to the Near Infra-Red (NIR) but this is not possible with silicon CCDs. Additionally, to scan the entire sky and make global absolute parallax measurements the spacecraft must have a constant rotation and this requires the detectors operate in Time Delayed Integration (TDI) mode or similar.
[5]  oai:arXiv.org:1904.08836  [pdf] - 1869907
All-Sky Near Infrared Space Astrometry
Comments: 7 pages
Submitted: 2019-04-18
Gaia is currently revolutionizing modern astronomy. However, much of the Galactic plane, center and the spiral arm regions are obscured by interstellar extinction, rendering them inaccessible because Gaia is an optical instrument. An all-sky near infrared (NIR) space observatory operating in the optical NIR, separated in time from the original Gaia would provide microarcsecond NIR astrometry and millimag photometry to penetrate obscured regions unraveling the internal dynamics of the Galaxy.
[6]  oai:arXiv.org:1805.03394  [pdf] - 1721105
Unidentified quasars among stationary objects from Gaia DR2
Comments: Submitted to A&A, comments welcome
Submitted: 2018-05-09
We here apply a novel technique selecting quasar candidates purely as sources with zero proper motions in the Gaia data release 2 (DR2). We demonstrate that this approach is highly efficient toward high Galactic latitudes with < 25% contamination from stellar sources. Such a selection technique offers a very pure sample completeness, since all cosmological point sources are selected regardless of their intrinsic spectral properties within the limiting magnitude of Gaia. We carry out a pilot-study by defining a sample compiled by including all Gaia-DR2 sources within one degree of the North Galactic Pole (NGP) selected to have proper motions consistent with zero within 2-sigma uncertainty. By cross-matching the sample to the optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the mid-infrared AllWISE photometric catalogues we investigate the colours of each of our sources. Together with already spectroscopically confirmed quasars we are therefore able to determine the efficiency of our selection. The majority of the zero proper motion sources have optical to mid-infrared colours consistent with known quasars. The remaining population may be contaminating stellar sources, but some may also be quasars with colours similar to stars. Spectroscopic follow-up of the zero proper motion sources is needed to unveil such a hitherto hidden quasar population. This approach has the potential to allow substantial progress on many important questions concerning quasars such as determining the fraction of dust-obscured quasars, the fraction of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, and the metallicity distribution of damped Lyman-$\alpha$ absorbers. The technique could also potentially reveal new types of quasars or even new classes of cosmological point sources.
[7]  oai:arXiv.org:1804.10881  [pdf] - 1674001
Astrometry history: Hipparcos from 1964 to 1980
Comments: 52 pages, 7 figures, on the history of satellite astrometry
Submitted: 2018-04-29
Here follow three reports covering different aspects of the early history from 1964 to 1980 of the Hipparcos satellite mission. The first report "Interviews about the creation of Hipparcos" contains interviews from 2017 with scientists about how the mission was conceived up to the begin of technical development. The second report "From TYCHO to Hipparcos 1975 to 1979" is about the Hipparcos development based on new material from my archive. From my 65 years dedicated to the development of astrometry, I argue that very special historical circumstances in Europe were decisive for the idea of space astrometry to become reality: Hipparcos did not just come because astrophysicists needed the data. The third report "Miraculous 1980 for Hipparcos" documents how the approval of the astrometric mission in January 1980 in competition with an astrophysical mission was only achieved with very great difficulty, even after an outstanding astrophysicist had presented overwhelming arguments that the astrometric mission would be scientifically much more important.
[8]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3302  [pdf] - 1579553
Solar system and small-field astrometry
Comments: 5 pages. Contribution to the study of a Gaia successsor in "Absolute astrometry in the next 50 years" at arXiv:1408.2190. In 2017: Update wrt my dropbox and website
Submitted: 2014-08-14, last modified: 2017-08-03
Astrometric issues for solar system studies are discussed. An overview gives references and cover all aspects of the solar system where astrometry is important: orbits of planets, moons, asteroids and NEOs, masses of asteroids, occultations of asteroids and KBOs, and families of asteroids and KBOs. The roles of astrometry from the ground, from Gaia and from a Gaia successor are discussed, but not small-field astrometry from space. It appears from work with CCD cameras at the 1.55 m astrometric reflector in Flagstaff that an accuracy of 1 mas is the best possible from the ground during one night observing when using ordinary telescopes, i.e. without wave-front correctors, and for field sizes larger than 2 arcmin. It has been seen that the same accuracies can be reached with the much larger 4-m class telescope on Hawaii although it is not specifically designed for astrometry. The accuracy of 1 mas from the ground refers mainly to non-moving point sources, but it is expected that 1 mas can be reached from the ground for solar system bodies from many nights of observations when phase effects are taken into account.
[9]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.01925  [pdf] - 1579768
The Baltic Meetings 1957 to 1967
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures. In 2017 the invalid references to dropbox changed to my website. Accepted for publication in Nuncius Hamburgensis, Volume 38 (2016)
Submitted: 2015-12-07, last modified: 2017-08-03
The Baltic meetings of astronomers from Northern Germany and Scandinavia began in 1957 and gathered up to 70 participants. Reports of the presentations are available from all meetings, providing an overview of the interests of astronomers in this part of the world 50 years ago. Most interesting to see for a young astronomer in our days, I think, is that a large part of the time was about astrometry. This focus on astrometry was the basis for the scientific knowhow which made the idea of space astrometry realistic, resulting in the approval by ESA of the first astrometry satellite Hipparcos in 1980 which brought a revolution of high-precision astrometry of positions, motions and distances of stars. The correspondence with ten observatories shows that only one of them has any archive of letters at all from the 1950s, that is in Copenhagen where about 7000 letters on scientific and administrative matters are extant. - These letters have now been stored in the Rigsarkivet.
[10]  oai:arXiv.org:1512.01924  [pdf] - 1579767
Young astronomer in Denmark 1946 to 1958
Comments: 30 pages, 9 figures, minor revision in Aug. 2017. Accepted for publication in Nuncius Hamburgensis, Volume 38 (2016)
Submitted: 2015-12-07, last modified: 2017-08-03
This is a personal account of how I became an astronomer. Fascinated by the stars and planets in the dark sky over Lolland, an island 100 km south of Copenhagen, the interest in astronomy was growing. Encouraged by my teachers, I polished mirrors and built telescopes with generous help from the local blacksmith and I observed light curves of variable stars. Studies at the Copenhagen University from 1950 gradually led me deeper into astronomy, especially astrometry (the astronomy of positions), guided by professor Bengt Str\"omgren and my mentor dr. phil. Peter Naur. I was lucky to take part in the buildup of the new observatory at Brorfelde during the first difficult years and the ideas I gathered there have contributed to the two astrometry satellites Hipparcos and Gaia launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) in respectively 1989 and 2013.
[11]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.2190  [pdf] - 1579552
Absolute astrometry in the next 50 years
Comments: 36 pages, 7 figures. Updates up to 12 June 2017 are included. Author - ehoeg@hotmail.dk
Submitted: 2014-08-10, last modified: 2017-08-03
With Gaia in orbit since December 2013 it is time to look at the future of fundamental astrometry and a time frame of 50 years is needed in this matter. A space mission with Gaia-like astrometric performance is required, but not necessarily a Gaia-like satellite. It should be studied whether this can be obtained within the budget of a medium-size ESA mission. A dozen science issues for a Gaia successor mission in twenty years, with launch about 2033, are presented and in this context also other possibilities for absolute astrometry with milliarcsecond (mas) or sub-mas accuracies are discussed. The three powerful techniques: VLBI, the MICADO camera on the E-ELT, and the LSST are described and documented by literature references and by an extensive correspondence with leading astronomers who readily responded with all the information I needed. In brief, the two Gaia-like missions would provide an astrometric foundation for all branches of astronomy from the solar system and stellar systems, including exo-planet systems, to compact galaxies, quasars and dark matter (DM) substructures by data which cannot be surpassed in the next 50 years. - In April 2017 ESA selected our proposal Hobbs et al. (2016) for study of a detector with NIR sensitivity for a Gaia successor mission, called GaiaNIR.
[12]  oai:arXiv.org:1706.08097  [pdf] - 1585125
Selected astrometric catalogues
Comments: 11 pages, update of report from 2008 contained as No.6 in arXiv:1104.4554v2, minor updates in v2
Submitted: 2017-06-25, last modified: 2017-07-09
A selection of astrometric catalogues are presented in three tables for respectively positions, proper motions and trigonometric parallaxes. The tables contain characteristics of each catalogue showing the evolution in optical astrometry, in fact the evolution during the past 2000 years for positions. The number of stars and the accuracy are summarized by the weight of a catalogue, proportional with the number of stars and the statistical weight. The present report originally from 2008 was revised in 2017 with much new information about the accuracy of catalogues before 1800 AD. For the ongoing Gaia mission the website and H{\o}g (2017) may be consulted.
[13]  oai:arXiv.org:1705.00688  [pdf] - 1583007
Gaia Data Release 1. Testing the parallaxes with local Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars
Gaia Collaboration; Clementini, G.; Eyer, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Muraveva, T.; Garofalo, A.; Sarro, L. M.; Palmer, M.; Luri, X.; Molinaro, R.; Rimoldini, L.; Szabados, L.; Musella, I.; Anderson, R. I.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Azntoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernánde, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: 29 pages, 25 figures. Accepted for publication by A&A
Submitted: 2017-05-01
Parallaxes for 331 classical Cepheids, 31 Type II Cepheids and 364 RR Lyrae stars in common between Gaia and the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1) as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). In order to test these first parallax measurements of the primary standard candles of the cosmological distance ladder, that involve astrometry collected by Gaia during the initial 14 months of science operation, we compared them with literature estimates and derived new period-luminosity ($PL$), period-Wesenheit ($PW$) relations for classical and Type II Cepheids and infrared $PL$, $PL$-metallicity ($PLZ$) and optical luminosity-metallicity ($M_V$-[Fe/H]) relations for the RR Lyrae stars, with zero points based on TGAS. The new relations were computed using multi-band ($V,I,J,K_{\mathrm{s}},W_{1}$) photometry and spectroscopic metal abundances available in the literature, and applying three alternative approaches: (i) by linear least squares fitting the absolute magnitudes inferred from direct transformation of the TGAS parallaxes, (ii) by adopting astrometric-based luminosities, and (iii) using a Bayesian fitting approach. TGAS parallaxes bring a significant added value to the previous Hipparcos estimates. The relations presented in this paper represent first Gaia-calibrated relations and form a "work-in-progress" milestone report in the wait for Gaia-only parallaxes of which a first solution will become available with Gaia's Data Release 2 (DR2) in 2018.
[14]  oai:arXiv.org:1704.05828  [pdf] - 1697874
GIER: A Danish computer from 1961 with a role in the modern revolution of astronomy
Comments: 19 pages,8 figures, Accepted for publication in Nuncius Hamburgensis, Volume 20
Submitted: 2017-04-19
A Danish computer, GIER, from 1961 played a vital role in the development of a new method for astrometric measurement. This method, photon counting astrometry, ultimately led to two satellites with a significant role in the modern revolution of astronomy. A GIER was installed at the Hamburg Observatory in 1964 where it was used to implement the entirely new method for the measurement of stellar positions by means of a meridian circle, then the fundamental instrument of astrometry. An expedition to Perth in Western Australia with the instrument and the computer was a success. This method was also implemented in space in the first ever astrometric satellite Hipparcos launched by ESA in 1989. The Hipparcos results published in 1997 revolutionized astrometry with an impact in all branches of astronomy from the solar system and stellar structure to cosmic distances and the dynamics of the Milky Way. In turn, the results paved the way for a successor, the one million times more powerful Gaia astrometry satellite launched by ESA in 2013. Preparations for a Gaia successor in twenty years are making progress.
[15]  oai:arXiv.org:1703.01131  [pdf] - 1567701
Gaia Data Release 1. Open cluster astrometry: performance, limitations, and future prospects
Gaia Collaboration; van Leeuwen, F.; Vallenari, A.; Jordi, C.; Lindegren, L.; Bastian, U.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Eyer, L.; Jansen, F.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Clementini, G.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J. -L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J. -M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Sarro, L. M.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Aramburu, A. Abreu; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Anderson, R. I.; Andrei, A. H.; Varela, E. Anglada; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Navascués, D. Barrado y; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; García, A. Bello; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bouy, H.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Martino, D.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Anjos, S. Dos; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Bontemps, G. Eynard; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Faigler, S.; Falcão, A. J.; Casas, M. Farràs; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garofalo, A.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; de Fombelle, G. Jevardat; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Kull, I.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J. -B.; Poncin-Lafitte, C. Le; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffer, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Fernandes, T. Magalhães; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marconi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; Mazeh, T.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, R.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegrio, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Muraveva, T.; Musella, I.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F. -X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Rimoldini, L.; Ripepi, V.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sellés, T. Sagristà; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Nieto, S. Soria; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szabados, L.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingril, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Prieto, C. Allende; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernsteiny, H. -H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P. -M.; Bunclarky, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Luche, C. Delle; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardio, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Parache, Y. Isasi; Janotto, A. -M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D. -W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A. -T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Sanz, A. Olias; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Palmer, M.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poelsy, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Sembay, S.; Vizcaino, I. Serraller; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J. -M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.
Comments: Accepted for publication by A&A. 21 pages main text plus 46 pages appendices. 34 figures main text, 38 figures appendices. 8 table in main text, 19 tables in appendices
Submitted: 2017-03-03
Context. The first Gaia Data Release contains the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). This is a subset of about 2 million stars for which, besides the position and photometry, the proper motion and parallax are calculated using Hipparcos and Tycho-2 positions in 1991.25 as prior information. Aims. We investigate the scientific potential and limitations of the TGAS component by means of the astrometric data for open clusters. Methods. Mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are derived taking into account the error correlations within the astrometric solutions for individual stars, an estimate of the internal velocity dispersion in the cluster, and, where relevant, the effects of the depth of the cluster along the line of sight. Internal consistency of the TGAS data is assessed. Results. Values given for standard uncertainties are still inaccurate and may lead to unrealistic unit-weight standard deviations of least squares solutions for cluster parameters. Reconstructed mean cluster parallax and proper motion values are generally in very good agreement with earlier Hipparcos-based determination, although the Gaia mean parallax for the Pleiades is a significant exception. We have no current explanation for that discrepancy. Most clusters are observed to extend to nearly 15 pc from the cluster centre, and it will be up to future Gaia releases to establish whether those potential cluster-member stars are still dynamically bound to the clusters. Conclusions. The Gaia DR1 provides the means to examine open clusters far beyond their more easily visible cores, and can provide membership assessments based on proper motions and parallaxes. A combined HR diagram shows the same features as observed before using the Hipparcos data, with clearly increased luminosities for older A and F dwarfs.
[16]  oai:arXiv.org:1612.02952  [pdf] - 1538988
Gaia data release 1, the photometric data
Comments: 9 pages, 6 figures, 1 table, Accepted for publication by A&A as part of the Gaia 1st data release issue
Submitted: 2016-12-09
Context. This paper presents an overview of the photometric data that are part of the first Gaia data release. Aims. The principles of the processing and the main characteristics of the Gaia photometric data are presented. Methods. The calibration strategy is outlined briefly and the main properties of the resulting photometry are presented. Results. Relations with other broadband photometric systems are provided. The overall precision for the Gaia photometry is shown to be at the milli-magnitude level and has a clear potential to improve further in future releases.
[17]  oai:arXiv.org:1503.02874  [pdf] - 1212342
A study of purely astrometric selection of extragalactic point sources with Gaia
Comments: 4 pages, 4 figures, sent in and accepted for publishing to A&A
Submitted: 2015-03-10, last modified: 2015-05-08
Selection of extragalactic point sources, e.g. QSOs, is often hampered by significant selection effects causing existing samples to have rather complex selection functions. We explore whether a purely astrometric selection of extragalactic point sources, e.g. QSOs, is feasible with the ongoing Gaia mission. Such a selection would be interesting as it would be unbiased in terms of colours of the targets and hence would allow selection also with colours in the stellar sequence. We have analyzed a total of 18 representative regions of the sky by using GUMS, the simulator prepared for ESAs Gaia mission, both in the range of $12\le G \le 20$ mag and $12\le G \le 18$ mag. For each region we determine the density of apparently stationary stellar sources, i.e. sources for which Gaia cannot measure a significant proper motion. The density is contrasted with the density of extragalactic point sources, e.g. QSOs, in order to establish in which celestial directions a pure astrometric selection is feasible. When targeting regions at galactic latitude $|b| \ge 30^\mathrm{o}$ the ratio of QSOs to apparently stationary stars is above 50\% and when observing towards the poles the fraction of QSOs goes up to about $\sim80$\%. We show that the proper motions from the proposed Gaia successor mission in about 20 years would dramatically improve these results at all latitudes. Detection of QSOs solely from zero proper motion, unbiased by any assumptions on spectra, might lead to the discovery of new types of QSOs or new classes of extragalactic point sources.
[18]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.2122  [pdf] - 903619
The Astrometric Foundation of Astrophysics
Comments: 2 pages, 2 figures, Abstract to the Conference Book 2014 of the Danish Astronomical Society and abstract of a review
Submitted: 2014-08-09, last modified: 2014-12-04
Astrophysical studies require a knowledge of very accurate positions, motions and distances of stars. A brief overview is given of the significance and development of astrometry by ESA's two astrometric satellites, Hipparcos and Gaia, launched in respectively 1989 and 2013. The astrometric foundation of all branches of astronomy from the solar system and stellar systems to compact galaxies, quasars and dark matter is being revolutionized by the observations from these satellites. The future of fundamental astrometry must be considered in a time frame of 50 years, therefore science issues for a Gaia successor mission in twenty years are discussed in an extensive report: "Absolute astrometry in the next 50 years" available at http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.2190
[19]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.4668  [pdf] - 863754
Interferometry from Space: A Great Dream
Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures. In: Asian Journal of Physics Vol. 23, Nos 1 & 2 (2014), Special Issue on History of Physics & Astronomy, Guest Editor: Virginia Trimble
Submitted: 2014-08-20
During some thirty years, 1980-2010, technical studies of optical interferometry from instruments in space were pursued as promising for higher spatial resolution and for higher astrometric accuracy. Nulling interferometry was studied for both high spatial resolution and high contrast. These studies were great dreams deserving further historical attention. ESA's interest in interferometry began in the early 1980s. The studies of optical interferometry for the global astrometry mission GAIA began in 1993 and ended in 1998 when interferometry was dropped as unsuited for the purpose, and the Gaia mission to be launched in 2013 is not based on interferometry. \c{opyright} Anita Publications. All rights reserved.
[20]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.4341  [pdf] - 863700
Exo-Jupiters and Saturns from two Gaia-like missions
Comments: 12 pages, 5 figures. Contribution to the study of a Gaia successsor in "Absolute astrometry in the next 50 years" at http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.2190
Submitted: 2014-08-19
Detection and orbit determination for thousands of planets with periods up to about 40 years would be obtained by astrometry from two Gaia-like missions, results which cannot be obtained by any other mission, planned or proposed. A billion stars of all spectral types will be surveyed. A comprehensive knowledge about heavy planets with these periods, reaching well beyond the snow line of any system, will lead to a better understanding of the formation and evolution of planets, also in the habitable zone.
[21]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3299  [pdf] - 863523
Astrometry for Dynamics
Comments: 8 pages, 2 figures. A Gaia successsor is studied in "Absolute astrometry in the next 50 years" at http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.2190, updated in August 2014
Submitted: 2014-08-14
In May 2013, I responded with the present paper to ESA's call for White Papers for the definition of Large missions. This was half a year before the launch of ESA's large astrometry mission Gaia. The present proposal for a Gaia successor mission is similar to Gaia, because two Gaia-like missions at an interval of about twenty years would provide a foundation for studies of dynamics in all branches of astronomy from the solar system and stellar systems to compact galaxies, quasars and dark matter by astrometric data which cannot be surpassed in the next 50 years.
[22]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.3305  [pdf] - 863526
A Gaia successor with NIR Sensors
Comments: 8 pages, 2 figures. Contribution to the study of a Gaia successsor in "Absolute astrometry in the next 50 years" at http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.2190
Submitted: 2014-08-14
The expected accurate astrometric data from Gaia offer the opportunity and the obligation to exploitation by a second all-sky mission. Therefore a proposal was submitted to ESA in May 2013 for a Gaia-like mission in about twenty years. Two new designs are here considered with NIR sensors in addition to the visual CCDs as in Gaia. This has been suggested by several colleagues in order to get better astrometry in obscured regions. A first design with CMOS sensors was quickly abandoned for technical reasons. The second design with specially developed CCDs for NIR looked more promising. But a deeper study showed that the longer wavelength in the near infrared at two microns deteriorates astrometry so much that only heavily obscured stars of extremely red types as M5III would obtain a better accuracy. Thus, an option with NIR sensors does not seem promissing.
[23]  oai:arXiv.org:1408.2407  [pdf] - 863371
Astrometry 1960-80: from Hamburg to Hipparcos
Comments: 2+41 pages, 1+25 figures, Proceedings of astrometry conference held in Hamburg in 2012, Nuncius Hamburgensis, Beitr\"age zur Geschichte der Naturwissenschaften, Band 24, 2014
Submitted: 2014-08-08
Astrometry, the most ancient branch of astronomy, was facing extinction during much of the 20th century in the competition with astrophysics. The revival of astrometry came with the European astrometry satellite Hipparcos, approved by ESA in 1980 and launched 1989. Photon-counting astrometry was the basic measuring technique in Hipparcos, a technique invented by the author in 1960 in Hamburg. The technique was implemented on the Repsold meridian circle for the Hamburg expedition to Perth in Western Australia where it worked well during 1967-72. This success paved the way for space astrometry, pioneered in France and implemented on Hipparcos. This report gives a detailed personal account of my life and work in Hamburg Bergedorf where I lived with my family half a century ago.
[24]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.0879  [pdf] - 353887
Astrometry history: Roemer and Gaia
Comments: 2011.05.04: The report is contained in the collection of reports "Astrometry during the past 100 years" placed at http://arxiv.org/abs/1105.0634
Submitted: 2011-05-04
During the Hipparcos mission in September 1992, I presented a concept for using direct imaging on CCDs in scanning mode in a new and very powerful astrometric satellite, Roemer. The Roemer concept with larger aperture telescopes for higher accuracy was developed by ESA and a mission was approved in 2000, expected to be a million times better than Hipparcos. The present name Gaia for the mission reminds of an interferometric option also studied in the period 1993-97, and the evolution of optics and detection in this period is the main subject of the present report. The transition from an interferometric GAIA to a large Roemer was made on 15 January 1998. It will be shown that without the interferometric GAIA option, ESA would hardly have selected astrometry for a Cornerstone study in 1997, and consequently we would not have had the Roemer/Gaia mission.
[25]  oai:arXiv.org:1105.0634  [pdf] - 351546
Astrometry during the past 100 years
Comments: 2011.05.03: Collection of reports from 2011. The following contains overview with summary and link to the reports Nos. 1-9 from 2008 and Nos. 10-13 from 2011. The reports are collected in two big file, see details on p.8
Submitted: 2011-05-03
The reports from 2008: "Astrometry and optics during the past 2000 years", are available at arXiv and at my website: www.astro.ku.dk/~erik/History.pdf . Here are now further contributions to the history of astrometry related to space astrometry. The development of photoelectric astrometry is followed from an experiment in 1925 up to the Hipparcos satellite mission in the years 1989-93. This period continues with my proposal in 1992 for CCD astrometry with a scanning satellite called Roemer, which led to the Gaia mission due for launch in 2013. Lectures on astrometry are described. - Further installments are planned.
[26]  oai:arXiv.org:1104.4554  [pdf] - 351497
Astrometry during the past 2000 years
Comments: 2011.05.03: Collection of reports from November 2008. The following contains overview with summary and link to the reports Nos. 1-9 from 2008 and Nos. 10-13 from 2011. The reports are collected in two big file, see details on p.8
Submitted: 2011-04-23, last modified: 2011-05-03
The satellite missions Hipparcos and Gaia by the European Space Agency will together bring a decrease of astrometric errors by a factor 10000, four orders of magnitude, more than was achieved during the preceding 500 years. This modern development of astrometry was at first obtained by photoelectric astrometry. An experiment with this technique in 1925 led to the Hipparcos satellite mission in the years 1989-93 as described in the following reports Nos. 1 and 10. The report No. 11 is about the subsequent period of space astrometry with CCDs in a scanning satellite. This period began in 1992 with my proposal of a mission called Roemer, which led to the Gaia mission due for launch in 2013. My contributions to the history of astrometry and optics are based on 50 years of work in the field of astrometry but the reports cover spans of time within the past 2000 years, e.g., 400 years of astrometry, 650 years of optics, and the "miraculous" approval of the Hipparcos satellite mission during a few months of 1980.
[27]  oai:arXiv.org:astro-ph/0101235  [pdf] - 40373
GAIA: Composition, Formation and Evolution of the Galaxy
Comments: Accepted by A&A: 25 pages, 8 figures
Submitted: 2001-01-15
The GAIA astrometric mission has recently been approved as one of the next two `cornerstones' of ESA's science programme, with a launch date target of not later than mid-2012. GAIA will provide positional and radial velocity measurements with the accuracies needed to produce a stereoscopic and kinematic census of about one billion stars throughout our Galaxy (and into the Local Group), amounting to about 1 per cent of the Galactic stellar population. GAIA's main scientific goal is to clarify the origin and history of our Galaxy, from a quantitative census of the stellar populations. It will advance questions such as when the stars in our Galaxy formed, when and how it was assembled, and its distribution of dark matter. The survey aims for completeness to V=20 mag, with accuracies of about 10 microarcsec at 15 mag. Combined with astrophysical information for each star, provided by on-board multi-colour photometry and (limited) spectroscopy, these data will have the precision necessary to quantify the early formation, and subsequent dynamical, chemical and star formation evolution of our Galaxy. Additional products include detection and orbital classification of tens of thousands of extra-Solar planetary systems, and a comprehensive survey of some 10^5-10^6 minor bodies in our Solar System, through galaxies in the nearby Universe, to some 500,000 distant quasars. It will provide a number of stringent new tests of general relativity and cosmology. The complete satellite system was evaluated as part of a detailed technology study, including a detailed payload design, corresponding accuracy assesments, and results from a prototype data reduction development.